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Publication numberUS3560313 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 2, 1971
Filing dateSep 17, 1968
Priority dateSep 17, 1968
Publication numberUS 3560313 A, US 3560313A, US-A-3560313, US3560313 A, US3560313A
InventorsHerkimer Lawrence R
Original AssigneeHerkimer Lawrence R
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Pom pon
US 3560313 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 2, 1971 L.. R. HERKIMER 3,560,313

POM PON Filed Sept. 1'7. 1968 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 ATTO RNE Y 1N roR. @i Lawrence R.H lmer Feb.2,1911 ...WERNER 3,560,313

POM PON Filed Sept. 17. 1968 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 mmm IN VIENT OR. Lawrence R. Herkimer BY WMH/MMMQ/ ATTORNEY United States Patent IC) 3,560,313 POM PON Lawrence R. Herkimer, 11766 Valleydale Drive, Dallas, Tex. 75230 Filed Sept. 17, 1968, Ser. No. 760,228 Int. Cl. D04d 7/ 06 U.S. Cl. 16-9 8 Claims ABSTRACT F THE DISCLOSURE A pom pon for use by yell leaders, pep squads, and the like having strands of crepe paper or similar material secured to a body with a protective hand around the portions of the strands on the body and a handle secured to the body for holding the pom pon.

This invention relates to attention-attracting sports and entertainment devices and more particularly to a pom pon and a method making the same.

It is one object of the invention to provide a new and improved pom pon.

It is another object of the invention to provide a method of making a pom pon.

It is a further object of the invention to provide a pom pon having a substantial number of strands of crepe paper or similar material supported along end portions thereof from a central core or body in a manner to provide a fluffy, ball-like conguration, the strands extending from all sides of the body so that the body is fully concealed over its side and bottom surface portions from the views of both users and observers.

It is a further object of the invention to provide a pom pon of the character discribed wherein the strands are formed integral with a continuous edge band which is wrapped around the body overlapped upon itself sufriciently to completely encircle the body.

It is another object of the invention to provide a pom pon of the character described having a protective sheath encircling and covering the end portion of the strans of material wrapped on the body which particularly protects the hands of the user from fading of the dye in the material for-ming the strands.

It is a further object of the invention to provide a porn pon of the character described wherein the protective sheath encircling the strands of material on the body extends toward the free ends of the strands over the juncture of the strands with the continuous edge band minimizing stress forces at the base ends of the strands to reduce tearing of the strands from the band.

It is another object of the invention to provide a pom pon of the character described wherein the protective sheath around the stranded material and a handle secured on the core are formed of a moisture proof soft pliable material which prevents hand moisture from reaching the stranded material and provides a minimum of physical irritation of the hands of the user.

It is a further object of the invention to provide a pom pon of the character described which is formed of either solid or multiple color strands.

It is another object of the invention to provide a pom pon of the character described wherein the protective sheath around the core and base end portions of the strands is elastic and is secured under tension thereby tightly securing the stands and edge band to the core.

It is still a further object of the invention to provide a porn pon which has strands of either uniform or nonuniform length, as desired.

It is another object of the invention to provide a pom pon which in a preferred form has a clear or transparent handle and protective sheath which permits manu- 3,560,313 Patented Feb. 21971 ICC facture of any desired color with a minimum stock of sheath and handle material and reduces manufacturing time.

Additional objects and advantages of the invention will be readily apparent from reading the following description of a device constructed in accordance with the invention and by reference to the accompanying drawings thereof wherein:

FIG. 1 is a view in perspective of the body and a handle secured thereto of a pom pon constructed in accordance with the invention;

FIG. 2 is a side view of a completed pom pon in accordance with the invention;

FIG. 3 is a perspective bottom view of a two-color form of the pom pon of FIG. 2;

FIG. 4 is an enlarged fragmentary plan view of a portion of a laminated strand-forming paper blank used in the pom pon;

FIG. 5 is an enlarged fragmentary view in perspective of a portion of acompleted pom pon showing partially in section the body and hadle and upper portion of the contiuous band on the strands and the protective sheath around the band and body;

FIG. 6 is a view similar to FIG. 4 showing a larger portion of a laminated strand forming blank for the pom pon;

FIG. 7 is an enlarged fragmentary side view of the pom pon illustrating particularly the junction of the strands with the continuous band on the body of the pom pon with the protective sheath and handle secured thereto;

FIG. 8 is a View in section along the line 8-8 of FIG. 7 of a two-color porn pon; and

FIG. 9 is a view in section similar to FIG. 8 taken along the same plane of a solid color pom pon.

In accordance with the invention, there is provided a pom pon which comprises a body, a plurality of strands of llexible material such as crepe paper secured along end portions around the body, a protective sheath secured around the body over end portions of the strands and an edge band connected thereto for protecting the strands and the hands of the user and minimizing tearing or severing of the strands from the body, and a handle secured with the body for holding the pom pon.

Referring to the drawings, a pom pon 20` constructed in accordance with the invention includes a ball-like fluffy portion 21 comprising a substantial number of individual free hanging strands 22 supported from a handle assembly 23 having a body or core 24. The handle assembly also includes a protective elastic jacket or sheath 25 which is stretched around and tightly encircles end portions of the strands and a continuous band connected thereto secured on the body to protect the strands from moisture, particularly on the hands of a user of the pom pon, and, as explained in greater detail hereinafter, minimizes tearing and shedding of the strands 22. A handle 29 of the handle assembly is connected on body 24 to aid the user of the pom pon in holding it.

The strands 22 are formed from sheets of material 30, preferably crepe paper, laterally partially cut at even intervals so that the strands extend from and are interconnected together along a continuous edge band 31 running along one longitudinal edge of the sheet. Where crepe paper is used to form the sheets 30, the creping or crinkling extends laterally of each sheet thereby extending along the length of each of the strips 22. The uncut edge 31 of each sheet is provided with two laterally spaced, longitudinally extending rows of crimped portions 32 spaced along the length of the band 31. The strips 22 are cut from the sheet 30 by any suitable cutting method which may include utilizing a reciprocating knife of a length shorter than the lateral dimension or width of a strip of paper. The paper is cut at uniformly spaced intervals to provide strips 22 of the desired width leaving the longitudinal uncut band 31 along a longitudinal edge of the sheet of paper. Two identical sheets 30 may be formed by interorly cutting a sheet twice the size of that shown leaving each longitudinal edge uncut and then splitting the sheet into two pieces along its longitudinal centerline. An appropriately shaped roller, not shown, may be used with cutting apparatus to simultaneously impress the crimps 32 in the band 31 of the sheet of paper.

If desired, a plurality of sheets 30 in laminated form as illustrated in FIG. 6 may be simultaneously cut. In such case, the crimps 32 aid in holding the sheets together without adhesive along the band 31. The use of laminated sheets 30 further facilitates the formation of a porn pon in fewer steps to provide a large volume of aligned free strands 22. As evident in both FIGS. 4 and 6, the terminal or secured end of each of the strands 22 joins the continuous band 31 adjacent to and spaced from the inward end of the inner row of crimps 32 along the band. The lamination of sheets 30 cut and corrugated as shown in FIG. `6 is of a length which permits the wrapping of several layers of the band 31 around the body 24. The continuous band 31 of each sheet 30 is defined between the longitudinal edge 30a of the sheet and the base ends 22a of the lateral cut in the paper defining the strips 22. The base end 22a of each cut is spaced slightly from the adjacent crimp 32. The end 22b is defined as the free end of each strand.

For purposes of reference, the body 24 of the handle assembly of the pom pon shall be considered as having a top surface 24a, bottom surface 24b, opposite side edge surfaces 24C, and opposite end edge surfaces 24d. The first step in the assembly of a pom pon is the connection of the handle 29 on the body 24. Opposite end portions 29a of the handle are each secured along the end surfaces 24d by a staple 40 driven through the handle into the body. The body is formed of wood or any other suitable material which is light in weight, substantially solid, and readily penetrated by fasteners such as staples. The bight portion 29b of the handle is of sutiicient length to permit all the fingers of one hand of a user to be inserted in the space between the inn-er face of the handle and the top surface 24a of the body. After assembly, the top face 24a of the body may serve as a surface for a label providing space for the name of the owner of the pom pon along with the name of the manufacturer and other desired information.

After the handle 29 is secured on the body 24, the strands 22 are connected to the body to form the balllike fluffy portion or strand mass 21 of the pom pon. FIG. 9 illustrates a single or uniform-colored pom pon, while FIG. 8 shows one having at least two colors with one color forming the central portion of the strand mass and another color forming the peripheral or outer portion of it. In making a solid colored pom pon as in FIG. 9, a lamination of the sheets 30 as illustrated in FIG. 6 is grasped along its uncut edge band 31 which is aligned with the body 24 so that the strands 22 extend from and perpendicular to the bottom face 24b of the body. The band 31 is located so that its longitudinal edge 30a is substantially parallel to the top surface 24a of the body with an end portion of the band held along one side face 24e. The end portion of the band 31 is secured by a staple to the sur-face 24C of the body as seen at the lower left portion of FIG. 9. The lamination of sheets 30 is then wrapped around the body with the continuous band 31 being wrapped around the body in a generally clockwise direction as in FIG. 9. The band 31 extends around the body along the opposite side faces 24C and opposite end faces 24d. After encircling the body one complete turn, band 31 is wrapped upon itself until the entire length of the band encircles the body. As the wrapping of the band or the body is about completed a first or inward end portion 25a of the protective sheath 25 is inserted beneath the free end of the band 31 between the band and its immediate preceding layer. Thus the completing outward end of the band 31 of the paper lamination overlaps the beginning inward end of the sheath 25 to hold the sheath as it is wrapped around the paper band on the body. The overlapping outer end of the end portion of the band 31, and the underlapping inner end portion of the protective sheath 25 are stapled along with the inner layers of the band 31 to the near side lface 24C of the body by a staple 40. During the wrapping of the paper band 31 around the body the band is placed under tension so that when released and stapled to the body the band tends to contract around the body.

The sheath strip 25 is then tightly wrapped around the body 24 over the band 31 until the outer free end portion ZSb of the sheath strip overlaps its inner end portion 25a a substantial distance as shown along the right end of FIG. 9. Preferably the sheath strip is a polyvinyl chloride film having selfaadhesive characteristics causing the strip to adhere to itself along the overlapping portions so that its outer end portion 25b fits tightly in overlapping relationship along the underlying inner end portion 25a. A staple 40, not shown, is driven through the overlapping and underlapping ends portions of the sheath strip and the various underlying layers of the band 31 into the body 24 along the end face 24d or side face 24C of the body. In wrapping the sheath strip 2S around the band 31 on the body, the strip is placed und-er tension as it is wrapped so that the several layers of the crepe paper under the strip on the body are tightly compressed within the sheath strip around the body. The upper edge portion 25e of the sheath strip contracts inwardly around the upper edge portions of the crepe paper band 31 as best seen in FIG. 7 providing a partial closure over the upper end edge of the paper layers on the body.

The sheath strip is positioned on the body so that its lower edge 25d is located below the upper ends 22a of the slits between the strands 22 so that the sheath strip overlaps the upper terminal or secured ends of the strands thereby tightly enclosing the juncture between the strands 22 and the'continuous band 31. The zones of maximum stress between the strands 22 and the band 31 are thus protected by the sheath strip. The presence of the sheath strip at the upper ends of the strands has been found to minimize shedding or tearing of the strands 22 from the continuous band thereby providing improved pom pon life and optimum appearance. It also has been found that while a strand may tear into the band 31 it still has a tendency to remain secured with the band and resist separation from the band due to the sheath strip. While crepe paper will remain secured on the body due to its tightly wrapped condition and the connection of the staples through it, without the sheath strip around the band the shedding problem or loss of strands 22 is substantial.

If a two color pom pon is desired, it is constructed as represented in FIG. 8. The first or inner color which will provide streamers over the central portion 21a of the pom pon 20b as shown in FIG. 3 is provided by attachment of a paper lamination such as that shown in FIG. 6 along each side surface portion 24C of the body. For example, each paper lamination of the desired first color is folded upon itself until it is several layers thick and as wide measured across the streamers 22 along the band 31 as the length of one of the side faces 24e` of the body. Each folded paper lamination is then stapled along its band portion 31 to one side face 24C of the body with the upper edge of the band aligned with the top face 24a and the strands 22 of the lamination extending away from the bottom face 24b. A paper lamination of the desired second color is then wrapped, as previously described, about the body over the paper laminations of the first color already stapled along the side faces 24C. As the terminal end of the band 31 of the second color of paper is wrapped on the body, the inner beginning end portion 25a of the sheath strip 25 is placed in underlying relationship with the end of the band portion and stapled. The sheath strip is then secured around the body and underlying layers of the paper lamination band as already discussed to complete the porn pon.

It will be evident that the quantity of the strands 22 and thus the volume and fullness of appearance of the strand mass 21 is dependent upon the number of sheets of crepe paper wrapped upon the body 24 of the pom pon. The number of sheets forming each paper lamination may be varied as desired and similarly the length of each sheet may be varied to provide the desired amount of paper on the body. While the pom pon has been discussed in terms of either a single color as in FIG. 9 or dual colors as in FIG. 8, it will be evident from FIG. 6 that a multiplicity of colors greatly intermingled when viewing the strands 22 may be provided by forming each of the paper layers 30 of a different color paper. The number of colors in the pom pon is thereby limited only by the number of layers of paper 30` wrapped upon the core.

After the pom pon has been completed by securing the crepe paper on the body and the protective sheath 2S around the continuous band 31 of the paper, the pom pon may be provided with a fluffy, expanded appearance by manually grasping the strand mass along the free ends 22b of the strands, compressing the strands together tightly, and forcing the gathered free ends toward the body causing the strands to expand outwardly and bend about midway along their lengths. The strands are then released and the pom pon shaken to give its strand mass a free, liuliy, expanded, ball-like appearance.

The pom pon is held in either hand of the user to perform various routines carried out by cheerleaders, pep squads, and the like. The handle assembly is grasped in either of two ways by the user. The users fingers may be inserted between the top face 24a of the body and the inner surface of the handle 29 with the palm of the hand facing away fro mthe face 24a and thus the back of the hand toward the face 24a. In this position of the hand of the user, the ngers of the user, up to all four fingers, extend around substantially encircling the handle with the ends of the lingers, if desired, engaging the palm of the hand when tightly gripping the handle. In this position, generally, the knuckles on the lingers will engage the face 24a on the body. In another method of holding the handle assembly, the hand of the user is positioned with the palm side facing the body 24 with the fingers being inserted beneath the handle between the top face 24a and the handle with the palm side surfaces of the fingers lying along the top face 24a of the body. After fully inserting the iingers, the end joints of the lingers are bent toward the body thereby overlapping the sheath strip 25 while the palm of the hand is bent relative to the fingers with the palm engaging the sheath strip on the opposite side of the body. The inside of the thumb extends along the sheath strip located over an end face 24d of the body. In this second method of holding the pom pon, almost the entire body is gripped by the palm side of the hand so that the sheath strip is especially important in protecting the band 31 and the connected ends 22a of the strands from moisture on the hand of the user.

When the pom pon is held by the user with the handle assembly in an upper position, the strands fall downwardly from the hand and handle assembly thereby exposing the hand and handle assembly to views of both the user and observers. When the handle asembly is held downwardly, however, with the connected ends of the strands extending upwardly from the handle assembly, the strands all fall outwardly and downwardly enveloping both the handle assembly and the hand of the user so that the hand and handle assembly are not observable from any location except perhaps immediately under the users hand. The completeness of the draping of the strands over the hand and arm of the user, of course, is dependent in part upon the length of the strands and the number of strands in the pom pon. If the pom pon has been properly fluffed and otherwise prepared, as previously discussed, by the gripping and gathering of the free ends of the pom pon and forcing them toward the body, the resultant distribution of the strands, particularly those forming the central core of the strand mass, prevents the bottom face 24a of the body from being seen from almost any point of observation. The pom pon may be shaken quite vigorously over extended periods of time without tearing or shedding of the strands due to the superiority of the construction of the handle assembly with the overlying relationship of the elastic sheath strip with the secured ends of the strands. Obviously, the vigorous l activity, particularly of young people, using one or more of the pom pons most often results in perspiration on the hand of the user, which would, when using pom pons of the prior art, cause substantial discoloration of the crepe paper of the pom pon and the hands of the user since the dye of the paper readily dissolves in the presence of moisture. The sheath strip effectively protects that portion of the paper of the pom pon which particularly is contacted by the palm side of the hand of the user so that the moisture does not readily reach the paper. Of course, also, such moisture, in additon to causing the dying, will accelerate deterioration of the paper forming the band and strands. The moisture-proof characteristic of the sheath strip thereby effectively extends the life of the pom pon not only by minimizing shedding but also by reducing moisture induced deterioration. The contracting of the upper edge portion 25C of the sheath strip and resultant compressing and gathering of the upper portion of the continuous band of the paper provides a smoothly contoured upper edge to the handle assembly so that the pom pon comfortably fits a hand. Also, the soft surface effect of the sheath strip and handle makes the pom pon easy to hold and minimizes irritation of the skin of the hand of the user, which is a particularly desirable feature as pom pons are used over lengthy periods of time, particularly in activities such as football games,

Numerous alternate forms and variations in several features of the pom pon will be evident to those skilled in the art. While the particularly preferred form of handle and sheath strip has been described as comprising a polyvinyl chloride iilm which is transparent so that it is usable with any color paper, it will be obvious that, if desired, such material may be of a contrasting color or of a color matching the underlying paper of the pom pon. Also, other forms of plastics and other types of material may be used for the handle and sheath strip though it is preferred that such material have the soft, water-repellent, and elastic characteristics previously described to provide a pom pon of maximum durability and usefulness with respect to comfort and appearance factors. The body of the handle assembly has been illustrated as generally rectangular as this shape more readily tits a users hand, though it will be understood that the body could be made in a square shape, and, as previously explained while the body is preferably of wood, other forms of substantially solid material, such as some of the various plastics, may be employed. The strands 22 have been illustrated as of uniform length. If various length strands are desired, the width of each of the sheets 30 forming a paper lamination may be varied so that the strands in the completed pom pon give the appearance of random length. Another form of pom pon which has found some degree of popularity may be constructed by forming a central group of the strand mass of strands of greater length than those in the peripheral portion of the strand mass. One way of constructing such a pom pon having longer strands over its central portion is to use a paper lamination for the central portion having strands of a greater length than the laminations used for the outer portions of the strand mass. For example, the form of pom pon shown in FIG. 8 may be utilized with the inner laminations secured along the opposite side faces 24C having strands of sub-Y stantially greater length than the lamnations completely encircling the handle assembly and providing the outer peripheral strands.

The pom pon has been described in terms of its construction of crepe paper. It is to be understood that other forms of paper and plastic sheeting may be utilized to construct the pom pon in accordance with the invention. A still further form of pom pon may include a molded integral sheath strip and handle assembly with the sheath strip 25 being formed integral with the handle 29 with the sheath strip of a length which requires that it be stretched over the continuous band on the body of the porn pon and secured thereto to provide the tight fit and end shape to the handle assembly represented in FIG. 7.

While the invention has been discussed in terms of the specific embodiments disclosed herein and suggested modifications thereto, it is to be understood that such descriptions have been given only by way of illustration and example, not by way of limitation, reference being for the latter purpose being had to the following claims.

What is claimed and desired to be secured by Letters of Patent is:

1. A pom pon for use by yell leaders, pep squads, and the like comprising: a substantially rectangular shaped block body of substantially rigid material; a U- shaped handle secured along the opposite end portions to opposite end faces of said body, said handle comprising a soft exible material; a mass of long narrow strands of flexible material formed integral with and extending from a continuous edge band of said material, said strands being formed perpendicular to the longitudinal dimension of said band, said band being wrapped around said body along opposite end and side edges of said body, whereby said strands extend freely from the bottom face of said body whereby said mass of said strands have a fluffy, ball-like shape; a protective sheath strip wrapped around said continuous edge band secured around said body eX- tending along opposite end and opposite side faces of said body and toward the free ends of said strands over the secured ends of said strands to protect said band and said secured ends of said strands from moisture and to minimize shedding of said strands from said body due to tearing of said strands from said edge band.

2. A pom pon as defined in claim 1 wherein said sheath strip is wrapped around and secured on said body over said continuous band under tension whereby said lo curved upper edge surface around said body over a gathered upper edge portion of said edge band.

6. A porn pon as dened in claim 1 wherein said continuous edge band has a plurality of longitudinally spaced crimps each extending laterally of'said band to 5 increase the elasticity of said band whereby said band lits tightly around said body.

7. A pom pon as defined in claim 1 wherein one portion of said strands are longer than another portion of said strands.

8. A pom pon as defined in claim 1 having a central core portion of strands of one color and a peripheral portion of strands of another color, said peripheral p0rtion comprising the strands connected with the continuous band wrapped around the body, and the central core of strands comprising two groups of strands, one group being formed with a continuous band folded upon itself and secured along one side edge of said body within said wrapped band with strands extending from said folded band within and in the same direction as the strands from said wrapped band and the other group of said strands in said central core being formed with and extending from a continuous band folded upon itself and secured along the other side edge of said body with the strands from said band also extending within said strands from said wrapped band in the same direction as said strands from said wrapped band.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,070,448 2/1937 Nork 15-168 2,810,977 10/1957 Barry i5-225x 2,987,103 6/1961 Yakubik 161*6 3,033,724 5/1962 Stokes 156-187 JOHN T. GOOLKASIAN, Primary Examiner H. F. EPSTEIN, Assistant Examiner

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4369215 *Dec 7, 1981Jan 18, 1983Nevada Post Office CorporationFinger held pompon
US4786535 *Nov 16, 1987Nov 22, 1988Gordon YoungPompon
US4806396 *Jul 29, 1985Feb 21, 1989Sg Ii, Inc.Pompon prize device
US4840822 *Jun 2, 1988Jun 20, 1989Cheng Peter S CDecorative netting bow and method of making same
US5055326 *Apr 13, 1990Oct 8, 1991Whitington Clyde RAutomotive supported pompon
US5234725 *Jul 2, 1992Aug 10, 1993Smith Catherine LWrist pompon structure
US5545445 *Sep 8, 1994Aug 13, 1996Cheng; Peter S. C.Decorative three-dimensional, curled bow and method of making same
US5567486 *Jun 7, 1995Oct 22, 1996The Family Trust U/T/ARibbon assembly
US5679415 *Sep 16, 1996Oct 21, 1997Southpac Trust International, Inc.Ribbon assembly
US5897926 *Jan 8, 1997Apr 27, 1999Mikulas; Christine MarieConnected decorative grass
US5962086 *Jun 1, 1998Oct 5, 1999Valley Decorating CompanyPompon pet
US6176756 *Jun 25, 1999Jan 23, 2001Treasure Bay, Inc.Plush construction set
US6253921Mar 1, 2000Jul 3, 2001Southpac Trust International, Inc.Packaging material
US6340507Dec 22, 1998Jan 22, 2002Sylvia Gomez HolguinSelf-securing pompon
US7308864 *Jul 27, 2006Dec 18, 2007Catner Anthony JWarning flag assembly for use with elongated loads on a roadway vehicle
US7364042Sep 8, 2005Apr 29, 2008Wanda M. Weder And William F. StraeterPackaging material
US7666056 *Mar 10, 2004Feb 23, 2010Parti-Line International, Inc.Streamer launching system
US8348822 *Feb 17, 2012Jan 8, 2013Govig Michele MaccollumMethod of manufacturing packing structure
Classifications
U.S. Classification428/4
International ClassificationD04D7/06, D04D7/00
Cooperative ClassificationD04D7/06
European ClassificationD04D7/06