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Publication numberUS3556528 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 19, 1971
Filing dateAug 7, 1968
Priority dateAug 14, 1967
Publication numberUS 3556528 A, US 3556528A, US-A-3556528, US3556528 A, US3556528A
InventorsJames Christopher Spiring
Original AssigneeJames Christopher Spiring
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Expedition simulating board game
US 3556528 A
Abstract  available in
Images(14)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent I [72] Inventor James Christopher Spiring FOREIGN PATENTS Stoneacre? Benfsbmk Park, 515,816 12/1939 Great Britain 273/134 c Holmwood, Dorkmg, Surrey England 619,427 3/1949 Great Britain 273 134 c 1 pp 750,819 801,964 9/1958 Great Britain 273/134 c 1 Filed 7r 1968 566,994 1/1945 Great Britain... 273/134(AC) 1 a n 1971 915,550 l/1963 Great Britain... 273/134(AC) 1 Pflomy Augt 1967 281,160 6/1952 Switzerland 273/134(DB) G t itain [33] rea r Primary Examiner-Anton O. Oechsle 31 37,333/67 Att0meyBa1dw1n, W1ght, & Brown [54] EXPEDITION SIMULATING BOARD GAME 14 Claims 17 Drawmg Flgs' ABSTRACT: A game for two to five players in which playing Cl 8 273/134 pieces move around an outer track of a board in accordance [51 Int. Cl n A63!" 3/04 with the throws of a numerical die to obtain equipment for use [50] Field ofSearch 273/134(All) in subsequent diving Sailing, archaeology and mountaineering expeditions. The expeditions are undertaken on a central [56] References cued maplike area of the board with the aid of a direction-indicat- UNITED STATES PATENTS ing die, equipment" cards obtained in the commencing stage 2,211,297 8/1940 Bull 273/134(C) of the game being required to permit access to cor- 2,273,292 2/ 1942 Smith 273/ l 34(AC respondingly marked subdivisions of the maplike area.

7-- 7 QNIIBJNIYlll/IOVI QNIAKJ A90'l0il/l-D3V UNI-"VS JNlZHJNlV "110W 'JNIAIG Z l J 4 BASE 7 7 l SAILIhGi A EOL m6 SAILING ml 2 PATE'NTEU JAN 1 9 ISBN SHEET 01 [1F PATENTEDJANISHYI 3556528 SHEET U3UF 14 fin as A5 Y l I D 4% j.

I CHAEOLOGY DWING .un ARCHAEQLOGY Show a DIVING SONNEL curd lfyou PERSONNEL card lfyou f0 uy EQWPMENT wanrro buy EQUIPMENT.

Q? zw a wmm SOO FIGS

PATENIEDIIIIIIQIIIII 35561528 sum 11 or 14 Take one exlra lurn when Receive $100 for lesfi'ug new required during llIe Expedilion.

kind of "IRON RATIous Explorallou Club membership Delayed al llie HOSPlTAL for mars mjecfious ogaiusl Tropical Diseases. Pay$100 M/Sf O/Vf Tl/KN Official "Semi off"for our 60 loflhe ueicllsquare expedmbn Take one 1 a 0 1 C lliraw of me DlRADlCE or me slarlol The Expedifion.

Throw me dice and go back [Hp WMAKD W W; Squares lf you have boughl equipmeul receive $150 from each player holding Persormel of your Pay $50 for passporls Expedifiou.

and visas.

If you are me FIRST or SECOND r 10 relurvi from We Expedifi'ous may '9 Mm 15 receive $300 for me sale of on all soles of equi'pmenl'. your Expedil'iou Slory.

(W mm Afffi W; mm m MAYO/76f.

AlF lufieum of Auliqugies has 00 m mvI e0 you lo Search or WINE Rewve $2 {m a JARS If you are successful, I Wealmy co1lecla$500 reward,

F IG .8. WW 7 M) Kfffi moor/ea. weaver om.

when you reach your MAIN OBJECTIVE llirow llIe ordman; dice and lake: $100 x Number on llIe Dice EX P LO 0 N mere/a" 0am momma c5 C L U B PATENTED JAN 1 9 I97] SHEET 12 [1F 14 DIVING SAILING Mime 54,7 3 71 fll/VG/l) THHMPE $300 1 $150 5/00 1 L $50 1 ARCHAEOLOGY ARCHAEOLOGW KARCHAEOLOGY\ F AE MQUNTAINEERHR (MOUNTAINEERIM? FAOUNTAINEERINQ FIGS EQUIPMENT PATENTEU JAN? 9 I97:

v Collecmsoofordwmq andfindmg H12 PEARLS.

fifi I SURVEYOR. I

C0llecf$4OQ award for excavafing the PREHISTORIC SKELETON PHOTOGRAPHER Enables the MOUNTAINEEIZI expedlfion I6 DESC m8 DRECIPICE.

Coforcarcnmq and menfifymqa RARE FISH .Als0$200fW I reachmgmemoLfirst I C0|lf$500 forfmdmq he RARE PLANI and phofogmpks of the IDOL reaching The SUMMIT f I ARCHAEOLOGIST I follecmoooaward dlSCOVQrMg the LOST CITY J PERSONNEL PATENTEU 1111191111 3,556, 528

SHEET l F 14 K fi CAPTAIN l CREWMAN I 0111130211150 award for 'ESUNKEN 11111511121101? 0 1 1 1 ALLEON 1 reaching megHfisTfirst r-'w /1 g T 3010011512101! $1150 RAFT $300 CHARTS. SEXTANT. $150 0100111110 DINGHY $100 3 11 10110110 $50 TELESCOPE $50 Q 1' ar $11 11' 101111 511011115011 ocoe 0w 1sca 0002c 5 H0O E 111F05 W HIRLS OO i. my above paymfi for the above Colle Fa110wa1zi0f$700 VP for reaching The 015111111 1 L 1 fi fi ARCHSA E0 LOGY MOUNTAINEERING HOP SHOP.

MULESMMZ, $200 TENTS $250 comp/15s 1 $100 RT M101. $200 FIG H NETUNG. $100 00015 $100 T0015 $50 ICEAXE. 3150 Show 111110111 R1 called Show 1111s card R1 coiled paymenli for We above paymenfs for me above equipment eqwpmenr.

EXPEDITION SIMULATING BOARD GAME This invention relates to a board game for two to five players, the game being known commercially by the name Exploration."

An object of the invention is the provision of a board game me aeineht of luck c ori ibines with the s kill of The various players in picking the best of two or more alternative choices of action that are open to them at various stages during the playing of the game.

According to the invention, there is provided a board game comprising a board having an outer track and an inner subdivided maplike area, a plurality of playing pieces, a numerically marked die for use in determining the movement of the pieces around the outer track, a direction-indicating die for use in choosing the directions of movement of the pieces over the inner area and a plurality of cards bearing symbols corresponding with those marked on a number of the subdivisions of the inner maplike area.

For a better understanding of the invention, and to show how the same may be carried into effect, reference will now be made, by way of example, to the accompanying drawings, in which: Y

FIG. 1 is a somewhat diagrammatic view of the whole playing board,

FIGS. IA, 15, 1C, ID, IE and IF show the playing board of FIG. 1 divided into six sections that are illustrated to an enlarged scale and in considerably greater detail,

FIG. 2 is a view of the five similarly shaped but differently colored playing pieces'that are used by up to five players when playing the game,

FIG. 3 is a perspective view of three sides of a direction-indicating die that it used in the game,

FIG. 4 is a perspective view of three sides of a conventional numerically spotted die that is used in the game,

FIG. 5 is a view of the token or scrip money which is used in the game,

FIG. 6 illustrates an explanatory panel of equipment symbols used in the game, said panel being found on the inner surface of the box in which the game is supplied,

FIG. 7 illustrates a further explanatory panel which is to be found in the same place, the panel of this FIG. illustrating the five different symbols which are to be found on the six sides of the die of FIG. 3 accompanied by explanations of the significance of those symbols,

FIG. 8 illustrates the faces of fourteen Exploration Club cards that are used in the game together with the back of one card (the fourteen backs being identical),

FIG. 9 illustrates the faces of sixteen Equipment" cards together with the back of one of them, the sixteen backs being identical except for different coloring to identify which of the four different expeditions, diving, sailing, archaeology or mountaineering, they are associated with, and

FIGS. 10 and I1 illustrate the faces of sixteen Personnel cards together with the back of one of them, the sixteen backs being identical but the faces of the sixteen cards being divided into twelve Men" cards and four Shop" cards.

Referring to the drawings, the game consists of two land expeditions, mountaineering and archaeology, and two sea expeditions, sailing and diving. In the first part of the game (preparation) a player has to obtain men and equipment cards (FIGS. 9, l0 and II) for only one of the four expeditions. When ready, a player may start the second part of the game (expeditions). During his chosen expedition, he travels from a base 1 (FIGS. 1 and IF) to his main objective (for example, a

sunken galleon 2 which is so shown in FIGS. 1 and 10 of the drawings as the main objective of the diving expedition), and then back to the base 1. He also has the choice of visiting lesser objectives such as a treasure chest 3 (FIGS. I and 1C It may be necessary to overcome certain hazards such as a whirlpool 4 (FIGS. I and 1C). The choice of objectives, and the route taken, are determined by the men (FIGS. 10 and 11) AND THE EQUIPMENT (FIG. 9). Since each of the four expeditions is different in length and difficulty, it is important to obtain the best men and equipment but skillful play is necessary to put them to their best use. The special die shown in FIG. 3 (which die forms the subject of my copending US. Design Pat. application No. D-l0236, and now Pat.' Des. No. 2l 2 ,6 3 l to which eference is directed) is used to determine the direction of movement during the second part of the game and its skillful use combined with luck in enabling a winning player to reach his objective and get back to the base I first. The winner of a game is the player who has the most money (FIG. 5) at its end.

As can be seen from FIG. I and FIGS. 1A to IF of the accompanying drawings, the playing board consists of an outer track which is used only for the first part of the game (preparations) and a central maplike area which is subdivided into squares or oblongs by a grid of straight lines and which is used only for the second part of the game (expeditions). The sixteen Personner cards that are illustrated in FIGS. 10 and II of the drawings are divided into four groups, each group being related to one of the four expeditions. The four Personnel" cards that relate to the diving expedition respectively show a captain, a diver, a marine engineer and a diving shop equipment list. The four Personner' cards that relate to the sailing expedition respectively show a zoologist, a navigator, a crew man and a sailing shop equipment list. The four Personnel" cards that relate to the archaeology expedition respectively show an archaeologist, a surveyor, a photographer and an archaeology shop equipment list..Finally, the four Personnel" cards that relate to the mountaineering expedition respectively show a mountaineer, a guide, a biologist an and a mountaineering shop equipment list. The various notes, instructions and so on that appear on the sixteen cards can be seen clearly in FIGS. 10 and II of the drawings.

The pack of sixteen Equipment cards which is shown in FIG. 9 of the drawings is grouped in a similar way to the Personnel cards that have just been described. The four Equipment" cards which relate to the diving expedition respectively show a schooner, diving clothing, charts and an aqualung together with appropriate charges for buying or renting these items of equipment. The four Equipment" cards which relate to the sailing expedition respectively show a raft, a sextant, a dinghy and a telescope together with appropriate charges for buying these items of equipment. The four Equipment" cards which relate to the archaeology expedition respectively show mules, netting, a compass and tools together with appropriate charges for hiring or purchasing these items of equipment. Finally, the four Equipment" cards which relate to the mountaineering expedition respectively show tents, porters, an ice axe and a pair of boots together with appropriate charges for purchasing or hiring these items of equipment.

The fourteen Exploration Club cards which are illus trated in FIG. 8 of the drawings are related to two squares or spaces 5 (FIGS. 1, 1C and IE) on the outer track of the play ing board. When a player's piece'(FIG. 2) lands on one of these squares or spaces 5, he takes one of the Exploration Club cards shown in FIG. 8 of the drawings and follows its instructions. It is not considered necessary to go into details of the various instructions since these are self-evident from an examination of FIG. 8 of the drawings. There is a wad of token or scrip money in the three denominations of $50., $100. and $500.that are shown in FIG. 6 of the drawings, it being noted that, of course, the marked values 50, and SOIY' could equally well apply to pounds sterling or any other units of currency. The five playing pieces that are shown in FIG. 2 of the drawings are respectively colored red, yellow, blue, green and black and they preferably have the illustrated shape which is somewhat reminiscent of an inverted golf tee. How ever, it will be appreciated that the forms and colors of the playing pieces illustrated in FIG. 2 of the drawings are by no means essential and that different shapes and/or colors could equally well be employed. The remaining pieces of equipment of the game are an entirely conventional numerically spotted die which is shown in FIG. 4 of the drawings having six sides respectively marked with one, two, three, four, five and six spots and the previously mentioned direction-indicating die which is shownli'n FIG. 3 of the drawings and which forms the subject of' my cop ending U.S. Design Pat. application No. D- 10236, and now Pat. Des. No. 212,63l. FIG. 7 of the drawings explains the way in which the die of FIG. 3 is used during the secondpart of the game and will be referred to again below.

It is noted that the expeditions are distinguished by different colors which appear on the outer track of the playing board and upon the Personnel" and Equipment" cards. The diving expedition is denoted by the color green; the sailing expedition by the color blue; the archaeology expeditionbythc color yellow; and the mountaineering expedition by the color red.

The backs of the Personnel cards are all grey whilst the on the outer track of the playing board are similarly colored.

In the playing of a game in accordance with the invention, the"Exploration Club" cards and the four differently colored kinds of Equipment" cards are placed in five piles in the center of the playing board away from the outer track and away from the base 1. The Personnel' cards are shuffled and dealt face downwards to the players of the game. When there are two or three players they receive four cards each; when there are four players they receive three cards each; and when there are five players they receive two cards each. The remaining Personnel" cards are placed face downwardly adjacent the other cards in the center of the playing board. Each player is given token money to the value of 2 $500. plus 3 X$l00. plus 4 X5550. and the rest of the money is placed into the box which normally contains the game when it is not in use, this box being the Bank. One of the players is appointed as the banker and the order in which the players have their turns is then decided in customary manner by throws of the conventional die shown in FIG. 4.

The two to five playing pieces (FIG. 2) are next placed on a Preparations Start" square 6 (FIGS. 1 and 1F)of the outer track of the board. All the preparations start and finish at the square 6 and the outer track is used at this time. It is followed in a clockwise direction as seen in FIG. 1 of the drawings. Each player, in turn, has one throw of the conventional die (FIG. 41) and moves the exact number of places indicated exv cept that, if a six is thrown, the player can choose to move.

either oneftwo, three, four, five or six squares along the track. When a players piece (FIG. 2) lands on a square marked diving, sailing archaeology or mountaineering, he may (if he wishes) buy one item of equipment. However, he must first show a *Personnel man card (FIGS. 10 and 11) of the same expedition to prove that he has a sufficient reason for buying the equipment. He then takes the top card from the correct (indicated by color) equipment card (FIG. 9) pile.

Having obtained one item of equipment, payment must be made to the player who has the shop card (FIG. 11) which contains that item. The player having the appropriate shop card shows it and immediately collects payment from the' purchasing player. If the purchasing player already owns the relevant shop can! (FIG. ll then no payment whatsoever is made. If the appropriate shop card is still in the pack, then payment is madeto a Prize Fund." Only two items of equipment can be bought for each man card so that one man card entitles the player to one or two items of equipment whilst two men cards entitle the player to three or four items of equipment. Only one item of equipment can be bought at each throw of the die (FIG. 4) and it is a rule that the possession of a PersonneF shop card does not qualify the possessing player for equipment purchases. Equipment can be bought for any When it is his turn, a player may exchange one item of equipment (FIG. 9) with any other player with a cash (FIG. 5) adjustment if necessary. On returning unwanted men cards (FIGS. 10 and 11) to the pack, a player must offer for sale any equipment (FIG. 9) which he bought using those men. He may charge an extra $50. on each item' of equipment. When a player has decided to begin hisexpedition and has reached'the base square 1 in the manne'rwhich' will be described below, he must offer unwanted equipment for sale again at $50. more than was paid for it. Ifthere are no offers, the equipment must be put back under the equipment card (FIG. 9) stuck (on the board) without any repayment. When a playing piece (FIG. 2) has moved onto a corner square 7 of the board (FIGS. I, 1A, 1C and 1D), these squares being colored grey, he may take the top card from the Personnel" pack and then return any card from his hand to the bottom of that pack. It is not in the player's interest to reveal to the other players which cards have been exchanged. Note that when there are five players, the Personnel card picked up may be kept and no discard made if all three cards in his had hand are men (rather than shop) Personnel cards (FIGS. 10 and ll)of the same expedition. The exchange of personnel between players is not allowed at any stage of the game. 7

When a player has reached the base square 1 in the manner which will be described below and is ready to start his expedition, he must retum all unwanted personnel men cards (FIGS. 10 and 11) to the bottom of the pack but he may still retain a shop card (FIG. 11) to collect payments. The men cards are used during the'expeditions but only 'rnen for one expedition can be used during that expedition. .When a players piece (FIG. 2) lands on one of the two Exploration Club" squares 5, he takes a card (FIG. 8) from the top of the appropriate pack, examines it, and follows the instructions. Returned cards go to the bottom of the pack and any payments of fines in accordance with the instructions are made to the aforementioned Prize Fund.

A player may begin'his expedition when he has at least two items of equipment and two men all belonging to the same expedition. When the first player has decided to begin an expedition and hassatisfied the last requirement, any other player may also begin his expedition even if he has less equipment and less men. To get to the expedition base square 1, it is necessary to return along the outer track of the playing board by throwing the conventional die (FIG. 4) until the Preparations Start" square 6 is exactly reached or a number on the die of FIG. 4 is thrown which takes the player beyond the square 6. The playing piece (FIG. 2) is then transferred to the Expedition Base" square 1. It is noted that some players may still be on preparations whilst others are on expeditions so that both dice illustrated in FIGS. 3 and 4 of the drawings will then be in use concurrently. As soon as at least one expedition is started, all the surplus cards must be removed from the playing board and put into the game box or some other convenient place. Each players own men and equipment cards should be placed face up in front of him for all to see as soon as he starts his expedition.

The land expeditions, archaeology and mountaineering, keep to the land regions of the central maplike area of the playing board and cannot go onto the sea, nor cross lakes. However, they can go over streams and rivers. The sea expeditions, diving and sailing, keep to the sea and cannot go onto nor cut across any part which is obviously land. The only exceptions to this are when landing on any objective, which is on the coastline. These are an island, 8, wine jars 9 (FIGS. 1, 1E and IF) and an idol 10 (FIGS. 1 and IA). All objectives are enclosed by a thick black line as can be seen on the central area of the playing board in FIGS. 1 and 1A to IF, the lesser objective afforded by the wine jars 9 being common to all four expeditions and forming the subject of one of the Exploration Club" cards (FIG. 8). A player must visit his main objective before returning to the base square 1. He may visit lesser objectives either going to, or returning from, his main objective. Payments for attaining objectives (the details are shown on appropriate men cards in FIGS. and 11) are only made once and the money (FIG. 5) comes from the bank. The payments are made when the playing piece (FIG. 2) is moved onto the objective. Players can only go onto lesser objectives for which they have the correct men.

Hazards are enclosed by thick black broken lines and are the whirlpool 4, strong currents 11 (FIGS. I and 1B) and a precipice 12 (FIGS. 1, ID and IE). A player must have the correct Men cards to go onto or over the hazards 4, I1 and 12 and they are the marine engineer (FIG. 11) for the whirlpool 4, the navigator (FIG. II) for the strong currents l1 and the guide (FIG. 10) for the precipice 12. These men belong to the diving, sailing and mountaineering expeditions respectively. Equipment symbols can be seen on many of the squares (in fact they are oblongs) of the central area of the playing board and these symbols are identified and explained in FIG. 6 of the drawings to which reference should be made. It is, however, emphasized that a player cannot go onto, nor jump over, any square on which there is an equipment symbol unless he has that item of equipment. When it is his turn, a player may stay where he is if it is not to his advantage for his piece (FIG. 2) to move.

The main objective of the diving expedition is the sunken galleon 2 and its lesser objectives are pearls 13 (FIGS. 1 and 1B), the treasure chest 3 and the wine jars 9. The main objective of the sailing expedition is the island 8 and its lesser objectives are a rare fish 14 (FIGS. 1 and 1E), the treasure chest 3, the idol l0, and the wine jars 9. The main objective of the archaeology expedition is a lost city 15 (FIGS. I and 1A), and its lesser objectives are a prehistoric skeleton 16 (FIGS. 1 and 1D), the idol l0 and the wine jars 9. The main objective of the mountaineering expedition is a mountain summit 17 (FIGS. 1 and 1D) and its lesser objectives are a rare flower 18 (FIGS. I and 1E), the prehistoric skeleton l6 and the wine jars 9.

The use of the so-called Diradice three sides of which are shown in FIG. 3 of the drawings is explained in FIG. 7. This FIG. shows the five symbols which are marked on the six sides of the die of FIG. 3, it being noted that the symbol which is to the lower right of FIG. 3 appears on two opposite surfaces of the die. The use of the Diradice of FIG. 3 is an important feature of the game since, whilst luck dictates which of the six sides of the die will be uppermost the players skill determines which of the possible and permitted directional moves he will take. It is considered unnecessary to give further details of the use of the die of FIG. 3 at this point since reference to FIG. 7 of the drawings will make the directions and distances which the playing pieces of FIG. 2 can move in response to a particular throw of that die abundantly clear. However, it is noted once again that the die of (FIGS. 3 and 7) of the drawings forms the subject of my copending US. Design Pat. application No. D-l0236,and now Pat. Design No. 2l2,63l to which reference may be made.

The first player who returns to the expedition base square 1 having visited his main objective receives a price of $1,000. The second player to do this receives $500. and the third player receives $200. The first player to return also receives any money in the Prize Fund." The game finishes as soon as three players have returned to base or two players if only two persons are playing the game. The winner of the game is the player who has the most money when three (or two in the circumstances just mentioned) players have returned to the expedition base square l.

A short practice game for beginners may be played by two, three or four players only. When playing the beginners game, one person is appointed as banker and gives each player (including himself) token or scrip money (FIG. 5) to the amount of 2 X $500., 3 X $100. and 4 X $50. The players choose which expeditions they are going to undertake by throwing the conventional die of FIG. 4 of the drawings, the player who throws the highest number having first choice in the customary way. The Personnel" men cards are separated into those corresponding to the four expeditions and each player is given the three men that correspond to the expedition which he has chosen. The shop cards (FIG. 11) are shuffled and one is dealt to each player. The equipment cards (FIG. 9) are separated into four piles corresponding to the four different expeditions and are placed face downwardly. Each player then takes the top three cards corresponding to the expedition which he has undertaken. Each player must pay for the equipment which he has received to the player having the corresponding shop card. If he has his own shop card, then the equipment costs him nothing. When there are only two or three players, there will be either two or one undealt shop cards or card. Money which should be paid to these shops goes into the Prize Fund which, as described above, is awarded to the first player who returns to the base square 1 from his expedition.

Each player puts his men and equipment cards face upwardly in front of him for all the players to see and one playing piece (FIG. 2) foreach player is placed on the base square 1. The players start their expeditions in the reverse order from that which was used in choosing the expeditions so that the person who had the last choice of expeditions is the first to throw the Diradice of FIG. 3. The remaining part of the beginners" game is exactly as previously described above for the full game.

Iclaim:

I A board game comprising a board having an outer track subdivided into a plurality of means each defining a difierent occupational specialty, an inner maplike area having means thereon defining a plurality of movement areas, means defining object areas upon said maplike area, said object areas each including indicia means respectively relating the object areas to said occupational specialties, a plurality of playing pieces adapted for movement upon said outer track and said maplike area, first coded means for determining the movement of pieces only upon said outer track for establishing a particular occupational specialty, second coded means for determining the movement of pieces only upon said maplike area, and said second coded means including a plurality of different means each indicating both a particular direction of travel between said movement areas and a particular distance of travel between said movement areas by said playing pieces.

2. The board game as defined in claim I including means defining hazard areas upon said maplike area normally preventing playing pieces from stopping thereon.

3. The board game as defined in claim 2 wherein said first coded means is a die having a plurality of faces each bearing a different number.

4. The board game as defined in claim 2 wherein said second coded means is a die having a plurality of faces, and one of said plurality of different indicating means is on each of said faces.

5. The board game as defined in claim 2 wherein said maplike area includes means for defining both land and sea regions, at least one of said occupational specialty defining means is directly related to at least one of said object areas defined on a land region, and at least another of said occupational specialty defining means is directly related to at least one of said object areas defined on a sea region.

6. The board game as defined in claim 1 including means defining hazard areas upon said maplike area normally preventing playing pieces from stopping thereon, and playing cards identifiable with each hazard area for permitting playing pieces to stop thereon.

7. The board game as defined in claim 6 wherein said first coded means is a die having a plurality of faces each bearing a different number. p

8. The board game as defined in claim 6 wherein said second coded means is a die having a plurality of faces, and one of said plurality of different indicating means is on each of said faces.

9. The board game as defined in claim 6 wherein said maplike area includes means for defining both land and sea regions, at least one of said occupational specialty defining means is directly related to at least one of said object areas defined on a land region, and at least another of said occupational specialty defining means is directly related to at least one of said object areas defined on a sea region.

10. The board game as defined in claim 1 wherein said first .coded means is a die having a plurality of faces each bearing a 13. The board game as defined in claim 1 wherein said maplike area includes means for e defining both land and sea regions, at least one of said occupational specialty defining means is directly related to at least one of said object areas defined on a land region, and at least another of said occupational specialty defining means is directly related to at least one of said object areas defined on a sea region.

14. The board game as defined inclaim 1 including a plurality of cards, and complementary indicia means on said cards and certain ones of said movement areas which when matched permit playing pieces to stop on said certain movement areas.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3740037 *Jun 11, 1971Jun 19, 1973Bono E DeBoard game apparatus
US3942800 *Apr 9, 1975Mar 9, 1976Dwight HolbrookArcheological game
US3973775 *Oct 2, 1974Aug 10, 1976William Bernard BolanGame board apparatus
US3997166 *Aug 4, 1975Dec 14, 1976Geraldo FloresBoard game apparatus
US4016939 *Jul 28, 1975Apr 12, 1977Harry Marshall ThronBoard game apparatus
US4070026 *Aug 20, 1976Jan 24, 1978Cambardella Nicholas ABoard game apparatus
US4456260 *Jul 19, 1982Jun 26, 1984Hilton Allen LProperty game having inner path space markers
US4569527 *Nov 14, 1983Feb 11, 1986Marvin Glass & AssociatesTreasure game with separable, changeable surfaces
US4570939 *Nov 21, 1983Feb 18, 1986Tourville David ABoard game
US4575093 *Apr 23, 1984Mar 11, 1986Russell Ethel CTravel board game
US5295695 *Apr 22, 1993Mar 22, 1994Tamanini Vicki LMethod of coding gifts
WO1985002127A1 *Nov 9, 1984May 23, 1985Charles D BordenSpace domination board game
Classifications
U.S. Classification273/254, 446/491
International ClassificationA63F3/00, A63F3/04
Cooperative ClassificationA63F3/0457, A63F3/00006
European ClassificationA63F3/04K