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Publication numberUS3561760 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 9, 1971
Filing dateMar 11, 1968
Priority dateMar 17, 1967
Also published asDE1678237A1
Publication numberUS 3561760 A, US 3561760A, US-A-3561760, US3561760 A, US3561760A
InventorsHans Klay
Original AssigneeHans Klay
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Hockey stick with flared upper and lower portions
US 3561760 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [72] Inventor Hans Klay Handbuehlstrasse 10, 4900 Langenthal, Switzerland [2]] Appl. No. 712,072

[22] Filed Mar. 11, 1968 [45] Patented Feb. 9, 1971 [32] Priority Mar. 17, 1967 [33 Switzerland [54] HOCKEY STICK WITI-I FLARED UPPER AND 2,486,952 1 1/1949 Kearsley et al. ..273/Glass Fiber Digest 2,768,921 10/ 1956 Pigg ..273/Glass Fiber Digest Primary ExaminerRichard C. Pinkham Assistant ExaminerRichard J Apley Attorney-Werner W. Kleeman ABSTRACT: An article of sporting equipment, for instance a conventional ice hockey stick which comprises a shaft with a handle portion formed at the upper end and an elongate blade provided at the lower end of such shaft and extending substantially transversely with respect to the lengthwise axis of such shaft. The blade possesses a central portion of substantially uniform cross section throughout its length and incorporates substantially vertical, parallel sidewalls. Additionally, there are provided outwardly flared portions at the upper and lower extents of the central blade portion, these flared portions extending substantially linearly the full length of the blade, and such flared portions being symmetrically formed on both sides of the blade.

PATENIEDFEB 9 IQII I 3; 5 1; 760

SYNTHETIC MATERIAL REINFORCED WITH GLASS FIBERS F J z I I l .I 'II IIIIIID SOLID SYNTHETIC MATERIAL PRIOR ART PRIOR ART HOCKEY STICK WITH FLARED UPPER AND LOWER PORTIONS BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION Up to now, two items of sports equipment were made almost entirely of wood, and therefore their shape and their mechanical properties were restricted by the resistivity of the wood.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION In accordance with the invention, by combining synthetic resins and fiberglass, the shape and the mechanical properties of the sports article can much better be adapted to its use. The invention is particularly suitable for the manufacture of improved ice-hockey sticks and boat oars.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING The invention will be described with reference to the accompanying FIGS. of the drawing, wherein:

FIG. 1 is a cross-sectional view of the blade of an ice-hockey stick of the prior art;

FIG. 2 is a cross-sectional view of the blade, with the puck about to be shot;

FIG. 3 is a cross-sectional view of the blade of an ice-hockey stick of the invention; and

FIG. 4 is a side view of the ice-hockey stick of the invention.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS FIG. 1 shows a cross section A through the blade of a wooden ice-hockey stick of the prior art. In shooting with the inclined face C of the blade (FIG. 2) the puck S is slightly lifted from the ice G, until its cylindrical surface touches the inclined surface C of the blade. In that position, the puck is completely lifted from the ice G and can be accelerated without friction.

In order to made the blade as light as possible, and resistant enough, the wooden blade has an inclined surface either on the left side or on the right side, but not on both sides. Therefore, there exist two sorts of sticks, depending on the side the player shoots from.

In accordance with the invention, the ice-hockey stick is made out of shockproof synthetic resin, with higher mechanical strength than wood, and can therefore easily take the ideal symmetrical form (FIG. 3). The cross section of the blade portion consists of a thin elongate vertical plate D having transverse flared portions E and F along the lower and upper edges, respectively, of plate D which flared portions extend symmetrically to both sides of the plate. The upper flared portions F prevent the puck from sliding upwards when receiving it on the blade. For a better guidance of the puck, the plate D can be provided with vertical ribs L. Advantageously, the walls of the plate are parallel between the flares.

The shaft H (FIG. 4) of the stick must also be as light as possible, strong enough (resistant enough), and of a desired elasticity. Made out of wood, it breaks easily. In accordance with the invention, the shaft is made out ofa tube of synthetic resin, reinforced with glassfiber. The desired elasticity can be obtained by varying the diameter ofthe tube and the thickness of the wall. The tube of the stick is filled with a light and pressureproof, hardened foam. This foam filling improves the solidity without increasing the weight.

The above described blade I and shaft are manufactured separately and fitted together over a prepared joint K.

Boat oars can be manufactured in the same way. The form of the blade of the oar can be better adapted to its use when it is made out of synthetic resin, instead of wood. The handle and loom of the oar are made, as described for the manufacture of hockey sticks, out of a single glassfiber-synethetic resin tube with hardened artificial foam filling. The desired elasticity can be obtained by suitably varying the wall thickness of the tube. This light and elastic synthetic-plastic oar is far less thing than a stiff wooden oar. The blade is connected to the loom by a 'oint.

Although the preferred embodiments of the invention have been described, the scope of, and the breadth of protection afforded to, the invention is limited solely by the appended claims.

Iclaim:

l. A conventional ice-hockey stick comprising a shaft with a handle portion formed at the upper end, an elongate blade provided at the lower end of said shaft and extending substantially transversely with respect to the lengthwise axis of said shaft, said blade possessing a central portion of substantially uniform cross section throughout its length and incorporating substantially vertical, parallel sidewalls, outwardly flared portions formed only at the upper and lower extents of the central blade portion, said flared portions extending substantially linearly the full length of the blade, and said flared portions being symmetrically formed on both sides of the blade.

2. A conventional ice-hockey stick as defined in claim 1, wherein said blade is constructed of a synthetic resin, said shaft being tubular and formed of a synthetic resin reinforced with glass fiber, the interior of said shaft being filled with a hardened foam.

3. A conventional ice-hockey stick as defined in claim 1, further comprising a plurality of vertical ribs on said blade.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2486952 *Dec 20, 1944Nov 1, 1949Spalding A G & Bros IncGolf club head
US2768921 *May 20, 1954Oct 30, 1956Robert F PiggMethod of molding tapered rods
US2912245 *Feb 27, 1957Nov 10, 1959Willard Brownson MackenzieHockey stick
US3083969 *Mar 27, 1961Apr 2, 1963Axaline Golf CompanyLong-handled, swingable driving instrument
US3140094 *Mar 14, 1960Jul 7, 1964Donald P HingsEpoxy resin golf club head integrally cured with a shaft wrapping of glass fiber material
CA706285A *Mar 23, 1965Andrew SaytarGames clubs
CH253977A * Title not available
GB776065A * Title not available
GB190007550A * Title not available
GB191127807A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3720410 *Jan 4, 1971Mar 13, 1973A SaytarBall hockey stick with curvilinear striking faces
US3934875 *Feb 14, 1974Jan 27, 1976James Leland EastonHockey stick
US4059269 *Feb 13, 1976Nov 22, 1977Karhu-Titan OyHockey stick or the like, particularly blade structure thereof
US4086115 *Oct 16, 1975Apr 25, 1978Sweet Jr Robert DMethod of making a hockey stick
US4340224 *Sep 18, 1980Jul 20, 1982Staats Hilton SGoalkeeper's hockey stick
US4361325 *Apr 3, 1981Nov 30, 1982Brimms Inc.Hockey stick shaft
US5407195 *Oct 6, 1992Apr 18, 1995K.C.G. Hockey Finland OyBlade construct for a hockey stick or the like
US5429352 *Feb 8, 1994Jul 4, 1995Mylec, Inc.Hockey blade
US5582405 *Mar 20, 1996Dec 10, 1996Montgomery; Robert D.Hockey stick
US5688197 *Aug 9, 1996Nov 18, 1997Peeters; Peter HubertbusMethod and apparatus for training goalkeepers
US5697857 *Jan 4, 1996Dec 16, 1997Christian Brothers, Inc.Plastic hockey stick blade structure
US5827141 *Dec 19, 1996Oct 27, 1998Lukey; RoderickStick blade
US5836841 *Jun 11, 1996Nov 17, 1998Fell; Barry M.Hockey stick blade with control fascia and replaceable control fascia for use therewith
US5913709 *Jun 24, 1997Jun 22, 1999Oddzon, Inc.Sound-producing golf club
US5935029 *Jun 24, 1997Aug 10, 1999Oddzon, Inc.Sound-producing hockey stick
US5976040 *Jun 16, 1998Nov 2, 1999Liu; Chao-JihBlade member of a hockey stick having a visible mark
US6471609 *Aug 24, 1998Oct 29, 2002Barry M. FellHockey stick blade with control fascia and replaceable control fascia for use therewith
US6926629 *Nov 3, 2003Aug 9, 2005Martin L. DehenAttachment for blade of hockey stick
US7044870Dec 7, 2004May 16, 2006John PagottoBlade for hockey stick or the like
US7097577Apr 16, 2004Aug 29, 2006Jas. D. Easton, Inc.Hockey stick
US7144343Dec 23, 2005Dec 5, 2006Jas. D. Easton, Inc.Hockey stick
US7232386Oct 20, 2003Jun 19, 2007Easton Sports, Inc.Hockey stick
US7410432Aug 3, 2006Aug 12, 2008Martin L DehenHockey stick
US7422532Jul 10, 2006Sep 9, 2008Easton Sports, Inc.Hockey stick
US7438655May 30, 2007Oct 21, 2008Warrior Sports, Inc.Hockey stick blade having rib stiffening system
US7476167 *May 30, 2007Jan 13, 2009Warrior Sports, Inc.Hockey stick blade having rib stiffening system
US7789778Dec 3, 2008Sep 7, 2010Easton Sports, Inc.Hockey stick
US7850553Jul 11, 2006Dec 14, 2010Easton Sports, Inc.Hockey stick
US7862456Jun 18, 2007Jan 4, 2011Easton Sports, Inc.Hockey stick
US7914403Aug 6, 2008Mar 29, 2011Easton Sports, Inc.Hockey stick
US7963868May 15, 2003Jun 21, 2011Easton Sports, Inc.Hockey stick
US8216096Jun 6, 2011Jul 10, 2012Easton Sports, Inc.Hockey stick
US8517868Jul 9, 2012Aug 27, 2013Easton Sports, Inc.Hockey stick
US8608597 *Sep 8, 2011Dec 17, 2013Tzvi AvneryHockey stick
US20130065714 *Sep 8, 2011Mar 14, 2013Tzvi AvneryHockey Stick
WO1997047365A1 *Jun 10, 1997Dec 18, 1997Barry M FellHockey stick blade with control fascia and replaceable control fascia for use therewith
Classifications
U.S. Classification473/563, 440/101, 273/DIG.700
International ClassificationA63B53/10, A63B59/14
Cooperative ClassificationA63B53/10, A63B59/14, Y10S273/07
European ClassificationA63B59/14, A63B53/10