Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3557763 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 26, 1971
Filing dateJul 25, 1969
Priority dateJul 25, 1969
Publication numberUS 3557763 A, US 3557763A, US-A-3557763, US3557763 A, US3557763A
InventorsProbst Stephen C
Original AssigneeAutomotive Performance Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Vapor injector
US 3557763 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [72 I Inventor Stephen C. Probst [56] References Cited Dallas. UNITED STATES PATENTS 1 1 pp N9 844,850 1,685,598 9 1928 Davis 123/198 [221 Flled July 25,1969 1,756,781 4 1930 Bergougnoux 123/198 [451 Patented I 1,772,011 8/1930 M310 123/198 {73] Ass1gnee Automotive Performance, nc. 2,602,435 7/l952 Boyan [23/119 Dallas f' 3,148,670 9/1964 Fiedler et al .1 123 1 87.5 a corporation of Texas Continuation-impart of application Ser. No. Primary Examiner-Wendell Bums 734834, May 6, 1968, now abandoned. A r yG es gg, J

ABSTRACT: Apparatus for supplying an additive vapor into the fuel-air mixture of an internal combustion engine includes a reservoir for a liquid solution including methanol. The reser- [54] VAPQR INJECTPR voir is connected to the engine by a flexible conduit defining a 4 Clalms 2 Drawmg suction line connected to the primary vacuum inlet of the en- [52] US. Cl 123/119, gine. The reservoir includes an inlet conduit for bubbling air l23/ l 34, l23/l98 through the solution to produce a vapor in the upper reservoir [51] Int. Cl F02f 9/00, chamber which is drawn into the engine inlet through the suc- F02m 17/22, F02b 77/00 tion conduit. A check valve in the suction line maintains the [50] Field of Search 123/1 19A, reduced pressure in the reservoir during times of increased 119B, 119D, 198A, 134, 187.5

pressure in the engine primary vacuum inlet.

PATENTED JANZS I8?! STEPHEN C. PROBST INVENTOR BY ATTORNE VAPOR INJECTOR BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This application is a continuation-in-part of my copending application Ser. No. 734,834 filed May 6, i968 for Vapor lnjector, now abandoned.

This invention relates to internal combustion engines and more particularly to apparatus for injecting vapor into the engine inlet improving the performance and efficiency of internal combustion engines.

The inefficiency of internal combustion engines is well known and this has been a major factor in air pollution due to the presence of unburned or partially burned fuel in the exhaust from the engines of automobiles and other vehicles. In recent years, the problem has become so severe that federal legislation has been passed requiring automotive manufactures to equip all new cars with smog eliminators. Numerous methods and apparatus have been proposed heretofore for reducing air pollution caused by internal combustion engines; however, none of the prior art devices have been entirely satisfactory. Filtering devices have been employed to remove unburned fuel from automotive exhaust, before the exhaust was discharged into the atmosphere. However, such devices have not been entirely effective and often cause a significant reduction in the performance of the engine. Other devices, such as superchargers, have improved the performance of the engine but have not greatly reduced the pollution problem. Furthermore, many of the prior art devices have been complex and expensive and have been difficult to install and maintain.

These disadvantages of the prior art are overcome with the present invention; and apparatus is provided whereby the efficiency and performance of internal combustion engines are both improved substantially. Moreover, the device of the present invention is simple and inexpensive, can be installed easily and requires virtually no maintenance.

The advantages of the present invention are preferably attained by providing an aqueous solution of methanol and apparatus for vaporizing the solution and injecting the vapor into the cylinders of an internal combustion engine during operation of the engine to produce more complete combustion of fuel.

Accordingly it is an object of the present invention to provide improved apparatus for increasing the efficiency of internal combustion engines.

Another object of the present invention is to provide improved apparatus for increasing the performance of internal combustion engines.

A further object of the present invention is to provide improved apparatus for reducing air polluting emissions from internal combustion engines while simultaneously improving the performance of such engines.

A still further object is to provide. improved apparatus adapted to be readily connected to an internal combustion engine for improving the performance-thereof.

A specific object of the present invention is to provide improved apparatus apparatus for forming a vapor of an aqueous solution of methanol alcohol and injecting the vapor into the cylinders of an internal combustion engine during operation of the engine.

These objects are accomplished by apparatus for connection to the suction inlet of an internal combustion engine, the apparatus including a reservoir for containing a solution to be vaporized, vaporizing means for flowing air from the exterior of the reservoir through the solution to form a vapor in the upper portion of the reservoir chamber, and the upper chamber portion of the reservoir being communicated with the engine suction inlet through a suction line, the flow of air through the reservoir being effected by the reduced pressure within the reservoir. Check valve means in the reservoir suction line prevents flow from the engine to the reservoir.

DRAWINGS The novel features of the invention, as well as additional objects and advantages thereof, will be understood more fully from the following description when read in connection with the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 is a diagrammatic and elevation view of an internal combustion engine and of associated vapor injecting apparatus; and

FIG. 2 is a detail sectional view of the vacuum line connector and check valve shown in FIG. 1.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT Referring to the drawing, FIG. 1 includes adiagrammatic il lustration of an automobile-type gasoline engine. As shown in FIG. I, carburetor 6 seated on top of the engine block including an inlet passage 7 and valve 8 through which combustion air flows from the air filter into the inlet manifold of the engine, gasoline being mixed with the air in the carburetor to provide a combustible fuel-air mixture. A passage 9 through the carburetor wall communicates with the carburetor throat 7 to define a primary vacuum inlet which serves as a source of vacuum or reduced pressure for various engine functions or for the operation of accessories.

The engine diagram also shows an exhaust valve 11, the stem of which extends through the cylinder head 10 to the exterior thereof, and a rocker arm 12 and a pushrod 13. The rocker arms and associated mechanism for the engine are enclosed by a valve cover 14 which is normally sealed to the cylinder head by a sealing gasket.

Since exhaust gases and fumes may leak around the valve stem into the chamber enclosed by the valve cover 14, it is conventional practice to evacuate these chambers by connect ing these chambers to the above mentioned primary vacuum inlet 9. This is part of the positive crankcase ventilation system by means of which engine fumes and vapors are returned to the engine inlet to afford further opportunity for complete combustion. ln this drawing, the valve cover return line includes a conduit 15, a portion of a T-connector 16, a conduit 17 and a fitting l8 fitted into the vacuum inlet passage 8. The conduits l5 and 17 may be flexible hoses of rubber or like material.

In accordance with the present invention, a primary vacuum inlet 9 is employed to introduce into the engine, for admixture with the fuel-air mixture, vapors which have the effect of improving the combustion and performance of the engine. It has been discovered that vapors from an aqueous solution which includes methanol as a principle ingredient to produce the desired beneficial results in the engine.

As shown principally in FIG. 1, apparatus for supplying vapor to the engine includes a reservoir 21 consisting of an open topped vessel 22, fabricated of high silica glass for example, and a closure cap 23 fabricated of cast aluminum for example. The closure cap may be threaded on to the container in a conventional manner and sealed thereto with a suitable gasket. The closure cap is provided with a filler opening, closed by means of a suitable plug 24.

For admitting air into the reservoir 21, the closure cap 23 is provided with an inlet passage and an associated control valve 26, such as an adjustable needle valve, for controlling the flow of air through the passage. An inlet conduit 27 communicates with the inlet control valve 26 and extends to a point adjacent the bottom of the reservoir, terminating in an aerator device 28 for breaking up the air into numerous bubbles which pass upward through the solution in the reservoir to the upper reservoir chamber defined above the liquid level.

The closure cap 23 is provided with a suitable boss 31 having a passage therethrough, to which is conveniently connected a suction conduit 32 for communicating the upper reservoir chamber with the primary vacuum inlet 9. For this purpose, in the preferred form of the invention, the suction conduit 32 which may be a hose of rubber or similar material, is connected to one branch of the T-connector 16 in the valve cover evacuation line. The suction conduit 32 includes a check valve to prevent the flow of vapor from the engine into the reservoir 21', and this check valve may be conveniently provided in the T-coupling 16 as will be described.

The T-coupling 16 is shown in FIG. 2 apart from the flexible conduits which may be connected to it. This coupling includes a principal body portion-35 which is elongated and has oppositely projecting nipples, each provided with spaced groups of annular serrations 36 and 37. The inner serrations 36, which are closer to the body 35, are of larger diameter to accommodate a -inch l.D. flexible hose, for example, while the outer serrations 37 are of smaller diameter to accommodate a 34 nch [.D. flexible hose, for example. in this sense then the connector 16 is a universal connector adapted to be inserted into an existing vacuum line of an engine for use with several sizes of hoses. The connector further includes a laterally projecting shank 38 which defines, with a valve seat portion 39, a check valve housing enclosing a ball closure member 40 coacting with the valve seat 41. The valve seat portion 39 of the connector includes a serrated nipple 42 to which the reservoir suction line 32 is connected.

During normal flow conditions, when the vapor flows from the nipple 42 through the check valve and into the connector body 35, the ball closure 40 is urged against small projections 50 surrounding the flow passage through the shank 38 which permits flow around the ball closure member. Should there be any reversing of the pressure differential, whereby the pressure on the reservoir side of the check valve should be less than that on the engine side, the check valve is dimensioned so that this reverse flow will effect an immediate seating of the ball closure member 40 on the seat 41 to prevent such reverse flow.

In operation, the vacuum produced in the engine suction inlet 9 withdraws air from the reservoir to reduce pressure therein. This results in air flow into the reservoir through the adjustable inlet control valve 26, this air flowing through the inlet conduit 27 and aerator 28 to produce numerous air bubbles which flow upward through the solution in the reservoir. In doing this, the air becomes mixed with the solution and forms a vapor of this solution which collects in the upper chamber portion of the reservoir ZlfThis vapor is drawn from the reservoir through the suction conduit 32, the check valve and the T-connector l6, and the connector 17 to mix with the fuel-air mixture flowing through the carburetor throat 7 into the engine intake manifold.

Thereafter, during each charging stroke of the engine, a mixture of the fuel-air mixture and the additive vapor will be drawn into the engine cylinders to be compressed and burned in a conventional manner. it has been found that the introduction of the vapor of the aqueous solution of methanol causes a significantly higher temperature of combustion than is achieved with a conventional fuel-air mixture. As a result, virtually 100 percent of the fuel in the fuel-air vapor mixture is burned, whereas only about 55 percent of the fuel in conven tional fuel-air mixture is burned. Because of the more efficiently burning of the fuel with the vapor additive, the perfonnance of the engine is improved, and the engine runs more smoothly and produces substantially more power than does the same engine when operated with conventional fuel-air mixtures. Furthermore, because of more efficient utilization of fuel, it is found that spark plug fouling and oil contamination are virtually eliminated resulting in longer life for the engine. in addition, air pollution problems are overcome or substantially reduced since substantially all of the fuel is burned and substantially no unburned or partially burned hydrocarbons remain to be discharged in the engine exhaust.

The combination ofa check valve with the described vapor producing device provides a number of advantages. The danger of damaging the apparatus, due to a sharply increased pressure within the reservoir produced by a backfire for example, is obviated. Such a pressure increase might rupture the container 22, or produce the inconvenience of blowing and losing the tiller plug 24 or ru turin the inlet conduit 32. The chec valve provides the ad ttiona advantage of maintaining the less-than-ambient pressure within the reservoir at times of increased pressures within the carburetor throat 7, such as at times of engine acceleration. At such times, the pressure in the suction inlet 9*may rise above the pressure within the reservoir 21 to produce a reverse flow to unnecessarily and undesirably increase the pressure within the reservoir. Furthermore, if such reverse flow is permitted through the conduit 32, vapors and fumes flowing through the conduit l5 from the valve cover 14 could then flow into the reservoir 21, resulting in surface contamination of the solution within the reservoir which may significantly retard the production of the desired vapor within the reservoir. With a check valve designed to seat instantaneously with any reverse pressure differential, these disadvantages are obviated. The apparatus described is adapted to be readily mounted in a motor vehicle in operative association with the vehicle engine.

lclaim:

l. Vapor injecting apparatus for use in combination with an internal combustion engine including a carburetor having an air passageand a throttle valve positioned in said air passage producing a region of reduced pressure in the air passage downstream of the throttle valve and a first line providing communication between the region of reduced pressure and a crankcase ventilation system of the engine that comprises a T- connector connected into said first line and having a branch outlet, a closed reservoir for containing a supply of volatile liquid additive with a vapor chamber above the liquid additive, means for admitting air into said reservoir below the liquid level at a metered rate, a second line connected between the branch outlet of the T-connector and the vapor chamber portion of the reservoir and check valve means positioned for permitting normal free flow of vapor from the vapor chamber of the reservoir into the region of reduced pressure and restricting undesired flow of fluid from the first line into the reservoir upon abnormal operation of the engine to prevent an excessive pressure being produced in the reservoir.

2. Vapor injecting apparatus as defined in claim 1 wherein said means for admitting air into said reservoir at a metered rate comprises adjustable valve means positioned in an inlet conduit of said reservoir for controlling the flow of air through said inlet conduit.

3. An internal combustion engine as set forth in claim 1 wherein said check valve means is disposed in the branch outlet of said T-connector.

4. An internal combustion engine as set forth in claim 3 wherein said T-connector includes terminal nipples for attachment to flexible conduits; and wherein one or more of said nipples include serrated portions of different diameters for accommodating flexible conduits having different internal diameters.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1685598 *Aug 14, 1925Sep 25, 1928William DavisAuxiliary fuel and cleaning device for internal-combustion engines
US1756781 *Jul 15, 1929Apr 29, 1930Jean B BergougnouxAuxiliary feeding device for internal-combustion engines
US1772011 *Jun 19, 1928Aug 5, 1930Thomas J MaloDecarbonizer for internal-combustion engines
US2602435 *May 20, 1950Jul 8, 1952Boyan FrankAuxiliary air supplying device for internal-combustion engines
US3148670 *Nov 6, 1963Sep 15, 1964Fiedler William SIntroducing combustible fluid to internal combustion engine fuel line
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3809035 *Aug 25, 1971May 7, 1974Ballmatic CorpAir admission valve for internal combustion engines equipped with pollution control valve
US3875922 *Apr 18, 1973Apr 8, 1975Jr Frank KirmssVapor injection system
US3923024 *Mar 28, 1974Dec 2, 1975John W DabrioAir metering valve for engine air inlet system
US3945366 *Dec 20, 1973Mar 23, 1976Matthews Roe IOxygen supply system for IC engines
US4183338 *May 4, 1977Jan 15, 1980U.S.A. 161 Developments Ltd.Combustion control system adding a liquid, exhaust gases, and PCV gases
US4195607 *Sep 7, 1978Apr 1, 1980Toyota Jidosha Kogyo Kabushiki KaishaBlow-by gas recirculating device
US4270505 *Mar 16, 1979Jun 2, 1981Auto-Miser International Manufacturing Corp.Fuel vaporizer system
US4369754 *Nov 4, 1980Jan 25, 1983Bob LofmanVacuum responsive injection system for engines
US4376739 *Feb 4, 1982Mar 15, 1983Passey Jr John RFor internal combustion engine
US4414924 *Jun 22, 1981Nov 15, 1983Harren Hugh HAir jet unit
US4589376 *Oct 15, 1984May 20, 1986Albertson Robert VVapor introduction system for internal combustion engine
US6584993 *Nov 6, 2000Jul 1, 2003Yen-Hsi ChangPortable-type cleaning device for internal combustion engine
US6948642Sep 17, 2003Sep 27, 2005Adam AwadApparatus and method for dispensing fluids into an air intake
US7640913Mar 6, 2007Jan 5, 2010Ethanol Boosting Systems, LlcSingle nozzle injection of gasoline and anti-knock fuel
US7640915Oct 12, 2007Jan 5, 2010Massachusetts Institute Of TechnologyFuel management system for variable ethanol octane enhancement of gasoline engines
US7726265Mar 9, 2007Jun 1, 2010Ethanol Boosting Systems, LlcFuel tank system for direct ethanol injection octane boosted gasoline engine
US7740004Aug 17, 2007Jun 22, 2010Massachusetts Institute Of TechnologyFuel management system for variable ethanol octane enhancement of gasoline engines
US7762233Dec 8, 2008Jul 27, 2010Massachusetts Institute Of TechnologyFuel management system for variable ethanol octane enhancement of gasoline engines
US7841325Nov 18, 2009Nov 30, 2010Massachusetts Institute Of TechnologyFuel management system for variable ethanol octane enhancement of gasoline engines
US8069839May 27, 2011Dec 6, 2011Massachusetts Institute Of TechnologyFuel management system for variable ethanol octane enhancement of gasoline engines
US8082735Jan 25, 2008Dec 27, 2011Massachusetts Institute Of TechnologyOptimized fuel management system for direct injection ethanol enhancement of gasoline engines
US8146568Oct 27, 2011Apr 3, 2012Massachusetts Institute Of TechnologyFuel management system for variable ethanol octane enhancement of gasoline engines
US8171915Oct 19, 2010May 8, 2012Massachusetts Institute Of TechnologyFuel management system for variable ethanol octane enhancement of gasoline engines
US8276565Mar 2, 2012Oct 2, 2012Massachusetts Institute Of TechnologyFuel management system for variable ethanol octane enhancement of gasoline engines
US8302580Feb 8, 2012Nov 6, 2012Massachusetts Institute Of TechnologyFuel management system for variable ethanol octane enhancement of gasoline engines
US8353269Nov 9, 2010Jan 15, 2013Massachusetts Institute Of TechnologySpark ignition engine that uses intake port injection of alcohol to extend knock limits
US8468983Feb 5, 2010Jun 25, 2013Massachusetts Institute Of TechnologyOptimized fuel management system for direct injection ethanol enhancement of gasoline engines
US8522746Sep 28, 2012Sep 3, 2013Massachusetts Institute Of TechnologyFuel management system for variable ethanol octane enhancement of gasoline engines
US8522758Sep 9, 2009Sep 3, 2013Ethanol Boosting Systems, LlcMinimizing alcohol use in high efficiency alcohol boosted gasoline engines
US8707913May 16, 2013Apr 29, 2014Massachusetts Institute Of TechnologyFuel management system for variable ethanol octane enhancement of gasoline engines
US8707938Aug 1, 2013Apr 29, 2014Ethanol Boosting Systems, LlcMinimizing alcohol use in high efficiency alcohol boosted gasoline engines
US8919330Apr 10, 2014Dec 30, 2014Ethanol Boosting Systems, LlcMinimizing alcohol use in high efficiency alcohol boosted gasoline engines
EP0846847A1 *Jul 4, 1997Jun 10, 1998Watase HideakiApparatus for combustion enhancing and method
WO1981002327A1 *Dec 24, 1980Aug 20, 1981H HarrenWater injection in internal combustion engines
WO2001066929A1 *Mar 8, 2000Sep 13, 2001E Max Japan Co LtdCombustion enhancing method and apparatus for internal combustion engines
WO2009009423A1 *Jul 3, 2008Jan 15, 2009Ethanol Boosting Systems LlcFast burn and high compression ratio fuel management system for minimization of ethanol consumption in ethanol boosted gasoline engines
Classifications
U.S. Classification123/531, 123/198.00A
International ClassificationF02B1/00, F02B1/04, F02M25/022, F02M25/00
Cooperative ClassificationF02M25/00, F02B1/04
European ClassificationF02M25/00