Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3567237 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 2, 1971
Filing dateOct 29, 1968
Priority dateOct 29, 1968
Publication numberUS 3567237 A, US 3567237A, US-A-3567237, US3567237 A, US3567237A
InventorsMiller Herbert Bernette
Original AssigneeLine Co A
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Ski covering
US 3567237 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

H. B. MILLER lll March 2, 1971 SKI COVERING 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Oct. 29, 1968 INVEN'IOR.

HA'EBEET BEE/M57735 M/LLEE,ET

Mo, M 5 ZTOEA/EVS SKI COVERING March 2, 1971 Filed Oct. 29, 1968 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVEN'IOR. HERBERT Baa/5W5 MILLEF, 227

I 1 Y W 770205 8 United States Patent O 3,567,237 SKI COVERING Herbert Bernette Miller III, Minneapolis, Minn., assignor to A-Line Company, Minneapolis, Minn. Continuation-impart of application Ser. No. 738,956, June 21, 1968. This application Oct. 29, 1968, Ser. No. 771,481

Int. Cl. A63c 5/12 US. Cl. 280-1113 2 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A tough protective covering secured to the upper surface of the runner member of the ski by a pressure-sensitive adhesive to form a scuff resistant membrane over the runner member. The protective covering may be transparent, colored, or contain a wood grain figure. In certain instances, additional symbols, letters, words, or other indicia may be applied to the ski covering and the combination covered with a transparent covering. The covering alleviates the problem of continually refinishing the upper surface of the ski.

This application is a continuation-in-part of my copending application entitled, Ski Covering, filed June 21, 1968, Ser. No. 73 8,956, now abandoned.

This invention relates to the field of protective coverings or coatings and more particularly to a protective and decorative covering for skis.

It is generally well known that the sport of skiing has become increasingly popular all over the world. With the advent of an increased interest in the sport, equipment manufacturers have made steady strides to improve the equipment which is being used by the skier.

In an effort to increase the reliability of the ski and its sturdiness, various forms of reinforcing structures have been incorporated into the body of the skis. For instance, the common wooden ski which was so popular a number of years ago has given way to a ski generally known as a metal ski which is formed by laminating numerous layers of metal, epoxy resins, certain forms of glass fibers, wood, and numerous other structural materials. More recently, skis are being fabricated of certain epoxies in combination with wood members in which no metal is used. As a consequence, the skis have generally increased in cost and have generally attained a more aesthetic appearance. This is largely due to the use of some form of melamine or phenolic material which covers the top of the ski. Additionally, certain of the metal skis and those generally known as epoxy skis have metal edges or strips embedded in the top of the skis along the outer edges to help protect the upper surface of the skis. It will be remembered that the underportion of the skis have metal edges so that the ski may be more maneuverable by cutting through the crusts of snow. Additionally, the metal strips are removable and new strips may be applied. These metal strips, after being used, quite often become quite sharp and thus if accidentally pushed across the top of the other ski, produce a gouge or scuff mark on the ski. Scuff marks on the skis are also easily obtained through the use of certain types of ski tows which are used to bring the skier to the top of a ski run. Because the skis do become scuffed and marred, and because of the relatively high cost made by the skier to purchase the skis initially, it is generally found that the skier makes every attempt to refinish the skis or keep them in good aesthetic appearance from year to year. One such means of doing this is to return the skis to their manufacturer or factory, or to a reliable ski shop where the upper surfaces are refinished by bufling and polishing, all of which produces additional cost for the skier.

Through the use of the coverings in the preferred form of the invention, it will be found that scuff marks are virtually eliminated and that a covering may be provided to cover the top of the skis in such a manner that the material may be replaced several times during one skiing season and yet costs only a fractional portion of the costs of refinishing the upper portions of the skis. The present invention allows the covering to be applied over the skis without removing the ski bindings and keeps the upper surfaces of the skis in a new condition through constant use. The skier may also change the appearance of his skiis through the use of the invention by using an opaque covering over the ski even though it s marred and adding certain symbols, characters, or letters of various colors, shapes, and sizes, the combination being covered by a transparent covering.

It is, therefore, a general object of this invention to provide in combination with a pair of skis, an improved ski covering which provides a scuff-resistant upper surface to protect the aesthetic appearance of the skis.

It is another object of the present invention to provide an improved ski covering which allows the skier to change the aesthetic appearance of the skis without refinishing the upper surface of the skis.

It is still a further object of this invention to provide an upper surface ski covering which has a tough covering that is readily replaceable and releasably secured to the upper surface of the ski runner.

It is still another object of this invention to provide a ski covering which allows the skier to change the color and aesthetic appearance of the upper surface of the ski at the will of the skier.

These and other objects and advantages of the invention will more fully appear from the following description, made in connection with the accompanying drawings, wherein like reference characters refer to the same or similar parts throughout the several views, and in which:

FIG. 1 is a top plan view of the improved ski covering shown on the ski;

FIG. 2 is a cross sectional view of the improved covering and ski combination taken along lines 2-2 as shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a top plan view of the improved ski covering in which a new aesthetic appearance is given to the ski; and

FIG. 4 is a sectional *view of the covering and ski combination as found in FIG. 3.

A ski 10 has the ski bindings 11 fastened in the normal manner to the upper surface of the ski. Secured along the edges of the upper surface of the ski is a metal head or strip 12 which extends down both sides of the ski and passes forward to the tip of the ski. A pair of transparent covering sheets 13 and 14 (FIGS. 1 and 2) cover or overlie the rear and forward portions respectively of the upper portion of the ski to protect the ski in the manner aforesaid. The material used for the covering may be of a polyethylene terephthalate composition and may be sold under the trademark of Mylar, a Du Pont product. The material is secured to the upper portion of the ski by the use of a rubber base adhesive 15 or some other pressure-sensitive adhesive, a number of which are on the market. In some instances, it may be desirable to apply the adhesive to the upper surface of the ski and press the covering material on to the top of the ski. Ski 10 may contain certain lettering or indicia 16 and through the use of the clear covering, the aesthetic appearance of the ski ismaintained. Generally speaking, the transparent adhesive material is applied to the back of the covering sheets 13 and 14 and a backing material such as paper prevents the pressure-sensitive material from sticking to a surface until the backing is removed. It has been found that adequate protection is obtained where the thickness of the material is approximately two or three thousandths of an inch thick.

It may also be desirable to use a thermo-setting adhesive in which the material is secured to the upper portion of the ski by applying heat.

Where it is desirable to cover an old pair of skis or ones which have been marred by previous use, it is the covering materials 13 and 14 that are supplied in certain colors to again enhance the appearance of the skis. For those who are using a form of Wood covering on the top of the skis or wooden skis, the covering material may have a wood grain effect.

Where it is desirable to change the appearance of the ski and give it a completely new face lifting, the ski is covered by an opaque sheet of material 20 and is secured to the ski in the same manner as previously described. The skis are then covered with various markings or symbols 21 and certain legends 22 in contrasting colors to individually style the ski to the liking of the individual. The markings and legends are formed from another layer of the opaque material and secured to the opaque covering in the same manner as described for securing the transparent covering sheets or opaque cover-. ing sheets to the ski. Because the material is approximately two or three thousands of an inch thick, it is readily secured in place without an appreciable increase in the thickness of the material lying on top of the upper surface of the ski. It will be found that various combinations may be placed upon the opaque material 20 and that different patterns may be readily developed by the individual. After the markings, symbols, or legends have been placed upon the skis, a sheet of the transparent covering material such as sheet 14 is then applied by the use of the pressure-sensitive material over the markings, symbols, and legends, and the opaque material to produce a smoothappearing finish with the various colors of the covering and markings, symbols, and legends being well protected. Where it is desirable to place the symbols 21 or legends 22 directly upon the skis, this may be accomplished through the use of the adhesive material on the backing of the symbols or legends or by applying an adhesive to the material and securing it to the ski. The transparent covering sheet 14 is then applied directly over the symbols and legends to provide a proper covering for the upper surface of the skis.

Should there be any residue of the adhesive clinging to the ski upon removal of the covering strips 13, 14, 20, or the symbols 21 or legends 22, a naphtha base material or solvent may be used to remove the adhesive.

While numerous ways have been used and devised to improve and protect the undersurface of skis, it is believed that the present invention provides a very worthwhile and unique solution to maintain the upper surface and appearance of the skis, and allows the skier to change the appearance at a minimum of expense. Sheets of the various symbols, indicia, and legends may be supplied separately in various colors and designs so that the skier may make the appearance of his skis unique, even with respect to other skis of the same manufacturer.

What is claimed is:

1. In combination with a semiflexible ski member having an undersurface forming a runner adapted to glide over snow and having a smooth aesthetic upper surface adapted to receive ski bindings, the improvement comprising:

(a) a protective cover of transparent polyethylene terephthalate composition material having a width and length greater than the general outline of said upper surface of the ski member and trimmable to conform to the outer edges of said upper surface;

(b) a plurality of colored indicia markings formed from thin plastic material and disposed between said transparent cover and the upper surface of the ski member;

(c) a film of adhesive applied between said plurality of colored indicia markings and the upper surface of the ski member;

(d) and a film of releasable adhesive applied to at least one of said ski member and said protective cover of plastic scuff-resistant material thereby releasably securing said upper surface of the ski member to said protective cover of plastic material and forming a scuff-resistant membrane over said ski member.

2. In combination with a semiflexible ski member having an undersurface forming a runner adapted to glide over snow and having a smooth aesthetic upper surface adapted to receive ski bindings, the improvement comprising:

(a) a protective cover of opaque polyethylene tere hthalate composition material having a Width and length greater than the general outline of said upper surface of the ski member and trimmable to conform to the outer edges of said upper surface;

(b) a plurality of colored indicia formed from thin plastic material disposed on said opaque material;

(c) a film of adhesive applied between said plurality of colored indicia markings and said cover of opaque material;

((1) an upper transparent cover of plastic sculT-resistant material having the same general outline as said upper surface of the ski member; and

(e) a transparent film of adhesive applied to releasably secure said transparent cover and said opaque cover and plurality of colored indicia markings thus forming at least a pair of scuff-resistant membranes over said member.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,096,389 10/1937 Bode 161-406X 2,262,400 11/1941 Laws 40-125(A) 3,322,435 5/1967 Kirschner 280-1l.13(LM) 3,332,829 7/1967 Avery 161-406X 3,350,805 11/1967 Jorgensen 40-125 3,424,469 1/1969 Hooker 28011.13(E) LEO FRIAGLIA, Primary Examiner M. L. SMITH, Assistant Examiner U.S. Cl. X.R. 161-406

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3704023 *Oct 2, 1970Nov 28, 1972Minnesota Mining & MfgSki with cut-resistant surface covering
US3980312 *Jan 29, 1975Sep 14, 1976Franz ButtnerSki containing a coating strip on its sliding surface
US4047735 *Jun 8, 1976Sep 13, 1977Fischer Gesellschaft M.B.H.Ski having a patterned top covering
US4409287 *Jun 9, 1981Oct 11, 1983Harrison Thomas BSki protective device
US4949996 *Feb 28, 1989Aug 21, 1990Mcnally Mark HSki equipment including a mirror panel attachment
US5143395 *Apr 3, 1991Sep 1, 1992Head Sportgerate Gesellschaft M.B.H. & Co. OhgSki
US5288097 *Apr 30, 1992Feb 22, 1994Salomon S.A.Process for manufacturing a ski, and a ski manufactured by the process
US5290063 *Nov 2, 1991Mar 1, 1994Klaus LenhartHand grip construction for a ski pole or the like
US5470108 *Oct 5, 1992Nov 28, 1995Goode; David P.Ski pole grip assembly
US6718675Jan 21, 2003Apr 13, 2004Clive S. LuDisplay grip for sports equipment
US6971959Jan 6, 2004Dec 6, 2005Lu Clive SGrip for sports equipment
US7195567Jul 12, 2005Mar 27, 2007Lu Clive SDecorative grip and method for manufacture
US7461474Aug 16, 2005Dec 9, 2008Clive S. LuDisplay grip for sports equipment
US8113533 *Oct 22, 2008Feb 14, 2012Skis RossignolSnowboard and assembly for the practice of snowboarding
US20050159237 *Jan 21, 2004Jul 21, 2005Lu Clive S.Decorative grip and method for manufacture
US20050159238 *Jun 2, 2004Jul 21, 2005Lu Clive S.Decorative grip and method for manufacturing
US20050206130 *Dec 22, 2004Sep 22, 2005Keith PartenRecreation board with high-definition graphics
US20050250593 *Jul 12, 2005Nov 10, 2005Lu Clive SDecorative grip and method for manufacture
US20090134590 *Oct 22, 2008May 28, 2009Skis RossignolSnowboard and assembly for the practice of snowboarding
EP0615773A1 *Jan 25, 1994Sep 21, 1994Skis Rossignol S.A.Snow-ski board and process for the fabrication
EP1666105A1 *Nov 23, 2005Jun 7, 2006Salomon S.A.Method of decoration for a glide or skate board and the board obtained through this method of decoration
EP2062623A1Oct 28, 2008May 27, 2009Skis RossignolSnowboard and assembly for practicing snowboarding
WO2014085841A1 *Dec 4, 2013Jun 12, 2014Fischer Sports GmbhMethod for producing a cross-country ski
Classifications
U.S. Classification280/610, D21/771, 428/202, D21/766
International ClassificationA63C5/00, A63C5/056
Cooperative ClassificationA63C5/003
European ClassificationA63C5/00B