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Publication numberUS3565441 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 23, 1971
Filing dateApr 24, 1970
Priority dateDec 16, 1969
Also published asDE2060874A1
Publication numberUS 3565441 A, US 3565441A, US-A-3565441, US3565441 A, US3565441A
InventorsTeruo Matsumoto
Original AssigneeTeruo Matsumoto
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Toy amusement bank
US 3565441 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [72] Inventor [21] Appl. No. [22] Filed [45] Patented [54] TOY AMUSEMENT BANK 7 Claims, 8 Drawing Figs.

[52] US. Cl. 273/143, 46/4, 194/81 [5 1] Int. Cl. A63h 33/00 [50] Field ofSearch 46/4, 5;

3.464.693 9/1969 Bailey 46/3X 3.474.562 10/1969 VanWoert .6 46/3 Primary Examinerl.ouis G. Mancene Assistant Exammer-D. L. Weinhold Attorney Brufsky. Staas, Breiner and Halsey ABSTRACT: A toy amusement bank incorporates two rotatable wheels, one wheel having a single row of indicia around its periphery and the other wheel having two similar rows of indicia. The wheels are aligned to display a horizontal row of indicia in a window located in the face of the bank. Attached to the bank is a handle for actuating a mechanism which causes the indicia wheels to spin. A coin is inserted into the savings bank and eventually is trapped between leverage elements until the handle is pulled down, at which time force is translated via the coin to the spinning mechanism. As the wheels begin spinning, the coin is deposited in a storage compartment within the bank. A pushbutton located on the front of the bank actuates, independently of the previously described system for spinning the wheels, a sensing mechanism for abruptly halting rotation of the wheels and dispensing coins that have been accumulated in accordance with preselected combinations of indicia framed within the bank window.

f PATENIEDFEB23|9I| 3565;441

' sum 1 OF 3 INVENTOR TE R U0 MATSUMOTO fi xjgxq s mhu i ATTORN EYS PATENTED FEB23 l9?! SHEET 3 OF 3 mlmnuq sk rov AMUSEMENT BANK BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION The present invention relates to a toy bank wherein manipulative amusement features encourage the user to save money.

A variety of amusement devices have previously been incorporated in toy banks to encourage personal savings. Such toy banks frequently feature indicia-bearing wheels set in motion by the downward movement of an arm after the insertion of a coin. As the wheels stop turning the bank may dispense a predetermined number of coins depending on the relationship of adjacent indicia. The amusement value of such toy banks is responsible for increased savings.

Those toy amusement banks capable of animating depositing and dispensing of coins sufficiently to retain the depositors interest are usually complex in construction. Wheresimpler, less expensive mechanisms are employed it is frequently found that the banks are not sufficiently entertaining to retain the interest of the depositor over a prolonged period. The present invention is unique in providing an inexpensive mechanism calculated to retain the depositors continued interest.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION,

After a coin is inserted into the bank embodying the present invention, a handle is pulled down actuating through the medis um of the coin itself a tumbling mechanism for rotating the indicia-bearing wheels. The operator then pushes a button abruptly halting rotation of the wheels. To the amusement of the user coins may be dispensed depending on the relation of indicia of adjacent wheels. Simplicity in construction without sacrificing amusement value is achievedin the present invention by separating the coin depositing and wheel rotation operation from the wheel stopping and coin dispensing operation.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF DRAWINGS FIG. I is a perspective view of the toy bank embodying the present invention illustrating generally the front and right side thereof;

FIG. 2 is a perspective view of the subject toy bank illustrating generally the rear and left side thereof;

FIG. 3 is a cross-sectional view of the bank taken along line 3-3 of FIG. 2;

FIG. 6 is a front elevation view of the toy amusement bank with the front cover removed to expose the internal mechanism thereof;

FIG. 5 is a cross-sectional view of the toy amusement bank taken along line 55 of FIG. 4 illustrating in particular the cam surfaces on the right indicia-bearing wheel and the interaction therewith of the sensing arm;

FIG. 6 is a cross-sectional view taken along line 6-6 of FIG. 3 illustrating in particular the coin depositing and storage compartments as well as the dispensing mechanism;

FIG. 7 is a sectional view taken along line 7-7 of FIG. 4 illustrating in detail the cam surfaces of the left indicia-bearing wheel and the sensing arm which has rotated into engagement therewith; and

FIG. 8 is a sectional view similar to FIG. 7 illustrating the sensing arm withdrawn from the cam surfaces as the left indicia-bearing wheel is rotated in a clockwise direction by the counterclockwise rotation of its mating ratchet arm.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT The toy amuwment bank embodying the present invention comprises, as illustrated in FIGS. 1 and 2, a plastic housing designated generally by reference numeral 10 consisting of front and rear molded plastic sections 12 and 18, respectively, held together appropriately, for example, by screws. Front section 12, as illustrated in FIG. I, is appropriately molded to provide window I4, centrally disposed opening 15 through which a button, as discussed in detail hereinaftenprotrudes and coin-dispensing mouth I6. Rear panel 18, as illustrated in FIG. 2, is appropriately molded to receive coin receptacle 20, while opening 22 is provided as 'an additional deposit mechanism and opening 24 permits excess coins to spill out.

The passage of coins within the bank is illustrated in FIG. 6. One method of saving is to deposit coins through opening 22, after which the coins pass downwardly through channel 32 into storage compartment 34. Should the capacity of storage compartment 34 be exceeded, the excess coins are diverted into exhaust channel 36 and may exit through opening 24.

The second and amusing method of saving is to deposit coins into receptacle 20, as illustrated in FIGS. 3, 4, and 6. The deposited coin passes immediately into the space between nylon bearings 44 and 46 which are slidably mounted within track 48 molded into back panel 18. Linkage 50, as illustrated in FIG. 3, is attached at one end to bearing 44 and at the other end thereof to L-shaped lever arm 52 which is rigidly secured to horizontally disposed shaft 28 appropriately journaled in. carriage frame 30. Attached to the right-hand side of shaft 28, as illustrated in FIG. 4, is'actuating handle 26. Spring 54 biases shaft 28 against rotation in a clockwise direction from the position illustrated in FIG. 4 thus positioning bearing 44 in the upper region of track 48. Linkage 56, as illustrated in FIG. 3, has one end connected to hearing 46 and the other end thereof connected to lever arm 58 which is fixedly secured to shaft 60 appropriately journaled in carriage frame 30. Spring 62 normally urges shaft 60 in a clockwise direction into abutment with stop 64 which is rigidly attached to carriage frame 30. As will be apparent, bearing 46 is thus normally positioned at its uppermost position within track 48.

After the coin is wedged between bearings 44 and 46, handle 26 is pulled downwardly rotating shaft 28 in a clockwise direction forcing bearing 44 through linkage 50 to move downwardly against the coin which, in turn, forces bearing 46 to also move downwardly within track 48. The downward travel of bearing 46 is translated via linkage 56 to lever arm 58 causing shaft 60 to be rotated in a counterclockwise direction, the purpose of which will be explained in detail hereinafter.

Referring now to FIG. 4, the reference numerals 68 and 70 designate, respectively, adjacent indicia wheels mounted on shaft 66 which is journaled within carriage frame 3!). Wheel 68 has one row of indicia aroundits circumference and wheel 70 has two rows of indicia. The indicia are arranged so that a horizontal row consisting of three separate indicia appears in window 14, as illustrated in FIG. I.

As illustrated in FIGS. 4 and 5, ratchet arms 72 and 74 are mounted on shaft 60for rotation therewith. In similar manner, gearwheels 76 and 78 are mounted on shaft 66 and secured to indicia wheels 68 and 70, respectively, for rotation therewith. As will now be apparenhwhen handle 26 is pulled downward, shaft 60 initially rotates in a counterclockwise direction causingratchet arms 72 and 74 to engage gearwheels 76 and 78 to thus move indicia wheels 68 and 70 in a clockwise direction.

Returning now to the travel of the coin, the clockwise turning of indicia wheels 68 and 70 is accompanied by the continued downward movement of bearings 44 and 46 and the coin which is wedged therebetween. As the coin passes downward beyond ridge 80, formed as a part of back panel 18, as illustrated in FIG. 6, it is forced by inclined edge 82 of hearing 46 outwardly to the right and is stored with other coins in compartment 34, as illustrated in FIG. 6. At this point, there no longer is interaction between bearings 44 and 46. Thus, shaft 60 immediately rotates in a clockwise direction under the force of spring 62 causing ratchet arms 72 and 74 to abruptly rotate in a clockwise direction in turn imparting to gearwheels 76 and 78 and indicia wheels 68 and 70 a free spinning counterclockwise motion which continues as the ratchet arms 72 and 74 rotate out of engagement therewith.

Referring nowto FIGS. 5 and 7-8, the reference numeral 84 designates generally a sensing or detecting arm rigidly mounted on shaft 60 for rotation therewith. Sensing arm 84 terminates in elbow 102, the purpose of which will be explained in detail hereinafter. Sensing arm 84 is drawn out of engagement with cam surfaces 86 and 88, as illustrated in FIG. 8, into a cocked position as ratchet arms 72 and 74 rotate counterclockwise. Rotation of the indicia wheels 68 and 70 is abruptly interrupted when sensing arm 84 is released to travel forward into cam surfaces 86 and 88 under the influence of spring 62. The exact shape of cam surface 86 is illustrated in FIGS. 78 wherein it is apparent that sensing ann 84 is permitted to travel or protrude into the aforementioned cam surface three distinct distances depending upon the position of wheel 68.

As previously discussed, the indicia wheels 68 and 70 are coaxially mounted on shaft 66 adjoining each other. The cam surfaces 86 and 88 are positioned on the sides of indicia wheels 68 and 70, respectively, facing each other. Cam surfaces 86 and 88 are spaced to jointly cooperate with sensing arm 84 to regulate its travel.

Referring now to FIG. 5, the reference numeral 88 refers generally to the entire cam surface forming a part of indicia wheel 70, configured to resemble a six-pointed star with depressed regions between points. It is into these depressed regions that sensing arm 84 travels to sense indicia. In two of the depressed areas positioned opposite each other are located channels 89 and 91 contoured to allow sensing arm 84 to travel its maximum distance into the cam surface, as illustrated in FIG. 5. In essence, channels 89 and 91 enable sensing arm 84 to interact with the adjacent cam surface 86 on indicia wheel 68, as illustrated in FIGS. 7 and 8. In FIG. 7 the sensing arm 84 is illustrated interacting with the star-configured cam surface 86 at depressed region 93 allowing the sensing arm 84 to travel its maximum distance into cam surface 86. Of course, before sensing arm 84 can travel into depressed area 93 either depressed area 89 or 91 of cam surface 88 must be axially aligned to permit sensing arm 84 to travel therein.

With the foregoing in mind, the system for stopping rotation of indicia wheels 68 and 70 will now be described. Button 90, which normally protrudes through mouth of front panel 12, is secured to guide 92, as illustrated in FIGS. 45, which in turn is fixedly mounted upon shaft 96. Spring 93, secured at one end to carriage frame 30 and at the other end thereof to guide 92, normally biases guide 92 into the forward position illustrated in FIG. 5. Guide 92 includes two parallel arms each containing openings 95 through which shaft 97 passes. Lever arm 98 which is pivotally mounted on shaft 60 and lever arm 99 which is rigidly attached to sensing arm 84, are both attached to shaft 97 which thus rotates about shaft 60. As will be apparent, when the user wishes to stop the'spinning of indicia wheels 68 and 70, button 90 is pushed inwardly urging guide 92 inwardly in turn allowing, as illustrated in FIG. 5, shaft 97 to slip over latches 100, defined by openings 95, thereby releasing sensing arm 84 from its cocked position and permitting same to rotate clockwise into engagement with the free spinning indicia wheels 68 and 70. Eventually, and by chance, sensing arm 84 engages certain of the depressed regions of cam surfaces 86 and 88, abruptly halting the spinning of wheels 68 and 70.

Referring to FIG. 5, sensing arm 84 is in position of deepest penetration and elbow 102 is at its maximum point of elevation. As will be apparent, with lesser degrees of penetration of sensing arm 84 into cam surfaces 86 and 88, elbow 102 rotates upward lesser distances.

Dispensing disc 38, as illustrated in FIG. 6, is rotatably mounted within back panel 18 and is biased to rotate in a counterclockwise direction under the influence of spiral spring 106 attached thereto. Dispensing disc 38, biased to its rest position, is provided with dispensing pocket 40 aligned with coin storage compartment 34 to receive up to three coins therefrom.

FIG. 6 illustrates elbow 102 extending into groove 104 which extends spirally from the periphery of dispensing disc 38 to its center. As will now be apparent, as elbow 102 is rotated upward in conjunction with sensing arm 84, dispensing wheel 38 is rotated about its axis in a clockwise direction and one, two, or three coins are dispensed depending upon the depth of penetration of sensing arm 84 within cam surfaces 86 and 88 which are appropriately coordinated with the combinations of indicia on wheels 68 and 70. Dispensing pocket 40, as illustrated in FIG. 6, is contoured to form two fulcrum points on the side of the pocket on which the coins rest as the dispensing disc 38 rotates clockwise. Fulcrum point 108 is nearest the bottom of pocket 40 and the fulcrum point is located further out from the center of dispensing disc 38. When sensing arm 84 is allowed to travel into the shallowest depressed region of cam surface 86, elbow 102 travels upward a sufficient distance to tip pocket 40 allowing one coin to travel over the fulcrum point 110. If sensing arm 84 enters a depressed region of intermediate depth on cam surface 86, pocket 40 is further rotated allowing a second coin to ride over fulcrum point 108. Should the sensing arm 84 travel into the deepest depressed area of cam surface 86, the pocket 40 will be fully tilted to allow all three coins to spill out of pocket 40 into dispensing chute 42. Of course, if neither depressed region 89 nor 91 on cam surface 88 is aligned to admit sensing arm 84 the dispensing disc 38 will not be rotated and no coins will be dispensed to the chagrin of the user who is prompted immediately to deposit more of his savings into the bank.

Iclaim:

I. In a toy bank of the type provided with an amusement feature for encouraging the user to save and having a housing, means for depositing and storing coins within said housing, multiple indicia-bearing wheels mounted for rotation within said housing, means for actuating rotation of said wheels after a coin has been deposited and means for dispensing coins from said storing means in relation to predetermined combinations of indicia appearing on said wheels upon termination of their rotation, the improvement comprising a sensing mechanism, means mounting said sensing mechanism within said housing for rotation, means integral with said indicia-bearing wheels for receiving said sensing mechanism and for regulating the degree of rotation of said sensing mechanism in relation to the combinations of indicia appearing on said wheels, means operatively connecting said sensing mechanism and said dispensing means to deliver a predetermined number of coins in relation to the degree of rotation of said sensing mechanism and means actuated and controlled independently of said indicia-bearing wheels for rotating said sensing mechanism into engagement with said means integral with said indicia-bearing wheels for receiving said sensing mechanism to stop the rotation of said wheels.

2. A toy bank as described in claim I, wherein said means integral with said indicia-bearing wheels for receiving said sensing mechanism includes cam surfaces on adjacent sides of said indicia-bearing wheels, said cam surfaces cooperating to regulate the depth of engagement of said sensing mechanism and thus the degree of rotation of said sensing mechanism.

3. A toy bank as described in claim 2, wherein said cam surfaces are configured to provide corresponding fulcrum points between which are located distinct relieved areas corresponding to indicia on said wheels, said relieved areas allowing said sensing mechanism to penetrate jointly into said cam surface of each of said wheels.

4. A toy bank described in claim 2, wherein said sensing mechanism includes an arm biased towards said cam surfaces on said indicia-bearing wheels and means permitting said arm to be rotated out of engagement with said cam surfaces into a cocked position by said means for actuating rotation of said wheels.

5. A toy bank described in claim 4, wherein said means actuated independently of said indicia-bearing wheels for rotating said sensing mechanism includes a button protruding through the front of said housing and means releasing said sensing mechanism from its cocked position in response to movement of said button.

6. A toy bank as described in claim 4, wherein said dispensing means includes a disc, means mounting said disc within said housing for rotation, means defining a pocket within said disc, means normally biasing said disc to position 7. A toy bank as described in claim 6, including means defining a plurality of fulcrum points along said pocket over which the coins must ride to be dispensed.

Patent Citations
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US497906 *Nov 3, 1891May 23, 1893 bettini
US500015 *Feb 20, 1893Jun 20, 1893 Coin-controlled machine
US2650686 *Feb 18, 1950Sep 1, 1953Bigler Mfg CompanyToy bank
US3406976 *Apr 18, 1966Oct 22, 1968Kenneth B. Van Woert Jr.Toy bank
US3464693 *Mar 16, 1966Sep 2, 1969Bailey Richard BToy bank
US3474562 *Oct 14, 1968Oct 28, 1969Woert Kenneth B Van JrToy amusement bank
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3747936 *Oct 6, 1971Jul 24, 1973Ito YManually actuated and electrically operated rotatable drum chance device and saving bank
US4261571 *Oct 15, 1979Apr 14, 1981Yoshie ItoMechanical slot machine
US4838554 *Apr 28, 1987Jun 13, 1989Sutter James JToys
US5054782 *Jan 16, 1990Oct 8, 1991Kulay Manufacturing LimitedToy gaming device
US6595385 *Feb 9, 2001Jul 22, 2003Mattel, Inc.Token dispensing game apparatus for young children
US6644663 *Oct 1, 2001Nov 11, 2003Atlantic City Coin & Slot Service Company Inc.Reel mechanism
US7040620 *Sep 16, 2003May 9, 2006Atlantic City Coin & Slot Service Company, Inc.Reel mechanism
US8226314Jul 8, 2009Jul 24, 2012Benext International CorporationPress-action device
US20040051241 *Sep 16, 2003Mar 18, 2004Atlantic City Coin & Slot Service Company, Inc.Reel mechanism
US20100098477 *Jul 8, 2009Apr 22, 2010Lee Vincent KPress-action Device
EP2149458A2Oct 8, 2009Feb 3, 2010Benext International CorporationPress-action device
EP2149458A3 *Oct 8, 2009Dec 29, 2010Benext International CorporationPress-action device
WO2002063983A1 *Jan 17, 2002Aug 22, 2002Mattel, Inc.Token dispensing game apparatus for young children
WO2003030117A1 *Sep 30, 2002Apr 10, 2003Atlantic City Coin & Slot Service Company, Inc.Reel mechanism
Classifications
U.S. Classification273/143.00R, 194/294, 446/11
International ClassificationG07F17/34, A63H33/30
Cooperative ClassificationA63H33/3005, G07F17/34
European ClassificationG07F17/34, A63H33/30B