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Publication numberUS3562813 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 16, 1971
Filing dateJul 3, 1969
Priority dateJul 3, 1969
Also published asDE2021882A1
Publication numberUS 3562813 A, US 3562813A, US-A-3562813, US3562813 A, US3562813A
InventorsOriger Terrence F
Original AssigneeSchjeldahl Co G T
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Neck closure for protective hood device
US 3562813 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

T. F. ORIGER 3,562,813 NECK CLOSURE FOR PROTECTIVE HOOD DEVICE Feb. 16, 1971 Filed y 5, 1969 I (II W- 5 lw v X H 1| L k VII; 111 {ilk 5 2 IN VILN'IYIR. 595065- F 0 LQW g United States Patent 3,562,813 NECK CLOSURE FOR PROTECTIVE HOOD DEVICE Terrence F. Origer, Northfield, Minn., assignor to G. T.

Schjeldahl Company, Northfield, Minn, a corporation of Minnesota Filed July 3, 1969, Ser. No. 838,830 Int. Cl. A42b 1/04, 3/02 US. Cl. 2-3 4 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE In combination, protective hood means adapted to cover and enclose the wearers head, and neck closure means, the protective hood means including a hood enclosure with a closed top end and an open bottom end, and fabricated from gas impermeable flexible film of transparent heat resistant material, the neck closure means being disposed adjacent the open end of the hood and adapted to snugly fit about the neck of the wearer, the neck closure means comprising an annular ring of generally self-supporting elastomeric film.

The present invention relates generally to an enclosure or protective hood device which may be utilized for covering and enclosing the wearers head, this hood b ing fabricated from a gas impermeable flexible film of visibly transparent but heat resistant material. Protective hood devices of this type are particularly adapted for use in emergency situations, such as, for example, an airplane crash, a fire, or other catastrophic occurrence.

It has been ascertained that passengers in tragedies such as the crash of an aircraft or the like frequently survive the impact, but are found to have perished in the aftermath of flame, smoke, or other noxious conditions. In order to assist those survivors in being able to abondon or otherwise leave or evacuate the environment, a hood enclosure has been designed to be worn by these survivors, this hood providing a sufliciently sound protective barrier to assist the wearer for a limited period of time while in the process of evacuating the immediate area. This particular enclosure is sufliciently heat resistant and reflective to infrared so as to provide a maximum degree of protection for a limited period of time. Obviously, in such a situation, several minutes of protection may reasonably be adequate to provide evacuation of survivors from a flaming wreakage situation.

A basic protective hood structure is described in the copending application of Harold I. Reynolds, Ser. No. 668,738, filed Sept. 18, 1967, entitled Heat and Smoke Protective Hoods, and assigned to the same assignee as the present invention.

Briefly, in accordance with the present invention, a protective hood enclosure is provided with a gas impermeable elastomeric neck closure means adjacent the open end of the hood, the neck closure means being adapted to snugly fit about the neck of the wearer. The neck closure means comprises an annular ring of a generally self-supporting elastomeric film, the outer periphery of which is secured to the inner periphery of the base of the hood. The neck closure ring is fabricated from elastomeric material in order to permit the wearer to pull the hood structure over the top of his head, and still retain suflicient resiliency so as to provide a reasonably snug fit about the wearers neck. The neck closure means is preferably self-supporting in order that it will hold the portion of the hood which encloses the wearers face in a generally cylindrical configuration. Thus, the surface of the hood is held away from the wears face and skin, thus providing a greater degree of comfort for the wearer.

Patented Feb. 16, 1971 In addition, the self-supporting feature of the film provides a greater volume of entrapped air for supplying the wearer with the necessary respiratory air for a limited period of time.

Protective hood enclosures are preferably fabricated from a gas impermeable flexible film of transparent but heat resistant material. Such films are now commercially available, one such film being that certain film fabricated from polyimide (amide) substances such as disclosed in US. Pat. No. 2,867,609, this film being essentially polypyromellitimide. In order to assist the film material in being both visibly transparent, but yet reflective to infrared radiation, a visibly transparent protective film of a metal such as aluminum, silver, gold or copper is applied to substantially the entire outer surface of the enclosure. In order to protect the reflective properties of the infrared reflective metal, a protective film may be applied to the metallic surface. The protective film will render the metallic film resistant to oxidation or sulfiding.

In order to reduce costs, it is possible to fabricate the hood from combinations of different materials, the portions being combined together so as to form a gas impermeable transparent hood enclosure. In this connection, the cap portion and the neck portion may be fabricated from one material, while the portion about the wearers eyes may be fabricated from a different material so as to enhance the transparent features.

'It is important to recognize that the hood structure is omni-directional in its visual characteristics, thus permitting the wearer to place the hood over his head in any arcuate disposition, and still enable easy vision. Furthermore, the neck ring feature will prevent the entry of noxious gases or flames into the breathing area. With the neck-ring seal being utilized, it is nevertheless possible for the unit to be provided with an independent supply of air.

Therefore, it is a primary object of the present invention to provide a protective hood apparatus fabricated from a gas impermeable flexible film with transparent heat resistant material, the hood structure being further provided with a resilient neck-ring capable of sealing the enclosure from external air, and also providing a cylindrical configuration for the hood structure while on the wearers head.

It is a further object of the present invention to provide an improved protective hood enclosure for enveloping and otherwise covering the wearers head, the enclosure being provided with a resilient self-supporting neckring closure for maintaining the integrity of the air within the enclosure, and for also maintaining the hood structure outwardly of the wearers face.

Other and further objects of the present invention will become apparent to those skilled in the art upon a study of the following specification, appended claims, and accompanying drawing wherein:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a hood structure, the view showing the bottom neck ring closure prepared in accordance with the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a sectional view taken along the line and in the direction of the arrows 22 of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a view similar to FIG. 1 and illustrating a somewhat modified form of hood structure, the structure further including the neck ring closure at the base thereof; and

FIG. 4 is a sectional view taken along the line and in the direction of the arrows 44 of FIG. 3.

In accordance with the preferred modification of the present invention, the protective hood enclosure generally designated 10 comprises an envelope or the like 11, the upper portion thereof being shown in the form of a hemisphere or the like such as at 12, the lower portion being generally cylindrical such as at 13. In lieu of a hemisphere, other generally circular shell configurations may be utilized such as, for example, a modified hemisphere or semi-ellipsoid may be used. The portion normally covering the eyes is highly transparent, such as is shown at 14. The base of the unit is provided with a gas impermeable elastomeric neck closure means such as at 15, this closure means being mounted adjacent the open end of the hood. The elastomeric neck closure means is generally in the form of an annular ring, and has an inner periphery 16 which is adapted to snugly fit about the neck of the wearer. The annular ring neck closure is substantially self-supporting, thereby being somewhat resistant to lateral sag or droop, the self-supporting feature enhancing the ability of the hood to maintain a generally cylindrical configuration.

The material which has been found highly desirable for use in the neck ring 15 is a polyurethane film, oriented upon being blown. One such polyurethane film is sold by the B. F. Goodrich Company of Akron, Ohio, under the code name Tuftane TF 110.

The envelope structure is preferably formed from a heat resistant flexible film material, one such material which is particularly desirable being that certain polyimide (amide) substance sold under the code name Kapton by the E. I. du Pont de Nemours Corp. of Wilmington, Del. This material is available in film form, the thickness being in the range of from 1 to 3 mils. Polyimide (amide) films of the polypyromellitimide type are capable of withstanding ambient temperatures in excess of about 1400 F.

In order to protect the outer surface of the flexible film, a coating of a visibly transparent infrared reflective metal is applied to the entire outer surface of the enclosure. Visibly transparent films of aluminum, silver, gold or copper may be utilized. Film thicknesses of these various metals ranging from between about 200-400 A. have been found useful, with specific films of aluminum generally being preferred below about 300 A. It has been further found that somewhat heavier films of gold may be utilized, such as in the range of about 450 A. Generally, aluminum having a thickness ranging up to about 250 A. or silver ranging in thickness from about 300- 350 A. have been found to be preferred. With particular attention being directed to FIG. 2 of the drawing, it can be seen that the plastic film shown at 11 is covered with a film of a metal such as aluminum at 17, this metallic film being covered with a second coating or film such as the thermal balance or protective film material 18. One particularly desirable thermal balance material is silicon monoxide, this providing a high desirable A/E ratio, A referring to thermal absorption, E referring to thermal emission, and further providing that radiation in the range of about microns is absorbed. This material further provides protection against environmental conditions which may have an adverse effect on the metallic layer, such as those environments which would contribute to the formation of oxides or sulphides on the metal. In addition to retarding the optical transparent characteristics, sulphides or oxides of aluminum and silver are not as reflective to infrared radiation as the pure metal. It will be further appreciated that the protective film assists in both storage capability and resistance to flame or other hazardous conditions present in catastrophic environments. While the preferred protective film material 18 is silicon monoxide, it will be appreciated that other materials such as magnesium fluoride, evaporated Teflon, or parylene may be utilized. The protective film further makes it possible to handle the materials by hand, since unprotected silver, for example, readily tarnishes upon exposure to the acids normally found in human perspiration.

When silicon monoxide is used as the protective film, a thickness of about 1000 A. is generally preferable. This thickness is adequate to provide the protection, and this protection is then available without risking fracture or rupture of the film.

It will be appreciated that the structure of the protective hood should reasonably be capable of withstanding high ambient temperatures, and hence polypyromellitimide films are highly suited. In other situations, films of polycarbonates, or polyesters such as polyethylene terephthalate (Mylar) or films of polyvinylidine fluoride or other polymeric films may find utility.

In certain instances, it may be desirable to provide a source of atmosphere for breathing by the wearer. In this connection, a canister, container or the like may be provided which can maintain a supply of compressed air, for delivery into the interior of the hood under controlled conditions.

With attention being directed to FIG. 3 of the drawing, it will be observed that the hood generally designated 20 is in three separate parts or pieces,these including a hemispherical top member 21, a generally tubular or cylindrical base portion 22, along with a highly transparent window area 23. The window area 23 is bonded, by means of a suitable adhesive or the like to the portions 21 and 22 as indicated in FIG. 4 at 25, for example. In such a structure, it may be possible to utilize heat resistant materials for the portions 21 and 22, and a highly transparent segment or portion as at 23. The portion 23 may be coated with a film of metal, if desired, but may also be free of such a film in order to enhance transparency.

As indicated in FIG. 4, the structure is provided with a metallic reflective film as at 26. In some instances, it may be deemed suflicient to provide a metallic coating on the upper cap portion only.

It will be appreciated that individuals wearing these hoods may be able to move substantial distances through flame and smoke areas while wearing these hoods, without suffering severely from the flame and smoke environment. In addition to aircraft tragedies and the like, these devices may find utility in other dangerous environments found in manufacturing facilities, refinery facilities and similar areas.

As typical dimensions, the hood structure will normally have a 12" diameter, and be substantially 16" tall. The neck closure means, when fabricated from 2 mil elastomeric polyurethane film has a 3" diameter opening as at 16 in FIGS. 1 and 3. This permits the neck closure means to fit reasonably tightly about the neck of a two year old child, and yet may be worn by adults without experiencing discomfort.

What is claimed is:

-1. In combination with a protective hood means adapted to cover and enclose the wearers head, the hood means comprising:

(a) a hood enclosure adapted to cover and enclose the wearers head, said hood enclosure having an open end, a closed end, and closure means on said open end to sealingly engage the neck of the wearer, and being fabricated from a gas impermeable flexible film of transparent heat resistant material, the hood enclosure including an upper cap portion and a depending tubular face covering portion of substantially uniform construction about the circumference at any individual axial disposition; and

(b) gas impermeable elastomeric neck closure means adjacent the open end and adapted to snugly fit about the neck of the wearer, said elastomeric neck closure means comprising an annular ring of a generally selfsupporting elastomeric film, the outer periphery of the ring being secured to the inner periphery of the base of said hood.

2. The structure as defined in claim 1 being particularly characterized in that said gas impermeable elastomeric neck closure means is fabricated from polyurethane elastomeric film.

3. The structure as defined in claim 2 being particularly characten'zed in that said polyurethane film has a thickness of about 2 mils.

4. The structure as defined in claim 1 being particularly characterized in that said elastomeric neck closure 3,181,532 means is self-supporting, and maintains the base of said 3,295,522 hood generally circular in its normal disposition. M 3,458,864

References Cited 5 454 911 UNITED STATES PATENTS 7/1872 Ackerman 25 7/1911 Vinton 128142.7 7/1948 Lester et al. 2-174 10 10/ 1949 Carlson 2174 6 5/1965 Harris 23X 1/ 1967 Johnson 128-142.7X 8/ 1969 Austin et al. 2202X FOREIGN PATENTS 3/1949 Canada 2-3 JAMES R. BOLER, Primary Examiner US. Cl. X.R.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3751728 *Feb 7, 1972Aug 14, 1973Raymond Lee Organization IncFootball helmet
US3895625 *Feb 28, 1974Jul 22, 1975Ulmer Aeronautique SaHead protection enclosure
US3911914 *Jun 6, 1974Oct 14, 1975Johansson Sven Olof GustavVentilated head cover and safety hood
US4078561 *Jun 14, 1976Mar 14, 1978The Raymond Lee Organization, Inc.Air supplied emergency helmet
US4221216 *Mar 6, 1978Sep 9, 1980Robertshaw Controls CompanyEmergency escape breathing apparatus
US4233970 *Nov 16, 1978Nov 18, 1980Robertshaw Controls CompanyEmergency escape breathing apparatus
US4523588 *Apr 27, 1982Jun 18, 1985Life Products, Inc.Protective pillow assembly
US4554683 *Jan 21, 1981Nov 26, 1985Wong Technology, Inc.Protective enclosure having self-contained air supply
US4572178 *Mar 27, 1984Feb 25, 1986Toyo Cci Kabushiki KaishaEmergency mask
US4583535 *Aug 7, 1980Apr 22, 1986Saffo John JProtection mask
US4627431 *Mar 12, 1985Dec 9, 1986E. I. Du Pont De Nemours And CompanyProtective hood with CO2 absorbent
US4683880 *May 16, 1983Aug 4, 1987E. I. Du Pont De Nemours And CompanyToxic fume protective hood and method of construction
US5109549 *May 22, 1990May 5, 1992Mattinson Beverley IHeat resistant material
US5142706 *Aug 15, 1991Sep 1, 1992Layhon Vera FDressing gown hood
US5214803 *Feb 19, 1992Jun 1, 1993David ShichmanSmoke hood
US5549104 *Sep 16, 1994Aug 27, 1996E. D. Bullard CompanyAir delivery and exhalation exhaust system for protective helmets
US5890236 *Sep 5, 1997Apr 6, 1999Harges, Jr.; Cordell FrankFirefighter goggles
US6016805 *Mar 10, 1998Jan 25, 20003M Innovative Properties CompanyFace seal for respirator
US6340024Nov 4, 1994Jan 22, 2002Dme CorporationProtective hood and oral/nasal mask
US6701920Jun 2, 2000Mar 9, 2004Gerald L. CoxHead enclosing gas hood
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US7197774Nov 12, 2004Apr 3, 20073M Innovative Properties CompanySupplied air helmet having face seal with differentiated permeability
US7398562Mar 10, 2004Jul 15, 2008Easy Rhino Designs, Inc.Article with 3-dimensional secondary element
US7805775 *Sep 10, 2004Oct 5, 2010Shoei Co., Ltd.Neck cover for full face type helmet and full face type helmet
US8613113Feb 25, 2009Dec 24, 2013Todd A. ResnickCompact protective hood with vulcanized neck dam interface
EP0124994A2 *Mar 29, 1984Nov 14, 1984Toyo Cci Kabushiki KaishaEmergency mask
WO1986003130A1 *Nov 30, 1984Jun 5, 1986Bertil WerjefeltAircraft safety cushion assemblies
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WO1999011207A1 *Sep 4, 1998Mar 11, 1999Harges Cordell Frank JrFirefighter goggle
Classifications
U.S. Classification2/410, 2/202, 2/5, D28/19, 128/201.23, D24/110.3
International ClassificationA61F9/02, A62B17/04, A62B17/00
Cooperative ClassificationA62B17/04, A61F9/029, A61F9/022
European ClassificationA61F9/02F, A62B17/04, A61F9/02Z