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Publication numberUS3570482 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 16, 1971
Filing dateDec 9, 1968
Priority dateDec 9, 1968
Publication numberUS 3570482 A, US 3570482A, US-A-3570482, US3570482 A, US3570482A
InventorsShigeru Emoto, Hiroshi Yamamoto
Original AssigneeFujiboseki Kk
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Elastic surgical bandage
US 3570482 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

I United States Patent [111 3,570,482

[72] Inventors Shigen Emoto; 56 References Cited Hiroshn Yamamoto, Shizuoka-ken, Japan UNITED STATES PATENTS [21] Appl. No. 782,030

Dec. 9 I Wagler Patented Mar. GI'OSS et al. 3,339,549 9/1967 Morse 66/192 [73] Assignee Flljlbmkl Kabushtkl Kalsha Tokyo-to, Japan 3,461,695 8/1969 Knohl 66/202 Primary Examiner-Adele M. Eager Attorney-Whittemore, Hulbert & Belknap [54] ELASTIC SURGICAL BANDAGE 10 Claims, 3 Drawing Figs. [52] 11.8. C1 128/156, B TRACT: Elastic surgical bandage consisting of chain 66/193 stitches each formed of nonelastic yarn running reciprocative- [51] Int.Cl A6lf15/00 ly across adjoining loops in the chain stitches or across the [50] Field ofSearch 128/155, l p of r n o Wale ahead, n p ly re hane yam 156, 157, 159, 171, 290; 66/193, 192, 195, 202; knitted along the wale, through a portion or all parts of the, 87/2 successive loops in the chain stitch.

&

Patented Mrch16, 1971 3,570,482

INVENTORS Shigeru Emoto Hiro 2 2 2 2 shi Yamamoto F'G. 2 BY 90% 45194 ATTORNEY BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION It is very important that the surgical bandage should have a proper elasticity, in order to fit on an affected part, to protect the diseased part and to prevent the bandage from loosening or slipping. In order to overcome such defects, it has been proposed to replace a part or all of warp yarns which compose a surgical bandage cloth with elastic yarns such as rubber yarn, specially modified yarns, etc. However, it was impossible to provide satisfactory surgical bandage. If one desires an increase in theair permeability of the bandage the density of warp and weft yarn in the fabric should be made rough or the yarn should be made fine, which eventually causes slip between warp and weft yarn and also generates strain of the texture in the weave. The present invention provides a surgical bandage by which all of the above mentioned problems have been overcome.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING FIG. 1 shows an enlarged texture of one embodiment of the surgical bandage of this invention.

FIG. 2 shows an enlarged texture of another embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 3 shows an enlarged texture of the surgical b'andage of this invention which is divided into warp direction.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS A surgical bandage in preferred embodiment as shown in FIG. 1 consists of weft yarn 5 formed of nonelastic yarn and running reciprocatively across loops 3, 4 of the chain stitches 2 adjoining one another and each formed of nonelastic yarnl, such as cotton, rayon, polynosic, etc. and polyurethane elastic yarn 6 knitted along the wale, through successive loops 3, 4 in all or some parts of the chain stitch 2.

Another preferred embodiment of the surgical bandage shown in FIG. 2 consists of weft yarn made of nonelastic yarn running reciprocatively across the loops in the chain stitch located more than one wale apart. Adjoining chain stitches are tied by weft yarn 5, so that when the weft yarn is pulled out, the knitted cloth is divided lengthwise. This means that it is possible to divide or split the knitted cloth lengthwise at any desired width, and the selvages of the divided bandage itself form a perfect surgical bandage, neither forming raised naps nor causing the falling out of warps as is often encountered in the usual woven bandage.

As is obvious from the above explanation, the surgical bandage of this invention organizes so-called inlaid net. Accordingly, it has superior'air permeability and resistance to slip between warp and weft yarns and thereby keeps the weft yarns within the warp surgical bandage without accompanying strain upon wearing. The greater the number of wales over which the weft yarns cross is the thicker the cloth which is obtained.

The polyurethane elastic yarn may be used either as uncovered yarn or as covered yarn being entwined with other yarn, i.e., in the form of so-called core yarn. These elastic yarns are knitted while under constant tension. After knitting, they shrink in proportion to the elasticity, and on wearing, the bandage shows adequate extensibility. Because the elasticity is little affected by the covering yarn or fiber, a soft elastic force can be exerted to the surgical bandage. Since the surgical bandage cloth of this invention has hooked weft yarns running across the loops of chain stitch adjoined one another, the weft yarns are kept more firmly by the chain stitch than those of or dinary plain weave bandage cloth. Slip between warp and weft yarns never takes place even when the density of warp and weft yarn is roughened. Roughening can be accomplished without causing strain in the texture. The warp yarn forms the chain stitch and the weft yarn runs-through its loops, so that it is possible to obtain rough density, bandages by simply reduc ing number of the stitches per unit length. Accordingly the density of weft yarn can be roughened freely while maintainin the len thwise elasticity at a hi h level.

IG. 3 s ows a state where in a nitted cloth is divided into two parts, i.e., right and left sides, by pulling out the weft yarns. The weft yarns can be easily pulled out by simply cutting anywhere with scissors. On knitting this bandage cloth only a given part of the weft yarns'may be formed with watersoluble yarn and after dissolving the soluble yarn by hot water treatment, it is possible to efficiently conduct the knitting process using the full width of a knitting machine and to easily determine the desired width of the product.

We claim:

I. A fabric for surgical bandage or the like comprising a plurality of chains of chain stitches extending in the direction of warp and formed of nonelastic yarn, nonelastic weft yarn members running reciprocatively across and through adjacent loops in adjacent chains for at least a portion of the length of the chains at least some of which weft yarn members are water soluble whereby on dissolution or cutting of a weft yarn member and withdrawal thereof the fabric is divided in the direction of the warp.

2. Structure as set forth in claim 1 and further including additional weft yarn members running reciprocatively across and through adjacent loops in a chain of chain stitches for at least a portion of the length of the chain which additional weft yarn members are elastic.

3. Structure as set forth in claim 1 wherein the nonelastic weft yarn members extend across and through chains of chain stitches separated by at least one intermediate chain of chain stitches.

4. Structure as set forth in claim 2 wherein the nonelastic weft yarn members extend across and through chains of chain stitches separated by at least one intermediate chain of chain stitches.

5. Structure as set forth in claim'l wherein at least some of the nonelastic weft yarn members are one of, cotton yarn, rayon yarn and polynosic fiber yarn.

6. Structure as set forth in claim 2 wherein at least some of the nonelastic weft yarn members are one of cotton yarn,

loops in adjacent chains for at least a portion of the length of the chains and additional weft yarn members running reciprocatively across and through adjacent loops in a chain of chain stitches for at least a portion of the length of the chain which additional weft yarn members are elastic whereby stretching of the fabric in the warp direction is permitted and on removal of a nonelastic weft yarn member the fabric is split in the direction of the warp.

9. Structure as set forth in claim 8, wherein at least some of the nonelastic weft yarn members are one of cotton yarn, rayon yarn and polynosic fiber yarn.

10. Structure as set forth in claim 8, wherein at least some of the elastic weft yarn members are one of covered yarn, core yarn, or bare yarn.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2411175 *Aug 22, 1939Nov 19, 1946William F GeibelElastic fabric and method of making the same
US2706898 *Jan 31, 1951Apr 26, 1955Fairhope Fabrics IncKnitted elastic fabric
US3339549 *Nov 2, 1959Sep 5, 1967Johnson & JohnsonSanitary napkin with knitted wrapper
US3461695 *Sep 19, 1967Aug 19, 1969Kendall & CoTwo-way stretch garment incorporating inlaid elastomeric yarn
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3685474 *Oct 20, 1970Aug 22, 1972Opti Holding AgMethod of making side-fastener stringers
US3708836 *Oct 20, 1970Jan 9, 1973Opti Holding AgWarp-knit slide-fastener stringer
US3724457 *Nov 17, 1970Apr 3, 1973E KlatteBandaging means
US3738125 *Dec 8, 1970Jun 12, 1973Smithfield Fibers IncThree-strand knitted yarn
US3747374 *Sep 15, 1971Jul 24, 1973R MeyerStretchable tubular fabric
US3757541 *Oct 20, 1970Sep 11, 1973Optic Holding AgStringer foundation for slide fastener
US3808840 *Apr 16, 1973May 7, 1974Smithfield Fibers IncThree-strand yarn knitting machine and method of knitting
US3848556 *Nov 26, 1971Nov 19, 1974Yoshida Kogyo KkMethod for producing a sliding clasp fastener
US3965703 *Apr 18, 1975Jun 29, 1976Southern Webbing MillsWarp knitted compression bandage fabric
US3999407 *Apr 1, 1975Dec 28, 1976Stedman CorporationEmbossed striped elastic warp knit fabric and method of making same
US4215684 *Sep 18, 1978Aug 5, 1980Lohmann Gmbh & Co. KgPermanent elastic net-shaped bandage, especially for medical purposes
US4244199 *Jul 5, 1979Jan 13, 1981Milliken Research CorporationWarp knit elastic tape construction for use as waistband reinforcement
US4248064 *Feb 14, 1979Feb 3, 1981Stedman CorporationLock-stitch knitted elastic fabric
US4331135 *Oct 24, 1980May 25, 1982Lohmann Gmbh & Co. KgPermanently elastic network bandage
US4391106 *Apr 21, 1980Jul 5, 1983Karl Otto Braun K.G.Wound dressing
US4476697 *May 26, 1983Oct 16, 1984Karl Otto Braun KgWound dressing
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US4751133 *May 11, 1987Jun 14, 1988Thermedics, Inc.Medical patches and processes for producing same
US4798200 *Dec 9, 1987Jan 17, 1989Milliken Research CorporationSelf-adhering orthopedic splint
US4880690 *Sep 9, 1988Nov 14, 1989Thermedics, Inc.Perfume patch
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US8641653 *Aug 31, 2011Feb 4, 2014Martin WinklerCompression garment
US20110119807 *Nov 24, 2009May 26, 2011Dellacorte MichaelArticle for alleviating bunion deformity and pain
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US20130014544 *Aug 31, 2011Jan 17, 2013Martin WinklerCompression garment
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Classifications
U.S. Classification602/76, 66/193
International ClassificationD04B21/00, A61F13/15, A61F13/00
Cooperative ClassificationD10B2509/028, D04B21/18, A61F2013/15235, A61F2013/00102, A61F2013/00238, A61F2013/00119, A61F13/00021
European ClassificationA61F13/00A4, D04B21/00