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Publication numberUS3566756 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 2, 1971
Filing dateJan 10, 1969
Priority dateJan 10, 1969
Publication numberUS 3566756 A, US 3566756A, US-A-3566756, US3566756 A, US3566756A
InventorsChamper James H, Schmid Richard G
Original AssigneeGulf Oil Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Gusseter guide
US 3566756 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent Richard G. Schmid Osgood;

James H. Champer, Greensburg, Ind. 790,419

Jan. 10, 1969 Mar. 2, 1971 Gulf Oil Corporation Pittsburgh, Pa.

[72] Inventors [21 I Appl. No. [22] Filed [45] Patented [73] Assignee [54] GUSSETER GUIDE 2,631,332 3/1953 93/20X 2,834,265 5/1958 93/l(WZ) 2,923,194 2/1960 93/20X 3,156,010 11/1964 93/20X 3,165,310 1/1965 93/84X 3,291,007 12/ 1966 93/20 3,418,889 12/1968 93/58(H) FOREIGN PATENTS 825,263 12/1959 Great Britain 931/20 Primary Examiner-Wayne A. Morse, Jr. Attorneys-Richard L. Kelly, Carl A. Cline, Forrest D. Stine and Richard A. Anderson ABSTRACT: A gusset is put into a bubble of blown film just before the film is flattened from a bubble by the pinch rolls by means of a gusseter guide sled which is shaped like a wedge in both lateral and transverse directions. The sled is positioned by a novel apparatus which controls depth of penetration of the sled into the bubble of blown film, and the angle of the sled in the film in both the transverse and lateral direction.

Patented March 2, 1971 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 E/cfiard 6f 55/7/77/0 James M hem 0W" FMM ATTORNEY INVENTOR$ ATTORNEY Patented March 2, 1971 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 hw C h 2 fl/ 4 Mm a E M GUSSETER GUIDE BACKGROUND OFTHE INVENTION This invention relates to a gusseter guide for putting a gusset into a bubble of blown film.

It is known to put gussets into paper bags with gusseter guides having positioning means. For example, see U.S. Pat. No. 2,818,004 to Taylor. However, the shape of the gusseter guide sled of this invention and the positioning means, making possible positioning the sled with regard to depth into the hub ble of blown film and also with regard to the angle of the sled in both transverse and lateral direction are novel.

SUMMARY 1 By means of this invention a gusseter guide sled, which is shaped like a wedge in both the lateral and transverse directions, can be positioned in a bubble of blown film to put a gusset into the film just as it is flattened into the pinch roll. Superior performance in providing an efficient gusseter means is provided both by the shape of the wedge and by the positioning means. The positioning means can control (I) the depth of penetration of the sled into the bubble of film, (2) the angle of the sled in the transverse direction, and (3) the angle of sled in the lateral direction. This is provided by a positioning means fastened to a part of the stationary frame portion of the building. The positioning means consists of four main components. First is a stationary member which is connected to the stationary frame portion of the building so that it is parallel to the flow of the blown bubble of film. A second major portion of the positioning means is the flat bar, which is slideably mounted through the stationary member, but held in a fixed position during operation. The stationary member has mounted on it, on each side, threaded bushings holding short threaded rods having knobs on the ends of them. The ends of the short threaded rods press against each side of the flat bar. The flat bar is pivotally attached to the side of the gusseter guide sled but the pivot is mounted so that the sled can pivot only in the transverse, or long, direction. By adjusting the short threaded rods the flat bar can be tilted in either direction, thereby tilting the sled and adjusting the angle of the sled in the lateral direction. The third component of the positioning means is a rigid member connected to the other end of the flat bar from the sled. This rigid member has apertures to receive the fourth major component of the positioning means, two long threaded rods. Tire first long threaded rod is rotatably mounted in a fixed position in a smooth bore aperture in the rigid member so that it is substantially parallel to the flat bar. This first long threaded rod is also mounted vertically in the stationary member in a mated threaded connection. Both long threaded rods have knobs on the ends so that they can be rotated. Thus by twisting the knob on the first long threaded bar when the flat bar is free to slide through the stationary member the depth of penetration of the sled is adjusted by screwing the first long threaded rod back and forth through mated threaded connection in the stationary member. The second long threaded rod is pivotally mounted on the gusseter guide sled at one end and mounted in a mated threaded aperture of the rigid member so that it is substantially parallel to the flat bar. Thus, by turning the knob on the second long threaded rod through the mated threaded aperture of the rigid member the angle of the sled is adjusted in a transverse, or long, direction.

V BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING FIG. 1 is a partially cutaway elevation view of the gusseter guide in position in a bubble of blown film.

FIG. 2 is a closeup elevation view of the positioning means showing a portion of the sled.

FIG. 3 is apartial cross-sectional side view of the positioning means.

FIG. 4 is a partial cross-sectional top view of the positioning means.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT FIG. I shows a bubble of blown film I with gusseter guide sleds 2 in position to provide a gusset in the film as it is flattened in the pinch roll 3. Stationary frame 4 is a portion of the building super structure. Stationary member 6 of the positioning means is rigidly mounted on stationary frame 4 with bolts 5. Flat bar 7 passes through stationary member 6. Knobs 8 are used to turn short threaded rods 21 not shown in this FIG. Flat bar 7 is attached to gusseter guide sled 2 by means of yoke fixture 9 lag screws or bolts 10 and pin 11. Rigid member 12 is mounted on the end of flat bar 7. Rigid member 12 has apertures' to receive long threaded rods 13 and 14. The aperture in rigid member 12 to receive long threaded rod 14 is also threaded. The aperture in rigid member 12 to receive long threaded rod 13 is smooth bore, and long threaded rod 13 is held in position by bushing 17. Long threaded rods l3 and 14 have knobs 15 and 16 so that they can be rotated. Long threaded rod 14 is pivotally attached to gusseter guide sled 2 by means of fixture 18 ball and socket joint 20 and screws 19. The larger views in FIGS. 2, 3 and 4 show the same elements in relationship and also show short threaded rod 21 in threaded bushing 22 mounted in stationary member 6. The detail also shows setscrew 23 is bushing 17 on long threaded rod 13.

To position the gusseter guide sled 2 for depth of penetration into blown film 1 knobs 8 are tum ed to loosen short threaded rod 21 from pressing on flat bar 7 so that it will slide. Then knob 15 is twisted to turn long threaded rod 13 through the threaded mated connection in stationary member 6.

To tilt the gusseter guide sled 2 in the lateral direction knobs 8 are twisted to tilt flat bar 7 which in turn tilts the sled by means of yoke fixture 9 and pin 11.

To tilt the gusseter guide sled 2 in the transverse, or long, direction, knob 16 on long threaded rod 14 is twisted so that it screws through threaded mated aperture in rigid member 12 and thus turns the sled 2 about an axis defined by pin 11 by means of the pivot connection shown as fixture 18 ball and socket joint 20 and screws 19.

Many variations of the'shape of gusseter guide sled 2 can be envisioned. However, any shape which is essentially wedgeshaped in both the lateral and transverse direction is useful in this invention. The gusseter guide sled 2 can be made of any material such as metal or plastic, however wood is preferred. It is also preferred to cover the surfaces of the sled 2 which contact the plastic film, when the sled 2 is made of wood, with a hard, smooth, long wearing surface such as conventional hardboard. The gusseter guide is preferably mounted with the small end pointing against the direction of flow of the blown bubble of film. Sled 2 extends into the bubble of blown film with one elongated edge foremost.

We claim:

1. A gusseter guide for putting a gusset into a bubble of blown film comprising:

a stationary member parallel to the flow of the said bubble of blown film, said stationary member attached at one end to a stationary frame portion of the building superstructure and at the other end to a positioning means which has mounted upon it a gusseter guide sled shaped like a wedge in both the lateral and the transverse directions and extending into said bubble of blown film with one elongated edge foremost;

said positioning means comprising a flat bar extending generally perpendicularly through said stationary member and held in position by a pair of short threaded rods, one of which presses on each side of said flat bar, said pair of threaded rods respectively mounted in a pair of threaded bushings mounted respectively in each side of said stationary member, said flat bar pivotally attached to said gusseter guide sled at one end, and attached at the other end to a rigid member having apertures to receive a pair of elongated threaded rods mounted through said rigid member;

one of said pair of elongated threaded rods being mounted through said stationary member in a mated threaded connection and rotatably mounted in a fixed position in a smooth bore aperture of said rigid member;

the other of said pair of elongated threaded rods being pivotally mounted to said gusseter guide sled and rotatably mounted through a threaded aperture of said rigid member so that said other rod is substantially parallel to said flat bar; and

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2265894 *Mar 22, 1940Dec 9, 1941Caldes Constantine APaper folding machine
US2544044 *Jul 14, 1948Mar 6, 1951Plax CorpApparatus and method for producing gusseted plastic tubing
US2631332 *Jun 23, 1949Mar 17, 1953Plax CorpInternal spreader for gusseting layflat tubing
US2834265 *Nov 4, 1955May 13, 1958Crist Earl EApparatus for folding corrugated cardboard shields for packing cases
US2923194 *Apr 2, 1956Feb 2, 1960Ici LtdFilm slitting apparatus
US3156010 *May 10, 1963Nov 10, 1964Nat Distillers Chem CorpSlit seal and multiple tube gusseter
US3165310 *Jul 10, 1963Jan 12, 1965Bartelt Engineering Co IncLongitudinal folding device for two strips
US3291007 *Feb 28, 1964Dec 13, 1966Olin MathiesonAnti-friction former device
US3418889 *Dec 21, 1965Dec 31, 1968William F. WeirichDevice for creasing and cutting slot insulation
GB825263A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3739694 *Nov 25, 1970Jun 19, 1973Paramount Packaging CorpApparatus for making plastic bags
US4055109 *May 4, 1976Oct 25, 1977Dai Nippon Insatsu Kabushiki KaishaMethod and apparatus for producing self-standing bags
US4285686 *Oct 5, 1979Aug 25, 1981Gloucester Engineering Co., Inc.V-Board folder for flexible plastic films
US4578051 *Feb 25, 1985Mar 25, 1986Container Corporation Of AmericaFilm tube gusset forming machine
US4650406 *Nov 27, 1985Mar 17, 1987Windmoller & HolscherApparatus for forming gussets in a tubular plastic film
US4923436 *Nov 26, 1985May 8, 1990Sonoco Products CompanyPlastic bag and method and apparatus of manufacture
US4943167 *Jun 12, 1987Jul 24, 1990Hilex Poly Company, Inc.Plastic bag and method and apparatus of manufacture
US5104365 *Sep 28, 1990Apr 14, 1992Tomio SonePaper sheet bending apparatus in bag making machine
US5137505 *May 15, 1991Aug 11, 1992Fuji Photo Film Co., Ltd.Bag-making apparatus with adjustable fold guides
US5147278 *Sep 29, 1989Sep 15, 1992Dowbrands L.P.Air separation method and apparatus for pleating a plastic film web
US5246416 *Aug 10, 1992Sep 21, 1993Dowbrands L.P.Air separation method and apparatus for pleating a plastic film web
US7013621Jun 18, 2003Mar 21, 2006Shanklin CorporationAdjustable package geometry web forming apparatus and method
US7254930 *Nov 18, 2005Aug 14, 2007Frito-Lay North America, Inc.Stationary tucker bar mechanism
US7780589 *Mar 8, 2006Aug 24, 2010Girnet Internacional, S.L.Device for altering the storage capacity of a tubular mesh bag
US8197394Mar 9, 2010Jun 12, 2012Girnet Internacional, S.L.Method for altering the storage capacity of a tubular mesh bag by altering the quantity of material per unit length
US8776484 *Dec 3, 2010Jul 15, 2014Ishida Co., Ltd.Form-fill-seal machine
US20110131935 *Dec 3, 2010Jun 9, 2011Ishida Co., Ltd.Form-fill-seal machine
DE102012017433A1Sep 4, 2012Apr 3, 2014Reifenhäuser GmbH & Co. KG MaschinenfabrikFaltschwert für eine Blasfolienanlage sowie Blasfolienanlage mit einem solchen Faltschwert
WO1987003249A1 *Nov 4, 1986Jun 4, 1987Wilverley Mansions I B VPlastic bag and method and apparatus of manufacture
WO2007058689A1 *Aug 17, 2006May 24, 2007Lawrence Joseph BartelStationary tucker bar mechanism
Classifications
U.S. Classification493/439, 493/476
International ClassificationB29C53/00, B29C53/10
Cooperative ClassificationB29C53/10
European ClassificationB29C53/10
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Jun 19, 1987ASAssignment
Owner name: CHEVRON U.S.A. INC.
Free format text: MERGER;ASSIGNOR:GULF OIL CORPORATION;REEL/FRAME:004748/0945
Effective date: 19850701
Nov 7, 1986ASAssignment
Owner name: CHEVRON RESEARCH COMPANY, SAN FRANCISCO, CA. A COR
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:CHEVRON U.S.A. INC.;REEL/FRAME:004688/0451
Effective date: 19860721
Owner name: CHEVRON RESEARCH COMPANY,CALIFORNIA
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:CHEVRON U.S.A. INC.;REEL/FRAME:004688/0451