Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3564932 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 23, 1971
Filing dateNov 4, 1968
Priority dateFeb 9, 1968
Publication numberUS 3564932 A, US 3564932A, US-A-3564932, US3564932 A, US3564932A
InventorsLebelle Jean Louis
Original AssigneeLebelle Jean L
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Vibrodriver system
US 3564932 A
Abstract  available in
Images(6)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

F. 23, 1971 J. LEBELLE 3,564,932

VIBRODRIVER SYSTEM Filed Nov. 4., 1968 6 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTOR JEAN LOUIS LEBELLE TORNEYS Feb. 23, 1971 J. LEBELLE 3,564,932

VIBRODRIVER SYSTEM Filed Nov. 4. 1988 e Sheets-Sheet 2 v INVEHTOP. JEAN nouxs LEBELLE A TORNEYS Feb. 23, 1971 .1. 1.. LEBELLE 3,564,932

VIBRODRIVER SYSTEM Filed Nov. 4'. 1968 s Sheets-Sheet. 5

INVENTOR I JEAN LOUIS LEBELLE ATTORNEYS 1971 J. LEBELLE VIBRODRIVER SYSTEM 6 Sheets-Sheet 4.

Filed Nov. 4-. 1968 INVENTOR JEAN LOUIS LEBELLE A ORNBYS 1971 J. L. LEBELLE 6 ,93

uenonmvnn SYSTEM Filed Nov. 4. 1968 s Sheets-Sheet s INVENTOR JEAN OUIS LEBELLE ATTORNEYS Feb. 23, 1971 J. L. LEBELLE 3,554,932

vzsnonmvmn SYSTEM Filed Nov. 4, 1968 e Sheets-Sheet a I52 INVENTOR JEAN LOUIS LEBELLE 41441644, 079 ZLQ ATTORNEYS United States Patent 015cc Patented Feb. 23, 1971 3 Int. Cl. F1611 33/00; lilZlb 7/04; E02d 7/18 US. Cl. 74-61 16 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A vibrodriver comprising at least two sets of eccentric weights, the weights of each set being so arranged that such set generates a net vibratory force along a functional axis, the functional axes of the two sets being coincident. The sets are coupled to one another by a transmission including a continuously variable phase shifting device such as a Pecqueur epicycloidal train so that although the two sets are driven synchronously (at the same speed of rotation), the mutual phase relationship of the sets can be altered at will without stopping rotation of the sets so as to thereby alter the amplitude of the conjoint net vibratory force.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION (1) Field of the invention Vibrodrivers which employ a unidirectional vibration to sink into the ground piles, stakes and posts or other elements and to facilitate their extraction.

(2) Description of the prior art In order to obtain the vibration of the apparatus along an axis called the functional axis, recourse has usually been had to a system of two identical wheels located in the same plane, said plane containing the functional axis, the centers of said two wheels being symmetrical in relation to one another with reference to said functional axis, and said two wheels being provided with identical eccentric masses identically disposed on said wheels which wheels turn in opposite directions at the same speed. The analysis of the functioning of such an assembly shows that each eccentric mass is subjected to a centrifugal force which may at each instant be resolved into a force parallel to the functional axis and a transverse force joining the centers of the two wheels. The. said transverse force is also perpendicular to the said functional axis. It is seen that if the two wheels rotate in perfect synchronism and if the eccentric masses are fixed on the two wheels in such way as to be at each instant symmetrical in relation to one another with respect to the functional axis, the components parallel to the functional axis of their centrifugal forces may be resolved into a force along the functional axis while the transverse components joining the centers of the two wheels cancel each other. As a result, the assembly of the apparatus becomes a source of a unidirectional vibrating force directed along the functional axis and whose intensity along that axis varies sinusoidally. Three identical wheels also have been proposed whose centers are aligned, the center of one of the three wheels called the central wheel being situated on the functional axis and the centers of the other two wheels called the lateral wheels being symmetrical in relation to one another with reference to said functional axis. It is seen that if the side wheels turn in the same direction and at the same speed and are provided with eccentric weights mounted along radial directions parallel to one another, and if the central wheel turns in the opposite direction and at the same speed and is provided with an eccentric weight double the mass of one of the side wheels, mounted along a radial direction symmetrical, in relation to the functional axis, to the radial direction in which the eccentric weights of the side wheels are mounted, a unidirectional vibrating force is obtained along the functional axis and whose intensity along that axis likewise varies sinusoidally.

In general to assure perfect synchronism among the various Wheels, the latter are provided with meshing teeth, the moving energy being supplied by at least one motor driving at least one of the wheels.

If a speed of rotation for the wheels and the characteristics of the eccentric weights are predetermined, the power which must be supplied by the motors for driving the system is determined. Evidently if under these conditions, i.e. use of full power, it is desired to increase the speed of rotation of the wheels, that is the frequency of the generated unidirectional vibrating force, its amplitude will have to be decreased. It is also evident that under such conditions if it is desired to increase the amplitude of the generated unidirectional force, it will be necessary to reduce its frequency. It is thus seen that in order under all circumstances to be able to use the full power of the driving motors, the frequency of the generated unidirectional force must be capable of being reduced when it is desired to increase its amplitude and vice versa. This possibility is important because the use of the driving motors at their full power makes for more rapid performance of the task to be done.

It has been proposed to cause variation of the amplitude of a unidirectional vibrating force directed along the functional axis, by using at least two groups of wheels provided with eccentric weights in like radial disposition, each group being adopted to produce a unidirectional vibrating force, the groups being disposed in such manner that said unidirectional vibrating forces which they pro duce are along the same axis as constitutes the functional axis, so that said unidirectional vibrating forces are additive, and finally to provide for the selective disengagement of certain of said groups from the driving motor. Under these conditions, assuming for example that the wheels and eccentric weights are identical in the various groups and that the weights are mounted in the same way in relation to the functional axis in the different groups, it is seen that for a given speed of rotation of the wheels with eccentric weights, the amplitude of the unidirectional vibrating force obtained is proportional to the number of groups used. The disadvantage of this system is that if the driving motor has been considered as functioning at full load when all the groups of Wheels having eccentric weights are working, it finds itself automatically functioning below its full load as soon as at least one of the groups of wheels having eccentric weights is disengaged.

Moreover the regulation of the amplitude of the unidirectional vibrating force is effected in this system in successive steps, i.e. finite increments, and not in a continuously variable fashion, which former arrangement may be disadvantageous, one of the steps corresponding to too weak an amplitude, and the succeeding step to too strong an amplitude. Finally in causing a variation in the speed of the driving motor, one may cause a variation in the frequency of the unidirectional vibrating force obtained,

which is sometimes necessary for certain applications. but in this case, if the member of Working groups is not varied simultaneously, the full power of the motors is not utilized.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The present invention proposes to remedy these disadvantages by means permitting the introduction of an angular displacement, i.e. change of phasing, between the radial directions of the eccentric weights of the wheels of one group of wheels and the radial directions of the corresponding eccentric weights of another group of wheels, which permits regulation of the amplitude of the unidirectional vibrating force obtained within wide limits and in continuously variable fashion for a given speed of rotation of the wheels with eccentric weights.

The invention likewise contemplates the introduction of said angular displacement (degree of dephasing) between the wheels of one group and the wheels of another group while the apparatus is in operation, i.e. is not shut down while the adjustment is made, which is particularly advantageous for adopting the amplitude of the unidirectional vibrating force at each instant to the task required of the vibrodriver. Moreover, the possibility of variation of displacement during operation permits the putting into operation of a device for automatic regulation of the amplitude of the unidirectional vibrating force as a function of its frequency or vice versa of such kind that if the driving motors are of variable speed, the result is obtained that the required variation of one of the parameters brings about a variation of the other in such a direction that the power used up is appreciably constant.

The invention consists of a vibrodriver apparatus embodying the utilizing of at least two sets of at least two wheels provided with masses forming eccentric weights, each of these wheel assemblies being disposed in such fashion as to constitute by itself a vibrodriver of known type generating along a fixed determined axis, called the functional axis, a unidirectional vibrating force. At least one of the wheels with eccentric weight constituents of the apparatus receives the energy necessary for its operation of the apparatus from a driving motor. Each set of wheels with eccentric weights is coupled to at least another such set by means of a transfer mechanism (transmission), the latter while assuring synchronism between the rotation of the wheels of the two assemblies which it couples, permitting the introduction while the apparatus is in constant operation of a dephasing between the wheels of one of said sets and those of the other so that the different sets being disposed in such fashion that the unidirectional vibrating forces which they generate are along a common functional axis, an apparatus is obtained producing a unidirectional vibrating force whose amplitude may be continuously regulated while the system is in operation within very wide limits from practically a zero value to a considerably large maximum value.

According to one particular embodiment of the invention the transfer mechanism constitutes a Pecqueur epicycloidal train, having an internal ratio equal to two, provided with a reaction arm friction coupled to a fixed planetary system capable when subjected to a suitable external force of undergoing a rotation relative to the reaction arm. If the Pecqueur epicycloidal train has an internal ratio different from two, the transfer mechanism comprises, besides the Pecqueur epicycloidal train, a suitable train of toothed wheels (gears) having a suitable ratio disposed between said Pecqueur epicycloidal train and one of the assembly of wheels such that it couples one set of weights to the other, in a fashion such as to assure the equality of speeds of rotation of the two coupled trains of wheels.

In accordance with a second particular embodiment of the invention, the transfer mechanism is comprised of a Pecqueur epicycloidal train of internal ratio in the neighborhood of l, i.e. near but not exactly one, the framework of said train being capable of undergoing a rotation around its axis when subjected to a suitable external force.

The invention resides also in a vibrodriver, in accordance with the invention, comprising a Pecqueur epicycloidal train used as a transfer element, and in the use of said epicycloidal train for the automatic regulation of the frequency of the unidirectional vibrating force generated as a function of the amplitude of said unidirectional vibrating force, or vice versa, in such manner that the power required of the driving motor is constant, the frequency of the unidirectional vibrating force being regulated at will by the user with the aid of an external control.

The automatic regulating apparatus acting on the Pecquer epicycloidal train may for example comprise at least one hydraulic oil pump of variable outflow feeding at least one hydraulic motor driving the wheels with eccentric weights. The variation of the outflow is regulated by a hand control which operates, at the same time, by means of a spring, a device assuring the shunting of a flow of oil furnished by an auxiliary pump either toward the reservoir from which it comes, or toward a hydraulic regulating motor so as to make it turn in the same direction as or in a direction opposite to the preceding one. The said regulating motor is connected to the Pecqueur epicycloidal train so as to give rise to a dephasing movement of the eccentric weights of one group in relation to those of the other group, the said dephasing movement stopping automatically when the device assuring the shunting of the oil flow is led toward One of its positions corresponding to a direct return of the oil to the reservoir from which it comes without passing through the regulating motor. The movement leading said device in the said direction is effected by a jack connected in the supply circuit of the eccentric weights, a circuit in which a pressure exists that is inversely proportional to the speed of rotation of the motors driving the wheels with eccentric weights.

Other devices which will occur to one skilled in the art may be used to activate the Pecqueur epicycloidal train,

such as for example a device comprising pumps driven by electric motors and regulated by speed changers in which the speed changer is acted upon manually while a wattmetric relay (a relay responsive to the power required to drive the pumps) mounted on the driving motors for the pumps controls the starting in one direction or the other of the motor acting upon the Pecqueur epicycloidal train. In the same way in case the wheels with eccentric weights are driven directly or indirectly by thermal motors (e.g. steam turbines, steam engines, Diesel engines, gasoline engines, etc.) one may envisage that the motor acting on the Pecqueur epicycloidal train is controlled by a relay controlled by the temperature of the exhaust gas of the driving motors.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS The invention will be better understood with the aid of the following description with reference to the annexed drawings in which:

FIG. 1 is a schematic view in elevation of a vibrodriver of known type with the housing removed;

FIG. 2 is a schematic view in elevation of a known variant for an apparatus for creating the vibration of the vibrodriver;

FIG. 3 shows the apparatus for creating the vibration for a vibrodriver in which the wheels in one group are angularly displaced in relation to their corresponding Wheels in another group;

FIG. 4 shows a Pecqueur epicycloidal train the principle of which is used in certain vibrodrivers embodying the invention;

FIG. 5 shows a vibrodriver embodying the invention using a Pecqueur epicycloidal train;

FIG. 6 shows a variant for the mounting of a Pecqueur epicycloidal train used in a vibrodriver embodying the invention;

FIG. 7 shows a portion of an apparatus such as illustrated in FIG. in which an angular displacement may be efiectuated between the wheels of one group and the corresponding wheels of another group by a Pecqueur epicycloidal train employing a modified form of actuator for dephasing;

FIG. 8 shows a vibrodriver embodying the invention using two groups of two wheels;

FIG. 9 shows a vibrodriver embodying the invention using two groups of three wheels;

FIG. shows a vibrodriver embodying the invention provided with an automatic regulating device whereby it always operates in the neighborhood of maximum load of the driving energy source, irrespective of the frequency of the vibration produced; and

FIG. 11 shows another embodiment of a vibrodriver in accordance with the invention using a Pecqueur epicycloidal train.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS In FIG. 1 is shown a schematic view, in elevation, of a vibrodriver of a known type with its casing removed. Said vibrodriver comprises a head 1 on which are fixed two closure jaws, one jaw 2 being stationary and the other jaw 3 being movable. The movement of the movable jaw is controlled by a jack 4 incorporated in the body of the head, said jack being activated by a hydraulic pump 5 fed by a motor 6. On top of the head is fixed a housing 7 containing the apparatus for creating vibrations, said housing being provided at its upper portion with a lug 8 having a hole 9 for easy manipulation of the apparatus with the hook of a crane.

The apparatus for creating vibration comprises two motors 10 and 10 rotationally driving respectively, two shafts 11 and 11 by any transmission means 12 and 12 such as a continuous belt or chain. A toothed wheel 13 integral with the shaft 11 permanently drives a toothed wheel 14 fixed on the shaft 15 and provided with an eccentric weight 16. Likewise a toothed wheel 13' integral with the shaft 11 permanently drives a toothed wheel 14' fixed on the shaft 15 and provided with an eccentric weight 16'.

It will be seen that if the two motors 10 and 10 turn at the same speed in opposite directions, the toothed wheels 14 and 14', identical in construction, will turn in opposite directions and at the same speeds, and, consequently, the two eccentric weights 16 and 16, identical in construction and weight, and identically disposed on the wheels 14 and 14, respectively, will at each instant be symmetrical with one another in relation to the functional axis 17 of the apparatus. This synchronism is, moreover, assured by having the shafts 15 and 15 separated from one another so that the toothed wheels '14 and 14' interengage.

If at a given moment one considers the centrifugal force to which the eccentric weight 16' is subjected and that to which the eccentric weight 16 is subjected, it will be seen that they are symmetrical in relation to the functional axis 17, and it follows, therefore, that the projections of these centrifugal forces on said axis 17 are sinusoidal forces in phase with one another and their eifects are additive, and that the projections on an axis in the plane of the figure and perpendicular to the functional axis 17 are sinusoidal forces in opposite phase and whose effects cancel each other out.

In FIG. 1 it is likewise seen that the toothed wheel 13 continuously drives a toothed wheel 18 fixed on the shaft 19 and provided with an eccentric weight 20, while the toothed wheel 13' permanently drives a toothed wheel 18' fixed on a shaft 19' and provided with an eccentric weight 20' and that these toothed wheels 18 and 18 turn in opposite directions in relation to each other, the wheel 18 turning in the same direction as the wheel 14 and the wheel 18' turning in the same direction as the wheel 14'. It is seen that the mutually identical eccentric weights 20 and 20' also create a unidirectional sinusoidal vibrating force directed along the functional axis 17.

Assuming the eccentric weights 20 and 20 are identical to the weights 16 and 16 and are identically disposed on their respective wheels, the unidirectional vibrating sinusoidal forces created along the axis 17 by the wheels 14 and 14 on the one hand, and the wheels 18 and 18' on the other hand are equal in phase, so that, on the whole, the system such as shown in FIG. 1, is subjected to a unidirectional vibrating sinusoidal force along the axis 17 and twice the unidirectional vibrating sinusoidal force created along that axis by the wheels 14 and 14' alone.

It has been proposed to provide an apparatus permitting disconnecting at will the wheels 18 and 18 from the driving mechanism, so that an apparatus is provided which may at will furnish a vibrating unidirectional sinusoidal force on the functional axis 17 of given amplitude (wheels 18 and 18' being connected to the driving mechanism) or of half the preceding amplitude (wheels 18 and 18 being disconnected from the driving mechanism).

If one imagines an apparatus comprising n couples of wheels such as 14 and 14 or 18 and '18, one of the couples being permanently driven by a driving mechanism and the other nl couples connected or disconnected at will it is seen that an apparatus is provided capable 0f furnishing a vibrating unidirectional sinusoidal force whose theoretical amplitude will be na, where a is the amplitude of the vibrating unidirectional sinusoidal force obtained with a single pair of wheels, and whose amplitude may take on all values: a, 2a, 3a na, according as there will be 1, 2, 3 or n pairs in service. Diiferent values may be obtained assuming that the diverse pairs of wheels are provided with eccentric weights which are not all identical from one pair to the next.

It will be noted that the motors 10 and 10' for the apparatus are preferably chosen so as to operate at their maximum normal power when all the wheels are in service and at their greatest speed. It follows that if a number of wheels are disconnected without changing the speed of rotation, the greatest aggregate power of the motors is no longer utilized.

In FIG. 2 is shown a schematic view in elevation of a known variant of apparatus for creating vibrations wherein each couple (pair) of toothed wheels such as 14 and 14' or 18 and 18' of the apparatus described in FIG. 1 is replaced by an assembly of three wheels, viz a median toothed wheel 21 and two side toothed wheels 22 and 22'; said median wheel is loaded with an eccentric weight 23 of a moment double that of each of the eccentric weights loading the wheels 24 and 24', respectively. Moreover the eccentric weight 23 is fixed in such fashion that its center of gravity, in relation to functional axis 25, is located symmetrically with the center of gravity of the eccentric weight 24 with relation to the axis 26 and the center of gravity of the eccentric weight 24' in relation to the axis 26. It can be shown that under these conditions the wheel 22 being rotatably driven in a certain direction by the toothed wheel 27 fixed on the shaft 28 and the toothed wheel 22 being rotatably driven at the same speed and in the same direction as the toothed wheel 22 by the toothed wheel 27' fixed on the shaft 28', the toothed wheel 21 rotates at the same speed but in a direction opposite to the toothed wheels 22 and 22', thus creating a vibrating unidirectional sinusoidal force directed along the functional axis 25.

The toothed wheel 27 is itself driven by a motor 29 by means of a chain or transmission belt 30 or in any other fashion and the toothed wheel 27 in an analogous manner by a motor 29' and a chain belt or any other means 30'.

As in the case of FIG. 1, several assemblies of three wheels may be grouped to increase the amplitude of the created vibrating unidirectional sinusoidal force and certain of these assemblies may be selectively disconnectable.

Given the meshing between the various wheels it is very evident that in all the apparatus described one motor may drive several eccentric weights and that therefore it is not necessary to have one motor for each eccentric weight.

In FIG. 3 is again shown the two groups of toothed wheels provided with equal eccentric weights comprising the apparatus described with the help of FIG. 1, but giving to each of the wheels of one of the groups an angular displacement (p with respect to the wheel of the other group rotating in the same direction. Under these conditions it is evident that the unidirectional force created along the axis 17, and consequently the amplitude of the unidirectional vibrations along that axis, is less than double the force and amplitude of vibrations created by a single group of wheels. It follows that the power required of the driving motor is less than that which would have to be utilized if the two groups of wheels agreed in phase.

In FIG. 4 is shown a Pecqueur epicycloidal train used according to this invention to make a vibrodriver in which the dephasing between the two groups of wheels may be easily regulated during the operation of the apparatus i.e. without stopping the same. In FIG. 4 is seen a toothed wheel 31 which constitutes the body of the device on which are fixed two discs 33 and 34. A shaft 35 is maintained in fixed position relative to the toothed wheel 31 and the discs 33 and 34 by means of bearings 36. On the shaft 35 are keyed two toothed wheels 37 and 38 called satellites. The satellite wheel 37 meshes with a toothed wheel 39 and the satellite wheel 38 meshes with a toothed wheel 40. The toothed wheels 39 and 40 are called planetaries and disposed in such manner that they are in line with the axis of the toothed wheel 31. The planetary 40 is keyed to the hub 41, while the planetary 39 is keyed to a sleeve 42 surrounding one reduced end of the hub 41. A disc 44 is held by screws 43 on the sleeve 42. A counter disc 45 is fixed on disc 44 by a number of regulatable closure pressure nuts 46 screwed on threaded shanks 47 fixed to said disc 44. Between the disc 44 and the counter disc 45, is held captive a ring 48 having a radial extension arm 49 provided with a slot 50. Between the ring 48 and the disc 44 on the one hand and the counter disc 45 on the other hand, are disposed friction linings 51. Moreover between the contiguous parts required to turn relative to each other are disposed ball hearings or needle bearings (not shown in the figure).

It is known that such an assembly, mounted on a shaft 52 within the hub 41 with the aid of closure collars 53 and whose arm 49 is immobilized by a member 54 having a fixed position relative to the shaft 52, transmits the rotary movement of the wheel 31 to the hub 41 with a transfer relationship in which p is the internal ratio of the meshing train constituted by the two satellites and the two planetaries, the common axis of the satellites being fixed in relation to the common axis of the planetaries.

In particular, if the dimensions and the teeth of the satellites and planetaries are such that the internal ratio of the meshing train is equal to 2 it is seen that K=1, that is the hub 41 turns at the same speed as the wheel 31 but in an opposite direction. Any toothed wheel which would be mounted on the hub 41 would turn, therefore, under these conditions in synchronism with but in opposite direction to the wheel 31. Moreover, if the power applied to the wheel 31 becomes too strong at any moment, for example, by racing of the driving motor, or if the resistance of the hub 41 to the drive becomes excessive at a certain moment as, for example, by the blocking of the mechanical part upon starting, the friction coupling obtained with the help of the linings 51 between the disc 44 and the disc 45 on the one hand and the ring 48 on the other permits the assembly made up of the disc 44 and the counterdisc to effectuate a rotation by slipping; the assembly thus provides a torque limiter which prevents destruction of the system.

Reversely if a sufficient external force is applied to the assembly of disc 44 and counterdisc 45 to give it a rotation moment greater than the resistance offered by the friction coupling, the disc 44 can be made to turn relatively to the ring 48 then the disc 44 screwed by bolts 43 on the sleeve 42. rotatably drives said sleeve 42 and the latter in turn rotatably drives the planetary 39 causes the satellite 37 keyed on shaft 35 to rotate and that rotation is thus communicated to the satellite 38 likewise keyed to the shaft 35. In rotating, the satellite 38 rotatably drives the planetary 40 and consequently the hub 41 to which it is keyed. In all this movement the wheel 31 has not been subjected to any rotation so that an angular displacement is obtained between said wheel 31 and the hub 41. If any toothed wheel is keyed to the hub 41, an angular displacement will have been obtained between that wheel and the Wheel 31.

The above described movement is a movement relative to the hub 41 with respect to the wheel 31; it can, without diificulty, be superimposed on the normal movement of the wheel 31 and the hub 41 at the time of (during) the functioning of the Pecqueur epicycloidal train. In particular, when the internal ratio of the meshing train obtained from the two planetaries and the two satellites is equal to 2 and as above seen the apparatus functions as a reverse rotation means, a dephasing means has been obtained between two wheels turning in synchronism. This property is utilized for the production of vibrodrivers in accordance with the invention which will be described with the help of the following figures:

In FIG. 5 is shown, schematically, the utilization of a Pecqueur epicycloidal train of internal ratio 2 for making a vibrodriver in accordance with the invention. In this figure is seen a motor 55 on whose shaft 56 is keyed a toothed wheel 57. The latter wheel 57 meshes with an eccentric weight Wheel 58 mounted on a shaft 59. The toothed wheel 58 with its eccentric weight is the equivalent in the vibrodriver according to the invention of the eccentric weighted wheel 14 of FIG. 1, or also of the eccentric weighted wheel 21 of FIG. 2. This Wheel 58 meshes with the toothed wheel 60 of a Pecqueur epicycloidal reducer of the kind described with the aid of FIG. 4. The latter wheel 60 and a body 61 fixed thereon constitute the equivalent of the assembly in FIG. 4 made up of the elements 31, 33 and 34. In the same way in FIG. 5 there is provided a shaft 62 carried by the wheel 60 and the body 61 and the equivalent of the shaft 35 shown in FIG. 4. Such shaft 62 has fixed to it two toothed satellites 63 and 64 meshing respectively with toothed planetaries 65 and 66. The planetary 65 is keyed to a hub 67 on which is fixed a toothed wheel 68. On its part the planetary 66 is integral with a sleeve 69 on which is fixed a disc 70. A counterdisc 71 is fixed on the disc by a certain number of variable closure pressure screws 72 and the assembly of the disc 70 and the counterdisc 71 provided with friction linings 73 holds captive a ring 74 having a radial extension arm 75. On the counterdisc 71 is rigidly fixed a sleeve 76 to which is keyed a toothed wheel 77. Lastly, the hub 67, sleeve 69 and sleeve 76, as shown in the figure, are mounted on a fixed shaft support 78.

Incidentally, a ratchet wheel 79 is mounted around the toothed wheel 77. Said ratchet wheel 79 rotating in one direction drives the 77 and rotating in the other direction drops back without acting on the wheel 77. The ratchet wheel 79 is operated by a lever 80- whose end 81 may be connected to a doubly (oppositely) effective hydraulic jack not shown in the figure. The arm is immobilized by an anchor pin 82.

Lastly, the toothed wheel 68 meshes with an eccentric Weighted toothed wheel 83 mounted on a shaft 84.

The shafts 59, 78 and 84, as well as pin 82, are fixedly mounted on the chassis 85 of the vibrodriver.

The internal ratio of the Pecqueur epicycloidal train being 2 by hypothesis, the toothed wheels 60 and 68 rotate at the same speed but in opposite direction and consequently if these two wheels 60 and 68 have the same number of teeth and if, moreover, the eccentric weighted wheels 58 and 83 are identical, it is seen that said wheels 58 and 83 will rotate at the same speed but in opposite directions. On the other hand a dephasing between the wheel 83 and the wheel 58 can be accomplished by applying a couple greater than the resistance offered by the friction linings 73 to cause the planetary 66 to rotate by means of the satellites 64 and 63 and the planetary 65. It is therefore seen that a means is provided for causing rotation of two eccentric weighted wheels and besides to introduce a continuously variable dephasing between them, even while the apparatus is in operation.

In FIG. 6 is shown a variant of the conditions of utilization of a Pecqueur epicycloidal train for obtaining a vibrodriver in accordance with the invention. According to this variant, the wheel 68 is fixed on the hub 67 on the same side of the disc 70 in relation to the Pecqueur train, bounded by the wheel 60 and the body 61. This variant in certain conditions makes for some facilities in the me- In FIG. 7 is shown a variant of the driving means for the disc and counterdisc that engage opposite sides of the anchored reaction arm. According to this variant, a toothed wheel 87 is fixed on the sleeve 76. This toothed wheel 87 meshes with a toothed wheel 88 mounted on the shaft 89 of a low-speed motor 90. It is seen that under these conditions when said motor 90 is made to rotate in one direction or the other, a dephasing is produced of the eccentric weighted wheel 83 in the one direction or the other relation to eccentric weighted wheel 58 (FIG. '5). For certain applications, it may be convenient to utilize a motor such as 90 rather than an oppositely acting jack acting on a ratchet wheel as indicated in FIG. 5.

In FIG. 8 there is shown a vibrodriver in accordance with the invention comprising four identical wheels 91, 92, 93 and 94 provided with identical and identically disposed eccentric weights 95, 96, 97 and 98 respectively. The wheel 91, according to the invention is connected with the wheel 93 through a Pecqueur epicycloidal train 99. At the same time, the wheel 91 meshes with the wheel 92 which is rotably driven by a toothed wheel 100 with which it meshes, said toothed wheel 100 being driven by a motor not shown in the figure. Moreover, the wheel 93 meshes with the wheel 94 with which the toothed wheel 101 eventually meshes, said toothed wheel being driven by a motor rotating at the same speed as that which drives the wheel 100 but in an opposite direction. Lastly, 102 denotes a toothed wheel mounted on the shaft of a lowspeed motor (not shown) and permitting action as explained with the help of FIG. 7 for the dephasrngbetween the wheels 91 and 93. Under these conditions, it is seen that the wheel 100 rotates in the direction indicated by the arrow 103. The wheel 92 rotates in the direction indicated by the arrow 104 and the wheel 91 rotates in the direction indicated by the arrow 105. The Pecqueur epicycloidal train 99 being assumed to have an internal ratio of 2, the wheel 93 will rotate in the direction indicated by the arrow 106 and consequently, the wheel 94 will rotate in the direction indicated by the arrow 107. If it is desired for reasons of transmission to apply power to the wheel 94 with the help of the wheel 101, it is seen that the latter will have to turn in the direction indicated by the arrow 108. There has been, therefore, easily obtained, a vibrodriver in which all the eccentric-weighted wheels are permanently in rotation and in which, while operating, the dephasing may be regulated between the eccentric weights of one pair of wheels and those of another pair of wheels, thus permitting continuously variable regulation of the unidirectional vibration produced by the apparatus.

In FIG. 9 has been shown an embodiment of a vibrodriver in accordance with the invention comprising two groups of three wheels 109, 110 and 111 on the one hand, and 112, 113 and 114 on the other hand. The wheel 110 is provided with an eccentric weight 115, and the wheels 109 and 111 with eccentric weights 116 and 117, respectively, the latter weights 116 and 117 each having a moment equal to half of the moment of the eccentric weight 115. In similar fashion, the wheel 113 is provided with an eccentric weight 118 and the wheels 112 and 114 with eccentric weights 119 and 120, each having a moment equal to half of the moment of the eccentric weight 118. A Pecqueur epicycloidal train 121 of internal ratio '2 couples the wheels 110 and 113 so that the latter wheels 110 and 113 rotate at the same speed and in opposite directions. A toothed wheel 122 capable of being rotatably driven by a low-speed motor permits action on the Pecqueur epicycloidal train 121 for selectively dephasing the wheels of one group of wheels relative to the wheels of the other group of wheels while the vibrodriver is in operation. Energy is furnished to the system by two motors respectively driving wheels 123 and 124 at the same speed but in opposite directions. If the wheel 123 is driven by a corresponding motor in the direction of the arrow 125, the wheels 110, 112 and 114 are driven in the same direction as indicated by the arrows 126, 127 and 128. On the other hand, the wheels 109, 111 and 113 turning in the opposite direction as indicated by the arrows 129, 130 and 131, it is seen that the wheel 124 must turn in the direction indicated by the arrow 132 in order to bring utilizable energy to the system.

In FIG. 10 is shown schematically a feeding and regulating circuit for a vibrodriver according to the invention, the latter circuit being intended to assure automatic regulation of the amplitude of the vibration produced by the vibrodriver when operating with a chosen working frequency by utilization in such fashion as to assure functioning of the driving energy source at practically constant load. In this figure, an embodiment of a vibrodriver in accordance with the invention is seen in the four wheels 133, 134, 135 and 136 provided with eccentric weights 137, 138, 139 and 140 respectively, the wheels 134 and 135 being tied (coupled) to one another by a Pecqueur epicycloidal train 141 of internal ratio 2. The wheel 133 is rotably driven by a hydraulic motor 142 and the wheel 136 is rotably driven by a hydraulic motor 143. The two hydraulic motors 142 and 143 being identical and fed in parallel by the same source, rotate at the same speed and are moreover connected in such way as to rotate in opposite directions in relation to one another. The arrows 144, 145, 146, 147, 148 and 149 show, respectively, the directions of rotation of the wheels 133, 134, 135 and 136 as well as of the motors 142 and 143. Moreover, a lowspeed hydraulic motor 150 acts upon the Pecqueur epicycloidal train as has been shown in FIG. 7 and permits the introduction of a continuously and selectively variable dephasing between wheels of one and of the other group of eccentric weighted wheels.

Likewise, it is seen in FIG. 10 that the motor 142 5 and 143 are connected by means of pipes 151 and 152,

respectively, to the pipe 153 which feeds fluid to them. This pipe 153 is fed with fluid by hydraulic pumps 154 and 155 to which they are connected by pipes 156 and 157, respectively. The pumps 154 and 155, driven by any motor, electric or thermal, not shown in the figure, draw fluid from a reservoir 159 by means of pipes 160 and 161, respectively. After causing rotation of the hydraulic motors 142 and 143, the fluid is returned to the reservoir 159 by a pipe 162. The pumps 154 and 155 are pumps of variable dischargev rates, the quantity of fluid delivered 1 1 per unit time being according to known apparatus, a function of the angular position of regulating elements 163 and 164, respectively. The latter elements 163 and 164 have their ends joined to the ends of rods 165 and 166 of pistons 167 and 168 of jacks 169 and 170.

The jacks 169 and 170 mounted to be operated according to volume transfer are series connected on the one hand to one another by a pipe 171 and on the other hand by pipes 172 and 173 to the ends of the cylinder of another jack 174. The piston 175 of the jack 174 has its rod 176 slidably pivoted at right angles to a lever 177 that is hinged at one of its ends to a fixed shaft 178 seen in end view in FIG. 10. The other end of the lever 177 comprises a screw nut 179 in which is threaded a long screw 180 fixed on a shaft 181 supported on ball bearings 182 and comprising at one of its ends a control wheel 183 having a handle 184. The lever 177 is likewise connected by a rod 185, fixed as an extension of the rod 176, to one of the ends of a coil spring 186. The other end of this coil spring 186 is connected by means of a screw 187, double threaded in opposite directions, to a rod 188 connected to a slide valve distributor 189.

The slide valve distributor 189 is connected by a rod 190, effectively constituting an extension of the rod 188, to the piston of a jack 192 itself connected to the pressure pipe 153 by a pipe 193. Moreover the distributor 189 on the one hand has its two outlets 194 and 195 connected by pipes 196 and 197 to the intake and outlet of the fluid motor 150, and on the other hand its two intakes 198 and 199 connected respectively by a pipe 200 to the outlet of a fluid pump 201 and by a pipe 202 to the top of a fluid reservoir 203. Lastly the pump 201 draws fluid from the reservoir 203 with the aid of a pipe 294 which terminates near the base of said reservoir 203.

The slide valve distributor shown schematically by 189 assures operation according to the position it is in, by the connection between the pipe 200 and the pipe 202 with the aid of a passageway shown schematically at 205, by the connection between the pipe 200 and the pipe 196, at the same time as the connection between the pipe 202 and the pipe 197, with the aid of passageways shown schematically at 206 and 207, and by the connection, lastly, between the pipe 200 and the pipe 197 at the time as the connection between the pipe 202 and the pipe 196 with the aid of passageways shown schematically at 208 and 209. In certain applications the slide valve distributor 189, instead of being connected directly to the rods 188 and may be actuated by a pilot servo-valve, itself connected to said rods 188 and 190. In other cases, the slide valve distributor may be replaced by a servo-valve with a main stage and pilot stage.

The apparatus shown in FIG. 10 operates in the following fashion. At the outset it is easy to understand that if it is desired that the power required of the external source of energy remain practically constant, the pressure of the oil in the pipe system should diminish by n% when the stream of the discharge is increased 11%. This being understood, let it be supposed that the eccentric weights 137 and 138 are fixed at a certain angle relative to the weights 139 and 140, respectively, and that the speed of rotation of these eccentric weights is such that the operation proceeds under conditions corresponding to the maximum power of the external source of energy. If it is then desired to increase the speed of rotation of the eccentric weights, that is to say, the frequency of the vibrating unidirectional force generated, the control wheel 183 is operated in-such a way as to raise the lever 177. It follows that the reaction of the spring 186 diminishes and under the action of the existing pressure in the piping 193, the piston 191 rises, driving the distributor which in turn feeds the motor 150 with fluid issuing from the motor 201. The motor 150 begins to turn and in acting on the Pecqueur epicycloidal train 141 produces a variation in the dephasing between the eccentric weights in a direction such that it corresponds to a reduction in amplitude of the vibrating unidirectional force generated. Moreover, the oil pumps 154 and 155 have begun to turn faster in consequence of the upward displacement of the piston 175 connected to the lever 177. At the same time, the pressure in pipe 193 diminishes because of the fact that the total moment of the eccentrics diminishes and consequently piston 191 comes down, so bringing back the distributor to its median position. This in turn brings about stoppage of the feeding of the motor 150 which then stops rotating. There is now again a stable condition with a vibrating unidirectional force whose frequency has increased and whose amplitude has diminished, the energy drawn from the external source being practically unchanged. Upon operating the control wheel 183 in the reverse direction, a reverse effect is produced, the distributor then causing feeding of the motor 150 in a reverse direction to the preceding one. Naturally, the two pumps 154 and 155 could be replaced by a single pump, the two pumps have been shown so as to show how they could be regulated simultaneously.

In FIG. 11 there has been shown schematically the utilization of a Pecqueur epicycloidal train having an internal ratio near but not equal to l to obtain a vibrodriver according to this invention. In that figure a first toothed wheel 210 provided with an eccentric weight is seen rotatable on a shaft 211 meshing with a toothed wheel 212 keyed to a hub 213 and freely rotatable around a shaft 214. On the shaft 214 is keyed a toothed wheel 215 which meshes with a second eccentric weighted toothed wheel 216 rotatable on a shaft 217. The wheels 210 and 216 are elements of different pairs of meshing wheels, e.g. correspond to the wheels 91 and 93. Around the shaft 214 and the hub 213 is disposed a Pecqueur epicycloidal train comprising a casing 218 on one of whose faces is disposed a toothed wheel 219. A first planetary 220 is keyed to the hub 213 and a second planetary 221 is keyed to the shaft 214 and two satellites 222 and 223 are mounted on an auxiliary shaft 224 fixed on the head 218. Lastly, a toothed wheel 225 meshes with the wheel 219. This wheel 225 is secured to the shaft 226 of a motor 227.

It is seen that the apparatus permits the transmission of rotatable movement of the eccentric weighted wheel 210 to the eccentric weighted wheel 216 and if the internal ratio of the Pecqueur epicycloidal train is in the neighborhood of l, and the number of teeth on the wheel 215 is suitably chosen, the two eccentric weighted wheels 210 and 216 will rotate at the same speed. Moreover, the motor 227 acting through the wheel 225 on the head of the Pecqueur train permits dephasing between the eccentric weighted wheels 2'10 and 216. This variant of utilization of a Pecqueur epicycloidal train is interesting in that the motor 227 which has to turn more quickly than in the arrangement previously described is of the smallest dimensions.

It will be well understood that modifications Within the province of a man skilled in the art may be made in the apparatuses described and shown without departing from the spirit of the invention.

Having thus described the invention, there is claimed as new and desired to be secured by Letters Patent:

1. A vibrodriver comprising at least two sets of eccentric weights, means mounting the weights of said sets symmetrically with respect to a common functional axis, means to spin the weights of said sets synchronously and so that the weights of each set generate a sinusoidally varying net force along said functional axis and no net force perpendicular to said axis, and a transfer mechanism coupling said sets, said mechanism including a dephasing means selectively variable by an external force while the spinning means is in operation so that the net forces of said sets can be made to experience a selected change in mutual phase relationship whereby to vary the amplitude of the conjoint net force of said sets between a value of practically zero to a value equal to the sum of the net forces of the sets without halting operation of the vibrodriver, the dephasing means being continuously variable and being a Pecqueur epicycloidal train.

2. A vibrodriver as set forth in claim 1 wherein the Pecqueur epicycloidal train has an internal ratio of 2.

3. A vibrodriver as set forth in claim 1 wherein the Pecquer epicycloidal train has an internal ratio of near but not equal to 1.

4.. A vibrodriver as set forth in claim 3 wherein the Pecqueur epicycloidal train includes a reaction arm coupled to a satellite-holder body, said reaction arm being mounted to be rotated by said external force.

5. A vibrodriver as set forth in claim 4 wherein the reaction arm is fixed by a force limiting device and can slip if the stress to be transmitted by the Pecqueur train exceeds a predetermined value.

6. A vibrodriver as set forth in claim 1 wherein the Pecqueur epicycloidal train includes a reaction arm coupled to a planetary which is mounted to be rotated by said external force.

7. A vibrodriver as set forth in claim 6 wherein the reaction arm is fixed by a force limiting device and can slip if the stress to be transmitted by the Pacqueur train exceeds a predetermined value.

8. A vibrodriver as set forth in claim 6 wherein the Pecqueur epicycloidal train has an internal ratio of 2.

9. A vibrodriver as set forth in claim 6 wherein the Pecqueur epicycloidal train has any internal ratio and wherein there is provided a transmission train between said epicycloidal train and at least oneset of eccentric weights, said transmission train having a ratio such that the sets of weights have equal velocities of rotation.

10. A vibrodriver comprising at least two sets of eccentric weights, means mounting the weights of said sets symmetrically with respect to a common functional axis, means to spin the weights of said sets synchronously and so that the weights of each set generate a sinusoidally varying net force along said functional axis and no net force perpendicular to said axis, and a transfer mechanism coupling said sets, said mechanism including a dephasing means selectively variable by an external force while the spinning means is in operation so that the net forces of said sets can be made to experience a selected change in mutual phase relationship whereby to vary the amplitude of the conjoint net force of said sets between a value of practically zero to a value equal to the sum of the net forces of the sets without halting operation of the vibrodriver, the sets of eccentric weights each including three such weights.

11. A vibrodriver comprising at least two sets of eccentric weights, means mounting the weights of said sets symmetrically with respect to a common functional axis, means to spin the weights of said sets synchronously and so that the weights of each set generate a sinusoidally varying net force along said functional axis and no net force perpendicular to said axis, a transfer mechanism coupling said sets, said mechanism including a dephasing means selectively variable by an external force while the spinning means is in operation so that the net forces of said sets can be made to experience a selected change in mutual phase relationship whereby to vary the amplitude of the conjoint net force of said sets between a value of practically zero to a value equal to the sum of the net forces of the sets without halting operation of the vibrodriver, and a regulating means to operate the spinning means at constant power at different amplitudes of the sum of the net forces of the sets.

12. A vibrodriver comprising at least two sets of eccentric weights, means mounting the weights of said sets symmetrically with respect to a common functional axis, means to spin the weights of said sets synchronously and so that the weights of each set generate a sinusoidally varying net force along said functional axis and no net force perpendicular to said axis, a transfer mechanism coupling said sets, said mechanism including a dephasing means selectively variable by an external force while the spinning means is in operation so that the net forces of said sets can be made to experience a selected change in mutual phase relationship whereby to vary the amplitude of the conjoint net force of said sets between a value of practically zero to a value equal to the sum of the net forces of the sets without halting operation of the vibrodriver, and a regulating means for varying the amplitude of the sum of the net forces as a function of the frequency of vibration so as to operate the spinning means at constant power.

13. A vibrodriver as set forth in claim 12 wherein the regulating means is connected to the dephasing means.

14. A vibrodriver comprising at least two sets of eccentric weights, means mounting the weights of said sets symmetrically with respect to a common functional axis, means to spin the weights of said sets synchronously and so that the weights of each set generate a sinusoidally varying net force along said functional axis and no net force perpendicular to said axis, a transfer mechanism coupling said sets, said mechanism including a dephasing means selectively variable by an external force while the spinning means is in operation so that the net forces of said sets can be made to experience a selected change in mutual phase relationship whereby to vary the amplitude of the conjoint net force of said sets between a value of practically zero to a value equal to the sum of the net forces of the sets without halting operation of the vibrodriver, and a regulating means for varying the frequency of vibrations as a function of the amplitude of the sum of the net forces so as to operate the spinning means at constant power.

15. A vibrodriver as set forth in claim 14 wherein the regulating means is connected to the dephasing means.

16. A vibrodriver comprising at least two sets of eccentric weights, means mounting the weights of said sets symmetrically with respect to a common functional axis, means to spin the weights of said sets synchronously and so that the weights of each set generate a sinusoidally varying net force along said functional axis and no net force perpendicular to said axis, a transfer mechanism coupling said sets, said mechanism including a dephasing means selectively variable by an external force while the spinning means is in operation so that the net forces of said sets can be made to experience a selected change in mutual phase relationship whereby to vary the amplitude of the conjoint net force of said sets between a value of practically Zero to a value equal to the sum of the net forces of the sets without halting operation of the vibrodriver, the dephasing means being a Pecqueur epicycloidal train, the spinning means being at least one hydraulic motor fed by at least one hydraulic pump having a variable discharge and a regulating means for interrelating the frequency of vibrations and the amplitude of the sum of the net forces so as to operate the spinning means at constant power, said regulating means including a control for varying the discharge of the pump, an auxiliary pump, a hydraulic regulating motor connected to the Pecqueur epicycloidal train to supply the external force, a distributor, a spring connection from the control to the distributor, said distributor being movable between a position in which the auxiliary pump turns the regulating motor in one direction to a position in which the auxiliary pump turns the regulating motor in an opposite direction through a position in which the auxiliary pump is disconnected from the regulating motor, said Pecqueur epicycloidal train upon operation of the regulating motor producing a variation in the rate of spinning of the eccentric weights and at the same time a variation in the mutual dephasing of the sets of weights, and hydraulic means responsive to the pressure in the liquid driving the hydraulic motor of the spinning means for operating the distributor against the spring connection so that dephasing movement is stopped when the distributor after being moved by the control through the spring connection to initiate a selected dephasing is moved to its pump-disconnect position upon such dephasing being obtained.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS Woolley 74-675 Pavlovich 17555 Austin et a1. 74----61 Bodine 17556 16 3,385,119 5/1968 Berger 74-61 3,433,311 3/1969 Lebelle 173-49 3,465,599 9/1969 Hennecke et a1 7461 5 LEONARD H. GERIN, Primary Examiner US. Cl. X.R.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4075895 *Oct 30, 1975Feb 28, 1978Politechnika WarszawskaMethod of obtaining periodical impacts in one direction
US4314365 *Jan 21, 1980Feb 2, 1982Exxon Production Research CompanyAcoustic transmitter and method to produce essentially longitudinal, acoustic waves
US4356736 *Mar 6, 1980Nov 2, 1982Wacker-Werke Gmbh & Co. KgImbalance-oscillation exciter
US4890682 *May 5, 1989Jan 2, 1990Shell Oil CompanyApparatus for vibrating a pipe string in a borehole
US5167163 *Jun 4, 1991Dec 1, 1992Mcmahon John CEnergy transfer device
US5253542 *Jul 14, 1992Oct 19, 1993Procedes Techniques De ConstructionVariable moment vibrator usable for driving objects into the ground
US5458204 *Jul 11, 1994Oct 17, 1995Tunkers Maschinenbau GmbhVibration pile driver for ramming and/or pulling of ram material
US5767633 *Sep 30, 1996Jun 16, 1998Kardas; MaciejElectric motor drive system
US6604583 *Mar 18, 1999Aug 12, 2003International Construction Equipment B.V.Vibrating device and a method for driving an object by vibration
US7017679 *Nov 21, 2001Mar 28, 2006Wacker Construction Equipment AgDevice for the continuous adjustment of unbalance of steerable vibration plates
US8225685 *Jul 7, 2009Jul 24, 2012Abi Anlagentechnik-Baumaschinen-Industriebedarf Maschinenfabrik Und Vertriebsgesellschaft MbhVibration generator
US20100050795 *Jul 7, 2009Mar 4, 2010Abi Anlagentechnik-Baumaschinen-Industriebedarf Maschinenfabrik Und Vertriebsgesellschaft MbhVibration Generator
DE4000011A1 *Jan 2, 1990Jun 27, 1991Gedib Ingbuero InnovationSingle axis vibrator with frequency and amplitude control - uses four synchronised rotating off=centre weights and rugged control
WO2011056910A1 *Nov 4, 2010May 12, 2011International Construction Equipment, Inc.Vibratory pile driving apparatus
Classifications
U.S. Classification74/61, 173/49, 175/56
International ClassificationE02D7/18, E02D11/00, B06B1/16, E02D7/00, B06B1/10
Cooperative ClassificationE02D11/00, B06B1/166, E02D7/18
European ClassificationE02D7/18, E02D11/00, B06B1/16B4