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Publication numberUS3559356 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 2, 1971
Filing dateApr 19, 1968
Priority dateApr 19, 1968
Also published asCA952281A, CA952281A1, DE1919104A1, DE1919104B2, DE1919104C3
Publication numberUS 3559356 A, US 3559356A, US-A-3559356, US3559356 A, US3559356A
InventorsKoral Ephraim
Original AssigneeSpecialties Const
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Resilient corner bead
US 3559356 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 2, 1971 E. KORAL 3,559,356

RESILIENT comm BEAD Filed April 19. 1968 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 P 'w'3o' G 23 20 I I E. B l I r l I as l El INVENTOR.

a m Ephraim Kora! BY- TEE Ti El 2 United States Patent 3,559,356 RESILIENT CORNER BEAD Ephraim Kora], Denver, 'Colo., assignor to Construction gpecialties, Inc., Cranford, N.J., a corporation of New ersey Filed Apr. 19, 1968, Ser. No. 722,594 Int. Cl. E041? 13/06, 19/02 US. Cl. 52-254 22 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE This invention relates to improvements in corner beads which protect the external corners of interior walls, and more particularly to corner beads of a tough, resilient construction which are capable of withstanding a substantial amount of abuse.

The interior walls in the rooms, and especially in the hallways of many public buildings such as hospitals and similar institutions, are finished with comparatively expensive materials. Even where plaster walls are used, the finished workmanship will be of high quality. Accordingly, it is desirable to protect the walls against unnecessary damage. Usually, such damage as does occur in the ordinary use of the building comes about through the somewhat careless use of carts, trucks, litters and similar vehicles traversing the hallways of the building, and usually, the damage occurs by the vehicle bumping an external corner of a wall as it is making a turn from one hallway corridor to another or into a room. If the wall happens to be of ceramic'tile, a corner tile will be chipped or broken. If the wall is of plaster, with a conventional metal corner bead embedded therein, the bead will be dented and some plaster about or behind the dent spalled away.

Naturally, scratches, dents and chips at such external corners in hallways are very obvious and unsightly and should be avoided whenever possible. Where the problem becomes serious, bumpers or rails are mounted upon the wall about the corner, but such expedients are not only expensive, but also almost as unsightly as the dents or chips.

The present invention was conceived and developed to overcome the problems set forth above, and the invention comprises, in essence, a resilient corner bead which may be aflixed to an external corner of a wall and a modification thereof, a resilient cap which may be affixed to an end of a wall. The improved corner bead and cap are formed of a tough, resilient material and are mounted in the converging walls in a manner which permits their yielding and flexure to a substantial shock without spalling or otherwise damaging them or the finished wall sections at either side of the corner bead.

Accordingly, an object of the invention is to provide a novel and improved corner bead for an external corner of a wall, and a novel and improved cap for a wall end. which are tough and resilient and will yield to the impact of a heavy object such as a loaded hand truck and thereafter, return to their original form and position without being damaged or marked.

Another object of the invention is to provide a novel 3,559,356 Patented Feb. 2., 1971 and improved corner bead and cap which have smooth, neatly finished surfaces and are firm and hard When handled in an ordinary manner.

Another object of the invention is to provide a novel and improved corner bead for an external corner and a cap for a wall end which can shift, as when struck a heavy blow, without damaging the adjacent wall sections, which are immune to effects of temperature variations and which will permit the converging wall sections to move slightly where there is settlement of the structure, and thereby minimize the possibility of cracking in the wall due to excess strain at the corner.

Another object of the invention is to provide a novel and improved corner bead and cap which may be easily repaired or easily replaced, if necessary, as where they are cut or otherwise damaged by an accident of unusual severity.

Further objects of the invention are to provide a novel and improved corner bead and cap construction which is simple in form and arrangement, versatile and may be adapted for use at both an external corner and at the end of a wall section, economical both in the basic cost and in the required labor for its installation, and generally, neat-appearing, rugged and durable components.

With the foregoing and other objects in View, all of which more fully hereinafter appear, my invention comprises certain constructions, combinations and arrangements of parts and elements as hereinafter described, defined in the appended claims and illustrated in preferred embodiments in the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 is a sectional plan view of the corner portion of a plastered wall, with the improved corner bead being mounted thereon in accordance with the principles of the invention.

FIG. 2 is an isometric view of the lower portion of an external corner of a plastered wall of a construction such as that shown at FIG. 1, but on a reduced scale, and with the corner bead being struck by a hand truck to depict a common type of accident.

FIG. 3 is an isometric sectional view of a short portion of the corner bead per se.

FIG. 4 is an exploded isometric sectional view of a short portion of the corner bead and of retaining devices at each side of the corner bead.

FIG. 5 is a fragmentary side elevational view of the bottom of a wall section, as taken substantially from the indicated arrow 5 at FIG.'2 but illustrating a construction using a recessed baseboard.

FIG. 6 is a fragmentary sectional detail as taken from the indicated line 6-6 at FIG. 5, but on an enlarged scale.

FIG. 7 is a sectional view of an end portion of a plastered wall which is capped with a modified form of the improved corner bead, which will be hereinafter referred to as a wall-end cap.

FIG. 8 is an isometric view of a retainer clip used with the wall-end cap shown in FIG. 7.

FIG. 9 is a fragmentary perspective view of the wallend cap installation shown at FIG. 7, but before the wall is plastered and using a dilfernt type of retainer clip, as indicated in broken lines.

FIG. 10 is an isometric view of the retainer clip per se, depicted in the showing at FIG. 9.

FIG. 11 is a fragmentary isometric view of a corner portion of a masonry wall which is to be finished with plaster, using the improved corner bead and illustrating further, another type of clip for holding the corner bad in place.

FIG. 12 is a plan view of another form of clip which may be used in lieu of the clip shown at FIG. 11.

Referring more particularly to the drawing, FIGS. 1

to 6 illustrate the improved corner bead B as being mounted upon the external corner of a plastered wall P by securing the corner bead to the corner studs S of the wall sections. As such, the corner bead B is an elongated member of uniform cross section, having a length corresponding to the height of the wall whereon it is mounted or a lesser height such as chair rail height.

In cross section, its corner bead has the appearance of a partially folded member. It may have a thickness of approximately one-eighth inch or less if desired, and is formed as two leg portions which are 90 degrees apart. These leg portions are preferably symmetrical with respect to a vertical, longitudinal intermediate reference plane which would appear as a line X at FIG. 1. Each leg portion includes an elongated face strip 20 which is approximately two inches wide and which has a finished outer surface which may be adapted to lie in the plane of the finished surface of the corresponding wall section, as indicated by the line W at FIG. 1. These face strips 20 converge towards a common corner point, but they merge together at this central portion of the unit by 90- degree arcuate segment 21 having a radius of approximately on inch. This arcuate segment eliminates a sharp corner construction which is formed by some types of metal corner beads and is better adapted to yield to a blow by a heavy object. Arcuate segment 21 may, obviously, be provided with a greater or lesser radius of curvature and may be used with corners which are not right angles.

A narrow, inturned otfset 22 is formed at the outward edge 23 of each face strip 20, and a mounting flange or edge portion 24 extends outwardly from the inner edge 25 of each offset 22 to lie in spaced parallelism with the adjacent face strip 20. When this corner bead is used in a plastered wall construction, as illustrated, the mounting flanges 24 lie against the studs S, and the width of the offsets 22 may be such that the face strips 20 will lie at the plane of the finished wall surfaces W, as illustrated. In plaster-wall constructions, this width will ordinarily be approximately inch if coplanar strip and wall surface configurations are desired.

This corner bead B may be formed of any suitable fiber-reinforced, tough but resilient, synthetic resin and is preferably, a good quality polyester type of resin reinforced with glass fibers. Such reinforced resins, commercially available under the trademark Fiberglas, are very tough, strong and resilient and are thus used in the manufacture of boat hulls and the like. Materials having these qualities are ideal for the improved corner beads. The techniques of forming these and other similar plastics into finished articles are well known to the art, and in the present invention, the corner beads B are preferably formed in female molds which produce a very fine finished outer surface on the corner bead structure. Such a surface may be smooth or may be textured to any desired pattern. For example, a comparatively flat surface presenting a rippled beaded pattern, has been found to be quite acceptable to the trade. Because such techniques of forming the improved corner bead are common to many similar articles of manufacture, they need not be described further. As will be apparent, however, other known or suitable resilient materials having the property of substantially full elastic recovery from accidental deformation may be selected in accordance with the choice of the user or manufacturer.

The corner bead may be mounted on the studs of a wall corner by simply nailing the flanges 24 in place. Plaster stops 30 may then be fitted over the mounting flanges 24 and the wall finished. However, a preferred mode of installation provides for mounting the corner bead flanges 24 in sockets 32 to provide a floating fit of the corner bead upon the wall studs. Thus, whenever the corner bead is struck y a heavy j he sockets permit the head to flex and slide without causing plaster to spall. That is, the fact the flanges 24 are slidable within their associated sockets or rscesses, in addition to the resilient nature of the bead or strip B, allows flexure of the bead or strip toward the underlying wall members S upon accidental impacting and subsequent returning of the bead or strip to its initial disposition, the flanges 24 initially sliding further into their sockets and then returnng again following impacting. The sockets may be formed by retainer strips R, narrow metallic strips which are stood alongside a stud and secured thereto by nails 34. Each retainer strip R is formed with a central longitudinal offset 35 so that the socket 32 is formed by an overhanging side 36 and the other side 37 is nailed to the surface of the stud.

Accordingly, in the preparation of a finished plaster wall in the desired manner, the corner bead B is placed upon an external corner and while held in position, the retainer strips R are nailed into place and may leave a gap G of, for example, from one-fourth to three-eighths inch between the edge of the overhanging side 32 and the offset 22 of the bead. Next, the plaster stops 30 are fastened to the studs by overlaying the retainer strips and are secured by nails in a manner not shown. Finally, the lath and plaster are applied to provide for the finished wall surface as illustrated.

In the construction illustrated, it is to be noted that the flanges 24 are not completely inserted into the sockets formed by the retainer strips R to provide for the gap G. Likewise, the plaster stops 30 are preferably placed over the retainer strips R in such a manner as to have their ends flush with the edges of the retainer strips, as illustrated, to maintain the spacing formed by the gap G. With this arrangement, the desirable movement of the corner bead can easily occur.

A number of variations are possible in the manner in which this improved corner bead may be installed in different types of walls, as by nailing as heretofore mentioned. Preferably, however, slots 32 for retaining the flanges 24 will be provided. FIG. 4, an exploded fragmentary view, includes a section of a corner bead B and a retainer R at one side thereof. Also, the figure shows a portion of a ceramic tile T having a slot 32a cut in its end. This slot will be cut in all of the end tiles to extend from the bottom to the top of the wall to receive the entire flange of the corner bead.

The construction illustrated at FIGS. 5 and 6 depicts a wall structure having a recessed base. This is used in the finished structure with the main finished wall portion overhanging the baseboard. Whenever a corner bead B is mounted in a wall of this type, it will necessarily be terminated at the bottom of the wall portion above the baseboard. When, however, it is mounted into sockets, as described, it will be necessary to restrain it against sliding and dropping downwardly. Such may be easily accomplished with an inturned end 38 of the bottom of the retainer R as illustrated at FIG. 6.

A modified embodiment of the invention is illustrated at FIGS. 7 to 10 and this embodiment provides for a wall-end cap C. Such a cap is used to protect an end of a wall section which forms a partial division of a room or the edge of an open archway and any other wall edge where it is not desirable or necessary to mount a door jamb. As in the case of an external corner, the end of a wall section is often subjected to considerable abuse, especially if the wall is located in a hallway system of a building where a substantial portion of the trafiic is with hand carts. Conventionally, the end of a wall is finished with a pair of corner beads if the wall is to be plastered, or with a special section of tile if it is to be masonry. The present invention contemplates in lieu of these units, the single protective end cap C made of tough, strong, and resilient plastic in substantially the same manner as that heretofore described.

In cross section, this wall-end cap C has the appearance of a folded member formed as two parallel leg portions. This member is symmetrical with respect to the vertical, longitudinal plane of the wall which appears as a line Y at FIG. 7. In contrast with the corner bead B, the fold of 180 degrees requires an elongated end surface 40 at the center of the cap which lies normal to the plane of the wall whereon the cap is mounted. The width of this surface 40 is sufiicient to permit the cap to correspond with the thickness of the finished wall as described. A 90 degree arcuate segment 21a is shown at each side of this section 40. This segment 21a is illustrated as having a radius selected at approximately one inch to provide for rounded corners at the end of the wall and to merge with side segments a at each side of the cap, whose surfaces lie flush with the surfaces W of the opposite sides of the wall. To complete this end cap in the same manner as the corner bead, a narrow, inturned offset 22a is formed at the outward edge 23a of each segment 20:: and a mounting flange 24a extends outwardly from the inner edge 25a of each offset 22a to lie in spaced parallelism with the adjacent face strip 20a and in spaced parallelism with the opposing flange 24a as illustrated.

In mounting the wall-end cap C onto a stud wall such as illustrated at FIG. 7, the flanges 24a embrace the opposite faces of the terminal stud S of the wall frame to place the side faces 20a outwardly therefrom flush with the finished wall surface W.

In holding the end cap C, it is preferred that the mounting flanges 24a be carried in sockets 32, formed by retainer strips R, the same as heretofore described. These strips R are nailed to the opposite faces of the stud wall. However, in contrast with the construction illustrated at FIG. 1, the parallel flanges 24a of the wall-end cap can easily slide out of the sockets 32 unless another means for retaining the wall-end cap is provided.

Accordingly, the arrangement shown at FIG. 7 includes a stop member or clip 41 within the end cap C. This clip, as shown at FIG. 8, is formed as a flat, U- shaped, folded strip of sheet metal. Its flat, central base 42 carries a short upstanding leg 43 and each leg includes an inturned offset 44 and an ear 45 extending from the inner edge of the offset. This U-shaped member is proportioned to fit within the end cap C with the ears 45 being adapted to embrace and lie against the opposite sides of the terminal stud S of the wall. The flanges 24a of the cap then overlie these ears. The offsets 44 are adapted to lie against or engage the end cap offsets 22a to prevent the end cap from moving outwardly from the sockets 32. The legs 43 lie between the opposing face strips 20a while the base portion 42 connecting the opposing legs, functions to reinforce the other portions of the clip 41.

It is contemplated that a number of these clips 41 will be fastened to a terminal stud as by nails 46 being driven through holes 47 provided in the ears. Also, that this will be the first step in mounting an end cap C onto the stud wall. The clips are slipped into position in the cap, pulled tightly against the terminal stud and nailed. Next, the retainers R will be nailed in position over the flanges 24a of the end cap and at a location which will provide for a suitable gap G between the ends of the flange and the offset 22a of the end cap with the end cap bearing against the offsets 44 of the clips 41. Next, a plaster stop will be mounted upon each wall to overlie the retainer strips R to maintain the gap G as heretofore described. The final step is to apply the lath and plaster.

FIG. 9 illustrates isometrically, a partially completed wall-end where end cap and retainer strips have been applied and the wall section is ready for the plaster stop and lath and plaster. In that figure, however, a modified retainer clip 51 is provided. This clip is formed as a U-shaped body 52 which is adapted to snugly embrace the end of the stud and to be nailed thereto, with holes 53 on the sides being provided therefor. A ledge 54 is folded outwardly from this clip and it has a width sufficient to snugly lie between the opposing face strips 20a and with its inner corners 55 contacting the inner sides of the offsets 22a to prevent the end cap C from being pulled away from the stud.

A further modification of the invention is illustrated at FIG. 11 where a corner bead B is secured to a masonry wall of the type which is to be finished by plastering. The corner bead B is held by triangular clips 61, proportioned in such a manner as to have opposing corners 62 fit within the embrace of the face strips 20 and against the olfsets 22. These triangular clips are placed between the joints of the masonry during erection of the wall. They will have suitable holes 63 in their face to permit them to be better gripped by the mortar when the masonry, bricks or cinder blocks are laid up as in the manner illustrated.

The corner guard may be placed simultaneously with the erection of the masonry, while anchors 61 or 64 are slipped down and placed in mortar joints. Thereafter, retainer strips R may be applied, or if necessary, it is possible to use a plaster stop 30 without the strips by laying the end of the stop directly over the flange 24 as in the manner illustrated.

FIG. 12 illustrates a masonry clip 71 which may be used in lieu of the clip 61. This masonry clip is formed as a piece of flat sheet metal with a head portion having opposing corners 72 which will fit within the embrace of the face strips 20 and against offsets 22 of a corner bead B. This clip is provided with a tongue portion 73 having suitable holes 74 to permit it to be better gripped by the mortar between bricks or cinder 'blocks when the masonry wall is being laid.

It is quite apparent from the foregoing description that a similar retainer strip can be provided for a wall-end cap. Such a unit can be made as a simple clip formed similar to the unit illustrated at FIG. 10, but in lieu of the body 52, a flat plate 56 shown in broken lines may be formed which can lie between the courses of masonry with the ledge 54 projecting therefrom to hold the clips in place.

Whereas the apparatus and arrangements discussed hereinabove and illustrated in the accompanying drawings represent preferred forms of the invention, modifications and alterations may be made within the spirit and scope of the invention as defined in the appended claims. For example, while one material suitable for the formation of the bead or resilient member has been disclosed in detail, further suitable material of known resilience, toughness and other qualities will become apparent to those skilled in the art and may successfully be employed in the formation of the elongate bead or resilient member without departure from the invention.

I claim:

1. A protected portion of a structure located where the structure normally is vulnerable to abuse by external impacting including an underlying structural part located at the vulnerable portion, a resilient member having a first portion located in spaced relation to the underlying part, an outer surface on the first portion exposed to the external impacting, and means retaining the resilient member movably in place with respect to the underlying part, the resilient member having a second portion which is engaged by the retaining means to retain the resilient member in place and which is movable with respect to the retaining means and to the underlying structural part during flexure of the resilient member.

2. A protected portion of a structure located where the structure normally is vulnerable to abuse by external impacting including an underlying structural part located at the vulnerable portion, a resilient member having a portion located in spaced relation to the underlying structural part and providing an exposed impact protecting surface, and means retaining the resilient member movably in place with respect to the underlying part, the re- 7 taining means comprising recess defining means receiving an edge portion of the resilient member for movement of the edge portion within the recess defining means upon impacting of the resilient member.

3. An impact obsorbing protector arrangement including a resilient member having a portion for location in spaced relation to an underlying protected member, and means for retaining the resilient member movably in place with respect to the underlying member, the retaining means including a retainer member having an integral mounting portion for securing the retainer member upon a supporting wall part and a further integral portion extending away from the mounting portion to define a retain ing recess between the further integral portion and the supporting wall part, said resilient member having an edge portion slidably received within said retaining recess.

4. A protected portion of a structure located where the structure normally is vulnerable to abuse by external impacting including an underlying structural part located at the vulnerable portion, a resilient member having a portion located in spaced relation to the underlying structural part, and means retaining the resilient member movably in place with respect to the underlying part, the resilient member spaced portion defining an exposed surface protecting the supporting structure from marrying and deterioration by impacting, the resilient member being flexible inwardly toward the underlying part upon impacting thereof and being resiliently returnable following impacting, and wherein the resilient member includes an edge portion which is engageable by the retaining means and is slidable with respect thereto during fiexure and return of the resilient member.

5. An impact absorbing protector arrangement including a resilient member having a portion for location in spaced relation to an underlying wall member, and means for retaining the resilient member movably in place with respect to the underlying member, the resilient member including first and second edge portions each slidably retained in proximity to a wall part by the retaining means, and wherein the portion of the resilient member for location in spaced relation to the underlying wall member comprises a central portion intermediate the edge portions, supported outwardly with respect thereto, and shaped in conformity with the underlying wall member to extend at least partly around the underlying wall member in spaced relation thereto, said central portion being inwardly flexible upon impacting and resiliently returnable following impacting to cause movement of the first and second edge portions during fiexure and return of the central portion.

6. An impact absorbing protector arrangement including a resilient member having a first portion for location in spaced relation to an underlying protected member, and means for retaining the resilient member movably in place with respect to the underlying member, the resilient member having a second portion which is engageable by the retaining means to retain the resilient member means and to the protected member during fiexure of the resilient member, the resilient member spaced portion comprising joined, angularly disposed sections for extension about a corner, the resilient member second portion comprising at least one edge portion retained by the retaining means, and the resilient member further comprising an offset section angularly disposed with respect to the edge portion and supporting the joined sections for spaced relation to the underlying member.

7. The arrangement according to claim 6 further including stop means for contacting the olfset section to prevent movement of the edge portion out of association with the means for retaining.

8. An impact absorbing protector arrangement for application to a wall end, including a resilient member having a first portion for location in spaced relation to an underlying protected member, and means for retaining the resilient member movably in place with respect to the underlying member, the resilient member having a second portion which is engageable by the retaining means to retain the resilient member in place and which is movable with respect to the retaining means and to the protected member during fiexure of the resilient member, the spaced portion including first and second side sections for location on opposite sides of a wall end and a connecting portion spanning the first and second side sections.

9. The arrangement according to claim 8 in which the resilient member further includes first and second edge portions retained on the opposite sides of the wall end by the retaining means and first and second resilient member offset sections angularly disposed with respect to the first and second edge portions, respectively, and supporting the first and second side sections and connecting portion in spaced relation to the Wall end.

10. The arrangement according to claim 9 further including stop means for contacting the first and second ofiset sections to prevent movement of the edge portions out of association with the means for retaining.

11. The arrangement according to claim 1 further including stop means for contacting the resilient member to limit movement of the resilient member with respect to the retaining means.

12. An impact absorbing protector arrangement including a resilient member having a first portion for location in spaced relation to an underlying protected member, and means for retaining the resilient member movably in place with respect to the underlying member, stop means for contacting the resilient member to limit movement of the resilient member with respect to the retaining means, the resilient member having a second portion which is engageable by the retaining means to retain the resilient member in place and which is movable with respect to the retaining means and to the protected member during fiexure of the resilient member, the resilient member spaced portion being a central portion of the resilient member, said stop means having a mounting for locating the stop means beneath the central portion to interiorly contact the resilient member to limit movement thereof.

13. The arrangement according to claim 1 for employment with an underlying wall member, wherein the resilient member includes at least one edge portion retained by the retaining means, the retaining means including a wall panel supported adjacent the resilient member and means defining recesses at edges of the wall panel for receiving the resilient member edge portion for movement therein intermediate an outer surface of the Wall panel and an underlying wall part.

14. An impact absorbing protector arrangement including a resilient member having a first portion for location in spaced relation to an underlying wall member, and means for retaining the resilient member movably in place with respect to the underlying member, the resilient member having a second portion which is engageable by the retaining means to retain the resilient member in place and which is movable with respect to the retaining means and to the underlying Wall member during fiexure of the resilient member, the resilient member second portion including at least one edge portion retained by the retaining means, the retaining means including a wall panel supported adjacent the resilient member and means defining recesses at edges of the wall panel for receiving the re silient member edge portions for movement therein intermediate an outer surface of the wall panel and an underlying wall part, the wall panel including a plaster stop overlying the recesses at edges of the wall panel.

15. A protector arrangement for application to and protection of an underlying member and including a protective member having a central portion for support in spaced relation to the underlying member, and at least one edge portion terminating the protective member at one side thereof; means for retaining the edge portion of the resilient member to maintain the resilient member in protective association with the underlying member; and stop means located between the central portion and underlying member for contacting the protective member and preventing movement of the edge portion out of associationw ith the retaining means.

16. The arrangement according to claim 15' wherein the central portion of the protective member is supported outwardly of the edge portion to define a space between the central portion and the underlying member, and the stop means includes means located within said space for abutting the protective member upon movement of the edge portion toward said space.

17. The arrangement according to claim 16, wherein the stop means includes mounting means for securing the stop means to the underlying member, and means extending away from the mounting means for contacting the protective member.

18. The arrangement according to claim 17, for employment with an underlying wall end, wherein the mounting means includes first and second parts aflixable to pposite sides of the wall end, the contacting means including shoulders engageable with the protective member adjacent said first and second parts.

19. The arrangement according to claim 18 for employment with an underlying wall member constructed of laid-up wall parts joined by mortar, wherein the mounting means includes means for extension into the mortar between adjacent wall parts.

20. An impact absorbing wall protective member for use in a protector arrangement with wall mounted retainers engageable with edges of the protective member to retain the member in place while permitting movement of the edges with respect to the retainers and an underlying wall part; the protective member being of tough, resilient, dent resistant synthetic plastic and including edge mounting portions for retention by the retainers to be supported adjacent underlying wall parts, and an outwardly protruding central protecting portion to be supported in spaced relation to an underlying, protected wall part, the central portion being normally exposed to external impacting forces of a magnitude sufiicient to damage an unprotected wall part, being flexible when impacted externally to absorb forces applied thereto and being substantially fully elastically recoverable after impacting to assume the initial disposition thereof, the edge portion being connected with the central portion for movement upon flexure and recovery of the central portion during and following impacting to facilitate said flexure and recovery, thereby aiding the absorption of forces applied to the central portion and enhancing the abuse resistant nature of the protective member.

21. The protective member according to claim 20, wherein the edge portions define flange means for aiding flexure and recovery of the central portion, the flange means being slidable on surfaces during flexure and return of the central portion.

22. The protective member according to claim 21, wherein the flange means extend away from the central portion and are slidable away from the central protion upon flexure of the central portion during impacting and toward the central portion upon recovery of the central portion following impacting.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,127,329 2/1915 Wegenka 16-85 2,686,943 8/1954 Kunkel 49-470X 2,138,470 11/1938 Bischof 52255X 2,796,641 1/1957 Wollaeger 52-255 3,255,561 6/1966 Cable 52-288X 3,293,815 12/1966 Waldron 52-287 3,391,509 7/1968 Fruman 52 255X 3,415,019 12/1968 Andersen 52 288X PRICE 0. FAW, JR., Primary Examiner US. Cl. X.R.

mg UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION PatentNo. 3,559,356 Dated February 2, 1971 lnv nt fl Ephraim Koral It is certified that error appears in the above-identified patent and that said Letters Patent are hereby corrected as shown below:

Column 2, line 58, "in" should be at line 69 "bad" should be bead Column 3, line 24, "on" should be one Column 4, line 3, "rscesses" should be recesses line 9 "ng" should be ing Column 5, line 11, after "shown" insert formed Column 7, line 5, "obsorbing" should be absorbing line 26, "marrying" should be marring line 58, after "member" insert in place and which is movable with respect to the retaining Column 9 line 5, "tionw ith" should be tion with Column 10, line 19 "protion" should be portion Column 10, line 30 after "2,796 ,641" should be 6/1957 Signed and sealed this 28th day of March 1 972.

(SEAL) Attest:

EDWARD M.FLETCHER,JR. ROBERT GOTTSCHALK Attesting Officer Commissioner of Patents

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Classifications
U.S. Classification52/254, 52/288.1, 248/345.1, 52/309.1
International ClassificationE04B1/98, E04F19/02
Cooperative ClassificationE04F19/028
European ClassificationE04F19/02D2