Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3556907 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 19, 1971
Filing dateJan 23, 1969
Priority dateJan 23, 1969
Also published asDE1961528A1, DE1961528B2, DE1961528C3
Publication numberUS 3556907 A, US 3556907A, US-A-3556907, US3556907 A, US3556907A
InventorsNystrand Ernst Daniel
Original AssigneePaper Converting Machine Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Machine for producing laminated embossed webs
US 3556907 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 19,1971 E. D. EIYSTRAND MACHINE FOR PRODUCING LAMINATED EMBOSSED WEBS Filed Jan. 23, 1969 3Q IKVIZNUR" ERNST DANIEL NYSTRAND United States Patent 3,556,907 Patented Jan. 19, 1971 US. Cl. 156-470 6 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A machine for producing laminated embossed webs useful as toweling, napkins, placemats and the like. The machine employs a novel arrangement of embossing and laminator rolls to achieve a nested configuration of the embossed, inwardly-extending projections and avoids the speed limitations inherent in prior machines.

BACKGROUND AND SUMMARY OF INVENTION Embossed toweling has been made in the past by procedures such as are seen in US. Pat. 3,414,459. Toweling of this nature has peg-to-peg projections or embossments which are developed through rotating embossing rolls in synchronism with a high degree of precision. This necessarily limits production because the nip defined by the embossing rolls must be carefully controlled. In addition, the width of the machine is necessarily limited because of the possibility of run-out of the rolls, differential expansion and deflection along the length thereof due to dimensional differences which often are magnified during operation.

Through the provision of two embossing units plus a uniquely positioned laminator roll, I am simultaneously able to avoid the production limitations discussed above and at the same time provide a superior embossed laminate.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION The invention is described in conjunction with the accompanying drawing, in which:

FIG. 1 is a fragmentary schematic view of the inventive machine as would be seen from one side;

FIG. 2 is a reduced scale perspective view of the machine of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a fragmentary plan view of the product issuing from the left-hand side of FIG. 1, and corresponds to that seen along the sight line 3-3 applied to FIG. 1;

FIG. 4 is an enlarged scale fragmentary sectional view taken along the line 4-4 applied to FIG. 3; and

FIG. 5 is a fragmentary perspective view of the adhesive applicator roll seen in FIG. 2.

In the illustration given, the numeral generally designates a frame which is seen to include a pair of side elements for rotatably supporting a plurality of rolls. These rolls can be appreciated better from a consideration of FIG. 2 wherein a first embossing unit is made up of a platen roll 11 and an embossing roll 12. A second embossing unit consists of the embossing roll 13 and the platen roll 14. Each embossing roll 12 and 13 has a steel surface with a plurality of outwardly-extending projections formed thereon. Advantageously, the projections may number from about 10 to about 200 per square inch and may project upwardly from the surface from about 0.01 inch to about 0.05 inch whereby approximately 10% to about 75% of the surface of a web is embossed. For this purpose, the platen rolls may be covered with any suitable material currently used in the art, i.e., rubber as shown or paper etc. The platen rolls may also be made of steel with mating protrusions.

The numeral 15 designates a web issuing from an unwind stand (not shown) and passing around an idler roll 16 and thereafter into the nip defined by the rolls 11 and 12. The projections on the roll 12 develop corresponding projection 17 seen in the web 15 in FIG. 3. Adhesive is applied to some or all of the high points of these projections by means of the adhesive-applying unit generally designated 18 and which is seen to include a fountain 19 and a series of transfer rolls 20, 21 and 22 which are driven in conventional fashion. As seen in FIG. 5, the adhesive-applying roll 22 has provided thereon a pattern of raised surfaces as at 22a. This results in applying adhesive to less than all of the high points of the protrusions provided by the embossing unit which includes rolls 11 and 12. Through the use of a colored adhesive, a decorative, eye-pleasing pattern can be producedwhich is visible by the user of the web product. A certain amount of the adhesive penetrates through the web 15 to make the pattern visible and further, the web is generally at least translucent and almost transparent so that distinct color impressions can be obtained. For example, in the web product designated T in FIG. 3, six of the depressions as at 170 have been shaded to show a red coloration in a generally hexagonal design. This is readily achieved through the use of suitably engraved plates on the plate cylinder applicator roll 22.

In analogous fashion, an upper web is designated 23 and is seen to be passing around an idler roll 24 before being embossed by the coaction of rolls 13 and 14. The projections on the roll 13 develop corresponding projections in the web 23 -the developed projections being designated 25 in FIG. 3. Thereafter the webs are united in passing into the nip 26 defined by the rolls 12 and 27. The roll 27 is the so-called laminator roll and is seen to have a surface covered with resilient material 28 such as rubber having a rating in the range of about 50 to about 90 Durometer A.

In the illustration given, a steel roll is employed for the laminator roll 27 and the covering was achieved through initially gluing a layer of spiral-wrapped hard rubber-covered tape. The roll surface was then ground to present a smooth surface against the embossing roll 12. The pressure at the nip 26 was adjusted to the range of 50-60 pounds per linear inch which was satisfactory for the starch-adhesive used in laminating. Alternatively, a smooth steel roll could be employed as the laminator roll 27without any covering, but the thin, hard, rubber covering permits operation without the accuracy otherwise required insofar as run-out and straightness is concerned. The covering which in production machines may be of the order of one-half inch thick and Durometer rubber eliminates the danger of mushrooming the small embossing elements on the roll 12 when the usual nip pressures are present. An additional advantage from the use of a resilient covered roll is the lack of a need for a separate drive. The numerous protrusions on the embossing roll 12 drive the laminator 27 without difiiculty.

The web issuing to the left of the roll 27 is generally designated T and corresponds to the showing in FIG. 3. The adhesive which is applied only to the high points of the projections 17 results in glue bonds of the type designated 29 in FIG. 4. In some cases I prefer to have the height of the projection 25 somewhat less so that a gap 30 exists between the projection 25 and the confronting portion of the web 15. In any event, the projections 17 are rigidly supported during laminating.

As seen in FIG. 2, the plurality of rolls 11-14, 16 and 24 are all rotatably supported on the frame 10 as by means of suitable bearings, one of which is designated 31. The rolls are rotated in synchronisin by means of gears 32 from a power source (not shown).

i i hr- A illustrated," the productmay bje'towe'L the invention, dependingupon the n11.v

ing'a b'asiswei'g htbf about 7 to about 50 pounds.

v employed, again, depending. uponv the ul matepr machinefln airy event, there is developed an advantageous during the integration by Virtueofthe suption's' 1'7 on the web 15.. Also, I prefer to I e roll 27 with a diameter somewhat different v at of 'lroll so that the high points do not occur in the "same position'eachrevolution, providing, in effect, a hunting? of the high points relative to the resilient covered roll 27.

It will be appreciated also that considerable leeway is provided in the embossing pattern. As is illustrated, the patterns in the two rolls are identical so that there is a perfect interlacing or nesting of the projections of one web relative to the projections of the other web. However, one web may have more of an open pattern of projection so that several projections on the other web will be accommodated during the interlacing. The projections may be circular, triangular, oval, hexagonal, diamondshaped, or have any other of a multiple choice of shapes. Orientation of the pattern of the projections on the two webs may be similar or dissimilar as desired. Choice of shapes of the projections may be similar or dissimilar on the two webs. In any event, there is provided a unique nested-embossment type of web product where the nesting results in substantial bulk or air space and as can be appreciated from a consideration of FIG. 4. In other words, the embossments in one web do not occupy all of the space between embossments in the other web. This additionally makes possible the development of the attractive color pattern through the selective application of adhesive and to this an additional advantage accrues in that less adhesive is required since only a predetermined number of protrusions receive adhesive.

While in the foregoing specification a detailed description of an embodiment of the invention has been set down I rodnctg'such as placemats, napkins, andv are ad antageously provided on ,the inventive tails herein given may be made without departing from the spirit and scope of the claims.

I claim:

1. A machine for producin'g 'laminated, embossed webs comprising a fram,; ffirsti and second embossing units mounted on said frame, each unitihcludin'g' an embossing roll having a .patternof projections fflbOllt 10 to about 200 per square inch, and a platnroll for" coaction with each.embossing roll, means for rotatingsaid rolls. and;

for feeding a web for travel on the rolls of each unit to develop two embossed webs, adhesive applying means on said frame for one. of said units, a thirdroll operatively associated with the first unit embossing roll to press .both

on said embossed webs.

webs against said firstfunit' embossing roll andadhere the two webs together, the first and secondunit embossing rolls being" oriented relative lto each jotheir "to: position the projections in one web intermediate the projections inf the'other 'we'b as the webs approach saidfthirdroll,

Z. T he machine of claim 1 in, which said third roll is equipped with a resilient covering.

3. The machine of, claim ,,1 in which the third roll has a diameter difierent from that of the first unit embossing roll.-

4. The machine .0

fclaim 1 in which the projections on said first unit embossing roll'have a greater heightv than the projections on said second unit embossing roll. 5. The machine of-claim 1 in which said adhesive applying means includes a roll structured to "apply adhesive to only selected projections on one of said webs.

6. The structure of claim 5 in which said adhesive applying means includes fountain means'furnished with a colored adhesive whereby a visual pattern is provided 7 References Cited UNITED Wells 156 209 BENJAMIN A. BORCI1ELT, Primary Examiner C-. T. JORDAN, Assistant Examiner US. Cl. X.R.

.f r:the purposeofillustration, many: variations in. .the..de

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3722955 *Apr 28, 1970Mar 27, 1973Comfort Conditioning IncUnderbody ventilating structure
US3940529 *Jul 5, 1973Feb 24, 1976Scott Paper CompanyNon-nested two-ply absorbent fibrous sheet material
US4284465 *Dec 7, 1979Aug 18, 1981American Can CompanyApparatus for the manufacture of fibrous sheet structure
US4325768 *Dec 14, 1979Apr 20, 1982American Can CompanyMethod of manufacturing fibrous sheet structure
US4325773 *Dec 14, 1979Apr 20, 1982American Can CompanyApparatus for manufacturing fibrous sheet structure
US4326002 *May 15, 1980Apr 20, 1982American Can CompanyMulti-ply fibrous sheet structure and its manufacture
US4492238 *Jan 12, 1982Jan 8, 1985Philip Morris IncorporatedMethod and apparatus for production of smoke filter components
US4620896 *Dec 9, 1985Nov 4, 1986Rengo Co., Ltd.Single facer having two sets of corrugating rolls and a single pressure roll
US4671983 *Jun 12, 1985Jun 9, 1987Marcal Paper Mills, Inc.Embossments for minimizing nesting in roll material
US5269983 *Jan 9, 1992Dec 14, 1993James River Corporation Of VirginiaRubber-to-steel mated embossing
US5294475 *Jun 12, 1992Mar 15, 1994The Procter & Gamble CompanyDual ply cellulosic fibrous structure laminate
US5328565 *Mar 18, 1993Jul 12, 1994The Procter & Gamble CompanyTissue paper having large scale, aesthetically discernible patterns
US5356506 *Apr 4, 1994Oct 18, 1994The Procter & Gamble CompanyModular construction pattern rolls for use in paper converting
US5366785 *Oct 1, 1993Nov 22, 1994The Procter & Gamble CompanyCellulosic fibrous structures having pressure differential induced protuberances and a process of making such cellulosic fibrous structures
US5431786 *Jan 31, 1994Jul 11, 1995The Procter & Gamble CompanyA papermaking belt
US5458950 *Mar 29, 1993Oct 17, 1995The James River CorporationPaper towel with dual level diagonal infundibulate striae of slitted elongate hexagonal bosses
US5468323 *Nov 15, 1993Nov 21, 1995The Procter & Gamble CompanyApparatus and process for making a dual ply cellulosic fibrous laminate
US5520778 *Aug 9, 1994May 28, 1996The Procter & Gamble CompanyToilet, facial tissues, paper towels
US5549790 *Jun 29, 1994Aug 27, 1996The Procter & Gamble CompanyMulti-region paper structures having a transition region interconnecting relatively thinner regions disposed at different elevations, and apparatus and process for making the same
US5556509 *Jun 29, 1994Sep 17, 1996The Procter & Gamble CompanyTissues
US5580423 *Jun 1, 1995Dec 3, 1996The Procter & Gamble CompanyWith high density region having first thickness, low density region having second thickness and intermediate region having third thickness
US5609725 *May 11, 1995Mar 11, 1997The Procter & Gamble CompanyMulti-region paper structures having a transition region interconnecting relatively thinner regions disposed at different elevations, and apparatus and process for making the same
US5622734 *May 23, 1995Apr 22, 1997Kimberly-Clark CorporationApparatus for producing a crimp-bonded fibrous cellulosic laminate
US5637194 *Dec 19, 1994Jun 10, 1997The Procter & Gamble CompanyHigh density, low density domed areas; softness, absorbancy
US5674590 *Jun 7, 1995Oct 7, 1997Kimberly-Clark Tissue CompanyDisposable paper suitable for heavy wipe and dry uses
US5698291 *May 23, 1995Dec 16, 1997Kimberly-Clark CorporationCrimp-bonded fibrous cellulosic laminate
US5709775 *Jun 5, 1995Jan 20, 1998The Procter & Gamble CompanyPaper structures having at least three regions including a transition region interconnecting relatively thinner regions disposed at different elevations, and apparatus and process for making the same
US5776312 *Jun 5, 1995Jul 7, 1998The Procter & Gamble CompanyPaper structures having at least three regions including a transition region interconnecting relatively thinner regions disposed at different elevations, and apparatus and process for making the same
US5830558 *Jul 15, 1997Nov 3, 1998Procter & Gamble CompanyMultiple ply tissue paper having piles with and without continuous network regions
US5837103 *Jun 5, 1995Nov 17, 1998The Procter & Gamble CompanyWeb patterning apparatus comprising a felt layer and a photosensitive resin layer
US5846379 *Mar 1, 1995Dec 8, 1998The Procter & Gamble CompanyWet pressed paper web and method of making the same
US5855739 *Apr 22, 1997Jan 5, 1999The Procter & Gamble Co.Pressed paper web and method of making the same
US5861081 *Jun 7, 1995Jan 19, 1999James River Corporation Of VirginiaPaper towel with dual level diagonal infundibulate striae of slitted elongate hexagonal bosses
US5861082 *Jun 5, 1995Jan 19, 1999The Procter & Gamble CompanyWet pressed paper web and method of making the same
US5871887 *Mar 20, 1997Feb 16, 1999The Procter & Gamble CompanyWeb patterning apparatus comprising a felt layer and a photosensitive resin layer
US5874157 *Apr 2, 1996Feb 23, 1999The Procter & Gamble CompanySeparable laminated paper product
US5885418 *May 19, 1997Mar 23, 1999Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Papermaking of printing a bonding material onto the first and second outer surface of the web such that the bonding material penetrates the web, creping whereby the long fibers are substantially oriented in the z-direction of the web
US5904811 *Apr 21, 1997May 18, 1999The Procter & Gamble CompanyWet pressed paper web and method of making the same
US5906711 *May 23, 1996May 25, 1999Procter & Gamble Co.Multiply tissues of paper webs with high and low density areas
US6030690 *Apr 23, 1997Feb 29, 2000The Procter & Gamble CompanyHigh pressure embossing and paper produced thereby
US6086715 *Nov 23, 1998Jul 11, 2000The Procter & Gamble CompanyFirst plurality of indicia and second plurality of indicia disposed in nonrandom repeating patterns, said first ply and said second ply bonded in a face to face relationship
US6106929 *May 17, 1999Aug 22, 2000Fort James CorporationPaper towel with dual level diagonal infundibulate striae of slitted elongate hexagonal bosses
US6109326 *Aug 20, 1998Aug 29, 2000Paper Converting Machine CompanyEmbosser for producing two-ply paper products with either nested or foot-to-foot embossments
US6129972 *Sep 18, 1997Oct 10, 2000The Procter & Gamble CompanyEmbossed joined laminae having an essentially continuous network and juxtaposed embossments
US6165585 *Sep 19, 1997Dec 26, 2000The Procter & Gamble CompanyLaminated fibrous structure and method for manufacturing same
US6248212Dec 30, 1997Jun 19, 2001Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Applying to a portion of first side of paper web having high recycled fiber content a bonding material to penetrate a portion of the web thickness, drying, creping, then repeating the process for the second side of web
US6261666Aug 14, 1998Jul 17, 2001Paper Converting Machine Co.Two-ply paper products with either nested or foot-to-foot embossments and method of making
US6277466Nov 23, 1998Aug 21, 2001The Procter & Gamble CompanyEmbossed multi ply cellulosic fibrous structure and process for producing the same
US6395133Apr 11, 2000May 28, 2002The Procter And Gamble CompanyProcess for producing embossed multiply cellulosic fibrous structure having selective bond sites
US6572722Nov 22, 1999Jun 3, 2003The Procter & Gamble CompanyProcess for autogeneously bonding laminae of a mult-lamina cellulosic substrate
US6589634Mar 13, 2001Jul 8, 2003Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Embossing and laminating irregular bonding patterns
US6602387Nov 22, 2000Aug 5, 2003The Procter & Gamble CompanyUnwinding at least two plies from corresponding number of parent rolls, bulk embossing at least one ply, calendering at least one non-bulk embossed ply, juxtaposing plies to form multi-ply tissue having desired properties
US6602577Oct 3, 2000Aug 5, 2003The Procter & Gamble CompanyEmbossed cellulosic fibrous structure
US6723203 *May 11, 2001Apr 20, 2004Georgia-Pacific FranceAbsorbent paper product with asymmetric structure
US7118796Dec 3, 2004Oct 10, 2006Fort James CorporationHeavily embossed with better perceived softness and bulk along with better emboss definition, without unduly degrading strength
US7222436Jul 28, 2006May 29, 2007The Procter & Gamble CompanyProcess for perforating printed or embossed substrates
US7311800Feb 17, 2005Dec 25, 2007The Procter & Gamble CompanyDeep-nested embossed paper products
US7314663Sep 29, 2003Jan 1, 2008The Procter + Gamble CompanyEmbossed multi-ply fibrous structure product and process for making same
US7314664Sep 27, 2004Jan 1, 2008The Procter & Gamble CompanyEmbossed multi-ply fibrous structure product and process for making same
US7314665Sep 14, 2005Jan 1, 2008The Procter & Gamble CompanyEmbossed multi-ply fibrous structure product and process for making same
US7374638Sep 28, 2004May 20, 2008The Procter & Gamble CompanyHigh bulk strong absorbent single-ply tissue-towel paper product
US7413629Jun 8, 2005Aug 19, 2008The Procter & Gamble CompanyProcess for producing deep-nested embossed paper products
US7435313May 17, 2005Oct 14, 2008The Procter & Gamble CompanyProcess for producing deep-nested embossed paper products
US7435316Jun 8, 2005Oct 14, 2008The Procter & Gamble CompanyEmbossing process including discrete and linear embossing elements
US7524404Jun 8, 2005Apr 28, 2009The Procter & Gamble CompanyEmbossing process including discrete and linear embossing elements
US7597777Sep 9, 2005Oct 6, 2009The Procter & Gamble CompanyProcess for high engagement embossing on substrate having non-uniform stretch characteristics
US7678229Sep 7, 2006Mar 16, 2010The Procter & Gamble CompanyProcess for high engagement embossing on substrate having non-uniform stretch characteristics
US7785696Jun 8, 2005Aug 31, 2010The Procter & Gamble CompanyEmbossed product including discrete and linear embossments
US7887676Jul 11, 2008Feb 15, 2011The Procter & Gamble CompanyEmbossing process including discrete and linear embossing elements
US7918972Jul 11, 2008Apr 5, 2011The Procter & Gamble CompanyEmbossing process including discrete and linear embossing elements
US8007640Jul 11, 2008Aug 30, 2011The Procter & Gamble CompanyEmbossing process including discrete and linear embossing elements
US8083893Jul 11, 2008Dec 27, 2011The Procter & Gamble CompanyEmbossing process including discrete and linear embossing elements
US8158047Aug 10, 2010Apr 17, 2012Georgia-Pacific Consumer Products LpMulti-ply absorbent paper product having impressed pattern
US8246885 *Aug 3, 2011Aug 21, 2012Georgia-Pacific FranceMethod and assembly for the manufacture of an absorbent sheet, and absorbent sheet obtained
US8282775May 19, 2009Oct 9, 2012The Procter & Gamble CompanyWeb substrate having optimized emboss area
US8328984May 19, 2009Dec 11, 2012The Procter & Gamble CompanyWeb substrate having optimized emboss design
US8343411Apr 23, 2010Jan 1, 2013The Procter & Gamble CompanyMethod of producing a web substrate having activated color regions in deformed regions
US8377258Sep 5, 2012Feb 19, 2013The Procter & Gamble CompanyWeb substrate having optimized emboss design
US8404081Sep 5, 2012Mar 26, 2013The Procter & Gamble CompanyWeb substrate having optimized emboss area
US8409404Aug 24, 2007Apr 2, 2013Georgia-Pacific Consumer Products LpMulti-ply paper towel with creped plies
US8440587Apr 23, 2010May 14, 2013The Procter & Gamble CompanyMethod of producing color change in a web substrate
US8460597Mar 22, 2011Jun 11, 2013The Procter & Gamble CompanyMethod of producing color change in a substrate
US8496783Nov 29, 2012Jul 30, 2013The Procter & Gamble CompanyWeb substrate having optimized emboss design
US8637430Apr 23, 2010Jan 28, 2014The Procter & Gamble CompanyWeb substrate having activated color regions in topical additive regions
US8753737 *May 19, 2009Jun 17, 2014The Procter & Gamble CompanyMulti-ply fibrous structures and methods for making same
US8758558Nov 29, 2012Jun 24, 2014The Procter & Gamble CompanyWeb substrate having optimized emboss design
US8771578May 27, 2011Jul 8, 2014Kemira Chemicals, Inc.Acidified polyamidoamine adhesives, method of manufacture, and use for creping and ply bond applications
US20070298221 *Jun 20, 2007Dec 27, 2007The Procter & Gamble CompanyMulti-ply fibrous structures and products employing same
US20100297377 *May 19, 2009Nov 25, 2010Mcneil Kevin BensonMulti-ply fibrous structures and methods for making same
US20110290423 *Aug 3, 2011Dec 1, 2011Georgia-Pacific FranceMethod And Assembly For The Manufacture Of An Absorbent Sheet, and Absorbent Sheet Obtained
USRE43095 *Feb 8, 2008Jan 10, 2012The Procter & Gamble CompanyEmbossed multi-ply fibrous structure product and process for making same
EP0980750A1 *Aug 12, 1999Feb 23, 2000Paper Converting Machine CompanyTwo-ply paper products with either nested or foot-to-foot embossments and method of making
EP0980751A1 *Aug 12, 1999Feb 23, 2000Paper Converting Machine CompanyEmbosser for producing two-ply paper products with either nested or foot-to-foot embossments
EP1911574A1Oct 1, 2007Apr 16, 2008Delicarta SPAA paper material with an improved embossed pattern and method for the production thereof
EP2018959A2Jul 8, 2008Jan 28, 2009Fabio Perini S.p.A.Embossed paper material, method and device for the production thereof
EP2228208A1Oct 1, 2007Sep 15, 2010Delicarta S.p.A.A paper material with an improved embossed pattern and method for the production thereof
WO1998022284A1 *Nov 13, 1997May 28, 1998Procter & GambleEmbossed wet-laid fibrous structures
WO2000031341A1Jul 23, 1999Jun 2, 2000Procter & GambleAn embossed multi ply paper and process for producing the same
WO2000031342A1Jul 23, 1999Jun 2, 2000Procter & GambleEmbossed multi ply paper and process for producing the same
WO2001023172A1 *Sep 20, 2000Apr 5, 2001Biagiotti GuglielmoEmbossing and laminating device which joins areas of the layers, corresponding method, and resulting product
WO2004072373A1Feb 4, 2004Aug 26, 2004Procter & GambleProcess for making a fibrous structure comprising cellulosic and synthetic fibers
WO2010135386A1May 19, 2010Nov 25, 2010The Procter & Gamble CompanyWeb substrate having optimized emboss design
WO2011133329A1Apr 7, 2011Oct 27, 2011The Procter & Gamble CompanyWeb substrate having activated color regions in topical additive regions
WO2011133439A1Apr 18, 2011Oct 27, 2011The Procter & Gamble CompanyWeb substrate having activated color regions in deformed regions
WO2011133464A1Apr 18, 2011Oct 27, 2011The Procter & Gamble CompanyMethod of producing a web substrate having activated color regions in deformed regions
WO2011133622A1Apr 20, 2011Oct 27, 2011The Procter & Gamble CompanyMethod of producing color change in a web substrate
WO2012129026A1Mar 14, 2012Sep 27, 2012The Procter & Gamble CompanyMethod of producing color change in a substrate
WO2014004939A1Jun 28, 2013Jan 3, 2014The Procter & Gamble CompanyTextured fibrous webs, apparatus and methods for forming textured fibrous webs
Classifications
U.S. Classification156/470, 428/177, 425/101, 156/209, 425/115, 425/515, 425/520
International ClassificationB31F1/07, B31F1/00
Cooperative ClassificationB31F2201/0787, B31F2201/0733, B31F2201/0764, B31F1/07, B31F2201/0792, B31F2201/0728, B31F2201/0782
European ClassificationB31F1/07