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Publication numberUS3566734 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 2, 1971
Filing dateNov 19, 1968
Priority dateNov 22, 1967
Also published asDE1810480A1
Publication numberUS 3566734 A, US 3566734A, US-A-3566734, US3566734 A, US3566734A
InventorsRobinson Charles
Original AssigneeRobinson Charles
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Rotary cutting or creasing machine
US 3566734 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent Inventor Charles Robinson Henshaw Street Works, Lady Street Entrance, Henshaw Street, Oldham, Lancashire, England Appl. No. 776,911

Filed Nov. 19, 1968 Patented Mar. 2, 1971 Priority Nov. 22, 1967 Great Britain 53145/67 ROTARY CUTTING OR CREASING MACHINE 19 Claims, 5 Drawing Figs.

U.S.C1 83/339, 83/346, 83/663, 93/582 Int. Cl ,3 B26d 1/28 Field of Search 1 83/339,

346, 347, 663. 678; 93/58 l 58.2, 58.2(Flex) [5 6] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,577,619 3/1926 Gammeter 83/346X 2,812,798 11/1957 Van Antwerpen et al... 93/58.lX 3,192,809 7/1965 Crouch et a1. 83/346X 3,272,046 9/1966 Crouch et al7 83/346X 3,276,306 10/1966 Winkler et a1 83/346X Primary Examiner-William S. Lawson Attorney-Carlos A Torres ABSTRACT: A rotary cutting or creasing machine is disclosed having upper and lower drums between which material to be cut is passed on a conveyor belt, the upper drum being surrounded by a cylindrical sleeve of a diameter greater than the drum and supported by a removable end support in such manner that the sleeve may be withdrawn from one end and replaced by another sleeve Patented March 2, 1971 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 Patented March 2, 1971 4 Sheets-Shut 2 bUUtUE will-vi Patented March 2, 1971 3,566,734

4 Sheets-Sheet 5 Patented March 2, 1971 3,566,734

4 Sheets-Sheet FIE- .4.

ROTARY CUTTING R CREASING MACHINE The invention relates to rotary cutting or creasing machines.

Rotary cutting or creasing machines have been proposed which include cooperating rotary drums or rollers one of which carries steel rule strips forming'a pattern of cutters, material to be cut or creased being fed through the nip between the rollers and being cut or creased by the pattern of cutters.

A disadvantage of such machines as originally proposed was that the entire roller had to be changed if a different cutter pattern was desired. This called for the provision of a number of interchangeable rollers equal to the number of different patterns requiring to be cut by the one machine. The rollers are extremely expensive and hence this arrangement is not commercially practical, where a number of different patterns are required for relatively short runs. It has also been proposed to provide detachable forms of arcuate cross section which could be attached to the roller surface and while this is an improvement, a number of undesirable features are still evident. For example, as the arc of the forms is generally around or just over 180, almost half of the roller surface serves no cutting function which renders the machines unsuitable for continuous feed of material from a supply roll due to the large wastage.

It is an object of the present invention to obviate or mitigate the above disadvantages.

According to the invention there is provided a rotary cutting or creasing machine including a roller or drum cooperating with another surface to form a nip, means for transmitting drive to said roller, and means enabling a cylindrical sleeve of a diameter greater than that of said roller and carrying cutting and/or creasing means to be removably located around said roller for rotation in conjunction therewith.

Preferably said other surface is that of a further roller, and adjustable support means is provided comprising rolling members mounted on arms located on opposite sides of said firstmentioned roller and mounted for pivotal movement to and from said first-mentioned roller. Alternatively, said support means may comprise bars located outwith said first-mentioned roller and slidable in a direction normal to the axis thereof, said bars carrying rolling members for engagement with the inner peripheral surface of said sleeve.

Preferably also, said first-mentioned roller is carried in axially spaced bearings at one end and in a detachable end support at the other end whereby the end support may be removed to enable said sleeve to be slid on or off the roller from that end.

Preferably also, said sleeve is provided at at least one end thereof with an annular driving ring of hard resilient material engageable with a conveyor belt passing through the nip between said rollers so that said belt and said further roller are driven in synchronism with rotation of said first-mentioned roller. The peripheral surface of said further roller may be roughened in the area below said ring to improve transmission of drive to said further roller.

According to a further aspect of the invention, there is provided for use with a rotary cutting or creasing machine including a roller or drum, and a cooperating surface forming a nip with said roller a cylindrical sleeve which may be located around said roller and carries cutting and/or creasing means. Preferably the sleeve is provided at at least one end thereof with an annular driving ring of hard resilient material engageable to transmit drive to said surface from said roller.

Embodiments of the invention will now be described, by way of example only, with reference to the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a rotary cutting or creasing machine according to one embodiment of the invention;

FIG. 2 is an enlarged perspective view of one end of the machine with its cover removed to show interior detail;

FIG. 3 is an enlarged perspective view showing certain details of the mechanism of FIG. 2;

FIG. 4 is a diagrammatic end view of an alternative embodiment; and

FIG. 5 is a part-sectional plan view of the embodiment shown in FIG. 4.

Referring to FIGS. 1 to 5, the machine includes an upper roller 5 and a lower roller 6 mounted on shafts 7, 8 respectively. Shaft 7 is drivingly connected to an electric motor 9 by a chain drive 10. One end of the shaft 7 is supported in axially spaced bearings carried in supports 12, and the other end is supported in a removable end support 15 detachably secured to the machine frame in a manner described in greater detail hereafter. A conveyor belt 16 passes between the two rollers and serves to support material to be cut and to convey same through the nip between the rollers.

A sleeve 17 is mounted on the upper roller 5 and is providedon its outer peripheral surface with a pattern of cutters 18. These comprise strips of steel rule bent to the desired shapes and screwed on to studs secured directly to the surface of the sleeve. The sleeve is provided with end plates 19 welded thereto and is supported and prevented from twisting relative to the roller 5 by rolling members in the form of wheels 20 carried on pivot arms 21 at opposite sides of the sleeve. The arms may be swung about their pivot axes by rotation of threaded rods 22 pivoted to the machine frame, and the arms at opposite sides of the machine are interconnected for rigidity by cross braces. 23. The pivot points of the arms are selected such that irrespective of the sleeve diameter, pivotal adjustment of the arms results in the wheels engaging the sleeve approximately at its widest part. If desired, however, the pivot points could be altered, and provision for both pivotal and vertical movement of the wheels could be incorporated to enable engagement at the widest part of sleeves of different diameters.

A pair of annular driving rings 25 of hard rubber and canvas composition are secured to the outer peripheral surface of the sleeve, one adjacent each end thereof, and engage the conveyor belt 16 to trap same between the upper and lower rollers so that the belt and the lower roller are driven in synchronism with rotation of the upper roller. This friction drive may be enhanced by knurling the surface of the lower drum at the regions below the driving rings 25.

In order to enable removal of the sleeve from roller 5 and its replacement by an alternative sleeve, the end support 15 is located in a slideway 27 in the machine frame, the slideway having inwardly inclined end faces 28. In addition a pair of locking levers 29 are provided connected to lockshafts 30 located in grooves in the base of the end support. As best seen in FIG. 3, each lockshaft has a flattened face 31 such that when the flattened face is directed downwardly (as shown at the left of FIG. 3) it lies flush with the surface of the slideway and enables withdrawal of the end support. When the levers 29 are rotated to their locked positions the lockshafts 30 force the end support slightly upwards such that its base locks against the end faces 28. In addition end collars 33 on the lockshafts project below the slideway 27 when the lockshafts are in locked position, and in this way withdrawal of the end support from the frame is prevented. These end collars clear the slideway when the lockshafts are in the release position, as shown in the left of FIG. 3.

With the end support removed the sleeve 17 requires to be lowered to enable the end flange 19 at the end opposite to that from which the sleeve is withdrawn to clear the upper roller 5. For this purpose the lower roller shaft 8 is mounted in bearing blocks 35 which may be raised and lowered on guides 36 (FIG. 2) by rotation of handwheels 37 at each side of the machine. This serves to lower the lower roller 6, conveyor belt 16 and sleeve 17 relative to the upper roller.

In operation, the motor drives the upper roller 5 which drives the sleeve 17 and lower roller 6 in synchronism. Material to be cut or creased is fed between the sleeve 17 and the lower roller 6 on conveyor belt 16 and is engaged by the cutters. The type of rule used will determine whether the cutters completely or partially sever the material or only crease same, and/or the spacing may determine the extent of creasing or cutting. As the entire peripheral surface of the sleeve is used, the diameter of which is determined by the length of pattern required, continuous feed is possible with negligible wastage. The machine may be used to cut or crease carpets, woven fabrics, cardboard, plastic sheets and the like. in order to protect the conveyor belt a blanket of a suitable material, such as canvas, may be secured thereto such that the cutters cut the canvas but not the conveyor belt itself.

If it is desired to cut another shape, the arms 21 are pivoted clear of the sleeve, the locking levers 29 are moved to their unlocked position and the handwheel 37 at that end of the machine is rotated slightly to break the seal between the base of the end support 15 and the end faces 28 of the slideway 27. The end support is then free to slide clear of the machine frame. Thereafter the handwheels 37 at both ends of the machine are rotated in turn to lower the roller 6, conveyor belt and sleeve to an extent such that the sleeve can be withdrawn over the upper roller and an alternative sleeve fitted. The lower roller is than raised, the end support 15 located and locked in position and the arms 21 pivoted into engagement with the new sleeve.

Referring to the embodiment shown in FIGS. 4 and 5, this differs from the above arrangement in the manner of supporting the sleeve relative to the upper roller. A pair of parallel bars 40 extend between and are bolted to the end supports, and support adjacent their ends transversely slidable bars 41 carrying wheels 42. The bars 41 may be secured in desired transversely adjusted positions by bolts 43 passing through slots 44 in the bars 41 and screwed into the bars 40. Thus the effective width of the framework comprising bars 40, 41 and wheels 42 may be varied.

If it is desired to cut another shape the end support 15 is removed after unbolting the bars 40, and the bars 41 are moved laterally inwards to take the wheels 42 clear of the sleeve 17, access to the bolts 43 being gained through the open ends of the sleeve. The latter may then be lowered and slid off the roller 5 in a manner similar to the first embodiment, and replaced by a sleeve with a different cutter pattern and possibly also of a different diameter. Once the new sleeve has been slid into place, the lower roller, conveyor belt and sleeve are raised, the bars 41 are moved outwards till the wheels 42 contact the inner peripheral surface of the new sleeve, and the end support is replaced and the bars 40 secured thereto.

By virtue of the above embodiments the entire surface of the sleeve 17 is used, enabling continuous feeding of material to be cut without unnecessary waste, and the sleeve may be readily replaced by a sleeve with a different cutter pattern and/ or different diameter thereby avoiding the expense of acquiring a large number of rollers, the cost of sleeves being considerably less than that of new rollers. Moreover, the weight of the sleeves is such that they can be readily handled manually without requiring the use of lifting gear.

Many modifications may be made without departing from the scope of the invention. These include the following:

1. the wheels 20 or 42 could be replaced by rollers extending along the full length of the sleeve;

2. the cross braces connecting the laterally adjustable supporting wheels 20 of the first embodiment could, if desired, carry a metal or like curved safety guard arranged to extend over the sleeve;

. the bars 41 of the second embodiment could be arranged,

by means of a rack and pinion arrangement for example,

to move outwards and inwards in unison to the same extent by rotation of a handle readily accessible from outwith the sleeve;

the material to be cut could be fed in in sheets if desired;

. The sleeve could be fitted to the bottom roller;

. the top and bottom rollers could both be driven or neither could be driven, the drive being taken from the conveyor;

7. in the case of the second embodiment the upper roller could incorporate annular grooves in its surface for cooperation with annular ridges or rings secured internally of the sleeve;

8. the sleeve and the upper roller could be interconnected by gearing, though this restricts the number of sleeve sizes useable and has other disadvantages besides being expensive;

9. the rollers may take the form of hollow drums to save weight and cost;

10. the conveyor belt 16 need not be trapped between the ends of the upper and lower rollers or between the drive rings 20 and the lower roller; it could instead be independently driven. It is also possible to omit the lower roller and form the nip purely between the upper roller and the conveyor;

1 l. locating pins may be secured to the surface of the sleeve between the cutters in order to grip the material to be cut and propel same positively through the nip;

l2. rubber or like resilient pads may be located alongside the cutters to push the material clear of the cutters after passing through the nip;

13. the drive arrangement could be modified, for example by incorporating a worm drive at the end of the roller shaft and a V-belt drive to the motor via a variable speed gearbox;

14. the manner of enabling release and removal of the end support 15 could be modified in other ways apart from those described; geared down electric motor controlled by a pushbutton and upper and lower limit switches could be used;

15. the sleeve could be in the form of two semicylindrical parts hinged together or adapted to be bolted around the roller, such that release of the hinge or bolts enables the sleeve to be removed radially instead of from one end;

16. the inner peripheral surface of the sleeve and/or the outer peripheral surface of the upper roller could be provided with rubber or other friction linings to enhance transmission of drive therebetween;

17. the sleeve may be unsupported, though some form of support is preferable;

18. the upper roller and the sleeve need not be in peripheral contact. The roller shaft could be vertically adjustable and each sleeve provided with a series of axially spaced bearings such that the sleeve and drum were coaxial but the drum position varied in accordance with the diameter of the sleeve;

19. the bearing for the lower drum could be lowered under pushbutton control using a geared down electric motor acting between upper and lower limit switches in place of the handles 37.

20. the pattern of cutters may be replaced by a single cutter blade extending parallel to the sleeve axis to cut into pieces a continuous sheet of material fed, for example, directly from a calender. Other arrangements of single or multiple cutting and/or creasing blades may also be used.

Othermodifications within the ambit of the invention may readily occur to those skilled in the art.

1 claim:

1. A rotary cutting or creasing machine including a roller or drum cooperating with another surface to form a nip, means for transmitting drive to said roller, a cylindrical sleeve of a diameter greater than that of said roller and carrying cutting and/or creasing means, and means to enable said sleeve to be removably located around said roller for rotation in conjunction therewith with the axis of said sleeve offset from the axis of said roller.

2. A rotary cutting or creasing machine according to claim 1, wherein said roller and said sleeve are arranged such that the outer peripheral surface of the roller contacts the inner peripheral surface of said sleeve.

3. A rotary cutting or creasing machine according to claim 2, including adjustable support means engageable with said sleeve to support same in relation to said roller.

4. A rotary cutting or creasing machine according to claim 3, wherein said support means comprises rolling members mounted on arms located on opposite sides of said roller and mounted for pivotal movement to and from said roller.

5. A rotary cutting or creasing machine according to claim 4, wherein said arms are pivoted such that, irrespective of the sleeve diameter, pivotal adjustment of the anns results in the rolling members engaging the sleeve approximately at its widest part.

6. A rotary cutting or creasing machine according to claim 3, wherein said support means comprise bars located outwith said roller and slidable in a direction normal to the axis thereof, said bars carrying rolling members for engagement with the inner peripheral surface of said sleeve.

7. A rotary cutting or creasing machine according to claim 3, wherein said other surface is that of a further roller.

8. A rotary cutting or creasing machine according to claim 7, wherein said first-mentioned roller is located above said further roller, there being a conveyor belt passing through the nip between said rollers to carry material to be cut or creased therethrough.

9. A rotary cutting or creasing machine according to claim 1, wherein said roller is carried in axially spaced bearings at one end and in a detachable end support at the other end whereby the end support may be removed to enable said sleeve to be slid on or off the roller from that end.

10. A rotary cutting or creasing machine according to claim 9, wherein said end support is slidably located in a slideway formed in the machine frame, there being releasable locking means operable to secure said end support against sliding and to release same for removal.

11. A rotary cutting or creasing machine according to claim 9, including means enabling enlargement of the nip between said roller and said cooperating surface to facilitate endwise removal of said sleeve.

12. A rotary cutting or creasing machine according to claim 8, wherein said further roller is provided with a shaft rotatable in bearings vertically slidably mounted in the machine frame whereby vertical movement of said bearings lowers said roller, conveyor belt and sleeve relative to said upper roller to facilitate endwise removal of said sleeve.

13. A rotary cutting or creasing machine according to claim 8, wherein said sleeve is provided at at least one end thereof with an annular driving ring of hard resilient material engageable with said conveyor belt.

14. A rotary cutting or creasing machine according to claim 13, wherein the surface of said further roller is roughened in the area corresponding to said ring to improve transmission of I drive therebetween. v

15. A rotary cutting or creasing machine including a pair of rotary rollers or drums located one above the other and forming a nip therebetween, a conveyor belt passing through said nip for transport therethrough of material to be cut or creased, means for driving said rollers and said belt, a cylindrical sleeve of diameter greater than that of said upper roller and carrying cutting and/or creasing means, a removable end support for said upper roller to enable said sleeve to be slid on and off said roller from one end thereof and adjustable support means engageable with said sleeve to support same in peripheral contact with said roller for rotation in conjunction therewith with the axis of said sleeve offset from the axis of said upper roller.

16. A rotary cutting or creasing machine according to claim 1, including support means for supporting said sleeve in relation to said roller, said support means being adjustable to accommodate sleeves of different diameters.

17. A rotary cutting or creasing machine according to claim 16, in which said support means comprises arms on opposite sides of said sleeve and engageable therewith.

18. A rotary cutting or creasing machine according to claim 17, in which said arms are pivotally mounted.

19. A rotary cutting or creasing machine as claimed in claim 1, wherein said roller is carried in bearing means at one end and in a movable end support at the other end so that the end support may be moved to enable said sleeve to be slid on or off the roller from that end.

Patent Citations
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US1577619 *Jun 2, 1921Mar 23, 1926Goodrich Co B FRotary cutte
US2812798 *Dec 15, 1955Nov 12, 1957Vanant Company IncScoring and feeding mechanism
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US3272046 *Feb 18, 1965Sep 13, 1966Hanes CorpRotary cutting apparatus
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3683734 *Jun 25, 1970Aug 15, 1972Bhs Bayerische BergRoller bearing
US3786709 *May 1, 1972Jan 22, 1974E SpenglerRotary stamping apparatus
US3859879 *Mar 5, 1973Jan 14, 1975Stanztechnik Gmbh Roeder & SpeCutting apparatus
US3965786 *Jul 16, 1974Jun 29, 1976Moore Business Forms, Inc.Rotary die cutter
US4445408 *Sep 24, 1979May 1, 1984Keith Garland BMethod and apparatus for cutting continuous fibrous material
US4452116 *May 6, 1981Jun 5, 1984Preston Engravers, Inc.Assembly for rotary die cutting utilizing a shaftless roll
US4542671 *May 21, 1984Sep 24, 1985Preston Engravers, Inc.Assembly for rotary die cutting utilizing a shaftless roll
US4726271 *Oct 21, 1986Feb 23, 1988Elliott Bay Industries, Inc.Rotary cutting machine
US5189935 *Jan 9, 1992Mar 2, 1993Richard RosemannRotary cutting die assembly
US6565499 *Jan 2, 2001May 20, 2003Rinaldo BenzoniAutomatic machine for slitting and creasing paperboard sheets and the like
US7191690 *Jan 10, 2001Mar 20, 2007Heidelberger Druckmaschinen AgHelical mechanism cutting unit and method for operating for the same
US7690099 *Jun 8, 2006Apr 6, 2010Bobst S.A.Transformation station for a packaging production machine
Classifications
U.S. Classification83/339, 83/663, 493/60, 83/346
International ClassificationB26F1/38
Cooperative ClassificationB26F1/384
European ClassificationB26F1/38B