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Publication numberUS3559446 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 2, 1971
Filing dateMar 29, 1968
Priority dateMar 29, 1968
Also published asDE1907787A1, DE1966879A1, DE1966879B2, DE1966879C3, DE1966880A1, DE1966880B2, DE1966880C3
Publication numberUS 3559446 A, US 3559446A, US-A-3559446, US3559446 A, US3559446A
InventorsAllebach Gene E, Dom Harry A
Original AssigneeNat Machinery Co The
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Forging machine
US 3559446 A
Abstract  available in
Images(7)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

7 Sheets-Sheet 1 H. A'. DOM ETAL FORGING MACHINE M m m W MOE 1x7 n0/ M |l\ n. MM d, Illll L, l m llup Y WWW,... f w .1 M W. ,4 IH M 4 ,N w a M A d. 2 //l i l w, f .J. Mi

Feb 2,1971

` Filed March 29, 1968 ArroA/ys rgb. 2, 1971 A. 50M m FORGING MACHINE y' Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed March 29,'A 196s d 6cm/5 f. A145540/ H. A.jpoM ETAL 3,559,446

Feb. 2, 1971 FORGING vMACHINE Filed Marci; 29, 196e; f

FORGING MACHINE Filed March 29. 196s l 7 sheets-sheet 7 INVI-SNTORS HAP/QV 4. aar-4, Bg 654/5 f. 440/ United States Patent O 3,559,446 FORGING MACHINE Harry A. Dom and Gene E. Allebach, Tliin, Ohio, as-

signors to The National Machinery Company, Tifiin, Ohio, a corporation of Ohio Filed Mar. 29, 1968, Ser. No. 717,264 Int. Cl. B21d 28/00, 4 5/00,- B21j 9/00, 13/02, 13/04;

B21k 1/48 U.S. Cl. 72--337 14 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A five station progressive cold former is disclosed which is arranged to permit relatively quick toolchangeover. The die breast, the bolster plate and the shear elements are removably clamped in the machine by hydraulically-operated clamp actuators. A knockout mechanism is provided with a cam drive which includes cam sectors that can be removed and replaced without material disassembly of the cam drive. An adjustable tube nut is threaded into the machine to adjustably determine the rearward position` of the knockout mechanism. Power means are provided for the adjustment of the tube nuts. The separate fixtures are provided to permit installation of tooling and rough adjustment thereof on a die breast and bolster assembly separate from the machine. The machine is arranged so that a tooling change can be accomplished before the machine cools to environmental temperature so that warm-up adjustment requirements are minimized.

BACKGROUND OF INVENTION This invention relates generally to forging machines and more particularly to an automatic forging machine provided with means to facilitate the changing of the toolmg.

As used herein, the term automatic forging machine is intended to include the various types of forging machines which automatically operate to form slugs of stock in one or more die stations. In most instances such machines also include automatic shear means which cut the slugs of stock from rod or wire stock. Examples of the machines of the type contemplated by the term automatic forging machines are progressive formers, progressive headers, machines for making bolts and nuts, and multiple stroke machines such as double blow headers or the like.

PRIOR ART In the past considerable time and effort has been required to change the tooling of an automatic forging machine. Generally a tooling changeover has been accomplished by individually removing the elements of one set of tools from the machine and then individually installing the elements of the new set of tooling. The rough and nal adjustment of the tooling has been performed in the machine itself and in general it has been necessary to readjust the tooling as the machine warms up to a stable operating temperature.

A tooling changeover in the past has required that a machine be shut down for the entire retooling operation. Since the down time required for retooling has been relatively long, particularly in larger machines, it has been the practice to run a given machine as long as possible in the production'of a single part. Further, it has not been considered economically feasible to manufacture some parts not required in large quantities in automatic forging machines, since the time and expenses involved in retooling was too great.

SUMMARY OF INVENTION An automatic forging machine incorporating 'this invention is arranged so that the machine down time required to completely change the tooling is substantially reduced. For example, va complete tooling change of a 1% cold former required, according to past practices, about three days while working a full three shifts a day. A similar tool change in a similar size machine incorporating this invention can be accomplished in about two shifts or 16 hours.

This drastic reduction in the down time required for a tool change now makes it economically feasible to use an automatic forging machine in accordance with this invention for the manufacture of many additional parts which were, in the past, not considered economically feasible for such manufacturing procedures. Further, the tooling change can be accomplished quickly, before the machine has had time to cool completely. This reduces the difficulties encountered during initial operation of the machine when warm-up adjustments are required. Further, the quality of the parts being manufactured is improved since machine warm-up is not required to the same extent as in the past.

In the illustrated embodiment of this invention the progressive cold `former isl provided with power-operated means to releasably clamp the die breast, the bolster plate, and the shear mechanism. In this machine the tooling can be installed on an extra bolster plate assembly and die breast mountedin a fixture separate from the machine. Therefore, the initial set-up of the tooling in the die breast and on the bolster plate can be performed while the machine continues to operate with a previous tooling.

When the changeover is required, the die breast and the bolster plate are unclamped and removed as units from the machine with their tooling mounted thereon. The replacement die breast and bolster plate assembly are then installed in the machine with the tooling already mounted thereon. The bolster plate and the die breast are then clamped in position by the power clamping means.

The transfer is also removable from the machine. Here again the transfer may be adjusted separately from the machine in a xture and then may be installed on the machine as a subassembly.

The shear mechanism includes power clamping means for releasably clamping the quill and the cutter plate. Therefore, it is a simple matter to remove and replace these shear elements. In very large machines the clamping of the shear quill has been very diiiicult to perform manually. Therefore, the power clamping greatly reduces the time and eifort required for replacing a shear quill.

The illustrated embodiment of this invention also provides removable cam sectors in the knockout drive so that it is not necessary to disassemble the entire knockout drive mechanism in order to change the cams installed therein. Still further, power means are provided to adjust the knockout pin back-up elements.

All of these various features cooperate to provide a machine in which the tooling can be changed in a relatively short period of time and wherein the warm-up difficulties encountered in the initial manufacture with new tooling are greatly reduced.

OBI ECTS OF INVENTION It is an important object of this invention to provide a novel and improved automatic forging machine arranged to permit relatively rapid tool changes.

It is another object of this invention to provide a novel and improved automatic forging machine according to the preceding object arranged so that separate fixtures may be used to facilitate the initial mounting and adjusting of the tools on the die breast and bolster plate.

It is still another object of this invention to provide a novel and improved automatic forging machine according to either of the preceding objects wherein power clamping means are provided to releasably clamp the bolster plate, the die breast, and the shear mechanism in the machine.

It is still another object of this invention to provide a novel and improved automatic forging machine according to any of the preceding objects wherein the changing of the knockout cam drive can be accomplished without disassembling the entire mechanism and wherein the adjustment of the knockout system can be easily accomplished with power means.

It is still another object of this invention to provide novel and improved quill and shear clamping means.

Further objects and advantages will appear from the following description and drawings wherein:

FIG. l is a perspective fragmentary view illustrating a fixture for use in the installation of the tooling on the die breast and bolster plate;

FIG. 2 is a fragmentary perspective view of a fixture for supporting a transfer assembly with the transfer assembly mounted thereon;

FI'G. 3 is a fragmentary plan view of a machine incorporating this invention illustrating the mechanism for relcasably clamping the die breast in the machine frame;

FIG. 4 is a front elevation of the die breast area illustrated in FIG. 3;

FIG. 5 is an enlarged fragmentary section taken generally along 5-5 of FIG. 4;

FIG. 6 is a fragmentary front elevation of a bolster plate in position on the slide of the machine with one bolster removed for purposes of illustration;

FIG. 7 is a side elevation, partially in section, of the bolster plate structure illustrated in FIG. 6;

FIG. 7a is a fragmentary section taken along 7a-7a of FIG. 7;

FIG 8 is a fragmentary section of the clamping mechanism for relcasably clamping the shear quill in the die breast;

FIG. 9 is a fragmentary section taken along 9-9 of FIG. 8;

FIG. 10 is a fragmentary section taken along 10-10 of FIG. 8;

FIG. 11 is a perspective view of the fulcrum pin of the clamping mechanism of FIGS. 8 and 9;

FIG. l2 is a fragmentary perspective view of the cutter part of the shear illustrating the structure for relcasably clamping the cutter plate in position;

FIG. 13 is a plan view, partially in section, of the cutter illustrated in FIG. 12;

FIG. 14 is a fragmentary side elevation, partially in section, illustrating the knockout drive mechanism with its removable cam sectors;

FIG. 15 is a fragmentary end -view of the machine illustrating the knockout adjustment mechanism; and,

FIG. 16 is a fragmentary section taken generally along 16-16 of FIG. 15 illustrating the power drive for the knockout adjustment.

The illustrated embodiment of the present invention is a five station progressive cold former. In this machine rod stock feeds into the machine through feed rolls to a shear which automatically operates to cut the stock into slugs or blanks of uniform length. Automatic transfer devices operate to progressively transfer the sheared blanks to each of the give working stations wherein the blank is progressively formed to final shape.

The particular progressive cold former illustrated is an 1% cold former. The machine includes a base frame with a die breast mounted therein. A slide is reciprocated by a crank and pitman drive toward and away from the breast. The transfer is powered in timed relation to the operation of the slide by a connection from the main crankshaft of the machine. Since the general arrangement of a progressive cold former of this type is well known, the overall machine has not been illustrated in order to simplify the understanding of this application. Since the tooling per se forms no part of the invention, the tooling is also not illustrated.

FIXTURES FOR INITIAL TOOLING INSTALLA- TION AND ADJ'USTMENTS FIGS. l and 2 illustrate fixtures which may be used for the initial set-up of tooling. In FIG. 1 the fixture 10 includes a die breast support 11 adapted to receive and support a die breast 12 in a predetermined position with respect to the fixture. A bolster plate support 13 is mounted on a pair of guide rods 14 so that it can slide back and forth toward and away from the die breast support `11 and a die breast 12 mounted thereon. The bolster plate support is adapted to support a bolster plate 16 in a predetermined position with respect thereto.

The relative positions of the die breast 12 and bolster plate 16 in the fixture 10 corresponds to the relative positions therebetween when they are mounted in the machine. Further by moving the bolster plate support 13 back and forth along the rods 14, it is possible to move the bolster plate toward and away from the die breast 12 in a `manner corresponding to a similar movement in the machine itself. With this fixture it is possible to perform the initial set-up of the tooling on the die breast 12 and bolster plate 16 while they are mounted in the fixture 10. Since the fixture 10 is separate from the machine this work can be done on an extra die breast and an extra bolster while the machine continues to operate with the previous tooling. In most cases the tooling adjustment can be performed with sufficient accuracy on the fixture 10 to eliminate all but a final adjustment of the tooling prior to operation and the adjustment of the tooling required during the warm-up of the tooling and the machine.

FIG. 2 illustrates a transfer assembly 17 mounted on a fixture 1'8. The fixture is provided with five blank positions 19 which correspond to the die stations in the five station machine. Although the blanks illustrated at 19 are all the same, appropriate blanks which correspond to the tooling involved are normally mounted in the positions illustrated.

The transfer assembly includes five pairs of gripping transfer fingers 21 which operate to grip a blank at a work station and move it to the subsequent working station. The transfer fingers 21 are mounted on a laterally movable slide 22 and pneumatic springs 23 are connected between each pair of transfer fingers to resiliently urge the fingers toward their gripping position. Each of the pneumatic springs 23 is connected through a pressure line 24 to a header 26. The spring 23a is preferably double-acting so it can be operated to release the associated fingers. Therefore, this spring is provided with an extra pressure line 27 and a valve 28 to connect it with the header 26. Here again the adjustment of the transfer may be accomplished in the fixture 18 so that only the final adjustment need be made in the machine itself.

DIE BREAST MOUNTING FIGS. 3 through 5 illustrate the structure for relcasably clamping the die breast 12 in the frame 31 of the machine. The frame 31 is formed with a die breast shelf 32 extending between the two sides of the frame. The shelf 32 provides an upper surface 33 which engages and supports the lower surface 34 of the die breast 12.

The left end of the frame as viewed in FIGS. 3 and 4 is provided with a diagonally extending end face 36 which is adapted to engage a shim 37 mounted on the end of the die breast 12 to laterally locate the die breast in the machine. Normally more than one die breast is provided for a given machine and each die breast is provided with a shim which is accurately fitted to properly position the associated die breast with respect to the frame of the machine.

Positioned behind the die breast 12 is a back-up plate 38 which extends between the rearward face 39 of the die breast 12 and a vertical back-up surface 41 formed in the frame 31.

Four separate power-operated clamping asemblies are provided to releasably lock the die breast 12 in the frame 31. Lateral positioning of the die breast is provided by a wedge 42 which is adapted to fit between a wall 43 on the frame 31 and a mating camming surface 44 on the end of the die breast 12 opposite the shim 37. An actuator 46 is provided to operate the wedge 42. The actuator v46 includes a cylinder 47 mounted on the frame 31 and a double-acting piston 48 in the cylinder 47. The piston 48 is connected through a tie rod 49 and a sleeve 51 to the wedge 42.

When the actuator 46 is pressurized to retract the piston 48, the tie rod 49 is placed in tension and pulls the Wedge 42 back until it is properly seated. When release of the wedge is required, the piston 48 is pressurized to move in an extending direction and through the tubeSl pushes the wedge free of its locked position. The wedge 42 and the end face 36 cooperate to provide endwise location of the die breast and also cooperate to urge the ends of the die breast back toward the back-up plate 38.

The die breast 12 is tightly clamped against the backup plate 38 intermediate its ends by a pair of similar clamping actuators 52a and 52b. Since the actuators 52a and 52b are identical in structure, only the structure of the actuator 52b will be described in detail. The actuator 52b includes a cylinder 53 and a single-acting piston 54 connected through a piston rod 56 to a clamp plate 57. The clamp plate 57 extends between the forward face of the die breast shelf 32 and the adjacent forward face of the die breast 12, as best illustrated in FIG. 4. When the two cylinders 52a and 52b are pressurized, the clamp plates 57 operate to press the die breast 12 toward the back-up plate 38.

- The die breast 12, therefore, is held in the clamped position against the back-up plate at its ends and at two locations intermediate its ends. Since the working forces during forging operation tend to urge the die breast toward the back-up plate 38, excessive clamping is not required to clamp the die breast in this direction. Release of the clamping plates 57 is accomplished by relieving the pressure in the actuators 52a and 52b. A spring 58 normally urges the pistons 54 toward the clamp release position.

A plurality of clamping actuators are provided to hold the die breast 12 down against the die breast shelf 32. It is preferable to provide a group of clamping actuators for this purpose so that the die breast and the die breast shelf are clamped in intimate contact. With such clamping increased stiffness is provided since the shelf and die breast each augment the stiffness of the other.

The vertical clamping is provided by five clamping actuators 61 through 65. The actuators 61 through 65 are mounted on a plate 66 beneath the die breast shelf 32 in a pattern best illustrated in FIG. 3. In this pattern three of the actuators 61, 63, and 65 are located adjacent to the forward face of the die breast and two actuators 62 and 64 are located adjacent the rearward face. Each of the actuators 61 through 65 includes a piston 67 having a clevis 68 secured to its upper end. The pistons 67 are double-acting and can be extended until the associated clevis 68 projects into an associated opening 69 as best illustrated in FIG. 5.

Each clevis 68 is provided with a vertically elongated cross bore 71 adapted to receive an associated lock pin carried in the die breast 12. Similarly lock pins 72 are provided in the die breast 12 in association with the -forward actuators 61, 63, and 65 and similar lock pins 73 are provided for the rearward actuators 62 and 64.

I'he various elements are proportioned so that when the actuators 61 through 65 are extended, the associated clevises 68 are positioned to receive the lock pins 72 or 73 as the case may be. The lock pins 72 and 73 are provided with piston heads 74 and 76, respectively, so that hydraulic uid under pressure canbe admitted to the proper side of the piston heads 74 and 76 to extend the lock pins into the locked position illustrated in FIG. 5. The actuators 61 through 65 are then pressurized to pull down and tightly lock the die breast in position against the shelf 32.

It should be noted that when the lock pins 72 are in the proper lock position of FIG. 5, their end faces 77 are flush with the forward face 78 of the die breast. Similarly proper locked position of the lock pins 73 is indicated by the location of the end face 79 of the projection 81 on the lock pins 73 flush with the end face 78 of the die breast. Thus a visual indication is provided that each of the lock pins is in its proper locked position before the associated actuators 61 through 65 are operated to clamp the die breast. Release of the vertical clamping is provided by first reversing the pressure on the actuators 61 through 65 followed by pressurizing the opposite sides of the pistons 74 and 76 to cause the lock pins to move clear of the associated clevises 68. It should be noted that when the lock pins 72 and 73 are retracted clear of the associated clevises, the end face 77 is spaced back from the die breast face 78 and the end face 79 is spaced forward from the face 78. Additional clamping of the die breast 12 against the shelf 32 is accomplished by the shear clamp which is discussed in detail below.

BOLSTER PLATE MOUNTING ON SLIDE FIGS. 6, 7, and 7a illustrate the clamping means for releasably clamping the bolster assembly on the slide of the machine. The bolster assembly includes the bolster plate 16 and five individual bolsters 86 each of which is adapted to support a tool at one of the die stations.

Each of the holsters 86 is secured to the bolster plate' 16 by four studs with two studs 87 adjacent the upper edge and two studs 88 adjacent the lower edge. 'Ihe central studs are arranged so thateach stud engages two adjacent bolster plates so that only twelve studs are required to secure ve separate bolsters 86 to the bolster plate 16.

The bolster studs 87 are formed with headed extensions 89 (see FIG. 7) which extend rearwardly of the bolster plate 16. When the bolster plate 16 is moved vertically down along the face of a slide '91, the heads 89 of the studs 87 move down along a slot 92 into the slotted end of a lock pin 93. The lock pin 93 is formed with an opening rearwardly of the head 89 proportioned to receive a wedge 94 secured to the piston of a double-acting hydraulic actuator 96. Extension of the actuator 96 causes the Wedge 94 to cam the lock pin 93, to the right as viewed in FIG. 7, to securely lock the upper edge of the bolster plate 16. An adjusting wedge 97 which is vertically adjustable by means of an adjusting screw 98 determines the horizontal position of the tooling carried by the bolster with respect to the slide '91. Vertical adjustment of the wedge 97, therefore, provides adjustment of the forward position of the tooling carried by the bolster. A spring 99 normally urges the lock pin 93 toward the forward position so that retraction of the actuator 96 and lifting of the wedge 94 causes release of the clamping pressure on the head 89.

The locking of the lower edge of the bolster plate 16 is accomplished by a lock pin 101 formed with a head 102 which fits into a T-slot 103 in the bolster plate 16. Here again, a clamping actuator 104 is provided with a wedge 106 connected to its piston and arranged so that extension of the actuator 104 causes the lock pin 101 to be cammed rearwardly for clamping of the lower edge of the bolster plate 16. A spring 107 biases the lock pin 101 toward a released position.

With this clamping structure the bolster plate can be moved downwardly along the face of the slide 91 causing the heads 89 to move into the slots in the lock pins 93 and the heads 102 to be positioned in the slots 103 in the bolster plate 16. After the bolster is positioned the actuators 96 and 104 are extended and the bolster is 75. tightly clamped to the slide. Removal of the bolster assembly can be accomplished by retracting the actuators 96 and 104 followed by vertical lifting of the bolster assembly away from the slide. Suitable locating pins may be provided to accurately position the bolster plate 16 relative to the slide 91.

Adjustment of each bolster 86 with respect to the bolster plate 16 is accomplished by adjusting screws arranged as best illustrated in FIG. 6. There are four adjusting screws 108 located in opposed pairs to engage a pin 109 on the bolster plate 16. These screws provide vertical adjustment of the bolster plate 86 and lateral adjustment of the upper end of the bolster plate. Lateral positioning of the lower end of the bolster plate is accomplished by proper adjustment of opposed adjusting screws 111 which engage opposite sides of a pin 112.

SHEAR QUILL CLAMPING ASSEMBLY A mechanism for clamping the shear quill is illustrated in FIGS. 8 through 11. The shear quill 116 is a tubular element positioned in a semicylindrical groove 117 in the end of the die breast 12, as best illustrated in FIGS. 4 and 8. Positioned over the quill is a cap member 118 which is also formed with a semicylindrical groove 119 proportioned to fit the upper side of the quill 116. A pair of tie bolts 121 and 122 are used to clamp the cap member 118 in position.

The tie bolt 121 is provided with a head 123 which is proportioned to freely pass through the openings 124, 126, and 127 in the cap 118, die breast 12, and die breast shelf 32, respectively. A C washer 128 is removably positioned underneath the head 123 between the head and the cap member 118 so that a downward force on the tie bolt will cause the required clamping action. When the force is removed, the C washer 128 can be removed allowing the removal of the cap 118 and die breast 12 over the heads of the two tie bolts.

An actuation mechanism, best illustrated in FIGS. 8 and 9, is associated with each tie bolt 121 and 122 to provide the clamping tension therein. The actuators include a body 131 secured to the underside of the die breast shelf 32 and provided with a cylinder bore 132 for each actuator. A piston 133 is mounted in each of the cylinder bores 132 and is operable to produce a downward force (as viewed in FIG. 8) when pressurized. -Each of the pistons 133 is connected by a pivot pin 134 to one end of a lever arm 136. The other end of the lever arm 136 is positioned against an associated pivot or fulcrum pin 137. Each of the fulcrum pins 137 is provided with a radial face 138 adapted to be engaged by a mating surface 139 on the arm 136. This arrangement provides a pivot connection for the end of the lever arms 136 opposite the piston 133 and the interengaging surfaces 138 and 139 cooperate to allow slight longitudinal movement of the lever to accommodate the straight line movement of the piston 133.

A cross pin 141 is mounted in each of the lever arms 136 and is provided with a threaded opening 142 which receives the threaded lower end of the associated tie bolt 121 or 122. The pin 141 provides a pivotal action between the tie bolts and the lever arms to minimize bending movements in the bolts.

With this particular arrangement a substantial mechanical advantage is provided so that an extremely large tension force may be produced in the tie bolts for a relatively smaller force produced by the piston 133. Because the shearing forces on the quil are in an upward direction, the tie bolts must be placed under substantial tension, particularly in larger machines. For example, in a 1%" machine each tie bolt is subjected to a force in the order of 285,000 pounds. Therefore, heat treated alloy steel is preferred to form the tie bolts.

The fulcrum pins 137 are notched at 143 to clear the adjacent tie bolts. A release piston 144 is mounted in a cylinder on each arm 136 to produce clockwise movement of the associated arms when the tension in the tie 8 bolts is to be released. The piston 144 is supplied with fluid under pressure through a flexible line 146. This lifts the assembly so that C washer 128 can be engaged or disengaged.

SHEAR PLATE MOUNTING Referring to FIGS. 12 and 13, a shear plate 151 is provided with a shear insert 152 which is positioned in alignment with a shear quill 116 in one position of the shear so that stock may be fed through the quill 116 and insert 152 against a stock gauge (not illustrated). The shear plate 151 is then raised so that a blank is sheared from the stock for subsequent transfer to the working stations. The shear arm is vertically reciprocable in the illustrated embodiment and is driven by a mechanism (not illustrated) connected to the main crank shaft of the machine.

The cutter plate 151 is releasably mounted in the arm 153 by a pair of mounting wedges 154 and 156 positioned on one side of the cutter plate 151. Each of the wedges 154 and 156 is connected to a piston .157 mounted in a cylinder bore 158 in the arm 153. The piston rod extends through a gland 159 and the cylinder 158 is closed by a cap member 161. The actuators for the wedges 156 are preferably double-acting so that retraction of the pistons causes locking of the wedges 154 and 156 and extension of the pistons releases the wedges. 'I'he shear forces on the cutter plate 151 are in a `downward direction which tends to press the lower end 162 of the cutter plate into engagement with a fixed surface 163 on the arm 152. It is, therefore, not necessary to provide excessively tight clamping of the cutter plate in the arm 153.

In order to simplify this disclosure of this invention the hydraulic circuit for the various actuators has not been illustrated. It should be understood, however, that a suitable pump and a 4valved control system should be provided to control the operation of each of the actuators of the various clamping systems. Generally clamping pressure is supplied to all of the clamping actuators the entire time the machine is operating, even to the clamping devices provided with wedges having locking angles, so that vibration cannot cause release of the clamping forces.

KNOCKOUT DRIVE AND ADJUSTMENT FIGS. 14 through r16 illustrate the knockout arrange ment for this machine. A knockout assembly is provided for each die station. The power for the knockouts is provided by an oscillating cam shaft 166 journaled on the end of the frame 31 and connected for oscillating movement by a drive from the -main crank shaft of the machine (not illustrated). Mounted on the cam shaft 166 adjacent to each of the die stations is a cam sector 167 removably mounted on the cam shaft 166. The mounting of the cam sector 167 is accomplished by two bolts 168 and 169. The bolt 169 through a clamp plate 171 presses an interlocking end at 172 into locking engagement. Lateral mounting of the end adjacent to the bolt 169 is provided by the bolt 168. With this arrangement a drive cam sector 167 can be removed and replaced without disassembling the entire cam shaft.

A cam follower 173 is mounted on a rocker arm 174 which is in turn supported on the frame 31 by a pivot shaft 176. The cam follower 173 is removably supported on the rocker 174 by means of a removable plate 177. The plate 177 which supports the cam follower 173 is removably mounted in position by cap screws 178. Adjustment of the cam follower 173 is provided by adjusting bolts 179 and 181. With this arrangement the cam follower 173 can be adjusted with respect to the rocker arm 174 or the entire follower assembly can be removed and replaced by removing the plate 177 and replacing it with a different assembly.

The upper end of the rocker arm 174 is provided with an adjusting screw 182 which engages the rearward end of a knockout pin 183. Normally the knockout pin 183 is in a rearward position with a anged shoulder portion 184 positioned against the forward end 186 of an adjustable tube nut 187. However, operation of the cam shaft 166 to the position illustrated causes the rocker arm 174 to rotate in a clockwise direction to the knockout position of FIG. 14. 'Ihis causes the knockout pin 183 to kick forward and knock a blank out of the dies. After the knockout operation is completed, the compression spring 188 causes the'rocker arm to rotate in an anticlockwise direction back to its normal position as the cam shaft 166 rotates back in a clockwise direction from the illustrated position. This continues until the knockout pin shoulder 184 returns to the forward end 186 of the tube nut 187.

A power mechanism, best illustrated in FIGS. 15 and 16, is provided to facilitate the adjustment of the tube nuts 187. It should be understood that a similar tube nut and knockout pin 183 are provided for each die station. In the illustrated machine there are tive yknockout assemblies. The tube nut 187 is threaded into a bushing 191 in the frame 31 of the machine. A jam nut 192 is tightened to lock the tube nut 187 in the adjusted position.

The rearward end of the tube nuts '187 is provided with a flanged spur gear portion 193. A driving spur gear 194 is journaled on a pivot arm 196 so that it meshes with the selected gear portion 193 of one of the tube nuts 187. The arm 196 is pivoted on a shaft 198 so that it can be tipped up free of the tube nuts and then moved along the shaft 198 to a position adjacent to any of the other tube nuts. The length of the drive gear 194 is such that the flanged driven portion 193 is properly meshed in all adjusted positions of the tube nuts 187.

A power drive 199 is mounted on the arm 196 and connected to the drive gear 194 to rotate the drive gear and in turn thread the associated tube nut 187 in or out as required. The illustrated drive 199 is an air motor. However, any suitable drive means may be used so the illustrated air motor is shown in phantom.

Proper positioning of the arm l196 at each of the die stations is provided by a key 201 associated with each tube nut and positioned to fit into a mating recess in the arm 196 when the arm is properly positioned at the associated knockout station. With this arrangement rapid adjusting of the knockout mechanism can be accomplished since it is merely necessary to loosen the jam nuts 192, position the arm 196 at the appropriate die station and power rotate the tube nut to the desired position. Fine adjustment can be accomplished by a suitable hand wrench if desired.

CONCLUSION eliminated.

The new tooling can be mounted and roughly adjusted in an extra die breast and bolster plate assembly before the run with the prior tooling is completed. In fact, in some instances where a given machine is used to operate only two or three different jobs, the tooling for each job may be permanently installed on a given die breast and bolster plate assembly and it is merely necessary to remove one die breast and bolster plate and substitute the desired bolster plate and die breast for the next job. With this arrangement even line` adjustment of the tooling is substantially eliminated.

It should be understood that all of the various devices disclosed herein need not be incorporated in all machines incorporating this invention. For example, in smaller machines it may not be economical to provide power drive means for adjusting the knockout assemblies.

Although one preferred embodiment of this invention is illustrated, it is to be understood that various modifications and rearrangements of parts may be resorted to without departing from the scope of the invention disclosed and claimed herein.

We claim:

1. A horizontal progressive forging machine comprising a frame, a die breast mounted on said frame, a slide horizontally reciprocable in said frame toward and away from said die breast, said die breast and slide being adapted to support cooperating tools and dies in a plurality of die stations for progressively working a workpiece, rst power operating clamp means for releasably clamping said die breast in said frame against horizontal movement in a direction aligned with such slide movement, second power operated clamping means for releasably clamping said die breast and said frame against horizontal movement in a direction perpendicular to the direction of slide movement, and third power operated clamping means for releasably clamping said die breast in said frame against vertical movement.

2. A forging machine as set forth in claim 1 wherein. said clamping means are powered by hydraulic motors which are pressurized while said machine is operating.

3. A forging machine as set forth in claim 2 wherein said third clamping means includes a plurality of parallel hydraulic actuators adapted to pull the die breast toward a die breast shelf and maintain tight engagement therebetween, and a hydraulically operated connector pin slidable in said die breast associated with each actuator for releasably connecting each associated actuator and die breast, said pins providing visual indications of their positions.

4. A forging machine as set forth in claim 1 wherein said third clamping means also includes actuators operable to Secure a shear quill in said die breast.

5. A forging machine comprising a frame, a die breast in said frame, a slide reciprocable in said frame toward and away from said die breast, said die breast and slide being adapted to support cooperating tools and dies for forging workpieces, and a shear in said frame operable to automatically shear blanks from rod stock for subsequent forming in such dies and tools, said shear including a shear quill which is tubular in shape, a shear quill cap adapted to hold said quill against the die breast, a pair of draw bolts with one on each side of said quill adapted to pull said quill cap against said quill, and an actuator for each draw bolt to place each draw bolt in tension for clamping said quill in position, said draw bolts are provided with heads, said quill cap being provided with openings suiicently large to pass said heads, and washer means are positioned under said heads releasably connecting said heads to said quill cap.

6. A forging machine as set forth in claim 5 wherein said shear includes a reciprocable cutter adapted to coopcrate with said quill and shear blanks from said rod stock, said cutter including a removable cutter plate supported against a fixed surface in the direction of the cutting load, and power operated clamp means releasably clamping said cutter plate in position.

7. A forging machine as set forth in claim 6 wherein said power-operated clamp means includes a pair of piston and cylinder actuators connected to operate locking Wedges for securing said shear plate in position.

8. A forging machine comprising a frame, a die breast mounted in said frame, a slide reciprocable in said frame toward and away from said die breast, a bolster assembly mounted on said slide, said die breast and bolster assembly being adapted to support tools and dies operable to forge workpieces, and power operated clamping means for releasably clamping said bolster assembly to said slide, said power operated clamping means including piston and cylinder actuators carried by said slide and connected to drive wedges which clamp the bolster assembly against said slide, all of the moving parts of said clamping means 1 1 being movablein a direction perpendicular to the direction of movement of said slide.

9. A forging machine as set forth in claim 8 wherein said bolster assembly includes a bolster plate and a plurality of bolsters secured to said plate, said bolsters being adjustable with respect to said plate, and lock means for securing said bolsters to said plate in adjusted positions.

10. A forging machine comprising a frame, a first die breast mounted in said frame, a slide reciprocable in said frame toward and away from said die breast, a rst bolster assembly mounted on said slide, said die breast and bolster assembly being adapted to support tools and dies which cooperate to forge workpieces as said slide moves back and forth with respect to said die breast, power operated clamp means releasably clamping said die breast and bolster assembly in said machine, said power operated clamping means including three separate clamping systems for releasably securing said die breast in said frame, each separate clamping system clamping said die breast in said frame against movement in a direction which is perpendicular to the direction of clamping of the other two clamping systems, a second die breast similar to said first die breast, a second bolster assembly similar to said first bolster assembly, and a lixture separate from said machine adapted to support said second die breast and bolster assembly in positions relative to each other which are similar to the corresponding positions of said bolster assembly and said die breast in said machine.

11. A forging machine as set forth in claim 10 wherein said fixture permits relative movement of said second bolster assembly toward and away from said second die breast in a manner similar to the movement between the die breast and bolster assembly in said machine.

12. A forging machine as set forth in claim 10 wherein a transfer assembly is removably mounted on said machine to automatically transfer workpieces from one pair of cooperating tools and dies to a subsequent pair of 12 cooperating tools and dies, and a' second 'xtu're separate from said machine is adapted to support said transfer assembly and permit adjustment thereof at a location spaced from its installed position on said machine.

13. A forging machine as set forth in claim 1 wherein knockout means are provided to eject a workpiece from each die' station in said die breast, said knockout means includes a tube nut threaded into said frame to adjustably limit rearward movement of a knockout, and power means movably supported on said frame are provided to rotate said tube nut with respect to said frame.

14. A forging machine as set forth in claim 13 wherein said power means includes a driven gear portion on said tube nut and a drive gear supported by said frame for movement into and out of meshing engagement with said driven gear portion.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,727,065 9/1929 Kahn 10-12 2,038,543 4/1936 Clouse 10-12 2,272,758 2/1942 Wilcox et al 10-12 2,913,946 11/1959 Ellrich 100-299 2,984,176 5/1961 Sommer et al. 10U-299 3,112,660 12/1963 Hoyt 10-12 3,171,144 3/1965 Maistros 10-12 3,225,686 12/ 1965 Clements 100-299 3,229,791 1/1966 Soman 100--299 3,247,534 4/1966 McClellan 10-12 3,002,479 10/ 1961 Johansen et al. 100-299 CHARLES W. LANHAM, Primary Examiner E. M. CoMBs, Assistm Examiner Us. C1. XR.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
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Classifications
U.S. Classification72/337, 72/448, 470/139, 72/427
International ClassificationB30B13/00, B21K27/06, B21J13/00, B21K27/00, B21J13/14, B21J13/08, B21D37/14, B21J13/02, B21J13/03
Cooperative ClassificationB21J13/14, B21J13/085, B21K27/06
European ClassificationB21J13/08B, B21J13/14, B21K27/06