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Publication numberUS3565076 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 23, 1971
Filing dateMay 22, 1968
Priority dateMay 22, 1968
Publication numberUS 3565076 A, US 3565076A, US-A-3565076, US3565076 A, US3565076A
InventorsKadan Daniel A
Original AssigneeKadan Daniel A
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Evacuator system and apparatus
US 3565076 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent Daniel A. Kadan 19 Split Tree Road, Soarsdale, N.Y. 10583 21 Appl. No. 731,040

[22] Filed May 22, 1968 [45] Patented Feb. 23, 1971 [72] Inventor [54] EVACUATOR SYSTEM AND APPARATUS 10 Claims 3 Drawing Figs.

[52] U.S. (I 128/278 [51] Int. Cl A6lm l/00 [50] Field Search 128/278, 276, 277, 172

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,351,828 6/1944 Marsh 3,016,055 1/1962 Oldenburg 3,376,868 4/1968 Mondiadis Primary ExaminerAdele M. Eager Attorney-Howard S. Reiter so ir-' [CONTROL APPARATUS VACUUM 22 PRESSURE SOURCE V12 1 I EVACUATOR SYSTEM AND APPARATUS This invention pertains generally to the control of suction apparatus, and more particularly, to the control of vacuum systems of the type which may be employed in evacuating fluids from wounds or body cavities of medical patients.

Suction systems for evacuating fluids into a suitable receptacle are known in the prior art. Such systems have been provided generally with a receptacle, such ,as as toppered jar, having an inlet and an outlet, together with a catheter device coupled to the receptacle inlet, and a source of vacuum or suction pressure coupled to the receptacle outlet. The catheter may be a hollow tubular element with inlet apertures formed along the sides or at one end to admit fluids into the hollow interior. In use, the catheter is inserted into a cavity which requires fluid drainage, and vacuum pressure is applied to form a vacuum within the receptacle so as to draw fluids through the hollow catheter.

The practical application of these prior art systems has revealed that frequent cleaning of the catheterand catheter apertures is required to remove various small particles and tissue debris, which tend to block the passage of fluids to the receptacle. This procedure is undesirable generally, from the standpoint of its effect on a patients health, as well'as from its requirement for personal attention by attendants who might be occupied more gainfully with other tasks.

As an alternative to direct cleaning of the catheter itself, some attendants have been known to disconnect the vacuum source periodically for short periods of time. This procedure is effective in .perrnitting debris to fall away from the catheter inlets under the influence of atmospheric pressure in the hollow interior. It suffers from recognized disadvantages, however, in that it continues to require personal attention by attendants, and such attention must be on a regularly scheduled basis in order to be effective. A further disadvantage of operating on any regularly scheduled or simple periodic basis is that interruptions of suction may be made, frequently-, when they are entirely unnecessary due to absence ofobstructions at the catheter. ,And, on the other hand, an obstruction may very well continue for a considerable and undesirable period of time before a scheduled cleaning or vacuum interruption is performed. I 1' It is the aim of this invention to providean evacuator system and control apparatus which avoids these limitations and disadvantages of the prior art.

Accordingly, an object of this invention isthe' provision of an evacuator system of the type described,1with means for interrupting vacuumpressure in the receptacle, automatically, to clear obstructions from the catheter inlet apertures.

A further object of this invention is the provision of means in an evacuator system of the typedescribed for interrupting vacuum pressure in the receptacle in response to blockage of catheter inlet apertures.

Still another object of this invention is 1to provide a selfclearing evacuator system which is simple and inexpensive to construct, is easy to maintain, and which requires a minimum number of moving parts and motive power sources.

A feature of this invenn'on is the useof a pressure transducer which operates on electrical switchin response to detection of a selected maximum suction pressure within the receptacle of an evacuator system. The switchin turn operatesan electrically controlled vent-valve which opens to vent the receptacle to atmospheric pressure and then closes again. This cycle of opening and closing continues until'clearance of the catheter is signalled by the fact that suction pressure in the receptacle remains below the selected maximum value.

These and other and further objects, ;features, and advantages of this invention are more clearly pointed out and distinctly claimed in the following specification and claims and are fully illustrated in the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIG. I is a diagrammatic representation of an evacuator system constructed in accordance with this invention;

FIG. 2 is a partial cross-sectional representation of a control apparatus coupled together in accordance with this invention; and

FIG. 3 is a diagrammatic representation of an alternate embodiment of this invention.

Now, referring to the drawings more particularly, the evacuator system illustrated in FIG. I may be seen to comprise a catch-bottle receptacle 10, a source of vacuum pressure represented by black box 12 which is coupled to receptacle 10 by lengths of vacuum conduit I4, 16, and an adjustable pressure-control apparatus represented by "black box" 18' which is coupled to vacuum source 12 by vacuum conduit l4, l6 and T-connection 20. A source of electrical energy 22 is shown connected to apparatus 18 to provide power for operating the valve means described below. The receptacle 10 is pro vided with an airtight stopper 24 which includes apertures for admitting inlet pipe 26 and outlet pipe 28 into the airtight enclosure forrned within the receptacle. An inlet device or catheter 30 is coupled to inlet pipe 26 by a length of flexible conduit 32, and outlet pipe 24 is coupled to vacuum conduit 14 directly.

Operation of vacuum pressure source 12 acts to evacuate air from within receptacle 10 to create a vacuum which draws fluids through catheter 30, conduit 32 and inlet pipe 26 into the receptacle. Adjustable pressure-control apparatus 18 continuously senses pressure levels within vacuum conduit 14, 16 and responds to different pressure levels in the manner described below.

FIG. 2 represents a detailed, partial sectional view of the control apparatus contained with black box 18. This apparatus may be seen to comprise a pressure transducer 34, an atmospheric vent valve 36, and an electrically driven motive power source 38 for operating valve 36, and a plunger-actuated electrical switch 40 for controlling operation of motive power source 38. In addition, a power switch 42 may be provided as a means to shut off supply of electrical energy to the control apparatus.

Pressure transducer 34 comprises a housing 44 and a flexible diaphragm 46 which together define an enclosed pressure chamber 48. T-connection 20 opens into chamber 48 so that the pressure within this chamber corresponds to the pressure in vacuum conduit I4, 16. A compression spring 50 biases diaphragm 46 upward against a movable element represented by transducer plunger 52, and acts against the opposite force which is exerted on the diaphragm by the effect of vacuum pressure within chamber 48.

Atmospheric vent valve 36 includes a sliding sealing member 54 which acts to seal off a vent passage 56 under the normal spring pressure of a compression spring 58. The interior 60 of valve 36 is open to ambient atmosphere conditions through vent apertures 62 which are formed in the body of the valve. Vent passage 56 may be seen to open into transducer chamber 48 at one end, and into the interior 60 of valve 36, at the other end. Thus, when sliding seal 54 is drawn back against the force of compression spring 58, to open the end of vent passage 56, atmospheric or extemal air pressure will be admitted into transducer chamber 48 through the valve.

Movement of the sliding seal 54 in valve 36 is controlled by electrically driven motive power source 38 through a coupling link 64 and a rotary eccentric arm 66. Motive source 38, ac-

. cordingly, is preferably a rotary device such as a timer motor or similar electrical motor.

When power switch 42 is closed" so as to complete an electrical circuit path, the supply of electrical energy from source 22 to motor 38 becomes subject to control by plungeractuated switch 40. In this embodiment of this invention,

switch 40 is of the normally closed type, i.e. when pressure on switch-actuating plunger 68 is released, the switch will close" to complete an electrical circuit, and conversely, the switch will remain in open condition while pressure on actuating plunger 68 is maintained.

As illustrated in FIG. 2, switch 40 is pivotally mounted about an axis 70 which is coupled to a fixed position such as support 72 on transducer housing 44. A tension spring 74 is coupled to the free end of the switch so as to bias the switch against adjustment rod 76. The adjustment rod is threadly engaged in a threaded aperture 78 and in the wall of box" 18 and is provided with a handling knob 18 to facilitate rotation. The drawing clearly illustrates the rotation of rod 76 will advance it relative to the wall of box 18, and will tend to urge switch 40 around pivot axis 70 in a clockwise direction and against transducer plunger 52.

It may be seen now that the control apparatus which has been described, operates in the following manner: the presence of normal vacuum pressure in chamber 48, as sensed through T-connection 20, will be overcome by the force of bias spring 50 so as to maintain upward pressure on switch activator 68 through transducer plunger 52. Switch 40 will be maintained in open" position under these conditions and motive source 38 will remain inoperative in the position shown. However, an increase in vacuum pressure in chamber 48, such as might be caused by an obstruction of flow through catheter 30, will overcome the force of bias spring 50 to pull diaphragm 46 and transducer plunger 52 downward away from switch actuator 68. Upon release of plunger pressure on actuator 68, switch 40 will return to closed" position and will thereby initiate operation of electrically driven motive source 38. As source 38 rotates from the position shown, sliding seal 54 of valve 36 will be drawn back against spring 58 so as to open vent passage 56 to atmospheric pressure. The resultant presence of atmospheric pressure in chamber 48 of transducer 34 will be transmitted through conduit 14 to receptacle 10, and, ultimately the interior of catheter 30. Atmospheric pressure at this point will then permit debris and other obstructions to fall away from the inlet apertures of catheter 30. The presence of atmospheric pressure in chamber 48 will have the further effect of permitting spring 50 to return transducer plunger 52 into operative engagement with switch actuator 68 so as to open switch 40. With switch 40 again in open position, the electrical supply to motive source 38 will be cut off and the motor preferably will return to the position shown in FIG. 2 so as to again seal vent passage 56. Electrical motors which return to a given position upon interruption of power are generally available. It is obvious that this cycle of opening and closing vent valve 36 will continue so long as suction pressure within chamber 48 continues to exceed a preselected maximum value.

Selection of the maximum suction pressure value which will initiate the described venting cycle is accomplished by means of adjustment rod 76. The position of switch 40 relative to transducer plunger 52, as determined by rod 76, will determine the length of travel required for transducer plunger 52 to relieve pressure on switch actuator 68. Since the length of travel of plunger 52 against the force of bias spring 50 will be proportional to the suction pressure in chamber 48, it is clear that the position of switch 40 will determine the vacuum pressure within transducer 34 which is required to permit the switch to close.

FIG. 3 illustrates an alternative embodiment of this invention. The FIG. shows, schematically, a transducer plunger 152, a plunger-actuated control switch 140, a motive power source 138 for controlling a vent va.lve'(not shown), an electrically powered vacuum pressure source 112 and a power switch 142. The operation of this embodiment differs from that previously explained, in that plunger-actuated switch 140 is used here to control operation of the vacuum pressure source 112 instead of the vent valve motive power source 138. To accomplish this end, switch 140 is of the normally open type rather than the normally closed type shown in FIG. 2.

The pressure transducer and vent valve elements of this embodiment (not shown in FIG. 3) may be identical to those illustrated in FIG. 2. Thus, it may be seen that upon the closing of power switch 142 under normal conditions, the vent valve motive source 138 and vacuum pressure source 112 will operate continuously. Accordingly, in this embodiment, the vacuum conduit lines (not shown) will be periodically vented to atmospheric pressure on a continuing and repetitive basis during normal operation. However, in response to the buildup of excess vacuum pressure in the system, withdrawal of the transducer plunger 152 will permit control switch to return to open position. In the open position, switch 140 will halt operation of the vacuum pressure source until excessive vacuum in the system is relieved.

This invention has thus been described, but it is desired to be understood that is is not confined to the particular forms or usages shown and described, the same being merely illustrative, and that the invention may be carried out in other ways without department from the spirit of the invention; therefore, the right is broadly claimed to employ all equivalent instrumentalities combing with the scope of the appendent claims, and by means of which objects of this invention are attained and new results accomplished, as it is obvious that the particular embodiments herein shown and described are only some of the many that can be employed to obtain these objects and accomplish these results.

I claim:

1. A pressure relieving evacuator system, comprising:

a substantially closed receptacle having an inlet passage and an outlet passage;

a source of vacuum pressure having a vacuum pressure outlet coupled to the outlet passage of said receptacle and creating vacuum pressure therein;

a pressure transducer means, including a movable element and a pressure chamber, wherein said movable element is displaced relative to a given position in response to variations of pressure within said pressure chamber;

the said pressure chamber having a vacuum pressure inlet coupled to the said outlet passage of said receptacle;

controllable air valve means, movable under control between an open position and a closed position, said air valve means being coupled to said pressure chamber for admitting external air pressure into said chamber when in said open position;

2. The pressure relieving evacuator system of claim 1, wherein said controllable air valve means is electrically controllable, and said mechanically operated control means comprises a mechanically operated electric switch means.

3. The pressure relieving evacuator system of claim 2, wherein said electrically controllable air valve means comprises: a body member having an air passage coupled to the interior of said pressure chamber; a sliding seal member coupled to said body member for slidable displacement between a first position in which said air passage is sealed against the passage of air and a second position in which said air passages open to external air pressure; and an electric motor device having a driven rotary eccentric member coupled to said sliding seal member for displacing said seal member between said first and second positions.

4. The pressure relieving evacuator system of claim 2, wherein: the total movement of said movable element in said pressure transducer is proportional to the variations of pressure within said pressure chamber; and the position of said electrical switch means relative to said movable element is adjustable to select the total movement of said movable element which will operate said switch means.

5. A pressure relieving evacuator system, in accordance with claim 4, further including: rotatable threaded rod means coupled between said pressure transducer and said electrical switch means to threadedly advance and retract said switch means relative to the said movable element of said pressure transducer, when said rod is rotated.

6. Tire pressure relieving evacuator system of claim 1, wherein said pressure transducer means comprises: a body member; a flexible diaphragm element coupled to said body member and forming a wall of said pressure chamber; and a plunger member, slidably mounted to said body member, having one end coupled to said flexible diaphragm element and another end mechanically coupled to said mechanically operated control means, operating said control means in a substantially closed receptacle having an inlet passage and an outlet passage;

a controllable source of vacuum pressure having a vacuum pressure outlet coupled to the closed receptacle and admitting vacuum pressure into the outlet passage of said receptacle; v

said controllable source of vacuum pressure being selectively controllable to supply or withhold vacuum pressure;

a pressure transducer means, including a movable element and a pressure chamber, producing movement of said movable element in response to variations of pressure with said pressure chamber; I

said pressure chamber having a vacuum pressure inlet coupled to the said outlet passage of said receptacle;

periodically operating air valve means adapted to move periodically between an open position and a closed position, said air valve means being coupled to said pressure chamber for admitting external air pressure into said chamber when in said open position;

mechanically operated control means mechanically coupled to the said movable element of said transducer, and to said controllable source of vacuum pressure to selectively control said source in response to movement of said movable element.

8. The pressure relieving evacuator system of claim 7,

wherein:

said controllable source of vacuumpressure comprises an electrically operated vacuum pump;

and said mechanically operated control means comprises a mechanically operated electrical switch means electrically connected to start and "stop operation of said vacuum pump upon operation of said switch means in response to variations of vacuum pressure within said pressure chamber. g

9. In a pressure relieving evacuator system having a substantially closed receptacle which includes an inlet passage and an outlet passage, and a source of vacuum pressure, coupled to provide vacuum pressure in the outlet passage of said receptacle, control apparatus for relieving vacuum pressure in said receptacle, in response to an increase of said vacuum pressure in said receptacle in response to an increase of said vacuum pressure, said control apparatus comprising:

a pressure transducer means including a movable element and a pressure chamber, for producing movement of said movable element in response to variations of pressure within said pressure chamber;

the said pressure chamber having a vacuum pressure inlet coupled to the outlet passage of the receptacle;

controllable air valve means, movable under control between an open position and a closed position, said air valve means being coupled to said pressure chamber for admitting external air pressure into said chamber when in said open position;

and, mechanically operated control means mechanically coupled to the said movable element of said transducer means and to said controllable air valve means operating said air valve means between open and closed position in response to displacement of said movable element.

10. Control apparatus in accordance with claim 9, wherein said controllable air valve means is electrically operated, and said mechanically operated control means comprises a mechanically operated electrical switch means for controlling said air valve means.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
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US3016055 *Mar 20, 1958Jan 9, 1962Oldenburg Frank APulsating stomach pumping apparatus and the like
US3376868 *Jun 4, 1964Apr 9, 1968Howe Sound CoSurgical evacuator device
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3799702 *Nov 15, 1972Mar 26, 1974Weishaar EApparatus for draining blood from a surgical wound and transmission to a heart-lung machine
US4052987 *Apr 1, 1976Oct 11, 1977Cavitron CorporationAutomatic aspiration apparatus
US4402310 *Nov 13, 1980Sep 6, 1983Olympus Optical Co., Ltd.Endoscope system
US4655754 *Nov 9, 1984Apr 7, 1987Stryker CorporationVacuum wound drainage system and lipids baffle therefor
US4798583 *Jul 22, 1987Jan 17, 1989Walter BeckMethod and apparatus for aspirating secreted fluids from a wound
US5531712 *Sep 30, 1994Jul 2, 1996Malcolm; Roger J.Surgical suction regulator valve
US5645540 *Oct 11, 1994Jul 8, 1997Stryker CorporationMedical apparatus for vacuum draining a surgical wound
US5830198 *Apr 25, 1997Nov 3, 1998Stryker CorporationApparatus for suction draining of liquids from a surgical wound
US6200289Nov 30, 1998Mar 13, 2001Milestone Scientific, Inc.Pressure/force computer controlled drug delivery system and the like
US6786885Jan 22, 2001Sep 7, 2004Milestone Scientific IncPressure/force computer controlled drug delivery system with exit pressure control
US6887216Jan 22, 2001May 3, 2005Milestone Scientific, Inc.Pressure/force computer controlled drug delivery system with automated charging
US6945954Jan 22, 2001Sep 20, 2005Milestone Scientific, Inc.Drug delivery system with profiles
US7625354Nov 11, 2005Dec 1, 2009Milestone Scientific, Inc.Handpiece for fluid administration apparatus
DE3226359A1 *Jul 14, 1982Sep 15, 1983Armando Gamboa MayoralAspirator fuer chirurgische und aehnliche zwecke
DE3820211A1 *Jun 14, 1988Nov 10, 1988Walter NicolaiMethod and device for limiting the reduced pressure of an aspirator working with an aspiration phase and a venting phase
DE4002373A1 *Jan 27, 1990Aug 1, 1991Laabs WalterMedical suction instrument - has lateral ports with vacuum-operated valve
EP0063907A1 *Apr 19, 1982Nov 3, 1982Bio Research IncSurgical underwater drainage system
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Classifications
U.S. Classification604/67
International ClassificationA61M1/00
Cooperative ClassificationA61M1/0037, A61M2001/0033, A61M1/0031
European ClassificationA61M1/00H2