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Publication numberUS3557505 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 26, 1971
Filing dateAug 12, 1968
Priority dateAug 12, 1968
Publication numberUS 3557505 A, US 3557505A, US-A-3557505, US3557505 A, US3557505A
InventorsKaul Arthur A
Original AssigneeKaul Arthur A
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Wall construction
US 3557505 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jim. 26, 1 1971 A.A.KAUL 3,557,505

I WALL CONSTRUCTION Filed Aug. 12. 1968 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 ARTHUR A KAUL INVENTOR B) BUG/(HORN, BLORE; KLAROU/ST a SPAR/(MAN v ATTORNEYS Jan. 26, 1971" I A.;;JA,- KAUL Filed Aug. 12. 1 968 I Jan. 26,1971

Filed Aug. 12. 1968 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 ARTHUR A. KAUL INVENTOR BY BUCKHORN, BLORE, KLARQUIST & SPAR KMAN ATTORNEYS United States Patent US. Cl. 52-275 5 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A wall construction according to the present invention includes first and second tiers of interlocking blocks wherein the blocks of one tier are formed with opposed hooks for engaging the blocks of the opposite tier. The blocks of a given tier, for example the tier representing the outside of a building, are aligned vertically and horizontally to provide a uniform appearance, while the blocks of the remaining tier, for example the inside wall, are also aligned horizontally and vertically, but are offset horizontally by half-block intervals from the blocks of the outside tier. The blocks of the inner tier are also offset vertically from the blocks of an outer tier such that a given course of blocks in the outer tier is interlocked with two offset courses in the inner tier. The wall construction is thereby completely interlocked and may be formed, if necessary, without the initial application of mortar or the like. In addition, corner blocks are provided which interlock with a pair of intersecting walls in the same manner. Thus, the corner blocks may form an outside corner tier associated with an outside tier of blocks and interlocked with vertically and horizontally ofiset blocks in an inner tier for completing an interlocked construction. Each outside surface of each corner block corresponds to the outside surface of the other blocks whereby an identical overall pattern is presented.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION In my Pat. 2,942,453, issued June 24, 1960, a wall construction is described and claimed employing a single style of stretcher block having an exterior wall, two inwardly directed end walls, and hooks upon the end walls directed toward one another. These stretcher blocks are laid up in courses, arranged end to end in two tiers, with the hooks of blocks in an exterior tier course being engaged by hooks of an interior tier course. Such a wall construction is interlocked as a result of the aforementioned interhooking of the blocks and also as a result of use of upright buttons on the horizontal block surfaces which enter similarly located cups in the meet ing horizontal surfaces of blocks in the next course. At the corners it was necessary to use a half block to complete each course, and there was no interengagement between the blocks of one curtain and those of a curtain at an angle to the first. Fastening between curtains was supplied by means of thin bond strips interposed between courses and interengaged at ends thereof with the blocks of respective curtains.

The prior construction, although quite adequate, is characterized by objectionable qualities relating to the visual effect of a continuous vertical line at a corner at the point of abutment between two curtains. Furthermore, interlocking is obtained only by means of the aforementioned bond strips and buttons which are essentially auxiliary to the blocks themselves. Moreover, the ap- "ice pearance of the wall between corners is subject to objection for use in constructing the outside surface of modern buildings because of the customary brick-walllikeoffsetting of blocks in successive courses. A more uniform stacked-block appearance aciheves a more visusually pleasing exterior for many building purposes.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION According to the present invention, blocks are disposed in outer and inner tiers with the blocks of each tier being laid up in courses. Each block has a vertical exterior wall, end walls, and hooks supported upon such end walls with the hooks of one block receiving hooks of adjoining blocks of the opposite tier to provide an interlocking combination horizontally. Blocks of each tier are aligned in vertical colums and horizontal rows to provide a straight grid appearance, but the horizontal rows of one tier, e.g., the inner tie, are offset vertically with respect to the horizontal rows of the remaining or outer tier. Therefore, the hooks of a given block engage hooks of blocks both above and below the given block in the opposite tier. Inthis manner, the wall is secured both horizontally and vertically without the necessity of employing auxiliary devices or even mortar.

A pair of such walls are joined by a corner tier of corner blocks wherein each corner block has a pair of intersecting exterior walls, and end walls at the nonintersecting ends of the corner block exterior walls. Corner block hooks are supported upon the corner block end walls and are positioned thereby in spaced relation from the inside of the corner block exterior walls. The exterior walls of the corner block are preferably substantially identical in area to the exterior walls of the blocks of the curtains which the corner blocks adjoin. Therefore, the overall uniform appearance of the Wall construction is preserved.

Each corner block hook engages hooks of blocks forming part of the walls to which the corner tier connects. The corner block is interhooked with blocks of the opposite, e.g., inner, tier wherein the courses are vertically offset from the corner blocks. Thus each corner block hook engages the hooks of two blocks on the opposite or inner tier. Therefore, the corner block completes a totally interlocked construction while maintaining a pleasing and uniform overall appearance.

It is therefore an object of the present invention to provide an improved wall construction, which is of uniform and pleasing appearance, and which is totally interlocked and therefore very stable.

It is a further object of the present invention to provide an improved wall construction that is completely selfsupporting without the use of connecting hardware.

It is another object of the present invention to provide an improved wall construction which is interlocked both horizontally and vertically.

It is an additional object of the present invention to provide an improved wall construction including a corner construtcion which completes an interhooked relation in the wall construction.

The subject matter which I regard as my invention is particularly pointed out and distinctly claimed in the concluding portion of this specification. The invention, however, both as to organization and method of operation, together with further advantages and objects thereof, may best be understood by reference to the following description taken in connection with the accompanying drawings wherein like reference characters refer to like elements.

DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a wall construction according to the persent invention;

FIG. 2 is a plan view of the same wall construction;

FIG. 3 is a cross section of the wall construction taken at 33 in FIG. 2;

FIG. 4 is a perspective drawing of the corner block employed in the wall construction of the present invention;

FIG. 5 is a perspective view of a wall block employed according to wall construction of the present invention;

FIG. 6 is a perspective view illustrating partial construction of a wall according to the present invention;

FIG. 7 is a perspective view illustrating further steps in completing the FIG. 6 wall;

FIG. 8 is an inside corner view of a partially constructed wall according to the present invention;

FIG. 9 is an elevational view of a variation of wall construction according to the present invention; and

FIG. 10 is a plan view of the FIG. 9 wall construction.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION A wall construction according to the present invention is illustrated in FIG. 1 wherein a first Wall structure 10 intersects a second wall structure 12 at corner 14. Each of the wall structures, for example wall structure 10, includes an outer tier formed by blocks 16 and an inner tier formed by blocks 18. Similarly, wall structure 12 includes an outer tier formed by blocks 20 and an inner tier formed by blocks 22. Corner blocks 24 join the two wall structures to complete an interlocking construction. Before consideration of the complete construction, the form of an individual block will be considered.

FIG. 5 illustrates an individual wall block or stretcher block, which may be formed of concrete. Such block includes a vertical exterior wall (also illustrated in FIG. 1) and opposite end walls 28 and 30. The end walls extend inwardly from the aforementioned exterior walls and at a given distance from the exterior wall, e.g., at points 32, the end walls curve towards one another to form opposed hooks 34 and 36. These hooks are spaced from each other and from the inside 38 of the exterior wall. The relative dimensions involved will be considered with the aid of the FIG. 2 plan view. Here, portions of a block 18 are referred to by the same reference numerals employed in FIG. 5. If the effective thickness of exterior wall 26 indicated at A is taken as a modular unit, the effective thickness of each hook 34 and 36 is likewise a modular unit, and the overall effective thickness of the block is three modular units, or 3A. The length of the block is preferably eight modular units. The opposing ends of hooks 34 and 36 are more than two modular units apart whereby the hooks of other blocks, e.g., hooks 34 and 62, may be received between the opposing ends of hooks 34 and 36. The reference to effective thickness means only that the actual distance is somewhat less for allowing clearance.

Returning to FIG. 5, the block is also preferably provided with spacer ribs 42 and 44 on the inside of the exterior wall and the facing inside wall of the hooks, respectively. The spacer ribs preferably start at the top surface of the block and are beveled inwardly and downwardly such that their total height is a fraction of the height of the block. Moreover, the spacer ribs 42 and 44 are suitably offset where they face one another. Spacer ribs 44 are positioned near the ends of hooks 34 and 36, while spacer ribs 42 are closer towards ends 28 and 30 of the block. When the blocks are assembled in an interlocking wall construction, the spacer rib 44, as illustrated in FIG. 2, bears on the surface of hook 34 opposite the inside of exterior wall 26. Similarly, a spacer rib 42 bears on the outside of the same hook. The spacer ribs allow easy and correct alignment of the blocks when they are assembled in interfitting and interlocking relationship, while at the same time leaving space between the blocks for enhancing assembly of the same and for allowing the addition of mortar or grout, if desired. When a block such as the one illustrated in FIG. 5 is lowered into place in a wall, it can be seen that the beveled shape of the spacer ribs will aid in positioning the block, with the spacer ribs riding over the edge of an interfitting block until the block is properly aligned.

In addition, the blocks may be formed with spacer lugs on their lower surfaces, providing a space or crevice between successive courses of blocks. Then, when the blocks are laid up, or at a later time, grout 0r mortar may be applied or forced into the construction, tending to fill the crevices between blocks. However, in the usual instance, no spacer lugs are employed, and mortar is applied in the usual manner between blocks.

The block of FIG. 5 is provided with a cusp-shaped protusion 74 extending inwardly from the inside 38 of the exterior wall 26, at the center of the wall. As may be seen in FIG. 2, the cusp-shaped protrusion substantially matches the outside of curved end walls 28 and 54 of interlocking blocks whereby to form passages for hooks 34' and 62. The cusp-shaped protusion enhances the strength of the block and the strength and stability of the completed wall construction.

A corner block as illustrated in FIG. 4 includes a pair of perpendicular exterior walls 48 and 50 (also illustrated in FIG. 1). This block, which gives the appearance of being a double size block, i.e., extending in two directions from its corner, may also be formed of concrete. Each exterior wall has substantially the same dimensions as the exterior walls of the wall blocks, for example, exterior wall 26 as illustrated in FIG. 1. The exterior walls intersect at a corner, e.g., outside corner 14. Each corner block has a pair of end walls 52 and 54 extending perpendicularly inwardly from the ends of the respective exterior walls 48 and 50 at the ends thereof remote from corner 14. The end walls curve at locations inwardly from the corner block exterior walls, e.g., at points 56 and 58 respectively, and curve toward the remaining exterior walls to form corner block hooks spaced from the inside of the exterior walls. Thus, end wall 52 curves inwardly towards exterior wall 50 to form corner block hook 50. Similarly, end wall 54 curves toward the inside of the exterior wall 48 to provide end block hook 62. The corner block also preferably includes a central extended portion or corner '64 extending inwardly from the outside corner of the block to define interior walls 66 and 68 parallel to end walls 52 and 54 respectively as well as parallel to exterior walls 50 and 48, respectively. These interior walls face the corner block hooks 60 and 62 and form therewith passages and 72 for receiving hooks of blocks forming the first and second wall structures. The corner block illustrated in FIG. 4 may also be provided with spacer ribs 42 and 44.

The corner portion 64 considerably enhances the strength of the corner block and has dimensions which are suitably 4A by 4A. Thus, the aforementioned interior walls 66 and 68 match the ends of adjacent blocks of adjacent wall structures as illustrated in FIG. 2, with the corner portion extending substantially out to the inside corner of the wall construction. The corner portion 64 additionally includes a central aperture 76 through which motor and/or a reinforcing member may be provided, if so desired.

Returning to FIG. 1, in the completed wall construction, the wall structures 10 and 12 are suitably disposed at a ninety degree angle to one another, and ends thereof adjoin and interhook with the corner tier formed of blocks 24. The blocks in each wall structure are substantially identical, and the outside or exterior walls thereof match each other as well as exterior walls 48 and 50 of the corner blocks to form two substantially planar outside walls. The blocks are aligned in vertical columns and horizontal rows as viewed, for example, from outside the wall, and are not staggered or offset as in the conventional brick or block wall construction. This pattern of columns and rows is unbroken in appearance by the corner blocks, since the exterior walls of the corner blocks are identical to those of the other blocks, with the corner blocks being similarly disposed in columns and rows, the corner blocks being vertically aligned as illustrated to form and outside or corner tier of corner blocks. The wall thus presents an artistically or esthetically pleasing finished appearance or a uniform grid-like appearance suitable for modern building exteriors.

The blocks forming the inside of the wall, i.e., blocks 18 and 22 of the inner tier, also are aligned in vertical columns and horizontal rows. This construction is also illustrated in FIG. 8. However, the blocks of the inner tier are reversed, or oriented oppositely to outer tier blocks 16 and 20, and are interhooked with the outer tier blocks. Thus, the hooks 34 and 36 of one block in one tier blocks. Thus, the hooks 34 and 36 of one block in one tier are interhooked with similarly numbered hooks of the opposite tier. As illustrated in the FIG. 2 plan view, a block 18 of the inner tier has hooks 34 and 36.

Book 34, for example, interhooks with hook 34' of outside tier block 16. As a consequence of the hooked arrangement, the adjoining or interhooking blocks of one tier will be offset horizontally by one-half block intervals from blocks of the other tier. Thus, the junction between an outside tier block 16 and corner block 24 is opposite the center or cusp-shaped protrusion 74 of block 18. In the case of the block 18, as illustrated in FIG. 2, hook 36 engages or is interhooked with hook 62 of corner block 24, this completing an interlocking arrangement with wall structure and the corner tier.

Although both the inner tier blocks and outer tier blocks are disposed in horizontal row, the horizontal rows of one row are offset vertically with respect to the horizontal rows of the opposite tier. Referring to the FIG. 3 cross section, it can be seen that inner tier block 22 is oifset with respect to corner blocks 24 (having the same cross section as outer tier blocks), by the height of onehalf black. Thus a given hook on one block will engage two hooks of the opposite tier forming parts of blocks both above and below the one block, or the hooks of a given block engage hooks of a total of four blocks in the opposite tier located in horizontal tiers above and below the given block. Therefore, the blocks are not only interlocked horizontally in staggered fashion, but the blocks are also interlocked vertically such that a given.block cannot become unintentionally dislodged or moved out of place.

Each corner block exterior wall is in alignment with the exterior walls provided by blocks of the first and second wall structures. Each corner block is interhooked with inner tier blocks in substantially the same fashion as outer tier blocks. Thus, referring to FIG. 2, corner block hook 62 engages inner tier block hook 36 in one wall structure, while corner block hook 60 engages an inner tier block hook 34 in another wall structure. A corner block, which may be considered in effect an outer tier block, thus engages hooks of a pair of wall structure blocks in an inner tier, wherein the blocks are horizontally offset with respect to the outer tier. Since the corner block walls are aligned with other outer tier blocks, the hooks of each corner block actually engage hooks or four inner tier blocks, in vertically offset courses, for completing an interlocked corner construction.

The steps in forming the wall construction are further illustrated in FIGS. 6, 7, and 8. First, a first course of inner tier blocks 78, and a first course of outer tier blocks 80, together with a corner block 82, are laid up on a foundation or footing 84. As is most clearly illustrated in FIG. 8, the first course of inner tier blocks 78 comprises blocks of one-half the height of the blocks which will form the large portion or intermediate portion of the wall construction. These blocks are one-half the height of the remaining blocks in order to secure vertical offset between horizontal rows of inner and outer tier blocks. As a next step, a course of inner tier blocks is laid up upon the first course or half-height inner tier blocks. Block 86 in FIG. 8 is illustrative of this course. Then, outer tier blocks 88 are placed upon blocks 80, and a corner block 90 is positioned on block 82. The following step is the laying up of inner blocks 92 upon the inner tier blocks which include block 86. The wall construction suitably continues with the alternate laying of inner and outer tier courses until the desired height is reached. Then, the wall is completed by providing a course of half-height blocks to complete a flat top wall level. For example, the topmost inner tier blocks illustrated in FIG. 1 are half-height blocks. Desirably, the half-height blocks are employed on the inside tier at the bottom and top of a wall, as illustrated, to preserve the overall uniformity of appearance of the exterior block walls.

The wall is preferably constructed employing mortar between blocks, but may be alternatively constructed without the use of mortar. Mortar or grout may also be inserted in the spaces and crevices after the wall is formed. For example, as illustrated in the FIG. 2 plan view, apertures 94 are formed by the curved end wall of one block and the end of a hook of an interlocking block. Also, central apertures 76 are provided in the corner blocks. After the wall construction has been completed, thin grout may be blown in or otherwise placed in these recesses. Moreover, reinforcing rods 96 and 98 may be inserted vertically in apertures 94 and central apertures 76 after the wall construction is completed, and mortar, grout, or the like forced in around the reinforcing rods. It should be emphasized, however, that the wall construction is completely interlocked even when mortar is not used. For example, a construction of the illustrated type may be completed, after which sand may be poured in the apertures 94 and '76 for the completion of a fall-out shelter or the like. Construction may, of course, proceed very rapidly when no application of mortar is employed during lay-up. For all-out shelters and the like, no spacer lugs are employed.

In a wall construction of the present invention, the finished wall is stronger and more durable than a conventional wall not having the permanent interlocking feature. A building constructed in this manner is thus more earthquakeproof because dislodging of mortar during a quake will not cause the blocks themselves to fall inwardly or outwardly from the wall. Therefore, injury and property damage are more readily avoided.

A varation of the wall construction according to the present invention is illustrate in FIGS. 9 and 10. In this construction interlocking blocks are provided for construction of a curved Wall, for example, as employed in a cylindrical structure or silo. The wall construction includes an outer tier of blocks 100, and an inner tier of blocks 102 disposed in interhooking relation with the tier of outer blocks. In FIG. 9, some of the outer tier blocks are removed to show the interhooking inner tier blocks directly therebehind. Referring to a particular outer tier block in FIG. 10, (e.g., the right hand block 100), such block has a vertical exterior wall 104 which is curved convexly in horizontal cross section, and end walls 106 extending substantially perpendicularly inwardly from the exterior walls. The end walls then curve towards one another at a distance from the exterior wall, e.g., starting at points 108, to form opposed hooks 110 which are spaced from one another and from the inside of the exterior Wall. The spacing between hooks 10 is sufficient to receive curved ends of interior tier block 102.

An inner tier block 102 (e.g), the right hand block 102), also has a vertical exterior Wall 112, but vertical exterior wall 112 is concave in horizontal cross section. Also, each inner tier block has end walls 114 which extend perpendicularly from the inner tier block exterior wall toward the outer tier block exterior wall. The inner tier block end walls are also curved towards one another at a distance from the inner tier block exterior wall, e.g., starting at points 116. The inner tier block end walls are curved toward one another to form opposed books 118 which are spaced from one another by a sufficient distance to receive the curved end walls of outer tier blocks in interhooking relation. The inner tier blocks substantially match the outer tier blocks except that, while the outer tier blocks each have a convex exterior wall, and hooks 110 in substantial parallelism thereto, the inner tier blocks each have a concave exterior wall, with hooks 118 in substantial parallelism thereto. The blocks are interengaged so that each hook 110 engages two hooks 118 of adjacent horizontally and vertically offset inner tier blocks to provide horizontal and vertical interlocking.

The horizontal curved rows or courses of outer tier blocks are displaced by vertical half-block intervals with curved rows of inner tier blocks whereby to provide vertical intrelocking. For this purpose, an initial course, e.g., of inner tier blocks, is of half the height of the wall blocks thereabove except for a top row. Preferably, the top row of inner tier blocks is also formed of one-half height blocks, as illustrated at 120 in FIG. 9, to form a fiat top wall surface.

The curve of the exterior walls 104 of the outer tier blocks and the curve of exterior walls 112 of the inner tier blocks have the same center, 122. The construction may be circularly completed to form a cylindrical construction such as a silo, or the like, wherein given inner and outer tiers form complete circles. Since the exterior Walls of the inner tier blocks are inside the exterior walls of the outer tier blocks, that is, spaced toward center 122 therefrom, exterior walls 112 will be foreshortened relative to walls 104, in proportion to the foreshortening of the distance from point 122 to exterior walls 112 relative to the distance from point 122 to exterior walls 104.

The inner and outer tier blocks are preferably provided with cusp-shaped protrusions 124 extending from inside the respective exterior walls for substantially matching the outside of curved end walls of adjoining blocks of the opposite tier. These protrusions add additional strength to the blocks, and also complete passages in which the block hooks and curved end walls lie, to reinforce interlocking.

The hooks 118 do not extend completely to the curved end wall, but are spaced therefrom to form apertures 126 in the interlocking construction. The wall may be formed employing mortar between blocks, or after the Wall has been laid up, mortar or grout may be forced through these apertures in order to reinforce the wall, and/ or vertical reinforcing rods may be inserted therein.

While I have shown and described preferred embodiments of my invention, it will be apparent to those skilled in the art that many changes and modifications may be made without departing from my invention in its broader aspects. I therefore intend the appended claims to cover all such changes and modifications as fall within the true spirit and scope of my invention.

I claim:

1. A wall construction comprising:

a first wall structure including an outer and an inner tier of uniform sized blocks laid up in courses, each of said blocks including an exterior wall having a flat vertical exterior surface and an inner surface, an end wall at each end of said exterior wall, each end wall including an outer surface a portion of which is flat and normal to said exterior surface and an inner concave surface, a hook integral with each end wall and having an outer surface merging in with the flat surface of the end wall to which it is joined by a curved surface, an inner surface, and a fiat end face, and a cusp projecting from the inner surface of the exterior wall substantially midway the ends thereof being defined by converging concave surfaces, said hooks of each block in one tier receiving the hooks of adjacent block of the other tier with the outer surfaces of adjacent hooks of a pair of blocks in one tier defining a recess in which the cusp of a block of other tier is received, said walls and said hooks being of substantially uniform cross section,

the blocks within each tier being aligned in vertical columns and horizontal courses, wherein the horizontal courses of one tier are offset vertically with respect to the horizontal courses of the opposite tier, with hooks of a given block in one tier engaging hooks of blocks above and below the said given block on the opposite tier,

a second wall structure substantially similar to said first wall structure and angularly related thereto at one end thereof, said second wall structure comprising inner and outer tiers of blocks of the same size and shape as the blocks in the first wall structure with the hooks of the blocks of one tier interlocked with the hooks of the other tier, and a corner tier of corner blocks joining the wall structures, each corner block including a pair of walls having intersecting exterior surfaces in normal relation to each other, an end wall integral with each of said walls and having an end surface a portion of which is flat and normal to the exterior surface and an inner concave surface, a hook integral with each end wall and having an outer surface blending in with the fiat portion of the end surface, an inner surface merging with said concave inner surface, and a flat end surface, said block having a thickened corner portion with a pair of converging inner concave surfaces each of which is spaced from and in confronting relation to the flat end face of a hook and the inner concave surface of said end wall, and cooperating therewith to define a recess for receiving the book of an adjacent block in a tier of one of said wall structures, each corner block hook engaging books of blocks adjacent to the corner tier and forming a part of the first and second wall structures.

2. For use in a building construction including a pair of wall structures in normal relation and comprising blocks having interlocking hooks and presenting ends connected by a corner tier, a corner block for said corner tier comprising:

a pair of walls in normal relation each having a flat exterior surface with the two exterior surfaces intersecting at a right angle, and an inner surface,

an end wall integral with each of said walls and having an end surface a portion of which is fiat and normal to the exterior surface of the wall to which it is joined and an inner concave surface,

a hook integral with each end wall and having an outer surface which is merged with the end surface of an end wall by a curved surface, an inner surface that blends in with the inner concave surface of the end wall, and a fiat end face,

and a thickened corner portion defined by converging concave surfaces projecting inwardly from the inner surfaces of said inner wall surfaces and each of which is spaced from and in confronting relation to the end face of a hook and the inner concave surface of the end wall to which that hook is joined,

each of said concave surfaces on the thickened corner portion cooperating with the concave end wall surface which it confronts and the end face of the hook which it confronts to define a recess that is adapted to receive a hook of a block in one of said wall structures.

3. The corner block of claim 2 in which the thickened corner portion is formed with a passage extending therethrough in a direction parallel to said exterior surface.

4. For use in a wall structure comprising interlocking blocks, a block comprising:

a wall having a fiat exterior surface that is intended to assume a vertical position in the wall structure, an inner surface,

a pair of end walls integral with said wall and each of which has an outer end face a portion of which is flat and normal to the exterior surface of said wall, and an inner concave surface,

a hook integral with each'end wall and having an outer surface that is merged in with the outer surface of said end wall by a curved surface, an inner surface spaced from the inner surface of said wall and blends in with the inner concave surface of the end wall to which said hook is joined, and a flat end face,

and a cusp projecting inwardly from the inner surface of said wall substantially midway the ends thereof and being defined by a pair ,of converging concave surfaces, each of said cusp concave surfaces being spaced from and in confronting relation to an inner concave surface of an end wall and the end face of a hook and cooperating therewith to define a recess for receiving the hook of an adjacent block in the wall structure.

5. The construction according to claim 4 wherein said hooks and the inside of the interior wall are provided and 10 with protruding spacer ribs joined to one facing surface on one block for positioning an interlocking surface on the other, said spacer ribs being beveled inwardly and downwardly.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,381,823 6/1921 Griffin 52570 1,388,181 8/1921 Guimonneau 52571 2,884,780 5/1959 Ramirez 52574 10 2,942,453 6/1960 Kaul 52574 FOREIGN PATENTS 3,275 5/1927 Australia 52570 813,768 9/1951 Germany 52570 15 605,667 6/1960 Italy 52570 FRANK L. ABBOTT, Primary Examiner I. L. RIDGILL, JR., Assistant Examiner US. Cl. X.R. 52249, 570, 608

Patent No.

Dated January 26, 1971 Inventor(s) Column 2,

Column Column 6,

Column Column Signed (SEAL) Attest:

line

line line line line line and that said Letters ARTHUR A. KAUL It is certified that error appears in the above-identified patent Patent 'are hereby corrected as shown below:

"intrelocking" should be --interlocking-- after "of" (at the end of the line) inse: --the--;

"books" should be --hooks--.

and sealed this 25th day of May I 971 EDWARD M.FLETCl-IER,JR. Attesting Officer WILLIAM E. SCHUYLER, JR.

Commissioner of Patents F ORM PO-105O (IO-69)

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Classifications
U.S. Classification52/275, D25/117, 52/570, 52/608, 52/249
International ClassificationE04B2/30, E04B2/02, E04B2/28, E04B2/36
Cooperative ClassificationE04B2/30, E04B2002/0232, E04B2/36
European ClassificationE04B2/30, E04B2/36