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Publication numberUS3569813 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 9, 1971
Filing dateJun 9, 1969
Priority dateJun 9, 1969
Also published asDE2027214A1
Publication numberUS 3569813 A, US 3569813A, US-A-3569813, US3569813 A, US3569813A
InventorsClark Kendall, Drop Joseph G, Godat Jean J L
Original AssigneeIbm
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Program controlled positioning device utilizing a stepping motor
US 3569813 A
Images(4)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent Kendall Clark;

Joseph G. Drop, Poughkeepsie, N.Y.; Jean J. L. Godat, Neuchatel, Switzerland [2]] Appl. No. 831,448

[72] Inventors [22] Filed June 9, 1969 [45] Patented Mar. 9, 1971 [73] Assignee International Business Machines Corporation Armonk, N.Y.

[54] PROGRAM CONTROLLED POSITIONING DEVICE UTILIZING A STEPPING MOTOR 11 Claims, 7 Drawing Figs.

3,003,094 10/1961 Gough, Jr. ....318/28X(20.320) 3,340,447 9/1967 MacDonaId.... ..3 1 8/1 8(20.l05) 3,383,573 5/1968 I-Iillyer ..3I8/I8(20.105)

Primary Examiner-Benjamin Dobeck Attorneys-Hanifin and Jancin and William J. Dick ABSTRACT: This patent discloses apparatus for locating a workpiece or work table along X and Y coordinates and for simultaneously orienting the work to precisely position the same in those three coordinates. The apparatus includes three separate positioning means each of which includes sensor means in which a plurality of sets of contacts have a source of power applied initially to the first of the sets. Adjacent the sets of contacts is sequencer means which include a plurality of rotary switches having make before break contacts each aligned with a set of contacts in the sensor means. Intermediate each of the rotary switches are counter-type gear boxes having a predetermined gear ratio which connects the rotary switches together so that there is a predetermined and precise turning ratio between each of the rotary switches. Intermediate the sequencer and sensor is common program means, in the present instance a punch card, which is operable to connect power from the first of the sets of contacts of each sensor to the switch contacts of its associated rotary switch until the program means interrupts the power applied to the first of the sets of contacts of the sensor. Connected to the rotary switches is stepping drive means operative to rotate the rotary switches, while the drive means are also connected to the work or workpiece which is to be positioned in accordance with the program. In addition, a plurality of electromechanical transducers are provided which correspond to the number of rotary switches, each of the transducers having switches which are operable between a first and second position, the switches being operable in a first position to actuate the stepping motor and cause rotation thereof, and in a second position to apply the source of power to the next succeeding set of contacts of the sensor means. As described, the transducers are actuable between their first and second positions in a serial manner, each transducers actuation being effected by its associated rotary switch.

, SENSOR 10B SENSOR SENSOR PROGRAM so I I {00A SEQUENCER 1003/ SEQUENCER 1006/ SEQUENCER 501 [1508 1500 STEPPING MOTOR STEPPING MOTOR STEPPING MOTOR POSITIONING FUNCTION POSITIONINGIFUNCTION POSITIONING. FUNCTION l XII II I llel PATEN-TED MAR 9197i 8,569,813

" SHEET 1 BF 4 50 PROGRAM 00A, SEQUENCER 1008/ SEQUENCER 1000/ SEQUENCER [150A 1503 1500 STEPPING MOTOR STEPPING MOT'OR STEPPING MoTR POSITIONINGIFUNCTION POSITIONING FUNCTION POSITIONING FUNCTION "X I IIYII Hell I a COLUMNS PER CHIP L POSITIONING HEAD IJUIJUUUUDUG 2 ROWS- e LJUDDDDL];]1}[1 UUUUUUUUUU UUDUUUUSUE] UUUIJEIGUUUU UUUUUUU' '15 2 H 5". I"! f! F. F? 10 RowS.nXu'uYu UUUDLJLJLJLJLJLJ [HUGHES-SUE] 50 DUUDEDUUUU UUDUUEHH'EUF IJUUBE'EHUUUU DUUUL'HIEULUKi 0LUMNS -"x" 40 4 COLUMNS="Y" INVENTORS KENDALL CLARK JOSEPH 0. DROP JEAN GODA TORNEY PATENTED MAR 9010 SHEET 3 0F 4 REVERSE MOTOR CONTROL FIG. 3B

A.C. POWER INPUT PROGRAM CONTROLLED POSITIONING DEVICE UTILIZING A STEIPIPING MOTOR SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The present invention relates to positioning means, and more particularly relates to apparatus for locating a workpiece or worktable along X and Y coordinates while angularly orienting the workpiece in a precisely desired position.

STATE OF THE PRIOR ART The prior art is replete with illustrations of methods and apparatus for positioning machine parts or workpieces into a desired and predetermined coordinate position. For example, U.S. Pat. 3,071,028 to Wagner, issued on Jan. 1, I963, disclosed such apparatus for moving a machine tool part through a desired distance along a predetermined path and locating the part accurately with respect to asecond part. As illustrated in Wagner, this requires a complex system of commutator segments arranged in decade, as well as a complex system of electronics to prevent or compensate for hunting of the positioning means upon the work part reaching the precisely predetermined position.

It has been discovered that by the use of a simple stepping motor to precisely position the work or workpiece, a simple and direct control for positioning the work or workpiece may be utilized. In addition, by utilizing a simple program such as a punch card, the control of the positioner to a precise and predetermined point is easily obtained.

In view of the above, it is a principal object of the present invention to provide an economic work and workpiece positioning apparatus operative to position the work or workpiece along X and Y coordinates and in a precise angular orienta tion so that subsequent work may be accomplished upon the workpiece.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a simple system for controlling the position of a workpiece by the use of stepping motors, to thereby reduce the problems that occur with associated type machinery in hunting as the positioning apparatus near the predetermined location.

Still another object of the present invention is to provide a precise positioning apparatus and controlmeans for the same, which positioning apparatus andcontrol means, upon removal of the programming means, returns to its initial position so that is is unnecessary to provide reference points throughout the system, except as an initial reference or starting point.

Still another object of the present invention is to provide a simple program comprising a punch card or the like upon which may be. placed all of the necessary information for precisely positioning the work or workpiece.

Other objects and a fuller understanding of the invention may be had by referring to the following specification and claims taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings in which:

FIG. I is a block diagram of the positioning apparatus illustrating in a schematic manner the sensors, sequencers, and stepping motors as associated with a common program means, in accordance with the present invention;

FIG. 2 is an enlarged fragmentary sectional view of a punch card which is utilized, in accordance with the present inven tion, as a common program means for the X, Y and angular positioners;

FIG. 3A is a fragmentary schematic representation of portion of the sensor and sequencer of the present invention;

FIG. 3B is a fragmentary schematic representation of the remaining portion of the sensor and sequencer as well as the stepping motor utilized in accordance with the present invention;

FIG. 3C illustrates the relationship between FIGS. 3A and 38;

FIG. 4 is a schematic representation of the sensor, sequencer, stepping motor and program for angular orientation of the work in accordance with the present invention; and

FIG. 5 is a schematic representation of the counter-type gearing utilized to connect the switch wipers to effect rotation thereof.

Referring now to the drawings, and especially FIG. 1 thereof, the apparatus of the present invention includes a plurality of sensor means 10A, 10B, and 10C which operate through a common program means 50 to provide power to one of a plurality of sequencers 100A, 1008, and 100C, which in turn provide power to and control of, in accordance with the dictates of the program means 50, stepping motors 150A, 1508, and 150C for precise location of the workpiece or work. As the sensor, sequencer, and stepping motor for both the positioning function X and positioning function Y are identical, that is, the one control shown in FIGS. 3A and 3B are identical for both X and Y positioning functions, one merely being the duplicate of the other, the control circuitry illustrated in FIGS. 3A and 38 shall be assumed to be for the positioning function X. However, it should be recognized that identical apparatus to that illustrated in FIGS. 3A and 3B, is necessary to control the position of the work in the Y coordinate.

Prior to discussing the cooperation of the sensor, sequencer, and stepping motor with the program means 50, it is noted that the program means contains all of the information necessary to precisely locate each of the stepping motors in a predetermined position in accordance with the dictates of the program. To this end, and referring first to FIG. 2, the program means 50 includes, in the present instance, a punch card 51, the punch card having a plurality of vertical columns and a plurality of horizontal rows, in the present instance the rows being designated 000, 00, 0 and l-9, respectively. In a manner which will be more fully explained hereinafter, each of the vertical columns designated 4 columns X" is associated with a set of contact means in the sensor 10A, while each of the four columns designated 4 columns Y is associated with a set of contacts in the sensor 108. With regard to the sensor 10C, this sensor is associated with two rows for indicating the angular orientation (9). In the system employed and shown in the drawings, the desired stop position for the X position function stepping motor 150A will be assumed to be 2571 which can be measured in increments of millimeters, centimeters, inches, etc., the stepping motor 150B for positioning the workpiece in its Y coordinate will also be assumed to have a desired stopping position at 2571 along the Y axis while the desired position of the work or workpiece for its 6 or angular orientation will be considered to be at precisely from its home or initial 000 orientation. To facilitate location of the particular punch corresponding to 2571, and 90, it is noted at the outset that the number 257] is not punched on the card but all other holes corresponding to all other numbers are punched. Similarly, as noted on FIG. 2 in the rows designated 2 rows 0", the 00, 45, 135 315 are punched while the 90, or desired position is not punched.

In accordance with the invention, the sensor is operative to provide power to the sequencer and thereby control the operation of the stepping motor until the program prevents the transfer of power from the sensor to the sequencer causing actuation of electromechanical transducer means to transfer operation and shut down the stepping motor associated with that sensor and sequencer. To this end, and referring first to FIGS. 3A and 3B, the sensor 10A includes a plurality of sets of contacts I1, l2, l3, and 14. As noted on the drawing, each of the contacts of a set is enumerated with a four digit number, for example, the set of contacts 11 is designated 0000 to 9000; the set of contacts 12 is designated 0000 to 0900; the set of contacts 13 is designated 0000 to 0090; and the set of contacts 14 is designated 0000 through 0009. As illustrated in FIGS. 3A and 38, adjacent to the sensor means 10A is the sequencer means A, in the present instance including a plurality of rotary switches I01, I02, 103, and 104, each of the switches l0I-l04 having a plurality of switch contacts which, for the sake of convenience and understanding, are designated with the same numbers appearing on the sets of contacts associated with the sensor means A. For reasons which will become more clear hereinafter, each of the rotary switches is preferably of the make-before-break type and is ganged to its next succeeding switch by counter type gearing in the present instance illustrated as gear boxes 105, 106, 107.

The counter type gearing is of the type found in the typical counter wherein the l0s digit rotor does not turn or move prior to the units digit rotor rotating 360. For example, as shown in FIG. 5, in the counter type gearing conventionally a pinion is connected to the drive shaft 26 and as the drive shaft rotates, so does the pinion. On the front face of the mating gear on sprocket 27 is a rotor 27A having a single toothed member 28 which serves to engage a second pinion 29 upon the first gear rotating 360. A rotary switch wiper, such as the wiper 104A, is connected to the sprocket 27. The second pinion 29 is, in turn, engaged with sprocket-type gear 30 connected to a rotor 30A having a wiper 103A so that every revolution of the first-mentioned gear 27 causes a predetermined segmental rotation of the rotor 30A. In this manner each succeeding gear is angularly displaced about its central axis for one predetermined increment of a complete rotation of a prior or preceeding gear. In this manner the wiper of the switch 103, for example, moves between the 0000 to 0010 position upon the wiper 104A of the switch 104 moving 360.

In order to impart rotation to the switches 101104, the switch 104 is connected to a stepping motor 151, the stepping motor being connected at its opposite end to a threaded shaft 152 and threaded member 153 to impart motion, in the present instance along the X axis, to a workpiece, work or worktable 154. As will be pointed out hereinafter, the number of revolutions of the shaft 152 is controlled by the sensor 10A causing operation of the sequencer 100A via the dictates of the program 50 which is interposed, as schematically shown in FIGS. 3A and 38, between the sets of contacts ll14 and the contacts associated with the rotary switches 101104.

In order to apply power to the sensor 10A, means are provided, in the present instance a typical card reader 200 (see lower left hand portion of FIG. 3B) for energization upon insertion of the card into the card reader 200. To this end, and as best illustrated in FIGS. 3A and 38, power may be applied to the unit by closing a switch 201 thus applying a source of power through lead 202 and energizing the first set 11 of contacts associated with the sensor 10A through lead 203. Simultaneously, power is supplied to the car reader 200 through lead 204 and to the first contact 205A, 206A, 207A, and 208A of electromechanical transducer means 205, 206, 207, and 208. As the punch card is inserted in the card reader 200 (FIG. 313) energy is provided to an electromechanical transducer 209, in the present instance a relay, having a plurality of poles 209A, 2098, 209C, and 209D, causing the circuit to be closed through the 0 punch on the punch card 51 and energization of the wiper arm 101A associated with the rotary switch 101. As this occurs, the electromechanical transducer or relay 205 becomes energized permitting current to flow through a lead 202A into a stepping motor power supply lead 210. As noted in FIG. 3B, energization of the line or lead 210 provides energy to a motor control 211 through line 212 labeled forward" initiating the stepping motor 151s rotation in the forward direction. The motor control 211 is preferably powered by AC as shown in FIG. 33. It should be noted at this time that only the first set 11 of contacts associated with the sensor 10A is energized, the relay 205 permitting energization of the stepping motor 151.

As the stepping motor 151 is connected to the rotary switches 101-104 via the counter type gearing or gearboxes 105-107, the stepping motor causes rotation of the rotary switches according to the predetermined preset ratio between the rotary switches, in the present instance 10 to 1. Thus the wiper 104A associated with the rotary switch 104 will turn 100 revolutions for every 10 revolutions of the wiper 103A associated with the rotary switch 103, the wiper 102A associated with the rotary switch 102 turning once for every 10 revolutions of the rotary switch 103 and every 100 revolutions of the rotary switch 104. In a similar manner, due to the gearbox 105, the wiper 10lA ofthe rotary switch 101 will turn one-tenth of a revolution for every revolution of the rotary switch 102, thus causing the wiper 101A to move from the 0000 position to the 1000 position. Referring to FIG. 2, as there is a punch in the first column, row 1, relay 205 retains its energization and the stepping motor 151 continues to rotate, once again there being revolutions of the switch 104 to cause the wiper 101A associated with rotary switch 101 to move from the 1000 position to the 2000 position. As shown in FIG. 2, as there is no punch in the first column, row 2, the wiper 101A of the switch 101 fails to receive power from the set of contacts 11, causing deenergization of the relay 205 and permitting power to be transferred from the contact 2058 to the contact 205A which, through the lead 213 causes energization of the second set of contacts 12 of the sensor means 10A. Upon energization of the set of contacts 12, wiper 102A becomes energized due to the punch in column 2, row 0, of the punch card 51 shown in FIG. 2. As this occurs relay 206 is energized applying a source of energy to contact 206B, thus energizing the stepping motor 151 for continued rotation in a manner such as heretofore described with regard to the contacts 11. As shown, rotation will continue until the wiper 102A reaches the 0500 contact os the contact set 12 at which time the relay 206 will be deenergized and a transfer will occur to the set of contacts 13 through the lead line 214. In a manner similar to that which has heretofore been described, the wiper 103A of the rotary switch 103 will cause actuation of the relay 207 and energization of the stepping 151 through contact 2078 and lead 210. Stepping will continue until the wiper 103A reaches the 0070 contact and, as there is no punch in the punch card 51 at this point, the relay 207 will be deenergized causing the transfer of power from contact 2078 to contact 207A, thus energizing the last set 14 of contacts associated with the sensor 10A through lead 215. As power is received by these contacts, the relay 208 is energized via the wiper 104A of the rotary switch 104 causing energization of the stepping motor 151 due to engagement of the contact 208A and its connection to the lead 210. Stepping, in this manner, will continue until the wiper 104A contacts the 0001 contact thereby deenergizing the relay 208, thus causing the stepping motor 151 to stop.

In order to indicate that the X table is in motion and to indicate when it has stopped, indicator means in the present instance comprising lights 16 and 17, preferably mounted on the front panel of the apparatus, may be utilized to indicate to the operator when the worktable 154 is in motion and when it has reached its predetermined and desired location. To this end, and as illustrated in FIG. 3B, the lead 210 is connected through the light 16 to ground whereby upon energization of the lead 210 and commencement of the stepping operation, light 16 will be energized. Conversely, upon the stepping motor 151 coming to a stop at the end of the readout of the punch card 51, the relay 208 becomes deenergized and the contact 208A of relay 208 causes energization of the finish light 17 through lead 216, the light 16 being deenergized because of the transfer by the relay between its first and second position, removing the source of power from the lead 210.

After certain function, as desired, are performed on the worktable or workpiece, and it becomes desirable to have the worktable resume its initial position, resetting of the worktable is accomplished automatically by merely removing the punch card 51 from the card reader 200. In this connection, and as may be readily seen in FIGS. 3A and 3B, removal of the card 51 from the card reader 200 deenergizes the relay 209 causing its associated poles 209-209D to be raised to the inactive position decoupling the 0000 contact associated with the sets of contacts 1114 of the sensor 10A from the switch contact 0000 of the rotary switches 101104, respectively. Simultaneously, as can best be seen in FIG. 3B, the switch contact 209D connects the motor control 211 to the reverse lead 217. Upon removal of the punch card, the sensor contacts at the 2 (set 11), 5 (set 12), 7 (set 13), and 1 (set 14) are connected to the wipers BIA-404A, respectively, thus energizing the relays 205208. At this point power is once again transferred to the lead 210, causing energization of the reverse lead 217 to the motor control 211. This results in the stepping motor 151 moving in the reverse direction until the wiper 101A of the rotary switch 101 reaches the 0000 position and contact is broken because the switch 209A is in its open position. This same action occurs with the rotary switches 102, 103, and 1114, the actuation of the stepping motor 151 in the reverse direction being terminated upon the rotary switches 101-1041 arriving at the 0000 position.

Thus the worktable may be positioned at any desired location in its X and Y coordinates and may be repositioned to its home location by simply removing the punch card therefrom without attendant checkpoints or recovery operations due to hunting or the like.

The rotational position (6) of the worktable or a workpiece operates on substantially the same principle as that heretofore described relative to FIGS. 3A and 3B. In the particular illustration shown in FIG. 4, certain parts have been reproduced for clarity, for example, the power switch 201 and the card reader 200. It should be recognized, however, that this unit may be integrally connected to that shown in FIGS. 3A and 38 by means of the common program punch card 51, once again schematically illustrated in FIG. 4 for purposes of clarity.

In order to precisely locate the workpiece in its proper angular position, it is desirable to break the angular coordinates into more readily usable and meaningful stopping points. To this end, the sensor means C includes a plurality of sets of contacts and 21, the sets of contacts 20 being broken up into eight contacts or steps, each step therefore representing 360 divided by 8 or 45 increments. In a like manner, the sets of contacts 21 of the sensor 10C have been broken up into 6 discrete increments or steps designated 0 -45 or 7% incremental steps.

As shown in FIG. 4, the sequencer 100C includes a plurality of rotary switches 110, 111, and 112. Each of the rotary switches 110 and 111 includes a plurality of contacts, respectively designated with the like numerals contained in the sets of contacts 20 and 21 for ease of following energization of a stepping motor 161. As shown, intermediate the switches 110 and 111 is a counter type gearbox 114 having a ration of 8 to 1, so that upon the wiper 111A of the switch 111 rotating once, the wiper 110A associated with the switch 110 will move between the 000 position and 0-45 position. In a like manner, intermediate the switch 111 and the special switch 112 is a 6 to 1 counter type gearbox 115 whereby upon one rotation of the switch 112 the wiper 111A associated with the switch 111 will move between the 00 contact and the 07% contact. As shown, the switch 112 has a rotationally mounted wiper 112A adapted for engagement with an outer ring 11213, the null spacing between the terminal ends of the ring being approximately 72 of arc. Additionally, the switch 112 is connected via a 7% to 1 counter type gearbox to the stepping motor 161 so that 7%. revolutions of the stepping motor 161 causes one complete revolution of the wiper 112A.

Assuming the switch 201 is closed and a source of energy is supplied to the sensor 10C and sequencer 100C, and the punch card 51 is in position, power is applied to the relay 209 causing the contacts 209E and 209F to close. Closing of the relay 209 causes actuation of the contact 209G and moves this contact into the forward motor control position as depicted at lead 220. The energization of the lead 220 in turn actuates the motor control 221 and thus the stepping motor 161.

In order to rotate the workpiece the desired amount, the switch 110 is provided with an output shaft 230, shown sche matically in FEG. 4, and connected to work piece clamping means 231 for holding the workpiece and orienting the same in accordance with the dictates of the program punch card S1. in the present instance the clamp or holding means 231 com prises a T bar 232 adapted to grip the connectors 233 of silicon integrated circuit chip (not shown) so that the orientation of the chip is proper for mating to a substrate. However, it should be recognized that the holding means 231 may comprise any fixture for holding a workpiece or may, through suitable gearing, be connected to the worktable 154 to cause rotation thereof throughthe desired angular degree necessary for positioning the worktable.

In operation, upon insertion of the punch card and energizations of the contact sets 20, the stepping motor 161 commences rotation by energization of the relay 235 through the wiper 110A of the rotary switch 110. Upon the contact 2358 being energized, lead 236 receives energy through contact 209G associated with relay 209 causing energy to be transferred to the motor control 221 energizing the stepping motor 1611. Continued rotation of the stepping motor causes the wiper arm 110A to ultimately move to the 045 contact and energy is once again supplied to the stepping motor until the wiper arm 110A reaches the 090 position. At this point, as there is no punch in the punch card 51, no energy is transmitted to the stepping motor and relay 235 opens, causing energization of contact 235A and thus energizing the contact set 21 associated with the rotary switch 111. As the wiper arm 110A may not have come to the full position of the wiper arm 111A may be contacting for example, the 22% position and relay 237 will be energized causing energization of contact 237A associated with the relay 237. As heretofore described, this causes energy to be transferred through the contact 209G through the motor controller 221 and thus into the stepping motor 161.

Upon the wiper 111A reaching its 0 position, as the punch card 51 has no punch in the 0 aperture, relay 237 will be deenergized and contact 237D will receive current, thus supplying energy to the ring 11213 associated with the switch 112. If the wiper arm 112A is contacting the ring 112B, solenoid 238 will be energized causing relay contact 2388 to receive power and causing current to flow into the motor control 221 and thus to the stepping motor 161. The wiper arm 112A will then continue rotation until the open position is reached and relay 238 is deenergized permitting energization of a stop or finish light 17A.

Automatic homing to an initial set position is easily obtainable, in the present instance, by simply removing the punch card 51 which causes contact to be made to the wiper A which is now in the 90 position. Energization of the wiper arm 110A causes actuation of the relay 235, but as the relay 209 has been deenergized by removal of the card from the card reader 200, the relay contact hitsthe reverse lead 220A causing energization of the motor control 221 to reverse operation of the motor 161. Thus the reverse operation will occur until the wiper arms 110A, 111A, and 112A coincide with the 0 position of the switches 110, 111, and 112, respectively. As before, the contacts 209E and 209F being in the inactive position causes the deenergization of the relays 235, 237, and 238 upon the respective wiper arms reaching their 0 or home positron.

We claim:

1. Apparatus for positioning a device, said apparatus comprising: sensor means including a plurality of sets of contacts; sequencer means including a plurality of rotary switches having make before break contacts, said rotary switches being connected together through counter gearing means and a stepping motor connected to said sequencer means and operable to cause rotation thereof; program means intermediate said sensor and said sequencer; power transfer means including at least one switch means for each of said rotary switches, a source of power connected to one of said sets of contacts, through said program and to at least the one of said rotary switches, each of said rotary switches having means for actuation of said switch means to a first position to thereby energize said stepping motor upon said source of power being connected through said program to said rotary switch, said switch means being movable to a second position energizing a succeeding set of contacts of said sensor means upon said pro gram means interrupting the power from said first set of contacts to said rotary switch, said transfer of power from said stepping motor to said next succeeding set of contacts continuing until the power to the last of said rotary switches is interrupted by said program means.

2. Apparatus in accordance with claim 1 wherein said program means includes ,a punch card having a plurality of punches in said card corresponding to the final position of said stepping motor.

3. Apparatus for positioning a device in accordance with claim 1 wherein said counter gearing means has a 10 to 1 ratio between adjacent rotary switches.

4. Apparatus for positioning a device in accordance with claim 1 wherein said counter gearing means have a ratio corresponding to the number of contacts in the preceeding rotary switch.

5. Apparatus in accordance with claim 1 including a plurality of sensor means and a corresponding number of sequencer means, each of said sensor means cooperating with a sequencer means; and a plurality of stepping motors corresponding to the number of cooperating sensor and sequencer means, each of said stepping motors including independent means for positioning a device in a precise position corresponding to said program means.

6. Apparatus in accordance with claim 1 including means for indicating when the power to the last of said rotary switches is interrupted by said program means.

7. Apparatus in accordance with claim 5 including means for indicating when the power to the last of said rotary switches is interrupted by said program means and means for indicating when said apparatus is running.

8. Apparatus for locating a workpiece along X and Y coordinates and for angular orientation thereof, said apparatus including three separate positioning means, each of said positioning means comprising:

Sensor means including a plurality of sets of contacts having a source of power applied initially to a first of said sets; sequencer means including a plurality of rotary switches each having a plurality of switch contacts, a plurality of counter type gear means having a predetermined gear ratio, each of said rotary switches being connected to a next succeeding rotary switch through one of said counter type gear means; the switch contacts of each of said rotary switches being aligned with one of said sets of contacts of said sensor means; stepping drive means connected to said rotary switches to cause rotation thereof, said drive means connected to said workpiece for imparting movement thereto in accordance with a preset program; a plurality of electromechanical transducer means corresponding to the number of rotary switches, each of said electromechanical transducer means having switch means operable between a first and a second position, said switch means operable in a first position to actuate said stepping drive means; and in a second position to apply said source of power to the next succeeding set of contacts of said sensor means, said electromechanical transducer being actuable between said first and second positions by its associated rotary switch, and common program means intermediate each of said sensor and sequencer means operable to connect power from said first of said sets of contacts of each sensor to the switch contacts of its associated rotary switch until said program means interrupts said power and then serially to each succeeding set until the predetermined and preprogrammed position is reached.

9. Apparatus in accordance with claim 8 wherein said program means includes a punch card having a plurality of punches therein corresponding to the ultimate position said stepping drive means is to attain.

10. Apparatus in accordance with claim 9 wherein at least one of said counter-type gear means has a ten to one ratio between adjoining rotary switches.

11. Apparatus in accordance with claim 8 including a means for indicating when the power to the least of said rotary switches is interrupted by said program means.

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US3943422 *Apr 24, 1974Mar 9, 1976Verdol S.A.Method and apparatus for the photo-electrical reading-in weaving designs
US3999044 *Jul 25, 1974Dec 21, 1976Siemens AktiengesellschaftInstallation for producing radiological angiographic exposures
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US5694926 *Sep 25, 1995Dec 9, 1997Bird Products CorporationPortable drag compressor powered mechanical ventilator
US5868133 *Feb 3, 1997Feb 9, 1999Bird Products CorporationPortable drag compressor powered mechanical ventilator
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US6877511Jun 10, 2003Apr 12, 2005Bird Products CorporationPortable drag compressor powered mechanical ventilator
US7222623Dec 29, 2004May 29, 2007Birds Products CorporationPortable drag compressor powered mechanical ventilator
US7849854Sep 7, 2004Dec 14, 2010Bird Products CorporationPortable drag compressor powered mechanical ventilator
Classifications
U.S. Classification318/569, 318/400.9, 318/696, 318/603
International ClassificationG05B19/40, B23Q5/52, B23Q5/22, H02P8/40, G05B19/18
Cooperative ClassificationG05B19/40
European ClassificationG05B19/40