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Publication numberUS3556276 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 19, 1971
Filing dateMar 29, 1968
Priority dateMar 29, 1968
Publication numberUS 3556276 A, US 3556276A, US-A-3556276, US3556276 A, US3556276A
InventorsKit E Pennell
Original AssigneeVendo Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Dual path coin sorting and validating device
US 3556276 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent- Inventor Kit E. Pennell Independence, Mo.

Appl. No. 717,306

Filed Mar. 29, 1968 Patented Jan. 19, 1971 Assignee The Vendo Company Kansas City, M0. a corporation of Missouri DUAL PATH COIN SORTING AND VALIDATING Primary Examiner-Stanley H. Tollberg Attorney-Schmidt, Johnson, Hovey, Williams & Chase ABSTRACT: A coin acceptor is capable of accepting either magnetic or nonmagnetic, legitimate coins of a single denomination. Separate coin paths are provided for testing magnetic and nonmagnetic coins for validity utilizing magnetic graduation and eddy-current separation principles. A coin rail defining the path for nonmagnetic coins is below a coin rail that defines the path for the magnetic coins, and a deposited coin is permitted to gravitate to the lower rail if it is of nonmagnetic composition. However, a guide ramp is provided that shifts into alignment with the upper rail when a magnetic coin is deposited to thereby divert the magnetic coin along the upper path. The guide ramp is shiftable between a normal position clearing the deposited coin and an operative position in alignment with the upper rail, response to the presence of a magnetic material in the deposited coin being provided through the use of a permanent magnet attached to the shiftable guide ramp which senses the deposited coin and shifts the ramp as it is attracted toward the approaching coin.

PATENTEDMN 1 9 I9?! snwa or 3 INVENTOR' 1 Kif E. Pennell )RNliYa.

DUAL PATH COIN SORTING AND VALIDATING DEVICE A proposed change in the composition, of Canadian dimes and quarters from nonmagnetic coinage material to pure nickel has producedthe need for a coin acceptot for vending machines that is capable of handling present Canadian and United States nonmagnetic coins plus the proposed nickel Canadian coinage which is magnetic. In the'case of quarters, for example. the present Canadian quarter and older United States quarters are of nonmagnetic; silveralloy composition. The clad composition of newer U.S. quarters is similarly nonmagnetic and of approximately the same electrical conductivity as the silver alloy coinage. Thus, since both U.S,. and Canadian quarters are of approximately the same size. the eddy-current separator may presently be utilized in accepters at border sites for slug rejection and coin validation.

However, it is apparent that the proposed pure nickel Canadian coinage is unsuitable for eddy-current separation v since the intensity of the magnetic field utilized in eddy-current validators holds a magnetic coin and prevents acceptance. Therefore, if a common acceptor is to be utilized for legitimate coinage of both magnetic and nonmagnetic composition, it is requisite that the magnetic coinage be precluded from subjection to magnetic fields of high holding power and yet some means of rejecting ferrous slugs must be provided or present levels of slug protection will be sacrificed.

It is, therefore, an important object of this invention to provide a high security coin acceptor of maximum flexibility for validating both magnetic and nonmagnetic coinage and rejecting counterfeit coinage of either the magnetic or nonmagnetic type that may be deposited by an unscrupulous customer.

As a corollary to the foregoing object, it. is animportant aim of the instant invention to provide a coin acceptor which will accept pure nickel coinage and valid nonmagnetic coins in order that a common acceptor may be utilizedin applications suchas discussed above where bothlegitimate and counterfeit coins of both compositions are to be encountered.

'Another important object of the invention is to provide a coin-handling device which will direct magnetic and nonmagnetic coinage along separate paths of travelin-order to effect sorting of the coinage by composition classification.

A further and important object of this invention is to provide a coin-handling device asaforesaid .capable of testing magnetic coins and nonmagnetic coins for validity in their respective paths, and which will not accept a magnetic coin traversing the path for nonmagnetic coins or a nonmagnetic coin that is traversing the path for magnetic coins, in order to preclude the possible acceptance of counterfeit coinage in the event that a coin should become misdirected into the improper path.

In the drawings:

FIG. I is a front elevational view of one embodiment of the acceptor;

FIG. 2 is a rear elevational view of the'frontmounting plate assembly of the acceptor of FIG. 1 showing the various components thereon in detail; 1

FIG. 3 is a fragmentary. front elevational view of the acceptor of FIG. 1 showing the cradle upon release thereof by a gravitating coin; I i

FIG. 4 is a front elevational view .of the acceptor of FIG. 1

showing the front mounting plate and othercomponents removed to reveal the rear plate of the unit;

FIG. 5 is a cross-sectional view taken along line 5-5 of FIG.

FIG. 6 isa cross-sectional view taken along line 66 of FIG. 1; p

FIG. 7 is a view identical to FIG. 6.exceptthat the magneticallyresponsive coin guide is shown in a position supporting a P magnetic coin thereon;

FIG. 10 is a view similar to FIG. 2 but showing a second embodiment of the acceptor of the instant invention; and

FIG. 11 is a cross-sectional view taken along line 11-11 of FIG. 10 showing the shiftable coin guide in a position for supporting a magnetic coin.

Referring to FIGS. l9, a coin acceptor 20 has a rear plate 22 provided with a pair of forwardly extending side flanges A front mounting plate assembly 26 is attached to the righthand side flange 24 (as viewed in FIG. 1) by a hinge pin 28 and is biased toward the rear plate 22 by a spring 30.

An entrance funnel for deposited coinage is provided at the upper edges of rear plate 22 and plate assembly 26 and serves to guide individual coins into a cradle 34 having coin-receiving lugs 36 and 38 extending through respective apertures in plate assembly 26. The cradle 34 is rotatably mounted on the front of plate assembly 26 and serves the usual function of checking incoming coins for proper weight and diameter. The cradle 34 is held in the normal position illustrated in FIGS. I and 2 by a latch 40 rotatably mounted on cradle 34 in eccentric relationship thereto. The latch 40 has a dog 42 extending into the coin channel defined by entrance funnel 32 and disposed adjacent the lug 36 for engagement by an incoming coin to release the latch 40.

An inclined coin rail 44 is mounted on plate assembly 26 and has a permanent magnet 46 therebelow of generally U- shaped configuration, presenting a pair of spaced pole faces 48adjacent a rounded portion 50of rail 44 that defines the lower end thereof. The main section of rail 44 is composed of nonmagnetic material, but a generally sector-shaped section 52 presenting end 50 is composed of a magnetic material and, as is apparent, is disposed in the field of magnet 46. I

A second, inclined coin rail 54 is spaced beneath rail 44 and extends in parallelism therewith, the lower end 56 of rail 54 terminating short of the end 50 of the upper rail 44. It may be -seen, however, that the upper end 58" of rail 54 extends beyond rail 44 and into generally aligned relationship with the coin channel defined by the entrance funnel 32 thereabove. A

thickness gauge for coins traveling along rail 54 is provided by the spacing between the flat face of a rectangular element 60 and the aligned end of a screw 62 threaded into rear plate 22 and adjustable from the backside of acceptor 20.

A pivotal member 64 is mounted on the front side of plate assembly 26 and depends from'a horizontally extending hinge pin 66 disposed at the level of the lower end of entrance funnel 32. The member 64 has an upright leg 68 upon which a rod-shaped, permanent bar magnet 70 is mounted approximately midway between hinge pin 66 and the lower extremity of leg 68. A coin guide 72 is integrally formed with leg 68 at the lower extremity thereof and extends into an opening 74 in plate assembly 26 (FIG. 6). The counterbalancing effect of the weight of bar magnet 70 normally maintains member 64 in the position illustrated in FIG. 6 where guide 72 is withdrawn from a downwardly extending coin passage 76 communicating with the coin channel defined by the entrance funnel 32 'thereabove. Note that a downtumed lip on the outer edge of shown resting on guide 7 2, the latter forming a ramp which is aligned with theupper coin rail 44 when guide 72 is shifted inwardly into blocking relationship to coin passage '76.

Referring to FIG. 4, an upper deflector 78 is shown ad- I justably mounted in a position to deflect coins under certain circumstances to be discussed trajecting from the upper rail 44. A lower deflector 80 is shown adjustably mounted for deflecting certain coins trajecting from the lower coin rail 54. A forwardly projecting separator 82 beneath and to the left of deflector 80 is used in conjunctionwith both of the coin rails 44 and 54, a common accept track for valid coins gravitating from rails 44 and 54 being defined'between separator 82 and the right side flange 24 of rear plate 22. The accept track ineludes an upper passageway 84 (FIG. 5) communicating with a coin exit opening 86 in rear plate 22 which, in turn. empties into a lower passageway 88 where the accepted coin is directed to the other coin-handling apparatus of the vending machine (not shown).

Other components on the rear plate 22 include a disc 90 of magnetic material which is in opposed, closely spaced relationship to the pole faces 48 of magnet 46. Additionally. a scavenge lever 92 is shown mounted on a pivot pin 94 and is provided with a cam 96 for engagement with a follower roller 98 (FIG. 1) carried by plate assembly 26. The scavenge lever 92 is spring-biased toward the normal position thereof il|us tratcd and. when depressed, cam 96 engages roller 98 to swing plate assembly 26 about hinge pin 28 away from the rear plate 22 to remove the coin rail 44 or 54 from beneath a coin to be rejected. A suitable scavenge wiper (not shown) would also be employed and would extend from the lever 92 for operation thereby in the usual manner. Rejected coins pass to the left of separator 82 as viewed in FIGS. 4, 8 and 9.

With reference to FIGS. and 11, the components of the second embodiment of the invention there shown that are substantially identical to components described above are designated by the same reference numerals with the addition of the a notation. The views of FIGS. 10 and 11 are simplified and serve to illustrate that, alternatively, a second cradle 100 may be disposed beneath the first cradle 34a for receiving and directing an incoming coin onto a lower coin rail 102 which replaces the coin rail 54 of the first embodiment described above. An additional permanent magnet is utilized and disposed such that a coin traveling along rail 102 must pass directly across its pole faces 104. Alternatively, an upper extension on rail 102 could be employed in place of the lower cradle 100 to direct coins onto the rail 102 for ultimate gravitation from the lower end 106 thereof.

A comparison of the two embodiments is bestmade by viewing FIGS. 6 or 7 and 11. In FIG. 6 it is clear that the coin rails 44 and 54 are vertically offset and that the coin paths defined thereby partially overlap. In the embodiment of FIGS. 10 and 11, however, the two rails 44a and 102 are disposed in a common vertical plane and the coin paths defined thereby do not overlap. For coins of a given diameter, it should be understood that a greater vertical spacing between the rails is required in the second embodiment. Note the provision of a shoulder 108 for deflecting a deposited coin into the lower cradle 100 if the guide ramp 72a is withdrawn.

OPERATION The operational principles for both embodiments of the invention are the same. When a deposited coin enters funnel 32 it is directed into the cradle 34 and strikes lugs 36 and 38 and the release dog 42 of latch 40. This rotates latch 40 slightly counterclockwise as viewed in FIG 1, permitting cradle 34 to rotatein a clockwise direction under the weight of the coin (FIG. 3). The incoming coin, if composed of a magnetic material, is thus brought into the field of the bar magnetic 70 carried by member 64. Therefore, a magnetic coin causes member 64 to pivot about hinge pin 66 and shift from the position thereof illustrated in FIG. 6 to the coin-supporting position illustrated in FIG. 7. With the guide r'amp 72 inserted into the coin passage 76, the coin is prevented from gravitating further downwardly and is diverted toward the upper rail 44. Conversely, if a coin of nonmagnetic material is deposited, such coin will have no effect on the pivotal member 64 and will gravitate downwardly through passage 76 until it comes to rest on the lower rail 54 (FIG. 6), whereupon the coin then commences movement along the path of travel defined by the lower rail 54.

From the foregoing, it may be appreciated that magnetic coins and nonmagnetic coins are handled in separate paths of travel once the same are introduced into the acceptor20. The upper rail 44 for magnetic coins trajects the same from its lower end 50 for further separation in accordance with a magnetic graduation effect caused by the presence of the magnetized section 52. Since section 52 is not highly magnetized by virtue of being spaced from the pole faces 48 of magnet 46. magnetic coins rolling along rail 44 will not be held on the rail by magnetic attraction but. instead. traject from the lower end 50 thereof as illustrated diagrammatically in FIG. 8. Steel coins (slugs) or illegitimateicoinagc composed of other highly magnetic, ferrous materials follow the trajectory designated 110 and wrap" around the lower end 50 due to the high magnetic attraction. Less magnetic coinage. such as the proposed pure nickel Canadian quarter, follows the trajectory designated 112 and are only partially wrapped around the end 50 by the effect of the magnetized rail section 52. Thus. a coin of pure nickel composition is directed into the accept track while steel slugs are rejected. If. for some reason, a malfunction should occur and the guide ramp 72 directs a nonmagnetic coin onto rail 44. such coin is not affected by the magnetic field and strikes the deflector 78, whereupon the nonmagnetic coin is deflected along a trajectory 114 and is rejected in the same manner as a steel slug. Thus, whether legitimate or counterfeit, nonmagnetic coins directed onto the upper rail 44 will not be accepted.

Since a nonmagnetic coin will not cause the guide ramp 72' to be drawn inwardly into blocking relationship to the coin passage 76. the nonmagnetic coin rolls down the lower ramp 54 directly across the pole faces 48 and into the strong magnetic field at the pole faces 48. The rail 54 is of nonmagnetic material and the field of magnet 46 adjacent the lower end 56 of rail 54 is further intensified by the disc 90 of magnetic material to provide an efficient eddy-current-type separator for the nonmagnetic coins. Referring to FIG. 9, coins composed of metallic materials of relatively low electrical conductivity are less affected by the braking action of the magnetic field and follow a longer trajectory designated 116, resulting in the deflecting of such coins from deflector to the left of separator 82 for rejection. Coins or slugs that would follow the trajectory 116 include those of zinc. brass, lead or nonmagnetic stainless steel composition. A valid, silver alloy or clad coin, being more conductive, follows an intermediate trajectory 118 and passes to the right of separator 82 into the accept track. Slugs of highly conductive materials such as copper are subjected to maximum braking action and follow the shortest trajectory 120, thus passing to the left of separator 82 for rejection.

The eddy-current separator just described is also foolproof in that magnetic coins which might for some reason be permitted to fall onto rail 54 are not accepted whether legitimate or counterfeit. It is apparent that the strong magnetic field adjacent the end 56 of rail S4'will hold any magnetic coin and require that the same be dislodged from magnet 46 by scavenging.

With respect to the second embodiment of the invention illustrated in FIGS. 10 and 11, operation is identical to that as described above except that nonmagnetic coins permitted to gravitate to the lower rail 102 now pass across the pole faces 104 of a separate magnet. Manifestly, the spacing between the deflectors 78 and 80 will be different for the second embodiment since the rails 44a and 102 are spaced a greater distance apart to provide the nonoverlapping, coplanar coin paths.

From the foregoing, it is evident that the teachings of the instant invention are also equally applicable to coinage of other denominations of any nation where both legitimate magnetic and nonmagnetic coins of the same denomination are encountered. Furthermore, separate dual path validators of the type shown and described herein may be provided in a single acceptor for each coin denomination where this duplicity is to be encountered.

I claim:

1. In a coin acceptor:

means for receiving deposited coins and sensing whether each of the latter is magnetic;

coin testing structure presenting a pair of coin paths;

said receiving and sensing means being disposed adjacent said structure for directing each deposited coin thereinto for travel along one of said paths if the coin is magnetic and along the other of said paths if the coin is nonmagnetic;

said structure having magnetic coin-validating means for accepting valid coins and rejecting. invalid coins traveling along said one path, and nonmagnetic coin validating means for accepting valid coins and rejecting invalid coins traveling along said otherpath;

said magnetic coin-validating means including a first,

inclined, coin-supporting rail defining said one path;

said nonmagnetic coin-validating means including a second,

inclined, coin-supporting rail beneath said first rail and defining said other path; 3

said first rail having a lower end and a magnetized section presenting said end; said second rail having a lower end and said nonmagnetic coin-validating means further including a magnet adjacent said end of the second rail and provided with poles disposed inclosely spaced relationship to coins gravitating over said end of the second rail, whereby to provide eddy-current braking of nonmagnetic coins thereon,

there being means beneath said rails defining a common track for coins accepted by said testing structure;

said magnetic and nonmagnetic coin-validating means being disposed to impart trajectories to valid coins gravitating from the ends of respective rails extending into said common accept track.

2. In a coin acceptor as claimed in claim 1, said receiving and sensing means including a shiftable coin guide movable between a first position where a deposited coin is directed along said one path, and a second position where the deposited coin is directed along said other path.

3. In a coin acceptor as claimed in claim 2, said receiving and sensing means further including means responsive to the deposit of a magnetic coin for shifting said guide from said second position to said first position thereof 4. In a coin acceptor:

means for receiving deposited coins and sensing whether each of the latter is magnetic; and

coin testing structure presenting a pair of coin paths;

said receiving and sensing means being disposed adjacent said structure for directing each deposited coin thereinto for travel along one of said paths if the coin is magnetic and along the other of said paths if the coin is nonmagnetic;

said structure having magnetic coin-validating means for accepting valid coins and rejecting invalid coins traveling along said one path. and nonmagnetic-coin validating means for accepting valid coins and rejecting invalid coins traveling along said other'path;

said magnetic coin-validating means including a first,

inclined, coin-supporting rail defining said one path; said nonmagnetic coin-validating means including a second, inclined, coin-supporting rail beneath said first rail and defining said other path;

said rails being vertically offset and sufficiently closely spaced to partially overlap said paths;

said first rail having a lower end and a magnetic section presenting said end;

said second rail having'a lower end and said nonmagnetic coin-validating means further including a magnet adjacent both of said ends and provided with poles disposed in closely spaced relationship to coins gravitating over said end of the second rail, whereby to provide eddy-current braking of nonmagnetic coins thereon;

said magnet having a field magnetically coupled with said section to magnetize the latter, 5. ln a coin acceptor:

means for receiving deposited coins and sensing whether means for accepting valid coins and rejecting invalid coins traveling along said other path;

said magnetic coin-validating means including a first,

inclined, coin-supporting rail defining said one path:

said nonmagnetic coin-validating means including a second, inclined, coin-supporting rail beneath said first rail and defining said other path;

said rails being disposed in a common vertical plane;

said first rail having a lower end and a magnetic section presenting said end, and said magnetic coin-validating means further including a magnet having a field magnetically coupled with said section to magnetize the latter;

said second rail having a lower end and said nonmagnetic coin-validating means further including a magnet adjacent said end of the second rail and provided with poles disposed in closely spaced relationship to coins gravitating over said end of the second rail, whereby to provide eddy-current braking of nonmagnetic coins thereon.

6. In a coin acceptor:

means for receiving deposited coins and sensing whether each of the latter is magnetic; and

' coin testing structure presenting a pair of coin paths;

said receiving and sensing means being disposed adjacent said structure for directing each deposited coin thereinto for travel along one of said paths if the coin is magnetic and along the other of said paths if the coin is nonmagnetic;

said structure having magnetic coin-validating means for accepting valid coins and rejecting invalid coins traveling along said one path, and nonmagnetic coin-validating means for accepting valid coins and rejecting invalid coins traveling along said other path;

said magnetic coin-validating means including a first, inclined, coin-supporting rail defining said one path and having a lower end and a magnetized section presenting said end, whereby different trajectories are imparted to highly magnetic invalid coins and less magnetic valid COInS;

said nonmagnetic coin-validating means including a second, inclined, coin-supporting rail defining said other path and having a lower end, and a magnet adjacent said end of the second rail and provided with poles disposed in closely spaced relationship to coins gravitating over said end of the second rail, whereby to provide eddy-current braking of nonmagnetic coins thereon and to stop and hold magnetic coins thereon;

said testing structure having deflector means spaced from said end of the first rail for deflecting nonmagnetic coins gravitating therefrom-along the same trajectory as said highly magnetic invalid coins whereby, in the event that deposited coins are directed along improper paths,

. neither coin validating means will effect an acceptance.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1931579 *Feb 13, 1931Oct 24, 1933Rowe Slug Ejector Co LtdMultiple coin separator
US2298440 *Jun 12, 1940Oct 13, 1942Bell Telephone Labor IncCoin collector
US3452849 *Aug 29, 1967Jul 1, 1969Wilson M StewartMagnetic coin tester
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3980168 *Jul 9, 1975Sep 14, 1976Michael John KnightMethod and apparatus for authenticating and identifying coins
US4315567 *Jul 1, 1980Feb 16, 1982Societe de Recherches et de Perfectionnements Industriels et Etablissements H. Morin-SecretanApparatus and method for selecting from coins or tokens
US5163759 *Oct 10, 1990Nov 17, 1992Brady Usa, Inc.Signmaking machine using character forming tool for overlapping impacts and web scoring
US5509521 *Nov 24, 1993Apr 23, 1996Northwestern CorporationCoin mechanism for vending machine for handling magnetic coins
US5566808 *Sep 9, 1994Oct 22, 1996Parker Engineering & Manufacturing Co.Low profile coin analyzer apparatus
EP0022712A1 *Jul 8, 1980Jan 21, 1981Societe De Recherches Et De Perfectionnements Industriels -S.R.P.I.Apparatus for testing coins or tokens
EP0156252A2 *Mar 14, 1985Oct 2, 1985Mannesmann Kienzle GmbHApparatus for testing the magnetic properties of a coin
Classifications
U.S. Classification194/324
Cooperative ClassificationG07D5/00, G07D5/08
European ClassificationG07D5/08, G07D5/00
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Mar 29, 1982ASAssignment
Owner name: BARCLAYSAMERICAN/BUSINESS CREDIT, INC., 180 GRAND
Free format text: SECURITY INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:VENDO COMPANY THE;VFC ACCEPTANCE CORPORATIONON;VAN PAR VENDING EQUIPMENT SALES, LTD.,;AND OTHERS;REEL/FRAME:003962/0922
Effective date: 19820301