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Publication numberUS3572590 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 30, 1971
Filing dateMay 31, 1968
Priority dateMay 31, 1968
Also published asDE1927207A1, DE1927207B2, DE1927207C3
Publication numberUS 3572590 A, US 3572590A, US-A-3572590, US3572590 A, US3572590A
InventorsMalone Carl E
Original AssigneeAfa Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Squeeze bottle atomizers and liquid dispensers
US 3572590 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

3,382,871 5/1968 Parry.......... 2,642,313 6/1953 Montenier...... 2,658,797 1 1/1953 Montenier...... 2,796,294 6/ 1957 McKinnon.. 3,162,372 12/1964 Viaro FOREIGN PATENTS 780,125 7/1957 Great Britain;...............

Primary Examiner-M. Henson Wood. .lr Assistant Examiner-John J. Love Attorney-Barnes, Kisselle, Raisch & Choate A squeeze bottle atomizer havin Inventor Carl E. Malone Fort Lauderdale, Fla. I 21 Appl. No. 733,356

May 31, 1968 Mar. 30, 1971 The AFA Corporation Miami, Dade County, Fla.

DISPENSERS 17 Claims, 17 Drawing Figs.

United States Patent 122] Filed [45] Patented [73] Assignee [541 SQUEEZE BOTTLE ATOMIZERS AND LIQUID 239/327, ABSTRACT: g an atomizmg 239/326, 239/434 head in which an airstream impinges on a column of liquid in a 865d 1/32 siphon tube to partially nebulize the liquid. The partially nebu- 239/327, lized liquid is then carried by the airstream through a mixing chamber and a restricted orifice or a wick saturated with 187 liquid and an orifice to further nebulize the liquid. The atomizing head is so constructed that the liquid is nebulized sequentially in two stages, thereby producing an extremely fine spray.

The size of the orifice through which the airstream impinges 239/327 on the liquid column can be adjusted to vary the fineness of 239/327X I the nebulized liquid.

{511 [50] FieldofSearch..... 326,434; 222/21 1, 212,189,193, 40218, 402.17,

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,140,052 7/1964 McCuiston..................

PatenteJfMarch 30, 1971 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 i l l I l L I I l I I l l INVENTOR CARL E. MALONE I FIG. 3

ATTORNEYS Patented March 30, 1971 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR CARL E. MALONE 2 a 2 v ll lI lm'Uhill w fldw liuflvm .w w My 1 l l 6 T i 1 1: 111i 6 w ATTORNEYS Patented March so, 1971 4 Sheets-Sheet 5 17-75- 10 INVENTOR CARL E. MALONE W gin/4 M) ATTORNEYS Pate nt'e'ci March 30, 1971 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 INVENTOR CARL E. MALONE ATTORNEYS SQUEEZE BOTTLE ATOMIZERS AND LIQUID DISPENSERS Conventional squeeze bottle atomizing devices produce a rather coarse spray or dispersion of liquid particles in a gaseous medium. This coarse spray is undesirable because it provides an uneven application of a liquid on a surface. If coarse particles are sprayed on human skin, it creates an undesireable...

mental impression of a sticky gooey substance being applied to the skin. In many situations, particularly in the application of medicaments, the conventional squeeze bottle devices do not provide a fine enough dispersion or breakup of the liquid particles of the medicament so that it can perform its intended function. Likewise, conventional squeeze bottle devices do not provide a fine enough dispersion or mist for use with expensive perfumes.

A principal object of this invention is to provide a squeeze bottle atomizer which produces a very fine dispersion or mist of liquid particles.

Another object of this invention is to provide a squeeze bottle atomizer in which the degree of dispersion of the liquid can be adjusted and controlled.

Another object of this invention is to provide a squeeze bottle atomizer in which air is the only propellant of the liquid particles.

Another object of this invention is to provide a combined atomizing and liquid-dispensing device.

Another object of this invention is to provide a squeeze bottle atomizer having only a few component-parts adapted to 'be injection molded from plastic material and hence of economical construction.

Other objects, features and advantages of this invention will be apparent from the following detailed description and accompanying drawings in which:

FIG. 1 is a plan view of a squeeze bottle atomizer constructed in accordance with the present invention.

FIG. 2 is a fragmentary elevational view partially in section of the squeeze bottle atomizer of FIG. I with a cap over its spray head.

FIG. 3 is a vertical sectional view on line 3-3 of FIG. 1.

FIG. 4 is a horizontal sectional view of line 4-4 of FIG. 3 but on an enlarged scale.

FIG. 5 is a horizontal sectional view on line 5-5 of FIG. 3.

FIG. 6 is a verticalsectional view on line 6-6 of FIG. 2.

FIGS. 7, 8 and 9 are fragmentary vertical sectional views of first, second and third modifications respectively of the spray head of FIG. 3. v

FIG. 10 is a fragmentary vertical sectional view of a second embodiment of the squeeze bottle atomizer.

FIG. 11 is a fragmentary vertical sectional view of a modification of the second embodiment of the squeeze bottle atomizer of FIG. l0.

FIG. 12 is a horizontal sectional view on line 12-12 of FIG.

FIG. 13 is a horizontal sectional view on-line 13-13 of FIG. 111.

FIG. 14 is a plan view of a third embodiment of the squeeze bottle atomizer.

FIG. 15 isa vertical sectional view on line 15-15 of FIG. 14.

FIG. 16 is a horizontal sectional view on line 16-16 of FIG. 15.

FIG. 17 is a horizontal sectional view on line 17-17 of FIG. l5.

Referring in more detail to the drawings, FIGS. 1 and 2 show a squeeze bottle atomizer designated generally as 20 with a flexible liquid container or bottle 22, a spray head 24, a spray head retainer 26 and a cap 28. Circumferential groove 30 (FIG. 2) in retainer 26 and a complementary recess 32 in cap 28 provide a slight interference fit to removably attach cap 28 to atomizer 20.

As shown in FIG. 3, bottle 22 is formed with a flexible cylindrical sidewall 34 and a threaded neck 36, and is partially filled with a liquid 38 to be nebulized. Sidewall 34 is shown in the partially collapsed position, with broken lines 40 indicating the normal position of sidewall 34. Polypropylene polyethylene plastics are suitable flexible materials for forming squeeze bottle 22. A flange 42 on spray head 24 seats on neck 36. Retainer 26 threadily engages neck 36 and clamps flange 42 on neck 36 to thereby attach spray head 24 to bottle 22. Spray head 24 is formed as a generally hollow inverted cup with a dividing wall 41 which forms annular chambers 43. 44

-(FIGS. 3, 4 and 5). Annular chamber 44 is fonned with an air vent opening 46in the top wall of head 24 and a nebulized liquid discharge opening or orifice 48 is formed in the sidewall of chamber 44. A one-way check valve 50 underlies air vent 46 and is loosely entrapped in the upper end of chamber 44 by a-horizontally disposed portion of a fine mesh wire screen 52. As shown in FIG. 4, screen 52 is fonned with protruding tabs 54 which engage with grooves 56 in spray head 24 to retain wire screen 52 in chamber 44. A tube 58 with a wick 60 therein (FIGS. 3 and 5) is inserted in the lower end of chamber 44 with wick 60 extending into chamber 44 beyond orifice 48 and overlying the vertically disposed portion of screen 52. In addition to retaining valve50 in the upper end of chamber 44, screen 52 prevents the fibers of wick 60 from being forced into orifice 48 and blocking or restricting the passage of nebulized liquid through the orifice. As best seen in FIGS. 3 and 6, a slot 62 in the lower end of wall 41 cooperates with tube 58 to form an opening or air inlet orifice 64 communicating with chamber 44 and the headspace of bottle 40. The size or cross-sectional area of orifice 64 is adjustable by slidably positioning the upper end of tube 58 in chamber 44. As shown in FIG. 5, wick 60 preferably has a semicircular or generally U-shaped cross section and is arranged with its open side aligned with slot 62 so that it does not coveropening 64.

Preferably orifice 48 is approximately 0.03l inch in diameter, screen 52 is a wire screen having a mesh of or finer and wick 60 is formed from cotton, felt, a fine cellulose sponge, fine steel wool, or like materials having a multitude of small generally discontinuous voids or passages distributed throughout their mass. Preferably, wick '60 will provide a capillary as well as an absorption action.

In operation of atomizer 20, bottle 22 is only partially filled with liquid 38, leaving an air space or air dome 66 (FIG. 3) above liquid 38. When bottle 22 is squeezed, the air in dome 66 is forced from dome 66 along-the path indicated by arrows 68 through orifice 64 into mixing chamber 44, which closes valve 50, and then out of chamber 44 through wick 60, wire screen 58 and exit orifice 48. Due to the restricted egress for air from dome 66 via orifice 64, chamber 44, wick 60, screen 52 and orifice 48, sudden squeezing of bottle 22 will produce a rapid buildup of air pressure in dome 66. This pressure buil-,

dup forces liquid 38 to rise in tube 58 and to issue in a stream from the upper end of the tube where it is impinged on by the air passing through orifice 64. The jet of air passing through orifice 64 and impinging on liquid 38 at orifice 64 in tube 58 nebulizes a portion of liquid 38 into a relatively coarse spray. The air jet then carries the relatively coarse nebulized spray up through mixing chamber 44 where it passes through wick 60, screen 52 and orifice 48. Wick 60, screen 52 and orifice 48 cause the relatively coarse spray to be further nebulized so that a very fine mist or fog of liquid particles is emitted from atomizer 20. The ability-of wick 60 to nebulize the liquid is improved if it is saturated with liquid 38. Therefore, a wick formed from a material having capillary properties provides a finer spray because the capillary action of the material keeps the portion of wick 60 adjacent to orifice 48 saturated with liquid 38. It is believed that this device produces an extremely fine spray because liquid 38 is nebulized in two distinct stages. Liquid 38 is partially nebulized by the impinging airstream at orifice 64 and it is subsequently further nebulized by wick 60 and exit orifice 48.

As clearly shown in FIGS. 3, l0, l1 and 15. the aforementioned mixing chamber 44 as well as the mixing chambers I06, 142 or 178 described hereinafter, is in the form of a relatively long and narrow tubular conduit having a lengthwise dimension several times the average lateral dimension of the conduit. The lengthwise dimension of the mixing chamber extends parallel to the axis of the outlet end of the liquid conduit or dip tube 58, 104, 150 or 182. The opening of the outlet pamageway 48, 112, 136 or 198 communicating with the mixing chamber is disposed near the upper end of the chamber with its axis generally perpendicular to the major axis (lengthwise dimension) of the chamber. The outlet 64, 105, 148 or 186 of the air inlet passageway is disposed near the lower end of the chamber adjacent the outlet end of the liquid conduit and is oriented with its axis generally perpendicular thereto. This arrangement promotes the aforementioned two distinct stages of nebulization as well as providing a readily manufactured structure for housing the further pervious nebulizing baffles such as wick 60 and screen 52.

FIG. 7 illustrates a first modification 67 of spray head 24 with air vent 46 and valve 50 removed from mixing chamber 44 and relocated in the top of chamber 43. A screen 69 is pressed into chamber 43 and against a shoulder 72 to support and retain valve 50. Screen 52 is slightly modified so that it extends to the top of chamber 44.

FIG. 8 illustrates a modification 74 of spray head 67 with a smaller siphon tube 76 pressed into a retainer 78 which slidably engages the lower end of chamber 44. In spray head 74 wick 60 is shortened so that it just extends to the top of retainer 78. Therefore, wick 60 is moistened by liquid only when bottle 22 is squeezed, which contracts the volume of air space 66 and thus increases the air pressure acting on the body of liquid 38, thereby forcing the liquid up tube 76 so that it squirts from the top of tube 76.

FIG. 9 illustrates a third modification 80 of spray head 24 with a shortened chamber 43 and a modified mixing chamber 44. In spray head 80 tube 76 slidably engages the lower end of a reduced diameter passage 81 which forms a portion of mixing chamber 44. Wick 60 is shortened so that it is moistened only by partially nebulized liquid passing through passage 81 and mixing chamber 44. The upper end of passage 81, at the center portion of mixing chamber 44, is formed with a converging orifice 82 which further nebulizes the partially nebulized liquid produced by an air stream through orifice 64 impinging on liquid issuing from the top of tube 76. A slightly modified exit orifice 84 communicates with the upper portion of chamber 44 with orifice 84 opening at its discharge end into a widely flared mouth 85. Modified spray heads 67, 74 and 80 all have structures providing the basic multiple stage nebulizing of spray head 24.

FIG. illustrates a second embodiment of a squeeze bottle atomizer of the invention with a flexible bottle 88 having a neck portion 90 and a spray head 92. An inwardly extending annular rib 94 on the lower portion of head 92 engages an annular groove 96 in neck 90 to secure and seal head 92 to bottle 88. Head 92 is formed with a depending tube portion 98 with a counterbore 100 and a slot 102 at its lower end. A liquid siphon tube 104 engages counterbore 100 and forms an adjustable air entrance orifice 105 in cooperation with slot 102. The depth of counterbore 100 limits the depth of insertion of tube 104 in counterbore 100 so that it cannot completely block or seal off entrance orifice 105. Tube 98 has a central bore 106 which forms a mixing chamber which communicates at its lower end with tube 104 and orifice 105 and at its upper end with a restricted spray spout 108. Spout 108 slidably engages and is pressed into bore 109 and counterbore 110 in head 92. Spout 108 provides a restricted passageway or exit orifice 112 which further nebulizes a liquid which has been partially nebulized by an airstream issuing through orifice 105 and impinging on the liquid issuing from the top of tube 104.

Atomizer 86 is also designed so that it can be used as a liquid drop dispenser. If atomizer 86 is inverted, the liquid in bottle 88 will flow through entrance orifice 105, mixing chamber 106, and spout 108. Spout 108 is designed to provide a very small surface area 114 adjacent the exit orifice 112 so that the liquid will be dispensed in drops from atomizer 86. Thus atomizer 86 provides a very convenient container and applicator for substances such as liquid sucrose where it is desireable in some situations to dispense the sucrose in liquid drop form and in other situations to apply it as a mist or spray. For example, with one and the same atomizer 86 the user can, by merely inverting the atomizer, readily place discrete drops of sucrose in coffee or tea, so that the drops can be accurately counted, and yet, merely by returning the atomizer to an upright posture and squeezing the same. the user can spray nebulized liquid sucrose on cereals or other solid food substances, so that there is an even or uniform application of the sweetener to all of the exposed surfaces of the cereal or food.

FIGS. 11, 12 and 13 illustrate a modification 116 of atomizer 86 with a spray head 118 and a head retainer 120 on flexible bottle 88. Head retainer 120 is in the form of a hollow inverted cup with an inwardly extending annular rib 122 adjacent its rim which engages an annular groove 96 in neck to secure and seal retainer to bottle 88. Retainer 120 is formed with a counterbore 123 in its top surface and a vertically extending central tube portion 124 in its top wall. The upper end of portion 124 terminates in an inwardly extending annular rib 126 and the lower end of portion 124 is formed with a slot 128 which extends about one-quarter of the circumference of tube portion 124. Head 118 is formed with a depending tube 130 which slidably engages in and extends below the lower end of retainer tube portion 124. An annular groove 132 in tube 130 engages with rib 126 to attach and seal head 118 to retainer 120 for rotational movement with respect to retainer 120, the lower edge of the skirt 133 of head 118 seating in counterbore 123. A spout 134 with a passageway or exit orifice 136 is pressed into a bore 137 and a counterbore 138 in head 118 to place orifice 136 in communication with a blind bore 139 in tube 130 near its upper end. Tube 130 is formed with a slot 140 in its lower end and bore 139 fonns a mixing chamber 142 the upper portion of which communicates with passageway 136. A central stud 144 in a cup 146 slidably engages within bore 139 in the lower portion of tube 130 to form an entrance orifice 148 in the lower part of mixing chamber 142. The size of orifice 148 depends on how far stud 146 is inserted into tube 130. An axial and radial L-shaped groove 150 in stud 144 cooperates with tube 130 to form a passageway 152 between the bottom interior of cup 146 and mixing chamber 142. A shoulder 154 at the base of stud 144 in cup 146 limits the travel of stud 144 into tube 130 so that entrance orifice 148 is not completely sealed or blocked oft.

As shown in FIG. 13, rotation of head 118 with respect to retainer 120 controls the effective area of entrance orifice 148 by causing the lower tube portion 124 to block or cover more or less of the 90 slot 140 in tube 130. When using atomizer 116, it is first momentarily inverted so that gravity will cause the liquid to fill the upper end of neck 90, and then some of this liquid will remain in cup 146 when atomizer 116 is returned to its normal upright position. After cup 146 is thus filled, if bottle 88 is squeezed the resulting rise in internal pressure forces the liquid in cup 146 up passageway 152 os that it squirts out of the top of passageway 152, while simultaneously the air in the upper portion of bottle 88 is forced therefrom into mixing chamber 142 via orifice 148 as indicated by arrows 156. The airstream issuing through orifice 148 impinges on the liquid issuing from the top of column 152 and partially nebulizes the liquid. This partially nebulized liquid travels up mixing chamber 142 and through passageway 136 where it is further nebulized by the action of spout 134 to produce a fine spray or smog. Spout 134 provides a nebulizing action due to the pressure drop created when the partially nebulized liquid exits from restricted passageway 136. Cup 146 provides a measured or metered dose or amount of liquid to be nebulized. This features is important in administering medicaments and other liquids whose doses must be accurately measured.

In atomizer 116 the size of the nebulized particles of liquid and/or the air-liquid ratio of the resulting spray can be varied by the user of the atomizer. If head 118 is rotated so that the lower end of retainer tube portion 124 does not cover or restrict orifice 148, the maximum amount of air can pass through orifice 148 which will produce the finest and leanest spray. This position is indicated in FIG. 12 by a tab indicator 198 on head 118 and the fine marking160 on base retainer 120. As passageway 148 is covered or restricted by the rotation counterclockwise (as viewed in FIGS. 12 and 13) of tube 130 of head 118, less air is able to pass through orifice 148 and a richer mixture results with the particles of liquid not as finely nebulized. This position is indicated by a coarse" marking 162 on retainer 120. Stops 164 (FIG. 12) are provided on retainer 120 to abut with indicator 158 and limit rotation of head 118 with respect to base retainer 120. Atomizer 116 can also be used as a liquid drop dispenser by inverting it for a sufficient period of time to allow liquid to enter mixing chamber 142 via passageway 152 and air orifice 148 and then to exit from the mixing chamber through passageway 136 of spout 134. Spout 134 is provided with a small exterior surface area 166 adjacent the outlet of passageway 136 to assure that the liquid from passageway 136 will be dispensed in single, countable drops. Hence atomizer 116 can be used to both administer a metered dose or quantity of nebulized liquid in spray form and to dispense a liquid in the form of single drops.

FIGS. 14 and illustrate a third embodiment of an atomizer 168 with a flexible bottle 170 having a neck 172 and a spray head 174. A lower skirt portion 176 of spray head 174 forms a cap which threadily engages neck 172, thereby removably attaching and sealing spray head 174 to bottle 170. Head 174 is formed with a mixing chamber 178 having a depending annular wall 180 with a slot 181 in its lower end. A siphon tube 182 is pressed into a bushing 184 which in turn slidably engages within wall 180 to attach siphon tube 182 to head 174. Bushing 184 cooperates with slot 181 to form an adjustable air entrance orifice 186 in the lower portion of mixing chamber 178. As shown in FIG. 17, a recess 188 and radial ribs 190 in the upper end of bushing 184 supports a ball 192 when atomizer 168 is upright such that ball 192 does not substantially restrict the upward flow of a liquid through tube 182 and into mixing chamber 178. Converging surface 194 in the central portion of chamber 178 provides a sealing surface for ball 192 when atomizer 168 is inverted.

A spout 196 with a passageway 198 is pressed into a bore 199 and a counterbore 200 in head 174 so that passageway 198 communicates with the upper portion of mixing chamber 178. As shown in FIG. 16, the edges of a wire screen 202 are wrapped around a wick 204 to attach the wick to the screen. Wick 204 and screen 202 slidably engage the wall of the upper portion of mixing chamber 178 adjacent nozzle 196 to form a pervious barrier between chamber 178 and passageway 198. When atomizer 168 is squeezed to collapse bottle 170 as shown in FIG. 15, a portion of liquid 206 contained in bottle 170 is forced up tube 182 and issues as a jet from the top of tube 182 and bushing-184. Simultaneously air from an air dome 208 above the surface of liquid 206 is forced through entrance orifice 186 where it issues as a jet and impinges on the jet of liquid issuing from the top of bushing 184 to partially nebulize the liquid. The coarsely nebulized particles of liquid 206 are thrown by the force of the issuing jets of liquid and air into the upper part of mixing chamber 178 where they are further nebulized by wick 204 and restricted passageway 198. if atomizer 168 is tipped or inclined about 135 from its normal upright position, or somewhat more than halfway toward an inverted position, ball 192 will travel toward the nozzle end of mixing chamber 178 and engage surface 192 to thereby seal the upper portion of chamber 178 so that liquid 206 cannot be ejected from atomizer 168. Thus atomizer 168 is especially useful with liquids such as hair sprays containing substantial amounts of lacquer which would be harmful if they were emitted from an atomizer in a liquid rather than a spray form, a condition which could occur inadvertently in the absence of ball valve 192 if the atomizer were tilted too far toward an inverted position.

It should be noted that all the disclosed squeeze bottle atomizing devices have two distinct stages of nebulization of a liquid, and also that all of the devices have a structure which allows the degree of nebulization to be adjusted. In squeeze bottle atomizer 116 the degree of nebulization can be adjusted without removing the spray head from the bottle. Squeeze bottle nebulizers 86 and 116 are provided with a special spout so that they can be used both as nebulizers and dispensers of a liquid in drop form. Atomizer 116 also has a metering cup so that it provides a predetermined dose or quantity of nebulized liquid. All of the atomizers have only a few components most of which can be molded from plastic materials, and hence the atomizers can be economically constructed and assembled.

Iclaim:

l. A squeeze bottle atomizer comprising:

a. a resilient flexible container having a liquid reservoir adapted to hold a liquid with an air dome above said liquid reservoir;

b. a spray head connected to said container and having a mixing chamber;

c. an air inlet passageway communicating with said air dome and having an outlet communicating with said mixing chamber;

d. an outlet passageway communicating with the exterior of said head and having an opening communicating with said mixing chamber with at least a portion of said outlet passageway having a cross-sectional area smaller than the cross-sectional area of said chamber;

e. a wick inside said mixing chamber overlying said opening of said outlet passageway and a fine mesh screen within said chamber interposed between said wick and said opening; and

f. a liquid conduit communicating with said liquid reservoir and said chamber, said liquid conduit having an outlet positioned with respect to said air passageway so that when said container is squeezed air passing from said dome through said air passageway will enter said chamber and impinge on and partially nebulize liquid emerging from said conduit into said chamber with said partially nebulized liquid being further nebulized by said wick and said outlet passageway.

2. A squeeze bottle atomizer as defined in claim 1 including an adjustable means for restricting said air inlet passageway.

3. A squeeze bottle atomizer as defined in claim 1 including a second air inlet passageway in communication with the exterior of said head and said air dome and a pressure actuated valve movable to seal said second passageway in response to said container being squeezed.

4. A squeeze bottle atomizer as defined in claim 3 in which said second air inlet passageway in said head is defined at least in part by a second chamber in said spray head, said second chamber communicating directly with said air dome, and said valve is disposed in said second chamber.

5. A squeeze bottle atomizer as defined in claim 1 in which said outlet passageway includes a spout projecting exteriorly from said head and having a restricted passage and discharge opening at the free end of said spout spaced from said head and having a small area adjacent said opening which will dispense a liquid within said container in the form of individual drops when said container is at least partially inverted so as to cause liquid to flow by gravity from said liquid reservoir to said spout discharge opening via said mixing chamber and outlet passageway.

6. A squeeze bottle atomizer comprising:

a. a resilient flexible container having a liquid reservoir adapted to hold a liquid with an air dome above said liquid reservoir;

. a spray head connected to said container and having a mixing chamber;

c. an air inlet passageway communicating with said air dome and having an outlet communicating with said mixing chamber;

. an outlet passageway communicating with the exterior of said head and having an opening communicating with said mixing chamber with at least a portion of said outlet passageway having a cross-sectional area smaller than the cross-sectional area of said chamber;

e. a wick inside said mixing chamber overlying said opening of said outlet passageway;

f. a liquid conduit communicating with said liquid reservoir and said chamber, said liquid conduit having an outlet positioned with respect to said air passageway so that when said container is squeezed air passing from said dome through said air passageway will enter said chamber and impinge on and partially nebulize liquid emerging from said conduit into said chamber with said partially nebulized liquid being further nebulized by said wick and said outlet passageway; and

g. an adjustable means for restricting said air inlet passageway, said adjustable means comprising at least a part of said liquid conduit slidably engaging said chamber and being adjustable relative thereto to variably restrict the opening in said air passageway communicating with said mixing chamber.

7. A squeeze bottle atomizer as defined in claim 6 in which said liquid conduit comprises a tube extending into said liquid reservoir.

8. A squeeze bottle atomizer comprising:

a. a resilient flexible container having a liquid reservoir adapted to hold a liquid with an air dome above said liquid reservoir;

b. a spray head connected to said container and having a mixing chamber;

c. an air inlet passageway communicating with said air dome and having an outlet communicating with said mixing chamber;

d. an outlet passageway communicating with the exterior of said head and having an opening communicating with said mixing chamber with at least a portion of said outlet passageway having a cross-sectional area smaller than the cross-sectional area of said chamber to further nebulize a partially nebulized liquid;

e. a liquid conduit communicating with said liquid reservoir and said chamber, said liquid conduit having an outlet positioned to cause a stream of liquid to issue therefrom into said chamber in a given direction in response to squeezing of said container, said outlet of said air passageway being oriented relative to said outlet of said liquid conduit such that when said container is squeezed air passing from said dome through said air passageway will enter said chamber in a direction transverse to said stream of liquid and impinge on and partially nebulize said stream of liquid emerging from said outlet of said liquid conduit into said chamber, said opening of said outlet passageway being spaced from said outlets of said air passageway and liquid passageway, said outlet passageway being oriented with its axis transverse to said given direction, whereby said partially nebulized liquid is forced from said chamber and into said outlet passageway and further nebulized by said outlet passageway; and

. a valve means disposed in said mixing chamber which prevents unnebulized liquid from flowing from such container through said outlet passageway when said container is inverted.

9. A squeeze bottle atomizer as defined in claim 8 in which said valve means comprises a gravity-actuated valve with said mixing chamber including a valve seat disposed above said valve when said container is upright so that said valve is free to move between an open position when said container is upright to a closed position of engagement with said seat when said container is inverted.

10. A squeeze bottle atomizer as defined in claim 1 comprising a valve means disposed in said mixing chamber which prevents an unnebulized liquid from flowing from said container through said outlet passageway when said container is inverted.

11. A squeeze bottle atomizer as defined in claim 10 in which said valve means comprises a gravity-actuated valve with said mixing chamber including a valve seat disposed above said valve when said container is upright so that said valve is free to move between an open position when said container is upright to a closed position of engagement with said seat when said container is inverted.

12. A squeeze bottle atomizer comprising:

a. a resilient flexible container having a liquid reservoir adapted to hold a liquid with an air dome above said liquid reservoir;

b. a spray head connected to said container and having a mixing chamber;

c. an air inlet passageway communicating with said air dome and having an outlet communicating with said mixing chamber;

d. an outlet passageway communicating with the exterior of said head and having an opening communicating with said mixing chamber with at least a portion of said outlet passageway having a cross-sectional area smaller than the cross-sectional area of said chamber to furthcr nebulize a partially nebulized liquid flowing from said chamber into said outlet passageway; and

e. a liquid conduit having an inlet communicating with said liquid reservoir and an outlet communicating with said chamber, said liquid conduit outlet being positioned to cause a stream of liquid to issue therefrom into said chamber in a given direction in response to squeezing of said container, said outlet of said air passageway being adjacent to and oriented relative to said outlet of said liquid conduit such that when said container is squeezed a stream of air passing from said dome through said air passageway will enter said chamber in a direction transverse to said given direction of said stream of liquid and impinge on and partially nebulize said stream of liquid emerging from said outlet of said liquid conduit into said chamber, said opening of said outlet passageway being spaced from said outlets of said air passageway and liquid passageway by a distance greater than the spacing between said outlets, said outlet passageway being oriented with its axis transverse to said given direction, whereby said partially nebulized liquid is forced from said chamber and into said outlet passageway and further nebulized by said outlet passageway, said opening of said outlet passageway being disposed with its axis generally perpendicular to said given direction of said stream of liquid, said outlet of said air inlet passageway being oriented with its axis generally perpendicular to the axis of said outlet of said liquid conduit, said mixing chamber comprising a relatively long and narrow tubular conduit having a lateral dimension greater than that of said outlets and that of said opening and a lengthwise dimension at least several times said lateral dimension, said conduit extending lengthwise generally parallel to the axis of said outlet of said liquid conduit, said mixing conduit containing a nebulizing screen positioned therein so as to extend across the flow of the liquid-air mixture through said conduit toward said opening such that all of said mixture passes through said screen and is further nebulized by said screen.

13. A squeeze bottle atomizer comprising:

a. a resilient flexible container having a liquid reservoir adapted to hold a liquid with an air dome above said liquid reservoir;

b. a spray head connected to said container and having a mixing chamber;

c. an air inlet passageway communicating with said air dome and having an outlet communicating with said mixing chamber;

d. an outlet passageway communicating with the exterior of said head and having an opening communicating with said mixing chamber with at least a portion of said outlet passageway having a cross-sectional area smaller than the cross-sectional area of said chamber to further nebulize a partially nebulized liquid flowing from said chamber into said outlet passageway; and

e. a liquid conduit having an inlet communicating with said liquid reservoir and an outlet communicating with said chamber, said liquid conduit outlet being positioned to cause a stream of liquid to issue therefrom into said chamber in a given direction in response to squeezing of said container, said outlet of said air passageway being adjacent to and oriented relative to said outlet of said liquid conduit such that when said container is squeezed a stream of air passing from said dome through said air passageway will enter said chamber in a direction transverse to said given direction of said stream of liquid and impinge on and partially nebulize said stream of liquid emerging from said outlet of said liquid conduit into said chamber, said opening of said outlet passageway being spaced from said outlets of said air passageway and liquid passageway by a distance greater than the spacing between said outlets, said outlet passageway being oriented with its axis transverse to said given direction, whereby said partially nebulized liquid is forced from said chamber into said outlet passageway and further nebulized by said outlet passageway, said opening of said outlet passageway being disposed with its axis generally perpendicular to said given direction of said stream of liquid, said outlet of said air inlet passageway being oriented with its axis generally perpendicular to the axis of said outlet of said liquid conduit, said mixing chamber comprising a relatively long and narrow tubular conduit having a lateral dimension greater than that of said outlets and that of said opening and a lengthwise dimension at least several times said lateral dimension, said conduit extending lengthwise generally parallel to the axis of said outlet of said liquid conduit, a nebulizing flow restriction being positioned in said conduit between said outlets and said opening to further nebulize the liquid-air mixture flowing through said conduit toward said opening, said nebulizing flow restriction comprising a screen positioned transverse to the flow of the liquid-air mixture through said conduit toward said opening. I

14. A squeeze bottle atomizer comprising:

a. a resilient flexible container having a liquid reservoir adapted to hold a liquid with an air dome above said liquid reservoir;

b. a spray head connected to said container and having a mixing chamber;

c. an air inlet passageway communicating with said air dome and having an outlet communicating with said mixing chamber;

d. an outlet passageway communicating with the exterior of said head and having an opening communicating with said mixing chamber with at least a portion of said outlet passageway having a cross-sectional area smaller than the cross-sectional area of said chamber to further nebulize a partially nebulized liquid flowing from said chamber into said outlet passageway; and

e. a liquid conduit having an inlet communicating with said liquid reservoir and an outlet communicating with said 10 chamber, said liquid conduit outlet being positioned to cause a stream of liquid to issue therefrom into said chamber in a given direction in response to squeezing of said container, said outlet of said air passageway being adjacent to and oriented relative to said outlet of said liquid conduit such that when said container is squeezed a stream of air passing from said dome through said air passageway will enter said chamber in a direction transverse to said given direction of said stream of liquid and impinge on and partially nebulize said stream of liquid emerging from said outlet of said liquid conduit into said chamber, said opening of said outlet passageway being spaced from said outlets of said air passageway and liquid passageway by a distance greater than the spacing between said outlets, said 'outlet passageway being oriented witl'i its axis transverse to said given direction, whereby said partially nebulized liquid is forced from said chamber and into said outlet passageway and further nebulized by said outlet passageway, said opening of said outlet passageway beingtdisposed with its axis generally perpendicular to said given direction of said stream of liquid, said outlet of said-air inlet passageway being oriented with its axis generally Jzrerpendicular to the axis of said outlet of said liquid con urt, said mixing chamber comprising a relatively long and narrow tubular conduit having a lateral dimension greater than that of said outlets and that of said opening and a lengthwise dimension at least several times said lateral dimension, said conduit extending lengthwise generally parallel to the axis of said outlet of said liquid conduit, said mixing chamber containing a wick overlying said opening of said outlet passageway whereby the partially nebulized stream of liquid passes through said wick on its way to said opening and is further nebulized by said wick, said mixing chamber containing a nebulizing screen positioned between said wick and saidopening through which the partially nebulized liquid flows and is further nebulized on its way to said opening.

15. A squeeze bottle atomizer as defined in claim 6 in which said wick extends into said tube.

16. A squeeze bottle atomizer as defined in claim 12 wherein a nebulizing flow restriction is positioned in said conduit between said outlets and said opening to further nebulize the liquid-air mixture flowing through said conduit toward said opening.

17. A squeeze bottle atomizer as defined in claim 16 wherein said nebulizing flow restriction comprises an orifice converging in the direction of flow through said mixing chamber conduit.

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3937364 *Apr 3, 1975Feb 10, 1976Hershel Earl WrightFoam dispensing device
US4463905 *Sep 14, 1981Aug 7, 1984The Dow Chemical CompanyFoam-generating pump sprayer
US4598865 *Oct 10, 1984Jul 8, 1986Siseido Co., Ltd.Sprayer cap structure
US4603812 *May 21, 1984Aug 5, 1986The Dow Chemical CompanyFoam-generating pump sprayer
US5337926 *Jul 22, 1993Aug 16, 1994The Procter & Gamble CompanySpray pump package employing multiple orifices for dispensing liquid in different spray patterns with automatically adjusted optimized pump stroke for each pattern
US5339988 *Oct 19, 1992Aug 23, 1994Ballard Medical ProductsDisposable tray sump foamer, assembly and methods
US5372281 *Oct 12, 1993Dec 13, 1994Ballard Medical ProductsDisposable tray sump foamer, assembly and methods
US5411185 *Jun 1, 1994May 2, 1995The Procter & Gamble CompanySpray pump package employing multiple orifices having an orifice selector system
US5452823 *Aug 24, 1994Sep 26, 1995Ballard Medical ProductsDisposable tray sump foamer, assembly and methods
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US8662419 *Apr 9, 2010Mar 4, 2014Chang Ho ChangMultifunctional spraying mineral water bottle
US20110180629 *Apr 9, 2010Jul 28, 2011Chang Ho ChangMultifunctional Spraying Mineral Water Bottle
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Classifications
U.S. Classification239/327, 239/434, 239/326
International ClassificationA45D27/02, A61M11/02, B05B11/04, B05B11/06, A45D27/00, A61M11/00
Cooperative ClassificationA61M11/02, B05B11/043
European ClassificationB05B11/04D1, A61M11/02
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
May 16, 1988AS03Merger
Owner name: AFA CONSOLIDATED CORPORATION, THE
Effective date: 19810428
Owner name: AFA CORPORATION, THE
May 16, 1988ASAssignment
Owner name: AFA CONSOLIDATED CORPORATION, THE
Free format text: MERGER;ASSIGNOR:AFA CORPORATION, THE;REEL/FRAME:004891/0692
Effective date: 19810428
Apr 18, 1988ASAssignment
Owner name: AFA PRODUCTS, INC., ONE PINE STREET, FOREST CITY,
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:WAYNESBORO TEXTILES, INC.;REEL/FRAME:004854/0923
Effective date: 19880203
Owner name: WAYNESBORO TEXTILES, INC.
Free format text: MERGER;ASSIGNOR:AFA CONSOLIDATED CORPORATION; ARCHIVES FOR ADVANCED FOR ADVANCED MEDIA, INC., WAYN-TEX INC., AND MHA, INC., (MERGED INTO);REEL/FRAME:004863/0715
Effective date: 19821202
Owner name: AFA PRODUCTS, INC., A CORP. OF DE,NORTH CAROLINA
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:WAYNESBORO TEXTILES, INC.;REEL/FRAME:4854/923
Owner name: WAYNESBORO TEXTILES, INC.,NORTH CAROLINA
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:WAYNESBORO TEXTILES, INC.;REEL/FRAME:004854/0923
Apr 18, 1988AS03Merger
Owner name: AFA CONSOLIDATED CORPORATION
Effective date: 19821202
Owner name: ARCHIVES FOR ADVANCED FOR ADVANCED MEDIA, INC., WA
Owner name: WAYNESBORO TEXTILES, INC.
Feb 8, 1988ASAssignment
Owner name: FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF BOSTON, THE, 100 FEDERAL ST
Free format text: SECURITY INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:AFA PRODUCTS, INC.;REEL/FRAME:004845/0316
Effective date: 19880203
Owner name: FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF BOSTON, THE,MASSACHUSETTS
Mar 18, 1985ASAssignment
Owner name: WALTER E. HELLER AND COMPANY, INC., 101 PARK AVENU
Free format text: SECURITY INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:WAYNESBORO TEXTILES, INC., A CORP. OF VA.;REEL/FRAME:004377/0941
Effective date: 19850227