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Publication numberUS3561764 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 9, 1971
Filing dateOct 3, 1968
Priority dateOct 3, 1968
Publication numberUS 3561764 A, US 3561764A, US-A-3561764, US3561764 A, US3561764A
InventorsThomas Richard A
Original AssigneeThomas Richard A
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Golf swing corrective mat
US 3561764 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [72] lnventor Richard A. Thomas Tallahassee, Fla. (11302 S. W. 104th Ave., Miami, Fla. 33156) [21) Appl. No. 764,691 [22] Filed Oct. 3, 1968 [45] Patented Feb. 9, 1971 [54] GOLF SWING CORRECTIVE MAT 7 Claims, 4 Drawing Figs.

[52] US. Cl 273/183, 273/195; 35/29 [51 Int. Cl A63b 69/36 [50] Field ofSearch 273/183 (A),(Cursory);273/183, 186, 187, 195,196,197, 198, 191, 192; 35/29; 73/380 [56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,960,787 5/1934 MacStocker 273/191(A) 2,087,334 7/1937 Rosengarten 273/195 Primary ExaminerGeorge .1. Marlo Attorneys-Clarence A. O'Brien and Harvey B. Jacobson ABSTRACT: A panel structure for positioning on the ground in a golf tee area and defining a pair of generally straight visually ascertainable paths inclined approximately 25 to 30 relative to each other and intersecting at one pair of corresponding ends, the panel structure being operative, when a ball is teed up on a first of the paths at a point spaced therealong from the intersecting ends of the paths and the nonintersecting end portion of the first path extends in the intended tee shot direction, to provide a visual guide defined by the second path to assist the golfer in swinging out and through when swinging at the teed ball.

PATENTEU FEB 9 l9?! 34561764 Fig.3 vv

Richard A. Thomas lNl IfNTOR.

GOLF SWING CORRECTIVE MAT Novice and many intermediate golfers have difficulty in correctly swinging their drivers when performing a tee shot. Most frequently a golfer having an incorrect swing will swing the club in a manner such that the head portion thereof swings across and to the inside of the intended line of flight of the ball as the club head reaches its lowermost position immediately adjacent the ground. With this type of incorrect swing the club head does not meet the ball squarely and as a result of this incorrect impact of the club head with the ball the latter has a tendency to veer horizontally outwardly of the are through which the club head is swung and the ball is caused to rotate about a generally vertical axis in a direction inherently causing the ball to veer still further in the same horizontal direction during flight of the ball. This particular type of tee shot which causes the ball to veer excessively toward the outside of the golfers swing is referred to as a slice."

In order to teach novice and intermediate golfers who have a tendency to slice" a correct swing which will not result in a slice instructors advise their students to swing out and through. Of course, this term does not have reference to the club head since outward cutting across of a club head relative to the line of intended flight of the ball would result in opposite veering of the golf ball which is termed a hook, but has reference to the hands of the golfer swinging the club inasmuch as the normal tendency of the hands of a golfer swinging during a tee shot is to swing around with the golfer as he pivots. Accordingly, in order to correct a slice" golfers are instructed to swing their hands in a manner such that their hands swing out and through which, if such instructions are carried out, results in the club head swinging directly along the intended line of flight of the ball during that portion of the swinging of the club head in which the head impacts with the teed ball.

While verbal instruction of a pupil to swing out and through" with his hands is at least partially effective in most instances, the result of such instruction does not approach 100 percent effectiveness and accordingly, it is the main object of this invention to provide means by which the swing of a golfers hands may be guided during each swing.

Another object of this invention, in accordance with the immediately preceding object, is to provide visual means which may be readily viewed by the golfer continuously during the period of swinging a club for a tee shot.

A still further object of this invention, in accordance with the immediately preceding objects, is to provide a visually ascertainable path near ground level, spaced slightly outwardly of the path through which the club head will swing and inclined forwardly and outwardly relative to the last-mentioned path.

Another object is to provide an apparatus which will, in addition to the visual swing corrective path, define a second path visible to the golfer intersecting with the first path extending in the direction of intended flight of the ball and along which the ball may be teed at a point spaced forwardly of the intersecting portions of the paths.

Yet another object of this invention is to provide a panel member having means defining the aforementioned paths with the second path generally paralleling and spaced slightly inwardly of one edge portion of the panel member in order that the panel member edge portion may be utilized as a guide for correct positioning of the golfers feet relative to the paths defined by the panel member and the location in which the ball is to be teed.

A still further object of this invention, in accordance with the immediately preceding object, is to provide a panel member which may be readily altemately produced in a first manner adapting the panel member for outdoor use and a second manner adapting the panel for indoor use.

A final object of this invention to be specifically enumerated herein is to provide a golf swing corrective apparatus in accordance with the preceding objects which will conform to conventional forms of manufacture, be of simple construction and easy to use so as to provide a device that will be economically feasible, long lasting and relatively trouble free in operation.

These together with other objects and advantages which will become subsequently apparent reside in the details of construction and operation as more fully hereinafter described and claimed, reference being had to the accompanying drawings forming a part hereof, wherein like numerals refer to like parts throughout, and in which:

HO. 1 is a perspective view of a first form of the invention constructed in a manner so as to be adapted for outdoor use;

H6. 2 is an enlarged vertical sectional view taken substantially upon the plane indicated by the section line 2-2 of FIG.

FIG. 3 is a plan view of a second modified form of the invention constructed so as to be adapted for indoor use; and

H6. 4 is a fragmentary vertical sectional view on somewhat of an enlarged scale and taken substantially upon the plane indicated by the section line 4-4 of FIG. 3.

Referring now more specifically to the drawings, and to FIGS. 1 and 2 in particular the numeral 10 generally designates a first form of the invention including a generally rectangular panel member 12 constructed of any suitable flexible and resilient material such as rubber. The panel member 12 is adapted to be spiked to the ground 14 by means of suitable headed spikes l6 driven into the ground 14 through openings (not shown) formed in the four marginal edge portions of the panel member 12.

The panel member 12 has first and second elongated openings 18 and 20 formed therein which are generally straight an intersect at one pair of corresponding end portions. The opening 20 generally parallels and is spaced slightly inwardly of one edge portion 22 of the panel member an the opening 18 diverges away from the opening 20 at its forward end 24,

In use, the panel member 12 may be either loosely laid upon the ground 14 or spiked thereto by means of spikes 16 with the opening 20 extending in the path of intended flight of a tee shot. The ball 26 to be used in the tee shot is teed up on a tee 28 piercing the ground at a point generally centrally intermediate the opposite ends of the opening 20 and centered transversely of the opening 20. The golfer 30 then stands along the edge portion 22 with his feet closely adjacent the edge portion 22 and spaced equally on opposite sides of an upstanding plane passing through the ball 26 and disposed normal to the longitudinal axis of the opening 20 and the edge portion 22. Then, as the golfer 30 swings his club 32 during the tee shot, as the golfers hands 34 approach the bottom portions of the arcs through which they are swung and the golfers body begins to pivot the golfer 30 attempts to have his hands 34 swing out and through along the opening 18, as viewed by the golfer 30. In this manner, the golfer's hands, during that portion of the golfers stroke during which the head 36 of the club 32 impacts with the ball 26, will swing through a vertical plane generally paralleling the longitudinal centerline of the opening 20 with the result that the head 36 of the club 32, during that portion of its swing in which it impacts with the ball 26, moves in a vertical plane extending longitudinally of the opening 20 and in which the ball 26 is contained, thus hitting the ball 26 squarely.

While the apparatus consisting of the first form of the invention 10 does not positively guide the golfers hands 34 in the above set forth manner, the golfer is visually aware of the opening 18 inasmuch as the ground 14 is of a different color than the upper surface of the panel member 12 and therefore the golfer 30 is provided a guide along which he may readily attempt to have his hands 34 move. Of course, after the correct swing is learned by the golfer 30, repeated practice of the swing while using the apparatus 10 will strongly impress upon the golfer 30 the feeling" of a correct swing and the apparatus 10 will subsequently be no longer needed.

With attention now invited more specifically to FIGS. 3 and 4 of the drawings there may be seen a second form of the invention generally referred to by the reference numeral 40 which includes a panel member 42 similar to the panel member 12 but which is secured to a suitable panellike base 44 by threaded fasteners 46 secured through the the panel member 42 and into the base 44. The base 44 may either be placed directly on the ground or used inside and placed upon a floor surface.

Generally straight stripes or paths 48 and 50 corresponding to openings 18 and 20 are defined on the upper surface of the panel member 42 either by a distinctive color paint or distinctive color strips recessed into the upper surface area of the panel member 42 and the latter includes a slot 52 upwardly through which a resilient support member 54 projects. The support member 54 is vertically short and includes a concave upper end face 56 for cradling a golf ball 58 on the upper end of the support member 54 so as to elevate the ball 58 above the upper surface of the panel member 42 in the same manner in which the ball 26 is elevated above the ground 14. Of course, the distinctively colored paths or areas 48 and 50 serve the same purpose as the openings 18 and 20 and therefore it may be seen that the second form of the invention 40 may be used in the same manner in which the first form of the invention is used.

The foregoing is considered as illustrative only of the principles of the invention. Further, since numerous modifications and changes will readily occur to those skilled in the art, it is not desired to limit the invention to the exact construction and operation shown and described, and accordingly all suitable modifications and equivalents may be resorted to, falling within the scope of the invention as claimed.

lclaim:

1. Golf swing corrective apparatus comprising means for teeing a golf ball and a generally rectangular panel member disposed on a support surface on which a golfer may stand, said panel member including parallel and straight opposite inside and outside edges as well as opposite end approach and departure end edges and means defining a generally straight visually ascertainable path extending generally diagonally across said panel member from the inside and approach comer portion to the outside and departure corner portion for instructing golfers to swing their hands out and through when swinging at a ball on said teeing means said panel means being so positioned relative to said golf ball teeing means that a golfer may execute a tee shot with said inside edge disposed adjacent the golfer and extending transversely of the direction in which the golfer is facing and said path inclined relative to the intended vertical plane of flight of the tee shot with the forward end portion of the path opposite the forward foot of the golfer spaced outwardly therefrom a distance greater than the spacing of the rear end portion of the path opposite the rear foot of the golfer and with said path intersecting with said plane of flight at a point spaced rearwardly of the location said ball teeing means in said plane.

2. The combination of claim 1 wherein said panel member also includes means defining a second generally straight visually ascertainable path generally paralleling and adjacent said inside edge and intersecting with and terminating at its end adjacent said approach end in the first mentioned path with the second path positioned in said plane and having said ball teeing means disposed in said second path.

3. The combination of claim 2 wherein said paths are inclined approximately 25 to 30 relative to each other.

4. The combination of claim I wherein said panel member includes an upper surface of a given color and said means defining said path comprises distinctively colored upper surface means on said panel member rendering said path visually discernible from the adjacent portions of said upper surface.

5. The combination of claim 1 wherein said panel member also includes means defining a second generally straight visually ascertainable path intersecting with and angulated relative to the first-mentioned path and positioned in said plane with said ball teeing means disposed in said second path,

said panel member including an upper surface of a iv en color and said means defining said paths comprise istinetively colored upper surface means on said panel member rendering said paths visually discernible from the adjacent portions of said upper surface.

6. The combination of claim 1 wherein said panel member includes an upper surface of a given color and said means defining said path comprise edge portions of said panel member bounding an elongated opening formed therethrough comprising said path.

7. The combination of claim 1 wherein said panel member also includes means defining a second generally straight visually ascertainable path intersecting with and angulated relative to the first-mentioned path and positioned in said plane with said ball teeing means disposed in said second path. said panel member including an upper surface of a given color and said means defining said paths comprise edge portions of said panel bounding elongated intersecting openings formed therethrough comprising said paths.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1960787 *Jan 16, 1932May 29, 1934Macstocker Francis BPrecision golf instructor
US2087334 *Apr 10, 1935Jul 20, 1937Rosengarten Mitchell GGolf practicing device
US2786683 *Jun 28, 1954Mar 26, 1957Eugene ShapiroGolf practice device
US2995376 *May 27, 1959Aug 8, 1961Leo Anthony RGolf training device
US3031889 *Jun 26, 1959May 1, 1962Do Ma Entpr IncDevice for simulating the play of golf
US3229981 *Jun 5, 1963Jan 18, 1966Taber Robert EFeet and ball positioning device for golfers
US3311377 *Mar 11, 1964Mar 28, 1967Holbus Steven AGolf swing practicing device
US3427031 *May 4, 1967Feb 11, 1969Scott John MWedge-shaped golf swing trainer
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3679206 *Apr 23, 1971Jul 25, 1972Shambaugh Howard GGolfing aid
US3868109 *Jun 6, 1973Feb 25, 1975Fowler Joe JGolfer{3 s practice mat
US4364563 *Mar 30, 1981Dec 21, 1982Stafford David FEnergy dissipating ball tee
US4871175 *Jul 14, 1988Oct 3, 1989Levin Steven DAlignment training device for golfers
US5004243 *Oct 16, 1989Apr 2, 1991Dlouhy Stephen JGolf practice apparatus
US5108106 *Nov 13, 1989Apr 28, 1992Cook Ross MGolf alignment template
US5350177 *Mar 3, 1993Sep 27, 1994Furbush Jr Norman CGolf club swing training apparatus
US5492328 *Mar 7, 1995Feb 20, 1996Lundquist; T. R.Golf stance alignment device
US5730660 *Dec 23, 1996Mar 24, 1998Young; William AndrewSand trap practice device
US5855523 *Aug 5, 1997Jan 5, 1999Hatchett; PhillipGolf swing training apparatus
US5893805 *May 8, 1997Apr 13, 1999Vision Golf Products, L.L.C.Golf swing training apparatus
US6932712 *Jan 17, 2003Aug 23, 2005James A. CardosiGolf teaching and training device
US6949029 *Sep 29, 2000Sep 27, 2005Strande Paul JGolf swing path and alignment training device
US7063626Mar 10, 2005Jun 20, 2006Cardosi James AGolf teaching and training device
US7131910 *Jan 7, 2002Nov 7, 2006Townsend Ii Marshall OGolf swing training template
US7214140 *Aug 5, 2005May 8, 2007John Michael CoombsGolfer training aid
US7238118Jun 30, 2005Jul 3, 2007Terrill Timothy TFoldable golf swing training aid for use by a right-handed golfer and a left-handed golfer
US7927228 *Sep 15, 2009Apr 19, 2011Stephen RhodesGolf swing training mat
US8409027 *Jul 17, 2010Apr 2, 2013Carl R. GagnonMethod for a player to play golf and system therefor
WO2003061780A1 *Jan 22, 2003Jul 31, 2003Townsend Marshall O IiGolf swing training template
Classifications
U.S. Classification473/257, 473/278, 434/252
International ClassificationA63B69/36
Cooperative ClassificationA63B69/36
European ClassificationA63B69/36