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Publication numberUS3570603 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 16, 1971
Filing dateOct 7, 1968
Priority dateOct 7, 1968
Also published asDE1945092A1
Publication numberUS 3570603 A, US 3570603A, US-A-3570603, US3570603 A, US3570603A
InventorsJohnson Gary R, Kammerer Archer W Jr
Original AssigneeRotary Oil Tool Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method and apparatus for cementing casing sections in well bores
US 3570603 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 1 [72] Inventors Archer W. Kammerer,Jr.

Fullerton; Gary R. Johnson, Anaheim, Calif.

[21] Appl. No. 765,474

[22] Filed Oct. 7, 1968 [45] Patented Mar. 16, 1971 [73] Assignee Rotary Oil Tool Company Buena Park, Calif.

[54] METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR CEMENTING CASING SECTIONS IN WELL BORES 35 Claims, 11 Drawing Figs.

52 U.S. c1. 166/290, 166/315, 166/208, 166/243 51 Int.Cl ..1:21b33/14, E21b23/OO s01 Field'ofSearch 166/290, 4 315, 212, 242, 243; 166/206, 207, 20s

[56] ReferencesCited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,233,888 7/1917 Leonard 166/207x Primary ExaminerDavid H. Brown Attorney-Bernard Kriegel ABSTRACT: Casing sections are cemented in a well bore between producing zones in an upward sequence starting from the bottom. Each casing section is lowered on a running string and running tool to its setting point, the casing section then being rotated to'expand cutter supporting members carried by the casing outwardly to cut a formation shoulder for supporting the cutter members and casing. The running tool is released from the casing and lowered therewithin to the casing float shoe, cement being pumped through the running string, tool and shoe to cement the casing in place, the running string and tool being removed from the hole.

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Gnes 12 claw/so METHGD AND APFTEJS FGR CEW SECTIONS m WELL BGRES The present invention relates to subsurface well bore apparatus, and more particularly to the running-in, supporting and cementing of casing in well bores.

Where a plurality of producing zones are present in a well bore, a string of casing is lowered in the well bore and the easing cemented in place to seal off the water sand zones between the producing zones. The casing may be perforated at each producing zone, or it may be milled away at each producing zone, the hole then being enlarged through use of a suitable expandable type of hole opener to remove the cement and expose the producing formation. It has also been proposed heretofore for the water sand zones themselves to be cemented off, leaving the producing zones free from cementitious materials. In such situations, the casing is either initially in a perforate condition between each producing zone, the perforations being opened at the appropriate time, or the casing sections at the producing zones are perforated or milled away, a suitable hole opening tool with expandable cutters being run in the well for the purpose of enlarging the hole diameter, so as to facilitate flow of the production into the easmg.

The running of a solid string of casing in the well bore, followed by the different types of cementing operations referred to above, is a costly and time-consuming operation, particularly in well bores having a substantial number of separate producing zones, which, for example, may be many as five in number. The present invention greatly reduces the cost of securing a cement bond between casing sections at the water sand zones and the securing of the producing zones in an opened condition for the freedom of flow of the production into the well bore.

In the present invention, an appropriate length of casing is lowered on a running string into the well bore and is located between producing zones. A shoulder is formed in the formation by expanding cutters outwardly against the formation, the cutters being supported by the shoulder so that the running string of pipe need no longer support the casing. In hard formations, the shoulder may be cut prior to lowering the casing in the well bore. The cutters or like supporting members are locked in their outwardly expanded conditions, resting upon the formation shoulder, and will remain in such conditions despite the release of a running tool from the length of casing, which will permit the running tool to be used in cementing the casing sections in place, which is done by pumping cement down through a drill pipe, or other tubular string, extending to the drilling rig and from the lower portion of the well casing for upward passage along the casing string, to provide an annular body of cement securing the casing in the well bore and cementing off the water and other zones in the well bore between the producing zones. The running string of drill pipe and the running tool associated therewith are then removed from the casing and elevated to the top of the well bore.

The foregoing sequence of operations is then repeated with other desired lengths of casing in an upward sequence, each casing being lowered to its appropriate location between adjacent producing zones, anchored in place by the act of causing its expanding cutters to produce a shoulder in the formation to support the casing string, the casing then being cemented in place and the running tool then being removed from the well bore.

After all of the lengths or sections of casing are cemented in place, and the running tool removed from the well bore, a bit is secured to the drill pipe and run in the well bore to drill out all of the internal devices in the casing string. The bit is then removed and a suitable hole opener lowered on the drill pipe into the well bore, for-the purpose of enlarging the well bore .at each producing zone between casing sections.

This invention possesses many other advantages and has other purposes which may be made more clearly apparent from a consideration of a form and method embodying the invention. This form and method are shown and described in the present specification and in the drawings accompanying and f CASHNG constituting a part thereof. They will now be described in detail, for the purpose of illustrating the general principles of the invention; but it is to be understood that such detailed FIG. 3 is a view similar to FIG. 2 illustrating the fonnation shoulder having been cut and the apparatus in condition for supporting the casing weight from the formation shoulder;

FIG. 4 is a view similar to FIG. 3 illustrating the apparatus in another condition with circulation ports open, the apparatus in condition for locking the expandable cutters in their ex-' panded condition;

FIG. 5 is a view similar to FIG. 2, 3 and 4 illustrating the running tool released from the well casing and the cutterblades or anchor members positively locked in their expanded condition;

FIG. 6 is a quarter longitudinal sectional view illustrating the running tool within the casing and the cementing of the casing in the well bore;

FIG. 7 is a view similar to FIG. 6 illustrating upper circulation ports open for the purpose of flushing the excess cement from the interior of the well casing and drill pipe;

FIG. 8 is a longitudinal section similar to FIGS. 2 to 7, inclusive, illustrating the running tool completely removed from the well casing in the well bore;

FIG. 9 is a cross section taken along the line 9-9 on FIG. 2; H6. 10 is a cross section taken along the line 10-10 on FIG. 3; and

FIG. 11 is a cross section taken along the line 11-11 on FIG. 4.

The drawings illustrate an apparatus and a method for cementing separate lengths or sections of casing A, B, C in a well bore D between producing zones E, F, G. FIG. 3; illustrates a plurality of casing sections cemented in place; whereas, the other FIGS. illustrate a single length of casing and associated apparatus, which is to be cemented in the well bore between producing zones at each end thereof.

As shown more particularly in FIGS. 2 to 11, inclusive, a suitable length of easing, such as the'casing A, which, for example, may be from 2 to 500 feet in length, depending upon the distance between producing zones E, F, has its lower end constituted as a bull plug casing shoe H of any known type. As specifically illustrated, the casing shoe is threadedly secured to the lower end of an adjacent casing section A and has a downwardly facing valve seat 10 therein adapted to prevent return flow of cement slurry, or other fluids, when engaged by a suitable ball check valve member ll therebelow, the downward movement of the ball from its seat being limited by engagement with suitable circumferentially spaced fingers 12 attached to the body 13 of the casing shoe. The central passage is through the casing shoe is closed by a suitable plug 15 threaded to the body, so that fluid flowing downwardly through the valve seat ll) will pass outwardly through side ports 16 in the casing shoe into the annulus .l surrounding the well casing. Since it is desired that the cement be prevented from flowing downwardly of the shoe, a suitable basket 17 is provided, which may be of the type specifically illustrated in U.S. Pat. No. 2,117,538. This basket may consist of circumferentially spaced longitudinal springs 18, the lower portions of which are suitably secured to the body l3 of the casing shoe, the spring arms and associated overlapping leaf spring members 19 diverging in an upward direction and being" adapted to engage and slide upon the wall of the well borefl Thus, the cement slurry is confined for movement upwardly from the basket 17 along the length of the casing string A.

The upper end of the casing A is nonrotationally securedto' a supporting and anchor device 20, which is capable of wil porting the entire length of casing and the column of cement deposited therearound in the annulus J. This device includes a tubular body 21, the lower end of which is connected to the upper portion of the casing string A by a suitable swivel 22, permitting the body to rotate without rotating the casing. The swivel may take any suitable form. As illustrated, it consists of a plurality of balls 23 located in opposed raceways 24, 25 in the casing and body, respectively, the balls being inserted in place between the raceways 24, 25 through a suitable radial hole 26 in the body closed by the threaded plug 27.

The body 21 carries a plurality of anchor or supporting cutter blades 28 disposed in longitudinally extending body slots 29. Each blade is pivotally mounted on a hinge pin 30 extending through the blade across its associated slot and suitably secured to the body, the blade depending from its hinge pin and having a rearward foot portion 31 extending from the trailing side of the blade to increase the lower width or effective thickness of the blade (FIG. The upper portion of each slot 29 above the foot portion has a width slightly greater than the thickness of the main portion of the anchor blade 28, the lower portion of the slot being wider to accommodate the foot portion 31 and permit its passage in a lateral outward direction through the slot.

The blades initially occupy an inward or retracted position, as disclosed in H6. 2, in which their outer longitudinal sides 32 are disposed substantially entirely within the confines of the body 21. Its inner portion 33'then inclines in an inward and downward direction. Such inward portion includes a tapered or expander portion 34 and also a stop flange 35 extending transversely outwardly of the leading face of the blade, the arrangement being such that outward expansion of each blade is limited by engagement of the flange 35 with the inner wall of the body at one side of the body slot 29, such as illustrated most clearly in MG. 10.

When in their retracted position, the inner portions of the blades extend through slots 48 of a tubular mandrel 37 disposed within the body 21. Downward movement of the mandrel relative to the body is prevented initially by a plurality of segments 38 extending through tapered side openings 39 in the body and extending into a counterbore 40 in the body in engagement with an upwardly facing, tapered body shoulder 41 provided by the counterbore. The shoulder 41 and lower side of the segments 38 taper in an inward and outward direction. The segments are held in their outward position by a holding and expander sleeve 42 within the mandrel 37, this sleeve being held in an initial upward position within the mandrel by a plurality of shear screws 43. When in such upward condition, the sleeve retains the thrust segments 3% within the counterbore 40, which precludes downward movement of the mandrel 37 within the body 21. Upward movement of the mandrel with respect to the body is then prevented by an inherently expandable split lockring 44 disposed in an external circumferential groove 45 in the mandrel, with its upper side engaging a downwardly facing shoulder 46 in the body.

Lateral extending expander lugs 47 are integral with the lower portion of the sleeve 42, such lugs extending through longitudinal slots 48 in the lower portion of the mandrel 37, and being initially disposed above the major portion of the anchor blades 28, the inner portions of the blades extending through the mandrel slots 48 with the expander blade portions disposed below the sleeve lugs 47, as illustrated in FIG. 2. The upper portions of the mandrel slots are slightly wider than the thickness across the blade and stop flange 35, the rotational drive, as explained hereinbelow, being transmitted from the mandrel 37 through the trailing side of each of its slots to the trailing face of an associated blade 28. With the blades in the retracted position, a lock sleeve 49 is disposed in its upper position within the body, as disclosed in H6. 2.

When the sleeve 42 is shifted downwardly within the mandrel, as a result of shearing the upper screws 43, the lugs 47 engage the tapered expander portions 34 of the anchor blades I and expand them outwardly. During their outward expansion, the string of drill pipe P to which the mandrel is secured and the mandrel are being rotated, the torque of the mandrel being transmitted directly to the anchor blades 23, the lower corner 50 of which will engage the formation and portion cutting it away. At this time, the drill pipe string and mandrel are maintained in the same vertical position, the anchor blades 28 swinging outwardly and penetrating into the formation as the body 31 and blades are rotated, until the blades have been expanded fully outwardly, as illustrated in FIG. 3, to produce an upwardly facing formation shoulder R engaged by the lower ends 51 of the blades and their foot portions 31. At this time, the sleeve 42 will have shifted downwardly to the extent at which its upper flange 52 engages alower set of shear screws 53 disposed below the upper shear screws 43 by a predetermined distance, these shear screws 53 being received within an elongate circumferential groove 54 in the upper portion of the sleeve. The lugs 47 on the expander sleeve 42 will have shifted downwardly off the tapered expander surfaces 34 of the blades when the upper sleeve flange 52 engages the lower set of shear screws 53, the inner surfaces 33 of the fully expanded blades then having an effective internal diameter which is no smaller than the external diameter of the mandrel Downward shifting of the sleeve 42 within the mandrel 37 occurs hydraulically. When the setting location of the casing string A has been reached, a trip ball 54 is dropped or pumped down the drill pipe, the ball passing through a sleeve valve member 55 of a circulation valve 56 formed in the upper portion of the mandrel 37, and covering side circulation ports 57, the sleeve valve member being held in its port closing position initially by one or a plurality of shear screws 58 releasably securing it to the mandrel. This sleeve valve member 55 has suitable seal rings 59 thereon engaging the mandrel on opposite sides of the circulation ports 57. The trip ball is of a smaller diameter than the passage through the sleeve 55, so that it can pass downwardly therethrough and through the central passage 60 of the piston sleeve member into engagement with a ball seat 61 in its lower portion. When the ball 54 engages the seat 61, the upper shear screws 43 are still intact, and the parts are in the position illustrated in FIG. 2. At this time, side ports 62 in the sleeve valve 42 are closed by being disposed within an imperforate intermediate portion 63 of the mandrel, seal rings 64 being provided on the sleeve on opposite sides of its ports 62 for sealing engagement with the wall of the mandrel.

When the trip ball 54 engages its seat 61, pressure can be built up in the tubular string of drill pipe P and within the mandrel 37, for the purpose of shearing the upper screws 33 and effecting expansion of the anchor blades 23 while the drill pipe and mandrel are being rotated to rotate the anchor blades and the entire body 21 around the formation, such rotation occurring without corresponding rotation of the casing string A because of the provision of the swivel 22. When the blades have been fully expanded, as disclosed in FIG. 3, and with the upper sleeve flange 52 engaging the lower set of shear screws 53, the sleeve ports 62 are still in the closed condition.

The efficacy of the formation shoulder R and blades 28 in supporting the casing A is then tested by setting down a desirable amount of weight on the drilling string P, which is trans mitted through the segments 38 to the body 21 of the tool and through the anchor blades 28 to the formation shoulder R. If the formation shoulder holds the down weight imposed upon it, as well as the weight of the casing section A therebelow, the fluid pressure in the drill pipe and the setting tool is increased to cause the sleeve 42 to shear the lower set of screws 53, the

sleeve moving downwardly to its lowermost position within the mandrel 37, in which the ports 62 are disposed in alignment with the mandrel slots 42, the elongate circumferential groove 54 of the sleeve then being disposed in alignment with or behind the segments 3b, as illustrated in FlG. 4. The fact that the parts are in this relative position will be indicated to the operator at the top of the well bore by the open condition of the ports 62 and the ability to circulate fluid down through the tubing string 1?, and out through the ports 62 and mandrel slots 48 into the casing A therebelow, the circulation fluid passing through the shoe H and out through the ports id for upward passage in the well bore around the casing section A.

Since the casing is now being supported by the blades or supporting members 28 resting upon the formation shoulder R, the drill pipe P and mandrel 37 are then lowered. The segments 38 engage the tapered shoulder 41 on the body 21 and are shifted inwardly completely out of the body and within the confines of the mandrel, freeing the mandrel for movement downwardly within the body. Such downward movement carries the split lockring 44 downwardly with it, this ring being in engagement with the upper end of the lock sleeve 49 and shifting the latter downwardly behind the upper portion of the expanded blades 28. Just prior to engagement of the lock sleeve with the expander portions 34 of the blades, the inherently expansible lockring 44 becomes positioned opposite an internal circumferential groove 70 in the body 21, the lockring expanding into such groove and completely out of the external mandrel groove 45. The mandrel is thereby freed from the upper body 21 and casing A and is movable downwardly within the casing A, with the lock sleeve 49 retaining the blades 28 in their outward expanded condition, as illustrated in FIG. 5.

The mandrel 37 carries a downwardly facing packing cup 71 of elastomer material and having a diameter conforming to the inside diameter of the casing string A, this cup being suitably fixed to the mandrel below its circulation ports 57 and being capable of sliding downwardly through the body 21, lockring 49, expanded blades 28 and along the wall of the casing therebelow. The drill pipe P and mandrel 37 are then lowered in the casing until the mandrel is disposed immediately above the casing shoe H (FIG. 6). Circulation fluid can then be pumped down through the drill pipe P and through the mandrel 37, discharging through the sleeve ports 62 and passing through the mandrel slots 48 into the casing A, and then through the valve seat 10 and out through the ports 16 into the basket 17, then flowing upwardly through the annulus surrounding the well casing. This circulation fluid is followed by a suitable charge of cement slurry pumped down through the drill pipe and through the apparatus, discharging through the shoe ports 16 and passing upwardly around the casing to the anchor blades 28 and body 21, the slurry being appropriately calculated in volume so as to avoid its being deposited along the formation zone above the upper end of the flaring mouth 75 of the body 21, as well as to avoid its spilling into the casing through such mouth. A ball or suitable plug element 76 may be placed in the drill pipe at the upper end of the charge of cement slurry, this ball coming to rest upon the valve sleeve of the circulation valve 56, whereupon further ejection of cement from the well casing will cease. An increase in fluid pressure in the drill pipe string will cause the shear screws 58 to be disrupted and the sleeve valve 55 to shift downwardly into engagement with a mandrel shoulder 80, opening the circulation ports 57 and allowing any excess cement in the well bore or in the casing string itself to be flushed from the well bore. As illustrated in FIG. 7, washing or circulating fluid can be pumped downwardly into the annulus S between the drill pipe string P and the wall of the well bore, such fluid, as well as the fluids in advance of it in the well bore, passing through the circulation ports 57 to the interior of the string of drill pipe, flowing upwardly therethrough to the drilling rig. The cement slurry deposited behind the casing cannot move downwardly through the shoe ports 16, in view of the upward seating of the ball check valve element ll of the casing shoe.

After reverse circulation or, if desired, circulation down through the drill pipe P and upwardly therearound has been completed, the drill pipe string P and the running tool 37, 42 are pulled from the well casing A and the well bore D to the drilling rig, leaving the casing with cement deposits behind it and in the condition illustrated in FIG. 3, the bore through the casing A and the body 21 thereabove being unobstructed, except for the presence of the internal mechanism of the casing shoe H, which is made of readily drillable material, as set forth in US. Pat. No. 1,994,850.

The next desired length of casing B an then be made up with its shoe H and basket 17 at its lower end and attached to the body 21 and mandrel 37 with the expander piston sleeve 42 and the circulation sleeve 55 in place and in the positions illustrated in FIG. 2. This organization is run in the well bore until the casing is located between a lower formation zone F and an upper formation zone G thereabove, and the foregoing sequence of forming a formation shoulder R to support the casing B, testing the supporting ability of the blades 28 and the formation shoulder, releasing the mandrel 37 from the body 21, locking the blades outwardly, cementing the casing B in place, and removing the setting tool and drill pipe being repeated. In the same fashion, other casing sections, C etc. are lowered and cemented in place in upward sequence between producing zones, until all of the casing sections are cemented in place, such as illustrated diagrammatically in FIG. 1.

After all the casing sections A, B, C, etc. have been cemented in place, and the drill pipe P and running tool 37, 42 removed, a suitable size drill bit (not shown) is secured to the string of drill pipe and is lowered in the well bore D, the drill pipe being rotated to drill out the internal mechanisms of all the shoes and other obstructions that might have been incorporated in the casing strings. When this operation has been completed, the drill pipe and bit are removed from the well bore. A hole opener (not shown) having expandable cutters, which, for example, may be of the type illustrated in U.S. Pat. No. 2,758,819 is then secured to the drill pipe P and lowered in the well bore, its cutters expanded outwardly at each producing zone to enlarge the well bore at each of the producing zones between casing sections. Suitable well completion equipment can now be run in and set in the casing sections, such as well packers and the like.

It is, accordingly, apparent that a method and an apparatus for performing the method have been provided, which will appropriately support each length or section of casing between producing zones while the cementing operation is being conducted and without cementing the well bore along the producing zones E, F, G, etc. Thus, water bearing sand zones and the like may be sealed off and the producing zones isolated from one another in a known manner by use of other equipment (not shown). It is unnecessary to effect any perforation of casing, run unneeded casing along the producing zones, and effeet a milling away of the casing sections if it is desired to expose one or more of the producing zones.

We claim:

1. A method of supporting a casing section in a well bore and carrying initially retracted supporting members, comprising lowering the casing section in the well bore to a desired setting point, forming a supporting formation shoulder in the formation wall of the well bore, expanding the supporting members after lowering the casing section to the desired setting point, and resting the supporting members on the supporting formation shoulder to support the weight of the casing section.

2. A method of supporting a casing section in a well bore and carrying supporting members, comprising lowering the casing section in the well bore to a desired setting point, forming a supporting shoulder in the formation wall of the well bore, and resting the supporting members on the supporting shoulder; wherein the supporting members are laterally expandable, forming the supporting shoulder by rotating at least a portion of said casing section while laterally expanding the supporting members to cause the supporting members to cut into the formation wall.

3. A method as defined in claim 2; a hydraulic force being imposed on the supporting members while said portion of the casing section is being rotated to laterally expand the supporting members to cause fire supporting members to out into the formation wall and produce the supporting shoulder on which the supporting members rest.

4. A method of supporting a casing section in a well bore and carrying supporting members, comprising lowering the casing section in the well bore to a desired setting point, forming a supporting shoulder in the formation wall of the well bore, and resting the supporting members on the supporting shoulder; the casing section comprising an upper rotatable portion swivelly connected to a lower casing portion, the supporting members being laterally expandable and carried by the upper rotatable portion, forming the supporting shoulder by rotating the upper rotatable portion and cutters by laterally expanding the supporting members to cause the supporting members to cut into the formation wall.

5. A method of supporting and cementing a casing section in a well bore, the casing section carrying supporting members, comprising releasably connecting the casing section to a running tool and lowering the casing section and running tool in the well bore on a tubular string to a desired setting point, forming a supporting shoulder in the formation wall of the well bore, resting the supporting shoulder in the formation wall of the well bore, resting the supporting members on the supporting shoulder, cementing the casing section in the well bore while the supporting members rest on the shoulder, and releasing the running tool from the casing section for withdrawal of the running tool from the well bore.

6 A method as defined in claim wherein the running tool is released from the casing section prior to cementing the casing section in the well bore, lowering the running tool in the casing section to the lower portion of the casing section, then pumping cementitious material through the tubular string and running tool into the casing section for discharge from the casing section and upward flow around the casing section.

7. A method as defined in claim 5; wherein the supporting members are laterally expandable, forming the supporting shoulder by rotating the tubular string, running tool, and at least a portion of said casing section while laterally expanding the supporting members to cause the supporting members to cut into the formation wall and produce the supporting shoulder on which the supporting members rest.

8. A method as defined in claim 5; the casing section comprising an upper rotatable portion swivelly connected to a lower casing portion, the supporting members being laterally expandable and carried by the upper rotatable portion, the running tool being releasably connected to the upper rotatable portion, forming the supporting shoulder by rotating the tubular string, running tool, upper rotatable portion, and supporting members carried thereby while exerting a hydraulically imposed force on the supporting members to laterally expand the supporting members to cause the supporting members to cut into the formation wall and produce the supporting shoulder on which the supporting members rest.

9. A method as defined in claim 5; the casing section comprising an upper rotatable portion swivelly connected to a lower casing portion, the supporting members being laterally expandable and carried by the upper rotatable portion, the running tool being releasably connected to the upper rotatable portion, forming the supporting shoulder by rotating the tubular string, running tool, upper rotatable portion, and supporting members carried thereby while exerting a hydraulically imposed force on the supporting members to laterally expand the supporting members to cause the supporting members to cut into the formation wall and produce the supporting shoulder on which the supporting members rest, the running tool being released from the upper rotatable portion prior to cementing the casing section in the well bore, lowering the running tool in the casing section to the lower portion of the casing section, then pumping cementitious material through the tubular string and running tool into the casing section for discharge from the casing section and upward flow around the casing section.

iii. in apparatus for supporting a casing section in a well bore: a body adapted to form part. of the casing section; laterally expandable supporting members carried by the body; and means shiftable longitudinally of said body for expanding said members laterally outwardly to penetrate said members into the formatio'n wall of the well bore or to rest said members on a formation shoulder, whereby said members support the weight of said body in the casing section from the formation wall or formation shoulder.

1111. in apparatus as defined in claim 10; and means for locking said members in their outwardly expanded position.

12. In apparatus for supporting a casing section in a well bore: a body adapted to form part of the casing section; laterally expandable supporting members carried by the body; and means for expanding said members laterally outwardly to penetrate said members into the formation wall of the well bore or to rest said members on a formation shoulder, whereby said members support the weight of said body in the casing section from the formation wall or formation shoulder; said body having swivel means for connecting said body to the portion of the casing section therebelow.

13. in apparatus for supporting a casing section in a well bore: a body adapted to form part of the casing section; laterally expandable supporting members carried by the body; and means for expanding said members laterally outwardly to penetrate said members into the formation wall of the well bore or to rest said members on a formation shoulder, whereby said members support the weight of said body in the casing section form the formation wall or formation shoulder; a running tool adapted to be secured to a running string and releasably connected to said body for lowering the body and remainder of the casing section in the well bore; and means drivably connecting said running tool to said supporting members whereby rotation of said running tool rotates said supporting members while they are being expanded laterally outwardly to produce the formation shoulder on which said supporting members can rest.

M. In apparatus as defined in claim 13; said body having swivel means for connecting said body to the portion of the casing section therebelow.

15. In apparatus as defined in claim '13; said expanding means comprising a member slidable downwardly in said running tool in engagement with said supporting members to expand said members laterally outwardly.

16. in apparatus as defined in claim 13; said expanding means comprising a fluid-actuated member slidably longitudinally in said running tool and movable downwardly by fluid pressure in the running string in engagement with said supporting members to expand said members laterally outwardly.

17. In apparatus as defined in claim 13; said drivable connected means including slots in said running tool into which said supporting members extend when in retracted position and during their lateral outward expansion.

18. in apparatus as defined in claim 13; and means for transmitting downwardly directed thrust from said running tool to said body.

K9. in apparatus as defined in claim 13; means for transmitting downwardly directed thrust from said running tool to said body; and means for releasing said thrust transmitting means from its transmitting relation, permitting downward movement of said running tool in said body.

20. in apparatus as defined in claim 13; means for transmitting downwardly directed thrust from said running tool to said body; means for releasing said thrust transmitting means from its transmitting relation, permitting downward movement of said running tool in said body; and lock means shiftable downwardly by said running tool within said body to a position behind expanded supporting members to lock said members in their expanded condition.

l. in apparatus for supporting a casing section in a well bore: a body connectable to the casing section to form a part thereof; laterally expandable supporting members carried by said body; a mandrel within said body and 'connectable to a tubular running string; means for transmitting rotary motion of said mandrel to members; an expander slidable downwardly in said mandrel and engageable with said members to expand said members laterally outwardly against the formation to produce a shoulder in the formation during rotation of said mandrel and members; and means releasably connecting said mandrel to said body whereby release of said connecting means permits said mandrel to move longitudinally in said body to a position longitudinally removed therefrom.

22. In apparatus as defined in claim 21; said motion transmitting means comprising slots in said mandrel receiving said members when said members are in retracted position on said body and during lateral expansion of said members.

23. in apparatus as defined in claim 21; said motion transmitting means comprising slots in said mandrel receiving said members when said members are in retracted position on said body and during lateral expansion of said members; said expander comprising means extending into said slots for engagement with said members.

24. 24. in apparatus as defined in claim 21; said expander comprising a sleeve having a seat, and a trip member movable through the tubular string into engagement with the seat to enable pressure to be built up in the tubular string to fluidly shift said sleeve downwardly in said mandrel in engagement with said members to expand said members.

25. in apparatus as defined in claim 21; said expander comprising a sleeve having a seat, and a trip member movable through the tubular string into engagement with the seat to enable pressure to be built up in the tubular string to fluidly shift said sleeve downwardly in said mandrel in engagement with said members to expand said members; said sleeve having one or more ports closed by said mandrel when said sleeve is in an upper position in said mandrel, said one or more ports being opened when said sleeve has been shifted downwardly in said mandrel.

26. in apparatus as defined in claim 21; said expander comprising a sleeve having a seat, and a trip member movable through the tubular string into engagement with the seat to enable pressure to be built up in the tubular string to fluidly shift said sleeve downwardly in said mandrel in engagement with said members to expand said members; said motion transmitting means comprising slots in said mandrel receiving said members when said members are in retracted position on said body and during lateral expansion of said members; said sleeve extending into said slots in engagement with said members.

27. In apparatus as defined in claim 21; said expander comprising a sleeve having a seat, and a trip member movable through the tubular string into engagement with the seat to enable pressure to be built up in the tubular string to fluidly shift said sleeve downwardly in said mandrel in engagement with said members to expand said members; said motion transmitting means comprising slots in said mandrel receiving said members when said members are in retracted position on said body and during lateral expansion of said members; said sleeve extending into said slots in engagement with said members; said sleeve having one or more ports closed by said mandrel when said sleeve is in an upper position in said mandrel, said one or more ports being opened when said sleeve has been shifted downwardly in said mandrel.

2%. ln apparatus as defined in claim 21; and packing means on said mandrel for slidably sealing with the casing section following release of said mandrel from said body and downward movement of said mandrel within the casing section.

29. in apparatus as defined in claim 2i; said releasable connecting means comprising segments on said mandrel engaging said body to transmit downward thrust from said mandrel to said body and also comprising a split ring on said mandrel engaging said body whereby the weight of said body and casing section therebelow are supported by said. mandrel, and means for releasing said segments and split ring to release said mandrel from said body and permit movement of said mandrel longitudinally within and from said body.

fill. in apparatus as defined in claim 21; and lock means shiftable behind said members to retain said members in expanded condition.

31. In apparatus as defined in claim 2i; said expander comprising a sleeve having a seat, and a trip member movable through the tubular string into engagement with the seat to enable pressure to be built up in the tubular string to fluidly shift said sleeve downwardly in said mandrel in engagement with said members to expand said members; said motion transmitting means comprising slots in said mandrel receiving said members when said members are in retracted position on said body and during lateral expansion of said members; said sleeve extending into said slots in engagement with said members; said releasable connecting means comprising segments on said mandrel engaging said body to transmit downward thrust from said mandrel to said body and also comprising a split ring on said mandrel engaging said body whereby the weight of said body and casing section therebelow are supported by said mandrel, and means for releasing said segments and split ring to release said mandrel from said body and permit movement of said mandrel longitudinally within and from said body.

32. in apparatus as defined in claim 21; said expander comprising a sleeve having a seat, and a trip member movable through the tubular string into engagement with the sea to enable pressure to be built up in the tubular string to fluidly shift said sleeve downwardly in said mandrel in engagement with said members to expand said members; said motion transmitting means comprising slots in said mandrel receiving said members when said members are in retracted position on said body and during lateral expansion of said members; said sleeve extending into said slots in engagement with said members; said releasable connecting means comprising segments on said mandrel engaging said body to transmit downward thrust from said mandrel to said body and also comprising a split ring on said mandrel engaging said body whereby the weight of said body and easing section therebelow are supported by said mandrel; said sleeve engaging said segments to retain said segments in engagement with said body, said sleeve being released from said segments upon downward movement in said mandrel to permit disengagement of said segments from said body, a lock sleeve in said body positioned for engagement by said split ring and shifted downwardly in said body behind said members in response to downward movement of said mandrel and ring in said body to lock said mem' bers laterally outwardly, said split ring being expandable from said mandrel upon downward movement of said lock sleeve to release said mandrel from said body and permit its movement longitudinally within and from said body.

33. In apparatus as defined in claim 2i; said expander comprising a sleeve having a seat, and a trip member movable through the tubular string into engagement with the seat to enable pressure to be built up in the tubular string to fluidly shift said sleeve downwardly in said mandrel in engagement with said members to expand said members; said motion transmitting means comprising slots in said mandrel receiving said members when said members are in retracted position on said body and during lateral expansion of said members; said sleeve extending into said slots in engagement with said members; said releasable connecting means comprising segments on said mandrel engaging said body to transmit downward thrust from said mandrel to said body and also comprising a split ring on said mandrel engaging said body whereby the weight of said body and easing section therebelow are supported by said mandrel; said sleeve engaging said segments to retain said segments in engagement with said body, said sleeve being released from said segments upon downward movement in said mandrel to permit disengagement of said segments from said body, a lock sleeve in said body positioned for engagement by said split ring and shifted downwardly in said body behind said members in response to downward movement of said mandrel and ring in said body to lock. said members laterally outwardly, said split ring being expandable from said mandrel upon downward movement of said lock sleeve to release said mandrel from said body and permit its movement longitudinally within and from said body; and packing means on said mandrel for slidably sealing with the casing section following release of said mandrel from said body and downward movement of said mandrel within the casing section.

34. In apparatus as defined in claim 21; said expander comprising a sleeve having a seat, and a trip member movable through the tubular string into engagement with the seat to enable pressure to be built up in the tubular string to fluidly shift said sleeve downwardly in said mandrel in engagement with said members to expand said members; said motion transmitting means comprising slots in said mandrel receiving said members when said members are in retracted position on said body and during lateral expansion of said members; said sleeve extending into said slots in engagement with said members; said releasable connecting means comprising segments on said mandrel engaging said body to transmit downward thrust from said mandrel to said body and also comprising a split ring on said mandrel engaging said body whereby the weight of said body and casing section therebelow are supported by said mandrel; said sleeve engaging said segments to retain said segments in engagement with said body, said sleeve being released from said segments upon downward movement in said mandrel to permit disengagement of said segments from said body, a lock sleeve in said body positioned for engagement by said split ring and shifted downwardly in said body behind said members in response to downward movement of said mandrel and ring in said body to lock said members laterally outwardly, said split ring being expandable from said mandrel upon downward movement of said lock sleeve to release said mandrel from said body and permit its movement longitudinally within and from said body; packing means on said mandrel for slidably sealing with the casing section following release of said mandrel from said body and downward movement of said mandrel within the casing section; said sleeve having one or more ports closed by said mandrel when said sleeve is in an upper position in said mandrel, said one or more ports being opened when said sleeve has been shifted downwardly in said mandrel.

35. A method of supporting a casing section in a well bore and carrying supporting members on its upper portion, comprising lowering the casing section in the well bore to a desired setting point, forming a supporting shoulder in the formation wall of the well bore at the upper portion of the casing section, and resting the supporting members on the supporting shoulder to support the weight of the casing section.

23 53 um mm s'm'rms 1.A'l1.-31\'1 owner;

* CER'LIFlCA'lE OF CORRECTION Patent No. 3 ,570,603 Dated March 16 1971 Imm t ARCHER w. KAMMERER, JR. ET AL It. is certified that error appears in the above-identified patent and that said Letters Patent are hereby corrected as ehox-m below:

Column 7, lines 19 and 20, eahcel "resting thsupporting shoulderv in the formation wall of the well bore".

' Column 8, line 42, "slida-bl y" should read --slidab1e--.

Column 10, line 22, "aea" should read -seat--.

Signed and sealed this 28th de y of March 1 972.

(SEAL) Attest: c

EDWARD M.FLETCHER, JR. .ROBERT GOTTSCHALK A Attesting Officer Commissioner of Patents

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5695009 *Oct 31, 1995Dec 9, 1997Sonoma CorporationDownhole oil well tool running and pulling with hydraulic release using deformable ball valving member
US5797454 *Jul 26, 1996Aug 25, 1998Sonoma CorporationMethod and apparatus for downhole fluid blast cleaning of oil well casing
US6454001 *May 12, 2000Sep 24, 2002Halliburton Energy Services, Inc.Method and apparatus for plugging wells
US6739391 *Oct 10, 2001May 25, 2004Baker Hughes IncorporatedSurface deployed cement separation plug
US6935423 *Apr 30, 2001Aug 30, 2005Halliburton Energy Services, Inc.Borehole retention device
US8739873 *Mar 5, 2010Jun 3, 2014Halliburton Energy Services, Inc.System and method for fluid diversion and fluid isolation
US8820417 *Mar 18, 2009Sep 2, 2014Petrowell LimitedCentraliser
US20110005776 *Mar 18, 2009Jan 13, 2011Petrowell LimitedImproved centraliser
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Classifications
U.S. Classification166/290, 166/377, 166/382, 166/208, 166/243
International ClassificationE21B33/14, E21B33/13
Cooperative ClassificationE21B33/14
European ClassificationE21B33/14