Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3563238 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 16, 1971
Filing dateDec 24, 1968
Priority dateDec 24, 1968
Publication numberUS 3563238 A, US 3563238A, US-A-3563238, US3563238 A, US3563238A
InventorsThomas J Mcguire
Original AssigneeBerger Brothers Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Elastic binder
US 3563238 A
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [72] Inventor Thomas J- McGuire South Royalton, Vt. [211 Appl. No. 786,578 [22] Filed Dec. 24, 1968 [45] Patented Feb. 16, 1971 [73] Assignee The Berger Brothers Company New Haven, Conn.

[54] ELASTIC BINDER 13 Claims, 6 Drawing Figs. [52] U.S. Cl 128/157, 128/171, 128/541, 128/579 [51] Int. Cl. A61f [50] Field ofSearch 128/155, 171, 539, 540, 541, 542, 544, 546, 548 [56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,301,865 4/1919 Metz 128/540 1,534,693 4/1925 Demagnani 1,764,209 6/1930 Kemp ABSTRACT: An elastic binder for applying support to parts of the body which are damaged or wounded, comprising a plurality ofelastic strips which are elastic along their length and substantially inelastic along their width. The adjacent lengthwise edges of each pair of elastic strips are secured together to form a set of at least two combined strips. The combined strips are overlapped along their lengthwise edges and the free lengthwise edges of one combined strip is stitched at measured intervals to the other combined strip which overlaps it. Means are secured at the ends of the combined strips for fastening the strips together in a body-encircling manner.

ELASTIC BINDER This invention relates to support garments and, in particular, to an elastic binder which can be used to support loose bandages applied on wounded or injured parts of the body.

There are presently many types of body support garments or binders on the market. Scultetus and cotton cloth binders have many disadvantages, in that they are difficult to keep in place, thus requiring frequent attention. Cotton cloth binders are particularly disadvantageous,.in that they are wound about the body member, so that they are difficult to remove. In cases where the wound has to be inspected frequently, the removal and reapplication of the cotton binder is difficult and time consuming. This disadvantage is also found with the so-called Ace bandages, which are wound about the body member. These types of bandages must be unwrapped completely to inspect the wounded part or member. Subsequently they must be rewound completely about the part or body. With respect to Ace bandages, it should also be pointed out that they are difficult to handle and to apply to the part of the body to be covered. Adhesive elastics are also commonly used. These types of bandages have only limited application for, when applied to large wounds, they create too much pain when they are removed. Further, Ace bandages and adhesive elastic bandages suffer from the disadvantage that they cannot be laundered very well. Thus, these types of bandages are discarded when they become soiled.

Another type of binder which is presently available comprises two or three elastic strips which are held together along their lengthwise edges by fagoting stitching. Attached to the ends of the elastic strips are hooks and eyes for fastening the binder about a body member, such as a waist and hips. Although such binder has a number of important advantages, such as the ease of removing or applying it so as to inspect a wound, it has many important disadvantages. Thus, such a binder is very uncomfortable to wear. The fagoting stitching permits the adjacent edges of the strips to move and pinch the skin of the body member which it supports during bending of the body member, Further, as can be noted, the pressure of stretched fagoting stitching against the skin is very irritating and tends to leave marks. Additionally, as a result of fagoting stitching, the relative movement of the elastic strips transverse to the length of the strips, is limited such that the elastic binder tends to apply undesirable pressure to parts of the body member when the body member bends.

The use of fagoting stitching to join the adjacent lengthwise edges of the elastic strips together requires the elastic strip to be of sturdy material. Such sturdy material is necessary, so that it will have the strength to hold the fagoting stitching.

However, elastic strips which are sturdy enough to hold fagoting stitching are abrasive and irritating to the skin. 'As a result, such elastic strips are usually provided with a Helenca lining or are lined with some other soft material, thus adding to the cost of the binder.

Soft elastic strips, which cannot hold fagoting stitching but are sturdy enough to provide the necessary support to the body member cannot be used to construct this type of binder. Thus, it can be seen that this type of elastic binder of the prior art is very uncomfortable and irritating to the body member which it supports. Therefore, there is a need for an elastic binder which will not have the foregoing disadvantages.

Accordingly, it is an object of this invention to provide a new and improved inexpensive elastic binder.

Another object of the invention is to provide a new and im proved elastic binder which will closely tit the body member regardless of its position.

A further object of the invention is to provide a new and im proved elastic binder which will closely fit the body member regardless of its position.

A further object of the invention is to provide a new and improved elastic binder which will provide sufficient pressure to the wounded or afflicted area of the body.

Still another object of the invention is to provide a new and improved elastic binder that will provide a comfortable support to a body member.

Still other objects and advantages of the invention will in part be obvious and will in part appear from the specification.

The invention accordingly comprises an article of manufacture possessing the features, properties and relation of elements which will be exemplified in the article hereinafter described and the scope of the invention will be indicated in the claims.

For a fuller understanding of the nature and objects of the invention reference is had to the following description taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 illustrates the preferred embodiment of the elastic binder of this invention, fastened on the waist and hips of a person;

FIG. 2 is a front view of the preferred embodiment of FIG.

FIG. 3 is a back view of the preferred embodiment of FIG.

FIG. 4 is a sectional view taken along line 4-4 of the preferred embodiment of FIG. 1;

FIG. 5 is a sectional view taken along line 5-5 of FIG. 3; and

FIG. 6 is a view similar to FIG. 5, of an alternate more preferred embodiment of the invention.

The elastic binder of this invention may be used to impart support to any part of the body. The preferred embodiment of the invention is constructed from four elastic strips which are elastic lengthwise and substantially inelastic along their widths. The elastic strips are divided. into two pairs, wherein the adjacent lengthwise edges of each pair of elastic strips are secured together to form two combined strips. The adjacent lengthwise edges of each pair of elastic strips are secured to each other by stitching on both sides of their lengthwise adjacent edges a narrow elastic band.

In a more preferred embodiment, the narrow elastic band is eliminated and each pair of strips is secured together by overlapping the adjacent lengthwise edges and stitching them together to form the combined strips. The combined strips are then secured together by overlapping the strips and stitching at measured intervals the free lengthwise edge of one combined strip to the part of the other combined strip which it overlaps. Hooks and eyes are attached to the ends of the elastic strips so that the ends may be fastened together, such that the elastic binder encircles and supports a body member.

In FIG. 1, the preferred embodiment of the elastic binder 10 of this invention is shown about the waist and hips of a wearer. Detailed views of the elastic binder are shown in FIGS. 25. It should be understood that, although the elastic binder illustrated in these FIGS. is shown encircling the waist and hips of an individual, the elastic binder of this invention can be constructed for use about any part of the body.

With respect to FIGS. 2-5, it is seen that the elastic binder is constructed from four elastic strips which are elastic along their lengthwise edges and substantially inelastic along their widths. Although the strips illustrated have a length substantially larger than their widths, it should be noted that when the binder is to be applied to a body member of small diameter, the lengths of the strips can be the same as or smaller than the widths. Generally, the widths of these strips are about three inches since they are produced in this size. However, for the purposes of this invention, these elastic strips can have any length or width. Additionally, strips of different widths may be used. The strips do not have to be all of the same width, as illustrated in the preferred embodiment.

Pairs of these elastic strips are secured together along their lengthwise, adjacent edges so as to form combined strips. Although many means may be utilized to secure the pairs of strips together, it has been discovered that there are substantial advantages in using an elastic double-edged lip. As can be seen, the adjacent lengthwise edges of the strips are secured together by stitching a narrow elastic band 12 onto the adjacent edges. Although one elastic band may be used for each pair of adjacent edges, a stronger connection is formed by stitching a narrow elastic band on both sides of elastic strip 11 along the lengthwise edges of the elastic band as shown at 13. An elastic band is preferred to a regular cloth band since the elastic band permits the elastic strips to freely stretch along their lengthwise edges. Also, the elastic bands should be substantially inelastic along their widths and elastic along their lengths so as to have the same elastic properties as the strip 11. in accordance with this invention, however, elastic bands 'which are elastic along their widths as well as their lengths,

can also be used. For purposes of economy, the elastic bands used are about one inch in width, just wide enough so they can be securely stitched to the edges of the strips. There are many advantages in stitching an elastic band to the elastic strips to hold them together. Basically, this permits a more secure and stronger connection of the two strips than has heretofore been possible with prior art methods.

Another important advantage is that it produces a comfortable binder, in a construction where fagoting or other type of stitching is used to hold the strips together, the adjacent lengthwise edges which are stitched together move and tend to pinch the skin of the body member, making the binder quite uncomfortable to wear, especially for extended periods of time. Also, the elastic bands permit use of softer elastic strips. When fagoting stitching is used to join the adjacent lengthwise edges, the elastic strips must be of sturdy material that can hold the fagoting stitching. Such material tends to be abrasive to the skin and, therefore, the elastic strips must be lined with a soft material. This is not necessary with the present invention, since the use of elastic bands permits use of soft elastic strips. It is to be understood however that, if desired, the elastic binder of invention can also be lined with a soft material. Further, two elastic bands are sewn together at about midway of their lengthwise edges as shown at 14, in order to form two sets of lips. This is done before the elastic bands are stitched onto the elastic strips, so as to facilitate the stitching of the elastic bands to the elastic strips.

A more preferred embodiment of the invention is shown in FIG. 6 for securing the adjacent lengthwise edges of the elastic strips so as to form combined strips. As can be seen from this FIG. the adjacent lengthwise edges of strips 11 are secured together by overlapping the adjacent edges for about onequarter of an inch and stitching them together, as shown at 15. Although this type of connection is preferred to that of FIG. 5, because it is less expensive, it does not provide as strong a connection between the elastic strips as the double elastic lips of FIG. 5. It should be understood, however, that the means for connecting the adjacent lengthwise edges of the strips as illustrated in FIGS. and 6 are preferred, but do not limit the invention. For the purposes of the present invention, any suitable means can be used for securing the adjacent lengthwise edges together to form combined strips.

The two elastic strips which are joined together as above, form a single combined strip. Two of the combined strips are then overlapped so that, preferably, one elastic strip on a combined strip just about covers another single strip on the second combined strip, as clearly shown in H0. 4. Although this amount of overlapping is preferred, since it permits good support without unduly shortening the width of the elastic binder, it should be understood that there can be more or less overlapping.

The combined strips are sewn together by stitching the free lengthwise edge of one overlapped strip to the underlying strip, as at 16. The combined strips are sewn together at measured intervals for about one-quarter of an inch. Preferably, the measured intervals are about 6 inches. Thus, about every 6 inches along the free lengthwise edge of the overlapped strip it is sewn to the other combined strip for about one-quarter of an inch. It should be understood that these distances were found to produce a better binder, but are not necessarily criti cal to the present invention. The stitching of the combined strips in this manner permits relative movement of the combined strips along the measured intervals while, at the same time, maintaining the strips together. Thus, as the result of movement of the body member on which the binder is positioned, the combined strips can move a great distance relative to each other without the binder as a whole riding up or moving on the body member. In binders where fagoting stitching is used to hold the elastic strips together, the relative movement of the elastic strips is limited to less than one-quarter of an inch. In the present invention, the combined strips can move relative to each other transverse to their lengths for at least an inch. This large relative movement keeps the whole binder from riding up or moving on the body member when the wearer bends or sits down. The most important advantage resulting from this large relative movement, is that it provides more comfort to the wearer. There is no skin pinching of the body member nor are large pressures applied against the body member during the bending of the body member. Also, the free lengthwise edge of the strip adjacent the body member is preferably stitched to the other combined strip. This will be described further below.

It should be noted that when the elastic binder is applied to a body member, the overlapped strips are applied directly over the wounded or injured part of the body so as to apply sufficient pressure to the loose bandage directly applied over the wound. However, it was found the overlapped strips applied too much pressure. In view of this, the external overlapped strip is cut at its central part so that the width of the central part is decreased by one-half and, preferably, onethird of its size. The cut is such that the edge 17 forms a parabolic curve. By cutting the edge in the form of a parabolic curve, a substantial part of the overlapped strip is cut away. This cutaway edge 17 is covered by an elastic lip 18 so as to prevent the cutaway edge from becoming ragged through use.

When the elastic binder of this invention is fastened about the body member, the cutaway portion of the overlapping strip is placed directly over the wounded or injured parts of the body external to the body. As a result, the external overlapped strip applies pressure above and on either side of the wound so as to hold the elastic strip below it tightly pressed against the body member during movement of the body member. Further, the pressing action of the overlapping strip will keep the underlying strip against the wound without excessive pressure. it is for this reason that the underlying strip, whose free edge has been stitched at intervals to the overlapping combined strip, is positioned directly over the body member.

In addition, in order to insure a snug fit of the elastic binder on the body member, the ends of the elastic strip are tapered, such that the ends 19 of the complete elastic binder are tapered. Thus, in the elastic binder illustrated, the upper shorter elastic strip will fit snugly about the waist, while the larger lower strip will fit snugly about the hips. if the ends 19 were not tapered, the binder would tend to be too loose about the waist and too tight about the hips.

The elastic binder is fastened onto the body member by means of hooks and eyes located at the ends 19 of the binder. Cotton tapes 20 and 21 are first applied to the ends of the elastic binder, wherein one tape 20 is applied to the outside end of the binder and the tape 21 is applied to the inside end of the binder. Affixed to tape 20 are two rows of eyes 22. While only one row of eyes need be used, it is advantageous to have more than one row for adjustment for different-size persons. On tape 21 is attached a single row of books 23 for hooking into the eyes 22, when the elastic binder is secured about a body member. Although the preferred embodiment has been illustrated, with reference to hooks and eyes for fastening the ends of the elastic strips together, it should be understood that any suitable means can be used, such as clips. Additionally, the ends of the elastic binder may be stitched together or sewn together on a cloth or elastic band similar to elastic band 12. If the ends of the elastic binder of the preferred embodiment were so sewn together, the wearer would put the binder on by stepping into it. However, it can be seen that the hook and eye means for fastening the elastic binder facilitate the application of the binder to a wounded person and permits the binder to fit snugly on persons of different sizes.

in addition, the elastic bands 12 need not be secured to elastic strips 11 only by stitching. Adhesive or other suitable means may be used for this purpose. Stitching is preferred, however, since it results in an inexpensive and secure connec tion between the elastic band and the elastic strips.

it can be seen from the preferred embodiment, that elastic strips 11 are formed from a single piece of elastic material. In this respect, the elastic strips 11 may be formed from a pair of elastic strips which are joined end-to-end by stitching onto the adjacent ends a narrow cotton or' elastic band. In particular, the elastic binder of H68. 1-6 may be formed from two sets of four elastic strips which are half as long as the elastic strips of these FIGS. From these elastic strips four elastic panels are formed, wherein each panel comprises'two elastic strips joined end-to-end. The combined panels are then formed by joining the adjacent lengthwise edges of each pair of panels to form two combined panels. The complete elastic binder is then formed from the two combined panels in the same way as the binder of FIGS. 1-6.

Additionally, the preferred embodiment is illustrated as being formed from two combined strips which are overlapped. It should be understood, however, that the elastic binder of this invention can also be formed from three or more combined elastic strips, wherein the additional combined strips are joined to the two combined strips of FIGS. 1-6 inv the same way as the two combined strips of FIGS. 1-6' are joined together. Thus, each combined strip would be overlappedby the strip directly above it to which it would be secured at measured intervals. Further, each elastic strip which overlaps a strip directly below it would be formed in the manner of edge 17.

It will thus be seen that the objects set forth above, among those made apparent from the preceding description, are efficiently attained and, since certain changes may be made in the above article without departing from the spirit and scope of theinvention, it is intended that all matter contained in the foregoing description and shown in the accompanying drawings shall be interpreted as illustrative and not in a limiting sense.

It is also to be understood that the following claims are intended to cover all the generic and specific features of the invention herein described and all statements of the scope of the invention which, as a matter of language, might be said to fall therebetween.

1. An elastic binder for applying support to parts of the body which are damaged or wounded, comprising:

a. a plurality of elastic strips which are elastic along their lengths and substantially inelasticalong their widths, the lengthwise edges of said strips being substantially parallel;

b. means for continuously securing adjacent lengthwise edges of each pair of elastic strips so as to form a plurality of combined strips;

c. means for securing the combined strips along their lengths at measured intervals, such that the combined strips overlap and are capable of substantial transverse movement relative to each other; and

d. means secured at the ends ofthe elastic strips for fastening the strips together in a body-encircling form.

2. The elastic binder of claim 1, wherein the means for securing adjacent lengthwise edges of each pair of elastic strips comprises stitching a narrow elastic band to the adjacent lengthwise edges to form a plurality of combined strips.

3. The elastic binder of claim 1, wherein the means for securing adjacent lengthwise edges of each pair of elastic strips comprises overlapping theadjacent lengthwise edges and stitching them together to form a plurality of combined strips.

4. The elastic binder of claim 3, wherein a narrow elastic band is stitched on both sides of the lengthwise adjacent edges of each pair of elastic strips so as to secure each pair of plastic strips together, and wherein the two narrow elastic bands secured on each side of adjacent lengthwise edges of the elastic strips are stitched together along their length and between the edges of the elastic strips, so as to form a double S. The elastic binder of claim 1, wherein the means for securing at least two of the combined strips along their lengths comprises stitching the combined strips together at measured intervals along the length of the'strips.

6. The elastic binder of claim 5, wherein the combined strips are overlapped so that two elastic strips are superimposed upon each other, and wherein the free lengthwise edge of one overlapped strip is stitched to the other combined strip at measured intervals, such that the combined strips are capable of substantial movement relative to each other in a direction transverse to the lengthwise direction of the strips and along the length of the strips.

7. The elastic binder of claim 6, wherein there are two combined strips and wherein the superimposed elastic strip which does not have its free lengthwise edge stitched to the other combined strip is cut along its free lengthwise edge, such that the width of the elastic strip is substantially reduced along a portion of the elastic strip, wherein the cut-out portion of the strip is placed directly over the wound and external to the wound when the body garment is applied to the body member.

8. The elastic binder of claim 7, wherein the free lengthwise edge of the superimposed elastic strip is formed in a parabolic curve so as to reduce the width of the strip by about one-half at the central portion of the strip.

9. The elastic binder of claim 1, wherein the ends of the elastic strips are tapered, resulting in the ends of the complete garment being tapered, such that the elastic binder provides a snug fit about the body member.

10. The elastic binder of claim 1, wherein the means secured at the ends of the elastic strips: are adjustable for varying the circumferential size of the binder.

1,1. The elastic binder of claim 1, wherein the inner surfaces of the elastic strips are lined with a soft lining material.

12. An elastic binder for applying support to parts of the body which are damaged or wounded, comprising:

a. a plurality of elastic strips which are elastic only about their lengths and are secured to each other end-to-end so as to form panels of two elastic strips secured end-to-end;

b. means for securing the adjacentlengthwise edges of each pair of said panels so as to form a plurality of combined panels; Y

c. means for securing the combined panels at intervals along their length, such that one panel in each combined panel is superimposed on another panel and capable of movement relative to each other in a direction transverse to the length and along the length of the panels; and

d. means secured to the free ends of the panels for fastening the panels together in a body-encircling form.

13. An elastic binder for applying'support to body members which are damaged or wounded, comprising:

a. four body-encircling strips which are substantially inelastic along their widths and elastic along their lengths; b. four elastic bands which are the same length as the strips and of much narrower width, stitched on both sides of the adjacent lengthwise edges of each pair of elastic strips so as to form first and second combined strips,

, whereby the combined strips overlap, such that one elastic strip on the first combined strip overlaps a single elastic strip on the second combined strip, whereby the free lengthwise edge of the superimposed strip of the first combined strip is stitched to the: center of the second combined strip at measured intervals, and whereby the free lengthwise edge of the superimposed strip of the second combined strip is cut in the form of a parabolic curve so as to reduce the width by one-half at about the center part of the strip; and

c. hooks and eyes secured at the ends of the combined strips for fastening the strips together in a body-encircling form, wherein the ends of the strips are tapered so as to snugly fit the body member.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1301865 *Jul 19, 1918Apr 29, 1919Victory Corset And Girdle Co IncFabric.
US1534693 *Apr 3, 1924Apr 21, 1925De Magnani Yole BruscoCorset
US1764209 *Jan 16, 1930Jun 17, 1930Fitch Kemp VivianDiaphragm support for personal wear
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3954698 *Dec 20, 1974May 4, 1976Bp Chemicals International LimitedPolymerisation process
US4527566 *Mar 14, 1983Jul 9, 1985Abare Enterprises, Inc.Body wrap
Classifications
U.S. Classification602/61, 450/117
International ClassificationA61F13/00, A61F13/15
Cooperative ClassificationA61F13/00, A61F2013/00119, A61F2013/00127, A61F2013/8476, A61F15/004, A61F2013/00102
European ClassificationA61F15/00C, A61F13/14