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Publication numberUS3564667 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 23, 1971
Filing dateMay 9, 1969
Priority dateMay 9, 1969
Publication numberUS 3564667 A, US 3564667A, US-A-3564667, US3564667 A, US3564667A
InventorsClodfelter Gerald G, Marshall Norman P Jr, Parrick Gerald H
Original AssigneeClodfelter Gerald G, Parrick Gerald H, Marshall Norman P Jr
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Ski clamp
US 3564667 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Fe 23, 19 G. H. PARRICK m ETAL 3,564,667

SKI CLAMP Filed May 9, 1969 INVI5N'I()R.S 652040 6. CLODFELTEE 65201.0 H PAQQQICK, M Mom mu P; MOPSHflLL,\T2

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United States Patent 3,564,667 SKI CLAMP Gerald H. Parrick III, Los Angeles, Calif. (5424 Corteen Place, North Holywood, Calif. 91607); Gerald G. Clodfelter, Los Angeles, Calif. (4657 Kraft Ave., North Hollywood, Calif. 91602); and Norman P. Marshall, In, Los Angeles, Calif. (18407 Dearborn St., Northridge, Calif. 91324) Filed May 9, 1969, Ser. No. 823,398 Int. Cl. A44b 21/00 US. Cl. 24-81 18 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE The clamp is a one-piece member of resilient material in the form of a U-shaped structure having upright arms. The arms are adapted to embrace a pair of skis. The arms extend upward above the skis and define first and second exposed recesses or channels for the reception and retained engagement of a pair of ski poles so that insertion of a ski pole locks the arms around the skis.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION '(1) Field of the invention This invention is directed to a ski clamp and, particu larly, a ski clamp which is formed of one piece of resilient material for the retention of a pair of skis and a pair of ski poles.

(2) Description of the prior art Skis and poles are difficult to transport. It is almost impossible to carry a pair of skis and a pair of poles in one hand or over one shoulder because they have a tendency to come apart and slide around. They are an unkempt bundle of sticks unless they are properly retained by clamping them or strapping them together. Straps work very well for simply a pair of skis, but even straps are not fully satisfactory because the straps can slide ofi, at least at the, back ends of the skis. Accordingly, clamps have been found necessary. Prior clamps have not placed the skis and poles into a rigid assembly from which they could be readily removed when desired. Instead, in most cases, prior structures have comprised a clamp for the skis, together with a loose assemblage for loose retention of the ski poles. Thus, the primary need for a totally rigid assembly has not been met. Other prior devices have clamped both a pair of skis and a pair of poles, but only with considerable complexity and weight. Since the assembly is to be hand-carried primarily, it is necessary that the assembly be as light as possible. Additionally, it should be easy to use without any wing nuts or clamping handles to snag on the clothing when the assembly is being carried. Furthermore, it is clear that the clamps for such an assembly must be light so that they do not contribute significantly to the total weight of the assembly when it is being hand-carried. Some of the prior devices employ complex clamping structures, including thumb screws and over-the-center lever action devices. Such structures are unnecessarily complex and weighty and thus do not fully meet the requirements for a good ski clamp. Accordingly, there is need for a ski clamp which is easily applied, light of weight, simple in construction, and inexpensive to manufacture.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION In accordance with the present invention, there is provided a ski clamp comprising a unitary resilient structure having first and second substantially parallel arms. These ice arms are joined at the bottom and, at the top, have opposed recesses for reception of ski poles. The resilient clamp arms embrace a pair of skis and are resiliently bent past each other to embrace a first ski pole. Thus, the first ski pole serves as a lock member for holding the arms against the skis. Preferably, there is a second pair of opposed recesses facing oppositely to the first, with the second recesses being adapted to carry a second ski pole with the arms again crossed over into the initial positioning whereby the first ski pole again serves to lock the arms into resilient engagement about the second ski pole. When thus assembled, the skis and ski poles are disposed in rigid parallel alignment with each other. The bottom of the clamp is formed to unitarily provide a hanging loop whereby the entire assemblage can be remov ably mounted as upon a wall.

Accordingly, it is an object of this invention to provide a ski clamp which rigidly and demountably forms an assembly of a plurality of skis and ski poles. It is another object to provide a ski clamp of resilient construction which is adapted to embrace a pair of skis, and to employ a ski pole as a lock to retain the ski clamp against the skis. It is a further object to provide a resilient ski clamp having first and second arms which are adapted to embrace and engage a pair of skis, with the arms extending upward beyond the skis, the upward portions of the arms having first and second pairs of opposed recesses for engagement on the ski poles. It is a further object to provide a unitary resilient ski clamp which is adapted to retain a pair of skis together with its pair of poles in a demountable assembly for hand transportation and also to serve as a means by which the skis and poles can be detachably wall-mounted.

Still other objects, features and attendant advantages of the present invention, together with various modifications, will become apparent to those skilled in the art from a reading of the following detailed description of the preferred embodiment constructed in accordance therewith, taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings wherein like numerals designate like parts in the several figures.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a perspective view of pairs of skis and ski poles in assembled relationship by means of a pair of the inventive clamps;

FIG. 2 is a perspective view of one of the clamps in a relaxed condition;

FIG. 3 is an end elevation view of the clamp, with the skis and poles in section as seen along line 33 of FIG. 1;

FIG. 4 is an enlarged fragmentary detail of the pole clip portion of the clamp as seen in FIG. 3;

FIG. 5 is an enlarged fragmentary elevational view of the pole clip portion of the clamp in its relaxed posi tion of FIG. 2;

FIG. 6 is similar in aspect to FIG. 4 and shows a clamp with a pair of skis and one pole therein in solid lines, with broken lines illustrating the configuration of the clamp as the first pole is inserted;

FIG. 7 is a view, similar in aspect to FIG. 6, showing the clamp with the first and second poles engaged therein in solid lines, with broken lines illustrating the configura tion of the clamp as the second pole is inserted;

FIG. 8 is a fragmentary side elevational view of the upper portion of the clamp;

FIG. 9 is a top plan view of the clamp in its relaxed position; and

FIG. 10 is a perspective view of the wall bracket employed With the clamp to provide wall support for the clamped assembly of skis and poles.

3 DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT Referring to the drawings, and initially to FIG. 1, a pair of the inventive clamps are indicated generally at in clamping engagement with respective pairs of skis and ski poles indicated generally at 12 and 14. In their illustrated assembled position each of the articles is securely mounted relative to each of the others by means of the clamps 10 and are arranged such that there is adequate clearance between the poles 14 and skis 12 whereby the skier may readily insert his hand, indicated generally in phantom lines at 16, therebetween for grasping either the skis 12 or the poles 14 for carrying the entire assemblage in either the horizontal position illustrated or any other convenient angle or orientation.

Referring to FIGS. 2, 5, 8 and 9 in particular, wherein the clamp 10 is seen in its completely relaxed position, it is seen that the clamp is a one-piece member. Preferably, the clamp 10 is composed of a resilient plastic material and is unitarily molded; alternatively, it may be composed of spring steel and formed from a single strip of metal which preferably is covered with a protective coating such as rubber, plastic or the like. The clamp 10 comprises a bottom portion 18 having first and second stops and 22 against which the skis lie, and U-shaped connector 24. Upright arms 26 and 28 extend from opposite ends of the bottom portion 18 in parallel with each other and spaced to provide a U-shaped channel for retained reception of a pair of skis. Each of the arm portions 26 and 28 is provided with a clip portion indicated generally at and 32, respectively, for providing a pair of tubular channels for reception and retained engage ment of a pair of ski poles in respective ones of such tubular channels. In the relaxed position illustrated in FIGS. 5 and 9, the clips 30 and 32 are a substantially open continuation of arms 26 and 28 so that the pair of skis may be inserted easily past the clip portions 30 and 32 into the U-shaped channel defined by the bottom 18 and arm portions 26 and 28. As best seen in FIG. 3, the U- shaped channel becomes closed and arms 26 and 28 are in tight squeezing engagement with skis 12 when the ski poles 14 are engaged by the clip portion. In this situation, the respective upper portions 26' and 28 or arms 26 and 28 are resiliently bent in the spatial region above the skis 12.

In order to assist in providing the necessary resiliency to embrace the pair of skis between arms 26 and 28, bottom 18 itself is formed with a U-shaped connector 24 extending beyond stops 20 and 22, as is seen in FIGS. 2 and 3. This provides lateral resiliency at the bottom of the arms, while each of the stops provides a bottom resting place for a respective one of the skis. The remaining open channel defined by connector 24 provides a loop which can be employed to hook the clamp and the skis carried thereby on a suitable bracket, as is hereinafter described. Thus, the stops 20 and 22, together with the U-shaped connector 24 extending therebelow, perform several functions including provision of lateral resiliency and expansion for clamping engagement of skis having different thicknesses and provision of a hanging engagement loop.

The clip portions 30 and 32 of arms 26 and 28 extend upward from the full width portions of the arms. The clips 30 and 32 are of reduced width, approximately half the width of the main portions of the arms, having setbacks 34 and 35, respectively, to permit the clip portions of the arms to pass each other.

As seen in FIG. 5, clips 30 and 32 are respectively provided with opposed, oppositely facing arcuate recess portions 36 and 38 which form the first or lower recesses. In the relaxed condition illustrated, these recesses face away from each other and face outwardly with respect to the channel which the arms 26 and 28 form. Recess portions 36 and 38 are substantially semicylindrical, and

4 are formed to recess inwardly from the straight upper portions 26 and 28' of the arms 26 and 28.

Additionally, clips 30 and 32 respectively are formed to provide arcuate recess portions 40 and 42 which again face in opposed directions. In this case, the recess portions 40 and 42 face each other and again each forms a. substantially semicylindrical recess. Recess portions 36 and 40, and recess portions 38 and 42, are connected together by means of respective straight sections 44 and 46 which are tangent to their respective arcuately reversed portions, whereby each of the clip portions 30 and 32 is substantially S-shaped, albeit reversed from each other. Each of the clip portions 30 and 32 is terminated by a respective tab or guide flange 48 and 50 oriented at an outwardly flaring angle.

When skis and poles are to be carried, a pair of clamps 10 is employed. When unoccupied, the arms 26 and 28 of each of the clamps 10 stand substantially parallel to the other to provide an open channel into which a pair of skis can be inserted. The entire clamp structure is made of resilient, springy material, such as a plastic or spring steel band, and thus the U-shaped channel bottom 24 provides resilient expandability so that the two arms 26 and 28 accommodate all ski thicknesses and can lie in contact with the skis along the entire width of the skis, as shown in FIG. 3. In order to maintain this embracing position, the upper portions of arms 26 and 28, above the skis 12, are bent to assume an upwardly converging attitude or position, such upper portions being indicated in FIG. 3 at 26' and 28'.

:Recess portions 36 and 38 are employed to embrace the lower pole 52 of the pair of poles 14. In order to place the first or lower pole 52 in position, the clips 30 and 32 are manually forcibly moved past each other to the broken line position shown in FIG. 6. In this position, the concave sides of arcuate recess portions 36 and 38 now face each other for reception of ski pole 52, and arcuate recess portions 40 and 42 have been moved past each other sufiiciently such that the minimum clearance distance between their convex sides is at least as great as the pole diameter; thus, a channel is open between the two clip portions 30 and 32 so that the lower pole 52 can be inserted therebetween for disposition between portions 36 and 38. Now, when the spreading force is removed from the clips 30 and 32, the resiliency of the clamp causes the clips to spring back into their normal position for this load condition, as shown in the full line position of FIG. 6, to lock the skis and pole 52 in place.

Now the arcuate recess portions 40 and 42 have their concave sides facing each other again but, unlike in the fully relaxed position of FIG. 5, are in the juxtaposed osition of FIG. 6 and ready to receive the second pole 54. It is to be noted that the arms, and the clips thereon, are crossed over manually for the placement of the first pole, and the upper portions 40 and 42 are crossed over again by return spring action so that they are on their original sides for the placement of the second pole 54. Referring to FIG. 7, the guide flanges 48 and 50 are spread apart to the broken line position for the insertion of second pole 54. They may be spread apart from the full line position of FIG. 6 to the broken line position of FIG. 7 simply by the pressing down of the pole 54 against the guide flanges. Thus, the pole 54 simply snaps into place. Now, the parts are in the position shown in full lines in FIG. 7, and in the relationship as they are shown in FIGS. 1, 3 and 4. Thus, the skis and poles are clamped together by means of the clamps 10 into unitary structural assembly ready for carrying or storage.

Carrying is accomplished, as previously described, by manually grasping one or both of the poles. This is the most convenient and comfortable way of carrying, although the skis themselves can be grasped instead, if desired. It now should be clear that removal of the poles and skis from clamped engagement is accomplished in the opposite or reverse manner from their assembly as described above.

Additionally, hook 56 consists of an apertured backplate 58 which is securable to a wall or other location, and a hook member 60 which may be punched from and extends out of the backplate. Hook member 60 is of such dimensions as to fit into the U-shaped extension channel 24 on bottom 18 of the clamp so that, when the hook is secured to a wall, the clamps can be hung therefrom, thereby suspending the skis and poles secured in the clamps. Thus, the skis may be easily transported and easily stored when clamps are employed.

As far as specific dimensions are concerned, the average ski width is between 3 /8 inches and 3% inches, with a maximum of about 3 /2 inches. Since the distance between stop and setback 34 should be about 4 inch longer than the maximum ski width to provide for adequate resiliency and displacement of the clip portions, this dimension preferably is about 4% inches. Additionally, the channel 24 of bottom 18, below stops 20 and 22, should be about /1 inch deep in order to provide both the desired expansion resiliency between arms 26 and 28 and also an adequate hook space for hook member 60. Ski poles vary or taper in diameter from about /2 inch to inch. In view of the fact that the maximum diameter must be accommodated, and a slightly smaller diameter should not cause release of clamping tension, the pole recesses are of such dimension as to provide effectively cylindrical surface or tubular channels having nominal diameters of about /2 inch. Thus, exemplary dimensions are given but it is clear that the dimensions can be varied to meet specific dimensional requirements.

It will be noted that, due to the crossover reversal of the clip portions 30 and 32 for defining the respective pole-receiving tubular channels, the first pole 52 received by its channel-defining recess portions 36 and 38 acts as a tension lock for both the skis and, when inserted, the second pole 54. Such function is achieved via Spring tensioning of arms 26 and 28, for the skis, and portions 40 and 42 for the second pole 54, since the spread or spatial separation of portions 36 and 3-8 occasioned by the reception therein of the first pole 52 tends to reduce the nominal dimensions of the skis-receiving U-shaped channel and second pole-receiving tubular channel afforded by arms 26 and 28 and recess portions 40 and 42 respectively, such reduction being physically prevented by the skis 12 and pole 54 located within their respective channels. In this connection, it will be noted further that the insertion of the second pole 54 increases the clamping tension of portions 36 and 38 about the first pole 52, thus rendering it immaterial whether ski poles 14 (see FIG. 1) are tapered or right cylinders, or arranged head-to-toe as illustrated or otherwise.

While the drafting convention employed in the illustrated sections of the skis and poles indicates plastic materials, it is clear that the materials of which the skis and poles are composed is immaterial to the present invention.

This invention having been described in its preferred embodiment, it is clear that it is susceptible of numerous modifications and embodiments within the ability of those skilled in the art and without the exercise of the inventive faculty.

What is claimed is:

1. A ski clamp adapted to carry a pair of skis and at least one ski pole in clamped parallel relatitonship, comprising:

first and second arms joined to a bottom and extending therefrom in substantially parallel relationship, said arms being adapted to embrace a pair of skis therebetween, the interior walls of said arms having respective aligned shoulder portions acting as first and second stops for the skis; and

first and second clips extending from the respective ends of said first and second arms away from said bottom, said clips each having an outwardly facing recess;

said arms and clips being composed of resilient material and formed in a configuration such that, when in the unstressed condition, said arms are substantially parallel to each other and said recesses are disposed in substantially back-to-back spaced relationship to define a U-shaped channel for receiving a pair of skis between said arms and adjacent said bottom, and said clips are resiliently bendable past each other whereby said recesses are disposed in faceto-face relationship to define a tubular channel for receiving a ski pole therebetween whereby said arms clamp said skis and said recesses clamp said ski pole.

2. The clamp of claim 1 wherein:

said bottom is integrally formed with said arms; and

said bottom comprises said first and second stops adjacent said arms, and a bottom channel between said stops, said bottom channel having its bottom spaced from said arms and said stops, and said stops being located to act as stops for skis positioned between said arms.

3. The clamp of claim 1 wherein: said clamp is formed as a unitary structure.

4. The clamp of claim 3 wherein: said clamp is composed of a plastic material.

5. The clamp of claim 3 wherein: said clamp is formed from a substantially rectangular band of spring metal material.

6. A ski clamp adapted to carry a pair of skis and at least one ski pole in clamped parallel relationship, comprising:

first and second arms joined to a bottom and extending therefrom in substantially parallel relatitonship, said arms being adapted to embrace a pair of skis therebetween; and

first and second clips extending from the respective ends of said first and second arms away from said bottom, said clips each having an outwardly facing recess;

said arms and said clips being composed of resilient material and formed in a configuration such that, when in the unstressed condition, said arms are substantially parallel to each other and said recesses are disposed in substantially back-to-back spaced relationship to define a U-shaped channel for receiving a pair of skis between said arms and adjacent said bottom, said bottom including at least one flat surface acting as a stop for the skis, and said clips are resiliently bendable past each other whereby said recesses are disposed in face-to-face relationship to define a tubular channel for receiving a ski pole therebetween whereby said arms clamp said skis and said recesses clamp said ski pole;

said clips being of less width than said arms;

each of said arms terminating at a respective setback;

and

said clips extending beyond said setbacks whereby said clips pass each other when said arms are resiliently deflected toward each other.

7. The clamp of claim 6 wherein:

said recesses comprise a first pair of recesses defining a first tubular channel; and

said clips each comprise a respective one of a second pair of recesses, said recesses of said second pair of recesses facing each other and defining a second tubular channel for receiving and clamping a second ski pole.

8. The clamp of claim 7 wherein: said clamp is formed as a unitary structure.

9. The clamp of claim 8 wherein: said clamp is com- 7 5 posed of a plastic material 10. The clamp of claim 8 wherein: said clamp is formed from a substantially rectangular band of spring metal material.

11. The clamp of claim 7 comprising: guide flanges extending from the ends of said clips beyond said second recesses so that, when a first ski pole is positioned in said first recesses, a second ski pole can be pressed against said guide flanges to spring said second recesses open for receiving a second ski pole.

12. The c1amp of claim 11 wherein: said clamp is formed as a unitary structure.

13. The clamp of claim 12 wherein: said clamp is composed of a plastic material.

14. The clamp of claim 12 wherein: said clamp is formed from a substantially rectangular band of spring metal material.

15. The clamp of claim 11 wherein:

said bottom is integrally formed with said arms; and

said bottom comprises first and second stops adjacent said arms, and a bottom channel between said stops, said bottom channel having its bottom spaced from said arms and said stops, and said stops being located to act as stops for skis positioned between said arms.

16. The clamp of claim 15 wherein: said clamp is formed as a unitary structure.

17. The clamp of claim 16 wherein: said clamp is composed of a plastic material.

18. The clamp of claim 16 wherein: said clamp is formed from a substantially rectangular band of spring metal material.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS BERNARD A. GELAK, Primary Examiner

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4059208 *Mar 15, 1976Nov 22, 1977Arro CorporationSki and pole tote
US7192069 *Oct 10, 2002Mar 20, 2007Handle It LlcWrap for bundling objects
US7341296 *Oct 3, 2006Mar 11, 2008Handle It LlcWrap for bundling objects
US7458623Mar 6, 2007Dec 2, 2008Handle It LlcWrap for bundling objects
US7469946Nov 19, 2007Dec 30, 2008Handle It, LlcWrap for bundling objects
US7673919Nov 19, 2007Mar 9, 2010Handle It LlcWrap for bundling objects
US8056948Mar 2, 2010Nov 15, 2011Handle It LlcWrap for bundling objects
US8256812Nov 14, 2011Sep 4, 2012Handle It LlcWrap for bundling objects
US8371614 *May 28, 2010Feb 12, 2013Joseph Judethaddeus RodriguezSki-pole coupling assembly
US8387216Oct 8, 2008Mar 5, 2013Nite Ize, Inc.Tie wrap for bundling objects
US8485578Aug 24, 2012Jul 16, 2013Handle It LlcWrap for bundling objects
US8616422Aug 2, 2011Dec 31, 2013Greg AdelmanCantilevered snap fit case
US8776322Mar 4, 2013Jul 15, 2014Nite Ize, Inc.Tie wrap for bundling objects
US8806723Aug 2, 2011Aug 19, 2014Nite Ize, Inc.Tie wrap for bundling objects
US20110291397 *May 28, 2010Dec 1, 2011Joseph Judethaddeus RodriguezSki-Pole Coupling Assembly
Classifications
U.S. Classification280/814, 294/147, 24/305, 24/324
International ClassificationA63C11/02, A63C11/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63C11/025
European ClassificationA63C11/02B2