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Publication numberUS3563553 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 16, 1971
Filing dateApr 29, 1969
Priority dateApr 29, 1969
Publication numberUS 3563553 A, US 3563553A, US-A-3563553, US3563553 A, US3563553A
InventorsBaldwin Bradford J, Conklin Robert M, Russell Jack A
Original AssigneeBrunswick Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Automatic indexing of indexible tee for automatic lie selection
US 3563553 A
Images(5)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent Bradford J. Baldwin;

Robert M. Conklin; Jack A. Russell, Muskegon, Mich.

Apr. 29, 1969 Feb. 16, 1971 Brunswick Corporation [72] Inventors [21 Appl. No. [22] Filed [45] Patented [73] Assignee [54] AUTOMATIC INDEXIN G OF INDEXIBLE TEE FOR AUTOMATIC LIE SELECTION 18 Claims, 8 Drawing Figs.

[52] 0.8. Cl. 273/176, 273/195, 273/183, 273/203 [51 Int. Cl. A63b 67/02, A63b 69/36 [50] Field of Search 273/176, 195, 184, 185, 183, 203; 73/379 [56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,143,350 8/1964 Lester 273/195(A) 3,501,152 3/1970 Conklinetal. 3,513,707 5/1970 Russelletal Primary ExaminerGeorge J. Marlo Attorney-Hofgren, Wegren, Allen, Stellman and McCord ABSTRACT: An automatic lie selection control for indexible tee constructions which are adapted to dispose any one of a plurality of different lie simulating mats at a predetermined location in a tee area of an indoor golf game. In one embodiment, lie material information is derived from scene selection switches of a projector that projects scenes of different portions of holes on a golf course to a screen for display purposes for a golfer playing the game. In another embodimentjlie selection information is derived from a coding associated with each frame on a film illustrating various scenes from a golf course so that projection of a selected scene results in the disposition of a corresponding lie material at a predetermined location at the tee area.

I AENTEDFEB SIQIL-.

- S 1 OF 5 I yfla,

AUTOMATIC INDEXING OF INDEXIBLE TEE FOR AUTOMATIC LIE SELECTION BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION In the copending application of Anderson, Ser. No. 545,41 l, filed Apr. 26, 1966, 1 entitled Golf Tee" and assigned to the same assignee as the instant application, there is disclosed an indexible tee device for use in indoor golf games. The tee device includes a turret mounted for rotation about a generally horizontal axis, which turret bears about its periphery three different mats, each simulating the lie on a dif ferent portion of a golf hole. Typically, one mat simulates the lie on the fairway, another simulates the'lie in the rough, and a third simulates the lie in the sand trap. Control means are provided for the turret so that upon appropriate manipulation of manually operable lie selection switches the turret may be rotated to dispose any one of the three mats at a location a ball thereon and hit the same 7 whereat the golfer may place with a golf club.

The Anderson construction has proved to be quite successful in that the mats used thereon provide very realistic simulation of the varying lies and the device is easy to operate. However, in order to select the appropriate lie simulating mat, a distinct physical act on the part of the golfer, namely, manipulation of lie selection switches, is required. ln indoor golf games, time is of great importance to the owner of an establishment housing such a game. Specifically, the proprietor's income dcpends uponxthe number of golfers who can play the game in a given period of time and as a result, it is highly desirable that the time required for the golfer to perform a given act be minimized so that more golfers may play the game in a given timeperiod.

Furthermore, because not all golfers playing the game will follow the instructions to the desired extent, it is also desirable that the game be fabricated to present-as little opportunity for a golfer to fail to follow instructions as possible.

When the Anderson device is used in a golf game, a certain amount of time is required for a golfer, prior to each shot, to manipulate the manually operable lie selection switches to select a suitable lie. Furthermore, there is the possibility that the golferwill fail to operate such switches and thus not obey the rules of the game. The latter situation could result in a golfer, quite unfairly, hitting a ball from an easy lie such as the lie on the fairway when a shot from a more difficult lie such as the rough simulating lie or the sand simulating lie is required.

SUMMARY 01 THE INVENTION The invention, in its broadest sense, automatically indicates within a tee area, to a golfer, which of at least two different lie simulating mats should be used by a golfer in playing a shot, in response to'the receipt of information, relative to a particular location on a simulated golf hole in an indoor golf game from which a particular shot is to be played. In the exemplary embodiment of the invention, the indicating means are in the form of an indexible tee'structure wherein a plurality of different lie simulating mats are mounted about the periphery of a turret. i t i In the exemplary embodiment of the invention, the means for receiving information relative to a particular location on a 7 hole from which a shot is to be played comprise alternatively, either scene selection means for causing a projector to project 7 a scene from the location on a screen at the tee area or means responsive to the disposition of a particular scene for projection on the screen after scene selection has been accomplished. While the exemplary embodiment of the invention is described in conjunction with a projector having manually operable scene selection means, the invention is not limited to the use of such manually operable means and it is contemplated that the same may be readily used in such indoor golf game systems previously proposed or considered in the future that use automatic scene selection means.

In the case of the first embodiment mentioned generally in the preceding paragraph, each hole to be played on the indoor the same lie condition throughout. That is, each zone will consist entirely of the rough, entirely of the sand or entirely of the fairway if three corresponding lie simulating meansare used. There is also provided a scene for each zone with the scene representing the view of the hole from the particular zone with which it is associated. Furthermore, each zone and each corresponding scene are provided with identification numbers for use in manual scene control and each number for each scene is chosen so that each number indicates a fairway zone, other numbers indicate rough zones and still other numbers indicate sand zones. Therefore, when the manual scene selection means are operated by programming the scene with a particular identification number for a particular scene, the same information provides an indication of the particular lie simulating means to be used in playing the shot from that zone and means are provided for automatically indexing the tee turret accordingly.

In the case of the second embodiment, each hole is again zoned so that each zone has the same lie throughout but there is no necessary correlation between zone identification num bers and the particular lie within that zone. Rather, on a film strip used by the projector and containing images of the various scenes that may be projected, each scene, which depicts the view from a particular zone, is provided with a code which indicates the lie for the zone corresponding to the scene. Thus. disposition of the selected scene for'projection on the screen provides lie information which may be sensed for controlling DESCRlPTlON or THE DRAWINGS,

FIG. 1 is a perspective view illustrating one environment in which the indexible tee structure may be used;

FIG. 2 is a side elevation of an exemplary embodiment of the invention with parts broken away for clarity;

FIG. 3 is a sectional view taken approximately along the line 3-3 of FIG. 2;

FIG. 4 is a logic diagram illustrating a control system for the indexible tee structure;

FIG. 5 illustrates a map divided into a plurality of zones, each having distinct codes which is utilized in the golf game to simplify automatic lie selection in one embodiment of the invention;

HO. 6 is a schematic illustrating control circuitry for automatically selecting the required lie in one embodiment;

FlG. 7 illustrates a portion of a film strip adapted for lie selection purposes according to a second embodiment of the invention; and

GENERAL DESCRIPTION OF ANlNDOOR GOLF GAME The automatic lie selection control means of the instant invention is primarily intended for use with the more sophisticated types of indoor golf games currently known wherein a direction parameter as well as a distance parameter of a ball hit from an indoor golf game tee is computed. This is in contrast to those games wherein'only a distance parameter is computed although, in some instances, the instant invention will have significant utility in the latter type of game also.

The foregoing distinction is based on the fact that, for the most part, the games computing distance assume that the golfers shot will always terminate on the fairway and there is, therefore, no need to provide the golfer with a lie simulating the rough or the sand. On the other hand, where the direction of a golfers shot is determined as well as the distance thereof, the shot may terminate to the right or the left of the fairway and therefore be in the rough; or mayhave a point of termination that causes the same to come to rest in a sand trap which occupies merely a portion of the fairway and/or the rough.

A number of such relatively sophisticated indoor golf games have been proposed from time to time and are well-known to those skilled in the art and the instant invention is capable of use with any of such indoor golf games. However, preferred embodiments to be described hereafter are particularly well suited for the type of indoor golf game made according to the teachings of the copending applications of Russell et al., Ser. No. 588,922, filed Oct. 24, 1966, entitled Golf Game Computing System" now U.S. Pat. No. 3,513,707; Conklin et al., Ser. No. 588,856, filed Oct. 24, 1966, entitled Golf Game," now U.S. Pat. No. 3,501,152; and Pratt et al., Ser. No. 574,218, filed Aug. 22, 1966, entitled "Visual Display System"; all of which are assigned to the same assignee as the instant application. The details of said Russell et al., Conklin et al., and Pratt et al. applications are herein incorporated by reference.

An indoor golf game made according to the teachings of the aforementioned Russell et al., Conklin et al., and Pratt et al. applications firstly utilizes a data acquisition system associated with a tee point at which a golfer may hit a ball for acquiring data relative to the initial trajectory of a shot. Such data is then utilized by the computer of the Russell et al. application which, in turn, generates three outputs relative to the location of the ball with respect to three, mutually perpendicular coordinates, during the theoretical flight of the ball.

The information thus computed is then used to control a socalled ball spot projector which projects a spot of light on a scene which is projected on a screen by the projector system of the Pratt et al. application in such a way as to indicate to the golfer the trajectory of the golf ball. When the computer has determined that the flight of the ball has ended, two of the informational outputs thereof are then fed to a so-called map spot projector" which utilizes the information to project a spot of light on a map of the golf hole being played to indicate the point of termination, both in terms of distance and direction of the shot. The golfer playing the game then observes the point of termination of the map and utilizes coded information in the point of termination to select the scene to be displayed for the next shot. Such a scene will correspond to the view of the hole being played from the point of termination of the preceding shot. The manner in which the foregoing is accomplished is described in the above-mentioned application of Conklin et al.

Thereafter, when the golfer is to make a succeeding shot, the Pratt et al. system is manually programmedto provide the desired scene that corresponds to the point of termination of the preceding shot.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS Indexible Tee Structure An exemplary embodiment of an indexible tee structure made according to the invention is shown in FIG. 1 in the environment of an indoor golf game. The indoor golf game includes a tee area, generally designated 10, in which the indexible tee structure, generally designated 12, is disposed. At the front of the tee area and in the general direction of flight of a ball hit from the indexible tee 12 there is disposed a screen, generally designated 14, which receives the projected image of a scene on a golf course from a projector, generally designated 16. To one side of the tee area 10 there may be disposed a console, generally designated 18, which may provide for control of the projector 16 and/or control of the indexible tee 12 as well as such other elements of the indoor golf game as might be manually operated.

The indexible tee 12 includes a support in the form of a turret, generally designated 20, which is arranged to dispose a mat 22 in an opening 24 in the tee area. Appropriate drive means, generally designated 26 are arranged in conjunction with a drive train, generally designated 28 to rotate the turret 20 so that any selected mat 22 about the periphery of the turret may be disposed in the opening 24.

As seen in FIG. 2, the turret 20 is generally triangular in shape and supports three mats which, in the exemplary embodiment, are constructed and arranged to simulate the lie on three different portions of a golf hole. One mat 22F is constructed in any suitable manner to simulate the fairway on a golf course while a second mat 22S is constructed to simulate the lie in a sand trap. The manner in which the mat 225 is constructed may be ascertained by reference to the copending application of Anderson et al., Ser. No. 587,839, filed Oct. 19, 1966, entitled Method and Means for Simulating a Sand Trap" now U.S. Pat. No 3,466,048 and assigned to the same assignee as the instant application.

Finally, there is provided a third mat 22R which is constructed to simulate the rough on a golf hole. The details of construction of the mat 22R may be ascertained by reference to the copending application of Anderson et al., Ser. No. 588,919, filed Oct. 24,1966, entitled Method and Means for Simulating the Rough on a Golf Course," now U.S. Pat. No. 3,459,107 and assigned to the same assignee as the instant application.

In general, each of the mats 22F, 22S and 22R comprise a plurality of bristles 30 which are mounted on a backing member 32. The backing member 32 is secured by means of screws 34 to a metal shell 36 forming part of the turret 20. Interposed between adjacent ones of the mats are suitable moldings 38.

The turret 20 is mounted for rotation about its longitudinal axis defined by means of a shaft 40 journaled in a pair of support brackets 42 (only one of which is shown) and which may be secured to any suitable support frame located below the upper surface of the tee area 10.

As viewed in FIGS. 2 and 3, a gear 44 is secured to the shaft 40 by means of a pin 46 so that driving movement of the gear 44 will cause rotation of the turret 20. The gear 44 is, in turn, in engagement with a sector gear 48 formed on part of a disc The disc 50 is mounted for rotation with a shaft 52 which is journaled in a bearing 54 (FIG. 3) supported'by the bracket 42.

A portion, generally designated 56, of the disc 50 is formed to provide a Geneva movement. The Geneva movement portion 56 includes three circular concave recesses 58 with the center recess 58 being separated from the two side recesses by radially extending slots 60. The slots 60 are adapted to receive an operating tooth 62 which is mounted on a disc 64 near the periphery thereof.

The disc 64 is mounted on a shaft 66 and secured thereto by means of a key 68 so that when the shaft 66 is rotated, the tooth 62 will move therewith. The disc 64, at a point opposite the tooth 62, also includes a circular segment 70 having a concave outer surface of the same radius as the circular recesses 58. As best seen in FIG. 3, the circular segment 70 and the Geneva motion portion 56 are disposed in essentially the same vertical plane and as will be apparent from FIG. 2, the segment 70 may be received in any one of the circular recesses 58 in abutting relationship with virtually the entire arcuate extent of the latter. When such is the case, it will be appreciated that the disc 50 is blocked from movement so that the turret 20 cannot be rotated.

Turning now to FIG. 3, it will be seen that the shaft 66 is journaled in bearing means 72 mounted on the bracket 42. The end of the shaft 66 opposite that to which the disc 64 is secured mounts a platelike casting 74 which includes a threaded bore 76 at one point near its outer periphery. Received within the threaded bore 76 is a spring 78 and a ball 80 and a bolt 82.

The driving means 26 include a bidirectional or reversible gear motor 82 (FIG. 2) which is arranged to have a rotary output shaft 84 (FIG. 3) driven at a relatively low rate of about approximately 30 r.p.m. when the motor 82 is energized. The shaft 84 is coaxially aligned with the shaft 66 and the end of the former mounts a second plate which has a small recess 88 in its periphery at a radial location corresponding to that of the ball 80 with respect to the plate 74. i i i As a result of the just-described construction, the bolt 82 and the spring 78 will normally urge the ball 80 into the recess 88 to establish a driving connection betweenthe plates 86 and 74 so that when the motor 82 is energized and the output shaft 84 thereof is'rotated, the shaft 68 will rotate and, in a manner to be seen hereinafter, ultimately rotate the turret 20. The purpose of the spring 78, the ball 80, the bolt 82 and the recess 88 is to establish a releasable drive connection to preclude damage to the indexible tee should, for one reason or another, the turret become jammed or if the control circuitry to be described hereinafter should m'alfun'ction and cause improper energization of the motor 82. In such a case, continued rota tion of the plate 86 will merely cause the ball 80 to be cammed out of the recess 88 againstthe bias of the spring 78 so that plate 74 will not rotate with plate 86.

The manner by which the turret 2 0 is indexed is as follows. When the gear motor 82 is energized, the shaft 84 will rotate at a relatively low speed and by means of the ball 80in the recess 88, the rotation of the shaft 84 will be imparted to the shaft 66. As a result, the disc 64 will, be rotated thereby rotating the tooth 62 and the circular segment 70. At some point in the rotation of the circular segment 70, the same will emerge from the recess 58 so that the turret, 20 will be free to move.

At approximately the same time as the segment 70 is moved out of contact with the recess 58 in which it is received, the tooth 62 will enter one of the slots 60 and continued rotation of the shaft 66 will cause the tooth now in the slot 60 to rotate the disc 50. Rotation of the disc 50 will cause rotation of the sector gear 86 on the disc-and by virtue of the engagement between the gear 44 and the sector gear 48, the turret 20 will rotate.

During the initial portion of such rotation, the tooth 62 will be moving deeper into the slot 60; However, at some point, the tooth 62 will begin to emerge from the slot 60 and at the time when it completely emerges from the slot 60, the continued rotation of the shaft 66 will cause the circular segment 70 to enter into a recess 58 that is adjacent to the recess 58 in which the circular segment 70 was originally disposed.

If the circular segment 70 was in either of the endmost recesses 58, the foregoing procedure may be repeated twice. On the other hand, if the circular segment 70 was originally in the central recess 58, the foregoing procedure will occur but once. Of course, the-above-described action can take place in either direction. I

From the foregoing, it will be apparent that some suitable control means be provided for controlling the direction of rotation of the motor 82 as well as for programming the number of revolutions of the disc 64 in each operational sequence. The mechanical elements of the control system are seen in FIGS. 2 and 3 and comprise three microswitches 90, 92 and 94 clustered about the shaft 52. As seen in both FIGS. 2 and 3, a cam 96 having a recess 98 is mounted on the end of the shaft 52 and the periphery of the same is adapted to engage the actuators of the respective microswitches 90, 92 and 94. The recess 98 is such that only the actuator of but one of the switches 90, 92 and 94 may be received therein at any given time.

By suitable selection of the gear ratio between the gear 44 and the sector gear 48 as well as the construction of the entire Geneva motion, all of which is shown approximately in scale in FIGS. 2 and 3, the actuation of a given one of the microswitches 90, 92 and 94 will be indicative of the fact that a particular one of the mats 22 is disposed in the opening 24 at the tee area 10.

The information provided by the actuation of the microswitches 90, 92 and 94 is utilized by a control circuit which then controls the amount and direction of rotation of the output shaft 84 of the gear motor 82 and the control circuit for the same is illustrated in FIG. 4.

gate 106 is conducting.

The OR gate 104 will, in turn conduct, whenever any one of three AND gates 108, 110 and 112 is conducting while the OR gate 106 will conduct whenever any one of three AND gates 114, 116 or 118 is conducting.

Each of the three microswitches 90, 92 and 94 is adapted to provide a signal whenever its respective actuator is in the recess 98 on the cam 96. When the microswitch provides a signal, the same indicates that the mat 22S is disposed within the opening 24. Similarly, when the microswitch 92 provides a signal, it indicates that the mat 22F is in the opening 24. Finally, when the microswitch 94 provides a signal, it is indicative of the fact that the mat 22R is in the opening 24.

There is also provided any suitable source of control signals. The source is generally designated 120 and is arranged to provide any one of three control signals to indicate that the sand, rough, or the fairway simulating mats 22S, 22R and 22F, respectively, are to be disposed within the opening 24. Typically, the source of signals 120 may comprise manually operable switch means operated by the golfer. However, the instant invention is not limited to the use of manually operable switches to provide the control signals and may be used with any means capable of providing such signals.

The output from the microswitch 90 is utilized as an input .by both the AND gates 108 and 110 while the output of the microswitch 92 is utilized as an input by the AND gates 112 and 118. The output of the microswitch 94 is used as inputs by the AND gates 114 and116.

An output from the source of signals which will be energized when the sand mat22S is to be disposed within the opening 24 is utilized as an input by the AND gate 116 and 118 while a similar line for generating a rough command signal is utilized as an input by the AND gates 108 and 112. Finally, a fairway command line from the source 120 is utilized as an input by the AND gates 110 and 114. I

The foregoing described logic makes use of the fact that the mechanical construction of the indexible tee is such that whenever the sand simulating mat 228 is not disposed in the opening 24 but its presence is commanded, counterclockwise rotation of the shaft 84 of the 'motor- 82 is required. Similarly, whenever the rough simulating mat 22R is not within the opening 24, clockwise rotation will be required. However, when the fairway simulating mat 22F is not within the opening 24 and its presence is commanded, rotation of the motor may either be counterclockwise or clockwise depending upon whether the mat 22R or the mat 22Sis currently disposed in the opening 24 when the command is issued.

The manner in which the control circuitry acts to cause a selected mat to be disposed within the opening 24 will become apparent from the following example. If it be assumed that the rough simulating mat 22R is currently disposed in the opening 24 and it is desired that the sand simulating mat 22S be moved to the opening 24, then it will be apparent that the following Boolean expression indicates the conditions that exist when the sand command is issued:

In roughgo to fairway+ In roughgo to sand+ In fairwaym In the foregoing Boolean expression, the first term represents the condition at the AND gate 114; the second term represents the condition at the AND gate 116; and the third term represents the condition at the AND gate 118. As a result, it will be apparent that the AND gate 116 will conduct which in turn will cause the OR gate 106 to conduct energized in the counterclockwise drive circuit 102. The motor 82 will then be energized to rotate in the counterclockwise direction thereby rotating the turret in the counterclockwise direction.

After one revolution of the Output shaft of the motor 82, the fairway simulating mat 22F will be disposed within the opening 24. At this time, the conditions of the microswitches 90, 92 and 94 will have changed due to the movement of the cam 98 and the conditions at the gates 114, 116 and 118 are represented by the following Boolean expression.

In roughgo to fairway-l- In roughgo to sand+ In fairwaygo to sand Again, the first, second and third terms of the above expression represent the conditions at the AND gates 114, 116 and 118 respectively and it will be apparent that at this time, the AND gate 116 is no longer conducting. However, the AND gate 118 is now conducting and it will continue to maintain the counterclockwise drive circuit 102 energized so that rotation of the motor 82 will continue through another revolution.

Upon completion of the second revolution of the output shaft of the motor 82, the conditions at the AND gates 114, 116 and 118 will be as follows.

It will therefore be apparent that at this point, none of the AND gates 114, 116 and 118 are conducting and as a result,

the counterclockwise drive circuit 102 will be deenergized and the motor 82 will be at rest. It will also be recognized that the second revolution of the motor 102 moved the turret 20 from a position wherein the fairway simulating mat 22F was disposed within the opening 24 to a position wherein the sand simulating mat 228 was disposed within the opening 24. As a result, the command to dispose the sand simulating mat 22S within the opening 24 has been met.

Those skilled in the art will recognize that a substantially similar operation occurs for each set of command inputs and each current turret position and in the interest of brevity, it is not believed necessary to describe the operation of the control circuit for all such conditions.

Automatic Lie Selection Control in order to provide, automatically, any one of the three signals emanating in the command source 120 to control the operation of the turret, it is necessary that there be a source of memorized information relating to the particular lie found at a particular point on each hole of the golf course being played on the indoor game. One possible source of such information could be a memory bank which, when provided with information as to the hole being played, and the distance and direction of the point of termination of each shot on the hole, would generate a signal to be fed to the circuitry in FIG. 4 and would indicate the type of lie at that point on that particular hole to cause automatic indexing of the turret. While such an approach is feasible from the technological standpoint, in most cases, it is economically unfeasible because of the tremendous cost of a memory bank of sufficient size to contain the required information for each such point on each of at least 18 holes on a golfcourse.

A more satisfactory approach resides in taking advantage of the ability to design an indoor golf game wherein each hole to be played is zoned into a plurality of zones with each scene to be displayed corresponding to the view of that hole from the zone. if the zoning of the hole, which normally can be done quite arbitrarily, is done with one criteria, advantage may be taken of the inherent memory capability of the scenes of the hole to be displayed.

More particularly. if each of the zones of the hole is configured to lie wholly within the rough. wholly within the fairway or wholly within the sand, the identity of each scene, which represents the view from the corresponding zone, may be used as an indication of the lie in that particular zone. Thus, if a particular scene depicts the lie from a zone which lies wholly within the rough, the commanding of the display of that particular scene can also be used to automatically command the disposition of the rough simulating mat at the tee area. Similarly. the commanding of a scene representing the view from the fairway or the tee of the hole can be used to command the presence of the fairway simulating mat. Finally, a scene depicting the view from a zone wholly within a sand trap, when displayed, can be utilized to command the disposition of the sand simulating mat at the indoor golf game tee area.

The manner in which such scenes and/or the display of the same may be used as memory means to command the disposition of a particular one of the simulating mats at the tee area will now be described according to two different embodiments.

A map of a golf hole, generally designated 139, is indicated in FIG. 5 and includes a first continuous line which defines the boundaries of the fairway. In order to distinguish the fairway from other portions of the course as shown on the map, the area enclosed by line 140 may be colored a medium green. A second line 142 surrounds the line 140 and the area between the lines 140 and 142 is considered to be the area of the rough on the golf hole. In order to distinguish the rough from the fairway, the area between the lines 140 and 142 may be colored a dark green. Any area outside the line 142 may be considered to be out of bounds.

A number of continuous lines 144 enclose areas which are sand traps on a golf hole and may be colored a sand color. Another continuous line 146 lies wholly within the line 140 and defines the green on the hole. in order to distinguish the green from the fairway and the rough, it may be colored a light green. There are also provided a pair of lines 148 and 150 which define a water hazard behind the green and the area between the lines 148 and 150 may be colored blue.

The lines 140, 142 and certain of the lines 144 together with other lines 152 divide the map into a plurality of zones, some of the zones being in the fairway, some in the rough and some in certain of the sand traps. it is to be noted that each of the zones defined by the aforementioned lines lies wholly within either the rough, the sand or the fairway. Each such zone is given a code number 154 as indicated and at some point in the zone, there may be provided a small circle 156 for use with the map spot projection system of the Conklin et al. application previously identified.

There are also provided a plurality of zones on and around the green defined by the line 146, all of which are within the area defined by a dotted line 158 and one of the lines 150 defining the water hazard. The zones within the dotted line 158 and not on the green defined by the line 146 are defined by the line 140, certain of the lines 144 and other lines 160. Each such zone has a code number 162 associated therewith.

The green defined by the line 146 is also divided into a plurality of zones by continuous lines 164, each line having a code number 166 associated therewith. in actuality, the lines 164 are drawn in the form of concentric circles about a center zone identified by the code number A in FIG. 5, the center of which is considered to be the location of the cup on the hole.

The zones within the dotted line 158 and those on the green are utilized in an indoor golf game to indicate to a golfer where a ball should be placed relative to a putting surface when holding out. Inasmuch as they do not relate to automatic indexing of the tee turret, they will not be discussed further herein.

It is to be noted that, with the exception of a mens tee zone labeled A1" and a womans tee zone labeled A2, all of the fairway zones are identified with an alphabetical letter which is used for scene selection purposes as described in the Conklin et al. application and a numerical figure similarly used. However, it is to be additionally noted that the numerical figure of each code number 154 of the fairway zones is in the range of l4, inclusive.

Like the fairway zones. the rough and sand zones are identified by a letter in the alphabet and a numerical figure which similarly serve to identify the zone for scene selection purposes. In the case of the zones in the rough, it is to be noted that each numerical figure comprising each zone number 154 consists of a number from -9 inclusive. In the case of the sand zones, the numerical figure utilized is always a 10.

Turning now to FIG. 6 there may be seen in schematic form, a portion of a projector scene selection control, generally designated 170 which controls the projector 16 to dispose a selected scene on the screen 14. Manual operators for the scene selection control 170 may be disposed on the console 18 and, as viewed in FIG. 6, are seen to comprise a first rotary switch 172 which is set by the golfer to designate the hole that is being played. Since all golfers playing the game at a given time will be playing the same hole, only one such rotary switch 172 is provided.

To further provide scene selection information, there is provided a second rotary switch 174 which has ten positions and alphabetic indicia corresponding to each such position. In the exemplary embodiment there is a rotary switch 174 for each golfer up to a maximum, of four golfers. Finally, there is provided a third rotary switch 176 which is of the ten position type and includes numerical indicia 1-10, each corresponding to the particular position of the switch.

When the point of termination of a shot is indicated on the map 139 to indicate that the next shot is to be played from a particular zone, if the hole is not to be changed, each player will adjust his rotary switches 174 and 176 to designate the particular code number. Thus, a shot indicated as terminating in zone D4 requires that the golfer adjust the rotary switch 174 to indicate the letter D and the rotary switch 17 6 to indicate the number 4". Thereafter, when operation of the projector 16 is initiated according to the teachings of the Pratt et al. application, the scene for zone D4 on the hole being played will be projected on the screen 14.

From the foregoing description of the map 139, it will be recalled that by design, each zone having a numerical figure from 1 to 4 lies in the fairway, each zone having a numerical figure from 5 to 9 lies in the rough and each zone having a numerical figure lies in the sand. Thus, when the golfer sets the switch 176, its position is an indication of whether the next shot is to be played from the fairway, rough or sand.

The rotary switch 176 has a single deck of ten contacts 178, all of which are connected to the projector for controlling scene selection. Additionally, the fifth through ninth contacts are connected through isolating diodes 180 to a common line which is connected to the gateof a silicon controlled rectifier 182. The tenth contact 178 is connected as an input to the gate ofa silicon controlled rectifier 184. Additionally, the fifth through ninth contacts for the rotary switches 176 for the remaining players are connected to the gate of the silicon controlled rectifier 182 while the tenth contacts of the player switches [76 for the remaining players are also connected to the gate of the silicon controlled rectifier 184.

The silicon controlled rectifiers 182 and 184 are in identical circuits and accordingly, only one will be described, it being understood that the other is similarly constructed. Referring the silicon controlled rectifier 184 are made as inputs to the NOR gate 198 and a second electronic switch 202. The just described arrangement is such that whenever the silicon controlled rectifier 182 is not conducting, the transistor 194 will be. As a result, there is a voltage drop across the resistor 196 and the collector of the transistor 194 is essentially at ground potential. When such is the case, the NOR gate 198 will lack at least one input and the electronic switch 200 will lack an input. As a result, the latter will not generate a positive output and the NOR gate 198 may not, depending upon an additional factor considered hereinafter.

Because of the identity of construction of the circuits involving the silicon controlled rectifiers 182 and 184, it will be appreciated that when the silicon controlled rectifier 184 is not conducting, essentially ground potential will be applied as an input to the electronic switch 202 and the same will not provide a positive voltage at its output. Similarly, ground potential will be applied as the second input to the NOR gate 198. Only when both inputs to the NOR gate 198 are at ground potential, will the output thereof swing positive.

If the silicon controlled rectifier 182 is conducting, the

transistor 194 will be turned off and as a result, there will be specifically to the silicon controlled rectifier 182, the same has its anode connected through a resistor 186 to a line 188 which may be provided with positive source of power as will appear hereinafter. The cathode of the silicon controlled rectifier 182 is connected to ground. The common junction of the silicon controlled rectifier 182 and the resistor 186 is connected to a first resistor 190 and then to a second resistor 192 which is also connected to ground. The common junction of the resistors 190 and 192 is connected to the base of a transistor 194 which additionally has its emitter connected to ground and its collector connected through a resistor 196 to the line 188. The common junction of the transistor 194 and the resistor 196 is connected as an input to a conventional NOR gate 198 and to an electronic switch 200 of conventional construction.

Similar connections from the output of the circuit utilizing no voltage drop across the resistor 196. Thus, the input to the electronic switch 200 will swing positive and the latter will then have a positive output. Similarly, a positive input will be applied to the NOR gate 198 and the latter will therefore have an output corresponding to ground potential.

Again, due to the similarity in circuits, it will be appreciated that when the silicon controlled 184 is conducting, a positive potential will'be applied as an input to both the NOR gate 198 and the electronic switch 202 resulting in the NOR gate having an output corresponding to ground potential and the electronic switch 202 having a positive output.

As will be seen hereinafter, when the NOR gate 198 has a positive output, such dictates that the fairway simulating mat 22F should be disposed within the opening of the tee area; when the electronic switch 200 has a positive output, the same commands that the rough simulating mat 22R be disposed within the opening; and when the electronic switch 202 has a positive output, the presence of the sand simulating mat 22S in the opening is commanded.

The foregoing presupposes that positive power is applied to the line 188. However, such is not always the case. Specifically, there is provided a switching transistor 204 having its emitter connected to the line 188 and its collector connected to a positive source of power. Thus, the line 188 will have power applied thereto only when the transistor 204 is conducting. To control the conduction of the transistor 204 there is provided a driving transistor 206 which has its emitter connected to ground and its collector connected to the positive source of power through a biasing resistor 208. The common junction of the resistor 208 and the transistor 206 is connected to the base of the transistor 204 and as a result, whenever the transistor 206 is conducting, the transistor 204 will be turned off. Conversely, when the transistor 206 is not conducting, the transistor 204 will be conducting.

The transistor 206 has its base connected to the common junction of a unijunction transistor 210 and a resistor 212, the latter being connected to ground and the former being connected to the source of power. The emitter of the unijunction transistor 210 is connected to ground through a parallel circuit of a capacitor 214 and the normally open contacts 216a of a reed relay 216. The emitter of the unijunction transistor 210 is also connected to the positive source of power through the serial combination of a resistor 217 and a cam operated switch 218.

The relay 216 is interposed between ground and the output of an OR gate 220 which receives two inputs. The first input is received from the output of the OR gate 104 (FIG. 4) while the second input is received from the output of the OR gate 106 (FIG. 4).

Returning momentarily to the cam operated switch 218, the same is normally open and forms part of the Pratt et al. projecting system. Specifically, it corresponds to the microswitch 246 in the Pratt et al. application and may merely form a second set of contacts thereon so that the microswitch 246 in the Pratt et al. application will not only perform the function therein stated but additionally, a control function in the automatic lie selection as will be described hereinafter.

As the nature of operation of the switch 246 of Pratt et al. is completely disclosed therein, it is not believed necessary to specify in detail its mode of operation. Rather, it is believed sufficient to note that the operation is such that switch 218 will be closed whenever the film transport mechanism has located a selected scene in the projection station. Stated another way, the switch 218 will be opened whenever the film transport mechanism of the projector is in operation.

As mentioned previously, there is provided a rotary switch 174 and a rotary switch 176 for each of four different players. Obviously, only one set of the switches 174 and 176 may be operative at any given time and accordingly, means are provided to energize but a single set of switches at any given time. Such means include a plurality of player push buttons 222, one for each player, which have associated therewith a conventional magnetic latch that is operative once a push button is depressed to hold the push button depressed until such time as a release signal is provided. Such a magnetic latch or lock is indicated schematically at 224.

Each of the push button switches include a set of normally open contacts 226 and a set of normally closed contacts 228. A positive source of power is connected to one side of the coritacts 226 and the other side thereof is connected to the push button latch 224 and to appropriate circuitry described in the Pratt et al. application for initiating operation of the projector. For purposes of the instant application, it is sufficient to note that such a connection includes a line 230 to the wiper of the rotary switch 176.

The push button latches 224 include a connection to ground through the parallel combination of normally open contacts 216b of the reed relay 216 and a normally open cam operated switch 232. The cam operated switch 232, like the cam operated switch 218 corresponds to the switch 246 in the Pratt et al. application except that its arrangement is such that it will be open at all times when the film transport mechanism is not operative. Stated another way, the switch 232 will be closed only when the film transport mechanism is in operation.

The normally closed contacts 228 of the push button switches 222 are connected in series with each other and have one connection to ground and a second connection to the NOR gate 198 and the electronic switches 200 and 202. The arrangement is such that whenever no player push button 222 is depressed, because all of the normally closed contacts 228 will then be closed, ground potential applied to the NOR gate 198 as on lNHlBlT signal and the electronic switches 210, 202 are constructed in such a way that they are incapable of providing any output whether the same be ground potential or a positive potential. in other words, when all of the contacts 228 are closed, the output circuit of each of the electronic switches 200 and 202 and the NOR gate 198 is broken.

Techniques for totally disabling logic gates such as electronic switches and NOR gates are well known in the data processing arts and need not be reiterated in detail herein.

The mode of operation of the circuit will now be described.

Let us first assume that player one had previously hit a shot which terminated in zone F5. He therefore will set the rotary switch 174 to the "F setting and the rotary switch 176 to the setting. At this time, it is to be noted that the OR gates 104 and 106 (FIG. 4) will have their outputs at ground potential because the previous operation of the turret will have resulted in the input command being satisfied. As a result, the reed switch 216 will be deenergized and contacts 216a and 216b thereof will be open. Similarly, because all players push buttons 222 will have been previously released, the contacts 226 of the player number ones push button 222 will be opened so that the wiper of the rotary switch 176 will be deenergized. Additionally, switch 218 will be closed because the selected scene of the previous player will be displayed and the film transport mechanism will not be operative. By the same token, the switch 232 will be opened because the film transport mechanism is inoperative.

With the switch 218 closed, the capacitor 214 will be charged and the unijunction transistor 210 will be conducting. As a result, the transistor 206 will be conducting but the switching transistor 204 will be in a nonconducting state.

When the player depresses his push button 222 thereby closing contacts 226 and opening contacts 228, the closing of contacts 226 will energize the push button latch mechanism 224 to hold down the depressed player push button. Simultaneously, the projector 16 will be energized and the film transport mechanism thereof set into operation. This will result in the closing of switch 232 to hold in the push button latch mechanism 224 and the opening of the switch 218. The contacts 216b will also close if the turret is not already at the desired position as will be seen hereinafter.

Simultaneously, power will be applied to the wiper of the rotary switch 176 and the disconnection of the inhibit line to the NOR gate 198 and the electronic switches 200 and 202 by the opening of contacts 228 will then permit the same to issue a ground potential or positive potential output as the condition may exist.

The opening of the switch 218 removes power from the emitter of the unijunction transistor 210 and after the capacitor 214 has discharged through the unijunction transistor 210, the latter will stop conducting thereby turning off the driving transistor 206. The latters reversion to its nonconducting state will then cause the switching transistor 204 to conduct applying positive power to line 188.

With the application of power to the wiper of the rotary switch 176, power will be applied through the line connected to the number 5 contact thereof to the gate of the silicon controlled rectifier 182 causing the same to fire. This will, in turn, cause the transistor 194 to be turned off so that a positive input will be present at one input of the NOR gate 198 and the electronic switch 200. As a result, the output of the NOR gate 198 will go to ground potential while the output of the electronic switch 200 will be positive issuing a Go To Rough com mand. This will be applied to the AND gate in FIG. 4 as described previously and if the rough mat is not currently disposed in the opening, the turret will be indexed to dispose the rough simulating mat therein. In the latter instance, the OR gate 104 will then have a positive output to cause clockwise rotation of the motor and as a result, the OR gate 220 in FIG. 6 will have an output thereby energizing the reed switch 216 to close contacts 216a, thereby shunting capacitor 214 and rendering it impossible for the unijunction transistor 210 to conduct even when the switch 218 is reclosed, and to close contacts 216b to hold in the push button latch 224.

It will be recognized at this time that the silicon controlled rectifier 184 will not be conducting and as a result, the electronic switch 202 will have an output of ground potential. This is due to the fact that positive power will not be applied to the number 10 contact of the rotary switch 176 inasmuch as the wiper of the latter is in contact only with the number 5 contact.

The indexible tee will respond to the given command in the manner set forth previously and simultaneously therewith, the projector will be disposing the commanded scene at the projection station thereof for projection onto the screen. When the selected scene is in the proper location, the film transport mechanism will be deenergized thereby causing switch 232 to open to release the depressed push button by deenergizing the push button latch 224 if contacts 2l6b of the reed relay 216 have opened. Simultaneously, switch 218 will be closed and if the tee had already completely responded to the commanded position so that the OR gate 104 does not have a positive output to energize the reed switch 216, the unijunction transistor 210 will be rendered conducting to cause driving transistor 206 to conduct and switching transistor 204 to be turned off thereby turning off the silicon controlled rectifier 182 to reset the same in readiness for a succeeding cycle.

If, on the other hand, the tee has not completely responded to the command, the positive output from the OR gate 104 will be applied to the OR gate 220 to maintain the reed switch 216 energized. The resultant closing of the shunting contacts 216a will then preclude the unijunction transistor 210 from conducting to ultimately turn off the switching transistor 204 with the result that power will remain applied to line 188 until such time as the reed relay 216 is deenergized corresponding to the disposition of the selected mat within the opening. Similarly, contacts 216b will remain closed to preclude premature release of the push button latch 224 which would inhibit gates 198, 200 and 202 thereby removing the required command signal.

When both the tee and the projector have fully responded ",to the commands so that bothswitch 232 and contacts 2l6b have opened, the release of the push button latch 224 will occur, the contacts 228 will revert to their normally closed state thereby placing the INHIBIT signal on the NOR gate 198 and the electronic switches 200 and 202.

In the event the golfer had selected a scene representing a zone in the sand trap, it will be appreciated that the wiper of the rotary switch 176 would have been disposed on the contact thereof so that the circuit including the silicon controlled rectifier 184 would have been fired rather than the circuit including the silicon controlled 182. In such a case, the firing of the silicon controlledrectifier 184 would have ultimately resulted in a positive input being placed on the electronic switch 202 thereby causing the same to issue a positive output corresponding to Go to Sand" condition. The same positive input would be applied as an input to the NOR gate 198 to cause the same to provide a ground potential output and, since the circuit including the silicon controlled rectifier 182 was not fired, the electronic switch 200 would have a ground potential output.

Finally, had the golfer been instructed to dispose a scene corresponding to the view from the fairway, it will be apparent that the wiper of the rotary switch 176 would have been on one of the 1-4 contacts thereof and neither of the circuits including silicon controlled rectifiers 182 and 184 would be energized. As a result, the two inputs of the NOR gate 198 would be at ground potential and as a result, the output would swing positive to issue a Go to Fairway command.

A modified embodiment of scene selection circuitry will now be described in conjunction with FIGS. 7 and 8. As described in the previously cited Pratt et al. application, a film strip bearing the scenes to be projected on the screen is utilized and the film strip includes a scene portion 240 bearing the image of the scene to be projected and an opaque portion 242 adjacent thereto. On the opaque portion 242 is an optical discontinuity 244 which permits light to pass therethrough for the purpose of causing operation of a means for accurately aligning the projected image at a' predetermined location on the screen.

The opaque portion 242 may also be used for automatic lie I selection purposes. Specifically, at different locations thereon optical discontinuity 244 may be provided to permit light to pass through the opaque portion 242 from the projected light source 250, although it is to be noted that this embodiment of the invention contemplates only that one optical discontinuity 246 or 248 will be present on the opaque portion 242 of any particular frame on the film strip and that, in some cases, neither will be present.-

Appropriately physically aligned with the light passed through the optical discontinuities 246 and 248 may be respective photocells 252 and 254.

Turning now to FIG. 8, the photocell 252 is seen to be interposed between a source of positive voltage and a resistor 256 connected to ground. The common junction of the photocell 252 in the resistor 257 is connected as an input to an electronic switch 202' which corresponds to the electronic switch 202 in FIG. 6. Additionally, a similar output is provided to a NOR gate 198' which corresponds to the NOR gate 198.

The photocell 254 is similarly connected between the positive source of power and a resistor 258 which is connected to ground. The common junction of the photocell 254 (the re sistor 258) is utilized as an input to the NOR gate 198 and as an input to an electronic switch 200' which corresponds to the electronic switch 200 in FIG. 6.

The photocells 252 are chosen with respect to their respective resistors 256 and 255 such that, when not illuminated, their resistance is extremely high with respect to the resistance offered by the associated resistor and yet, when illuminated, their resistance will be significantly less than that offered by the resistors 256 and 250. As a result, when the photocell 252 is not illuminated, the common junction of the same with the resistor 256 will be very close to ground potential so that electronic switch 202', will have a ground potential output and the NOR gate 195' will have a ground potential input. Similarly, when the photocell 254 is not illuminated, the potential at the common junction of the same and the resistor 258 will be very nearly equal to ground potential so that a second ground potential input is applied to the NOR gate 198' and the electronic switch 200' will have a ground potential output.

It will be recalled from the description of FIG. 6 that two ground potential inputs to the NOR gate 198 will result in a positive output corresponding to a Go to Fairway" command. The NOR gate in FIG. 8 behaves in the same manner and as a result, when neither of the photocells 252 and 254 are illuminated, a Go to Fairway command will be issued.

When the photocell 252 is illuminated, because in such a condition its resistance will be significantly less than that presented by the resistor 256, the common junction of the two will be very nearly equal to the positive voltage of the source and as a result, the electronic switch 202' will issue a positive Go to Sand command. Similarly, when the photocell 254 is illuminated, the electronic switch 200 will issue a positive Go to Rough" command.

In any of the foregoing cases, the signals from the gates 198', 200 and 202' are utilized as the source of signals in FIG. 4 and cause operation of the indexible tee in the manner described in conjunction with that figure.

From the foregoing, it will be apparent that the presence of an optical discontinuity 246 in the opaque portion 242 will result in the illumination of the photocell 252 to issue a Go to Sand command. Therefore, an optical discontinuity 246 will be present on the opaque portion 242 of only those scenes that depict the view from a sand trap. Similarly, inasmuch as the presence of the optical discontinuity 248 results in the illuminating of the photocell 254 to issue a Go to Rough command, the optical discontinuity 248 will be present on the opaque portion 242 of only those scenes depicting the view from the rough. Since the presence of neither optical discontinuity results in a Go to Fairway" command, it will be appreciated that those scenes representing the view from zones I on the fairway will have only the optical discontinuity 244 used for accurate alignment purposes and neither optical discontinuity 246 nor 248 will be present.

Because operation of the foregoing circuit depends upon the disposition of the selected scene with its corresponding opaque portion 242 in readiness for projection at a projection station before the appropriate commands to cause indexing the tee can be issued, it is desirable-to inhibit the circuit shown in FIG. 8 providing such commands until such time as the selected scene is disposed at projection station. Accordingly, each of the gates 190', 200 and 202' include an inhibit input from a line 229'which corresponds to the inhibit line 229 in FIG. 6. The inhibit 229' is returned through a cam operated switch 260 to ground. The cam operated switch 260 is similar to the switch 232 described in conjunction with FIG. 6 and is operated by the projector in the same manner, namely, it is opened whenever the film transport mechanism is not energized. Thus, whenever the film transport mechanism is in operation, which will be the case only when the selected scene is not at the projection station, switch 260 will be closed to inhibit the gates 198, 200 and 202'.

Of the two embodiments, that illustrated in FIGS. and 6 is generally preferred in that it enables indexing of the tee to take place during operation of the projector film transport mechanism and thereby provides a small time saving over the embodiment illustrated in FIGS. 7 and 8 which cannot go into operation until the selected scene is ready for display.

It is also noted that both circuits are arranged such that for most types of circuit failure, a Go to Fairway command will be issued. That is, because the NOR gate 198 or the NOR gate 198' will issue the Go to Fairway" command in the situation when neither input is present, malfunction of a circuit will almost always result in the fairway simulating mat 22F being disposed within the opening thereby enabling the game to be played with reasonable accuracy as would not be the case if all shots had to be played from the sand simulating mat sand or the rough simulating mat 22R if they were maintained in the opening due to circuit malfunction.

From the foregoing, it will be appreciated that the invention provides for automatic lie selection by utilizing scenes to be projected on the screen as the memory means. And while, in the exemplary embodiment, scene selection is achieved manually, it will be appreciated that the invention is not limited to use with manually operable scene selection means in indoor golf games. That is,'the principle of operation is equally applicable to games such as have been proposed wherein scenes are selected automatically as a result of computation by a golf game computer.

It will also be recognized that whether automatic or manual scene selection is used, there are means provided for receiving information as to a particular location on a hole of a golf course which the golfer is playing from which he should hit a shot. In the case of manual scene selection means, manually operable switches or their equivalents constitutes the receiving means. On the other hand, should automatic scene selection be used, any appropriate means such as electronic switches or their equivalents corresponding approximately in function to the manual scene selection switches but operated automatically in response to position information provided by a computer or by memories constitute such a receiving means.

lt will be further appreciated that the operation of the indexible tee disclosed herein in disposing a selected mat in an opening within a tee area also constitutes an indicating means which indicates, in the tee area, to the golfer which lie simulating means should be used for a shot from a particular location on a golf hole. That is, while the exemplary embodiment contemplates an indexible tee construction wherein any one of a plurality of lie simulating mats is disposed at the tee area, it is also contemplated that the invention will find use by indicating to a golfer which of a plurality of lie simulating mats should be used whether or not the mats are arranged on an indexible tee such as that disclosed.

Having described specific embodiments of our invention, we do not wish to be limited to the details set forth, but rather, to have the invention construed according to its true spirit set forth in the following claims.

We claim:

1. A tee construction for use in an indoor golf game comprising: means defining a tee area from which a golfer may hit balls in playing an indoor golf game; at least two different mat means disposable in said tee area for supporting a golf ball to be hit by a golfer and simulating at least two different lie conditions found at different locations on a golf hole; means for receiving information identifying a particular location on a hole on a golf course from which a golfer is to hit a shot in playing an indoor golf game; and means responsive to said receiving means for indicating within said tee area, to the golfer, the one of said mat means simulating the lie condition at said particular location so that the golfer will be advised to hit the shot from said one mat means simulating the lie condition at said particular location.

2. A tee construction according to claim 1 wherein said indicating means comprise a movable support means mounting said different mat means, and means for moving said support means to dispose the one of said mat means simulating the lie condition at said particular location in said tee area.

3. A tee construction according to claim I wherein said means for receiving information identifying a particular location comprise a plurality of selectively operable switch means arranged so that various combinations of operated ones of said switch means represent various locations on the hole.

4. A tee area according to claim 3 wherein said switch means are manually operable.

5. A golf tee according to claim 3 further including a screen adjacent to said tee area, a projector for projecting any of a plurality of scenes representing the views of various locations on the hole on a golf course on said screen, said switch means further being operative to control said projection means to cause the same to dispose the scene corresponding to said particular location on said screen.

6. An indexible tee construction for use in indoor golf games comprising a tee area from which balls are hit by a golfer; movable support means at said tee area; at least two different mat means mounted on said movable support for supporting golf balls in said tee area to be hit by a golfer and simulating at least two different lie conditions found at different locations on a golf hole; motor means for moving said support means to dispose a selected mat at a predetermined position within said tee area; means for receiving information identifying a particular location on a hole of a golf course from which golfer is to hit a shot in playing an indoor golf game; and means responsive to said receiving means for operating said motor means to cause said support means to be moved to locate the one of said mat means simulating the lie condition at said particular location at said predetermined position.

7. An indexible tee construction according to claim 6 and particularly suited for use in an indoor golf game having a screen, a projector for projecting on the screen any one of a plurality of scenes, each representing the view from a different location on a golf hole, and means for selecting a particular scene, said receiving means being associated with said projector and receiving information relative to the selection of a particular scene for projection on the screen, and said operating means being responsive to said receiving means for operating said motor means to cause said support means to be moved to locate, at said predetermined position, the one of the mat means simulating the lie condition at the location on the golf hole corresponding to the location represented by the view on said selected scene.

8. An indexible tee construction according to claim 6 wherein said means for receiving information comprise memory means for correlating information identifying a particular location on a hole on a golf course with the lie condition at said particular location, and means for identifying the lie condition operative in response to the receipt of information identifying a particular location by said memory means to operate said motor means.

9. An indexible tee construction according to claim 8 further including a screen, a projector including a plurality of scenes representing the views from various locations on a hole on a golf course for projecting a selected scene on said screen; said memory means comprising code means associated with each of said scenes for providing an indication of the lie condition at the location corresponding to the scene, and means for sensing said code.

10. A golf game according to claim 8 further including a screen, a projector adapted to project any one of a plurality of scenes from different locations on the hole of a golf course on said screen, and switch means for operating said projector; said memory means comprising means associated with said switch means for memorizing the lie condition at certain locations on a golf hole represented by certain ones of said switch means, and means responsive to operation of said switch means for operating said motor means.

11. A teeconstruction for use in an indoor golf game comprising: means defining a tee area from which a golfer may hit balls in playing an indoor golf game; at least two different mat means disposable in said tee area for supporting a golf ball to be hit by a golfer and simulating at least two different lie conditions found at different locations on a golf hole; signaling means for providing information identifying the lie condition at a particular location on a hole on a golf course from which a golfer is to hit a shot in playing an indoor golf game; and means responsive to said signaling means for indicating within said tee area, to the golfer, the one of said mat means simulating the lie condition at said particular location so that the golfer will be advised to hit the shot from said one mat means simulating the lie condition at said particular location.

12. A tee construction according to claim 11 wherein said indicating means comprise a movable support means mounting said different mat means, and means for moving said support means to dispose the one of said mat means simulating the lie condition at said particular location in said tee area.

13. A tee construction according to claim 11 further including a screen adjacent said tee area; a projector for projecting any one of a plurality of scenes on said screen to depict the view from various locations on a hole on a golf course; said signaling means including code means associated with each of said scenes.

14. A tee construction according to claim 11 further including a screen adjacent said tee area; a projector for projecting any one of a plurality of scenes on said screen to depict the view from various locations on'a hole on a golf course; and manually operable switch means for controlling said projector; said signaling means including said manually operable switch means.

15. A tee construction according to claim 11 further including a screen adjacent said tee area; a projector for projecting any one of a plurality of scenes on said screen to depict the view from various locations on a hole on a golf course; and switch means adapted to receive information identifying a particular location on a hole on a golf course to cause said projector to project the corresponding scene on said screen; said signaling means including means responsive to the receipt of information identifying a location on a hole on a golf course by said switch means to provide said information identifying a lie condition at a particular location on a hole on a golf course.

16. A tee construction according to claim 11 further including a screen adjacent said tee area, a projector for projecting any one of a plurality of scenes representing the views from various locations on a hole on a golf course on said screen, and means for operating said projector to cause the projection of a particular scene on said screen; said signaling means being operative in response to the operation of said scene selecting means.

17. A tee construction according to claim 11 further including a screen adjacent said tee area, a projector for projecting any one of a plurality of scenes representing the views from various locations on a hole on a golf course on said screen; said signaling means being operativein response to the pro jection of a selected scene on said screen.

18. A tee construction according to claim ll wherein said indicating means comprises a rotatable turret having said different mat means disposed about its periphery, motor means for rotating said turret, and control 'means for said motor means connected to said signaling means to receive information identifying the lie condition at a particular location on a hole on a golf course and for energizing said motor means until said turret has been rotated to dispose the particular location in said tee area to support a golf ball to be hit by the golfer.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3693979 *Aug 6, 1970Sep 26, 1972Koett Lee EGolf practice device
US4086630 *Jan 19, 1976Apr 25, 1978Maxmilian Richard SpeiserComputer type golf game having visible fairway display
US4150825 *Jul 18, 1977Apr 24, 1979Wilson Robert FGolf game simulating apparatus
US5226660 *May 14, 1991Jul 13, 1993Curchod Donald BGolf simulator apparatus
US6595863Jan 19, 2001Jul 22, 2003Par Action Golf, Inc.Golf simulator
US7744480 *Jan 20, 2004Jun 29, 2010Acushnet CompanyOne camera club monitor
US8187122Sep 30, 2010May 29, 2012Sri Sports LimitedClub fitting system
US8414409Apr 27, 2012Apr 9, 2013Sri Sports LimitedClub fitting system
US8545341 *Dec 17, 2009Oct 1, 2013Rd-Tek Co., Ltd.Eight-directional controlled dynamic plate based on one-point
US20100285874 *Oct 27, 2009Nov 11, 2010Cheung Chuen HingMethod and apparatus for detecting an image of a reflective object
US20110244978 *Dec 17, 2009Oct 6, 2011Rd-Tek Co., Ltd.Eight-directional controlled dynamic plate based on one-point
EP0278150A2 *Jun 29, 1987Aug 17, 1988Joytec LtdGolf game and course simulating apparatus and method
Classifications
U.S. Classification473/164, 473/279
International ClassificationA63B69/36
Cooperative ClassificationA63B69/3661
European ClassificationA63B69/36G