Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3574261 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 13, 1971
Filing dateSep 24, 1968
Priority dateSep 24, 1968
Publication numberUS 3574261 A, US 3574261A, US-A-3574261, US3574261 A, US3574261A
InventorsBailey Herman H
Original AssigneeGrace W R & Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Apparatus and method for drying permeable webs
US 3574261 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

O Unlted States Patent 1111 3,574,2 5 1 [72] Inventor Herman E. Bailey [56] References Cited Belmont, MaSS- UNITED STATES PATENTS $2 gfg: 1968 1,375,663 4/1921 Ainsworth 15/3061 [221 e P 1,954,098 4/1934 Powers 34/162 [451 t 1971 2,242,144 5/1941 15/3061 [73] Ass1gnee W. R. (jrace & Co. 23,689,196 9/1954 15/3061 Cambridge, M 2,760,410 8/1956 Gillis 34/23X Primary Examiner-Frederick L. Matteson Assistant Examiner--Robert A. Dua AttorneysMetro Kalimon, C. B. Parker and William L.

Baker [54] APPARATUS AND METHOD FOR DRYING E ABSTRACT: A moving textile web is expunged of liquid by a rawmg very high-pressure air jet which is directed through a thin slot [52] U.S.Cl 34/23, transverse to the direction of travel of the web. The jet is 15/306, 68/20, 134/37, 34/162 directed downwardly at the web which is horizontally sup- [51] Int. Cl F26b 5/00 ported by an open weave wire belt. The wire belt moves at a [50] Field of Search 34/23, 14, speed different from that of the web in order to avoid a pattern 16, 162, 160; l5/306.1 (Inquired), 308, 302; 68/20 (lnquired); 34/155; 134/37 formation on the web as it is impressed on the belt by the force of the air jet.

PATENTEU APR 1 31971 INVENTOR. HERMAN -H. BAILEY APPARATUS AND METHOD FOR DRYING PERMEABLE WEBS BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This invention relates to drying apparatus and a method for complete removal of all residues retained in the textile web after the rinsing step.

Relatively new developments in textile finishing include the application of special finishing techniques to impart crease retention, wrinkle resistance, permanent press, stain and water repellency. In order to produce essential uniformity in the application of many of the new finishes, fibers in the web must be cleared of all residual chemicals used in processing of the web prior to receiving the final finish. If chemicals used in such pretreatments are not uniformly removed, a nonuniform result may be realized in the finishing treatment.

The prior art practice is to subject the web to high pressure squeezing after a final rinse and before putting the web through a dryer where heat is applied and drying is obtained through evaporation. In preparing the web to receive the special finishes, the practice of high pressure squeezing and evaporation is unsatisfactory because it does not sufficiently clear the web of undesirable chemicals. It is particularly u satisfactory for synthetic weaves and blends of nylons, acetates, acrylics, polyesters, etc. where the yarns in the web are relatively incompressible. As a result of this incompressibility, the squeezing process leaves varying quantities of the final rinsing medium in the web which will be evaporated when subjected to heat and will leave a varying residue (e.g. soap) on each filament in the yarn. This residue interferes with the uniformity of application of the final finishing treatment.

In some cases the final rinse contains a caustic solution which upon evaporation-drying after n'nsing and squeeze-drying may be retained in the web in concentrated form. Such concentrated caustics may damage the web for example by tendering or stiffening especially if heat is subsequently applied. They may also resist bonding and saturation of resins and dyestuffs so that a nonuniform product results. In some cases odiferous chemicals such as formaldehyde are used in the final pretreatment which, if retained in the web even in small quantities, can impart an odor to the final product.

As a means for supplementing liquid removal from the webs, they are sometimes subjected to a vacuum after being processed by the squeeze rolls. One method is to attach a vacuum pump to a pipe having a narrow slot equal in length to the width of the cloth. By developing a vacuum in the pipe, an airflow is induced through the web, thereby removing additional liquid. The pressure equivalent obtained by this method is in the range of pounds per square inch which is of minimal value. In addition, there is a tendency for the web to seal the slot and prevent free flow.

By the present invention an airflow of considerably higher pressure than that employed in the prior art is used so that the web can be dried without retaining deleterious amounts of residue in the yarn.

BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION Compressed air under very high pressure, on the order of 90 pounds per square inch, is delivered through a narrow slot across the width of the web transverse to its direction of movement. The air jet thus created carries liquid out of the web as it passes through and out of the opposite side. To aid in carrying the liquid away, in one embodiment the web is drawn horizon tally under the air jet which is directed downwardly so that the liquid falls away from the web. The liquid may be collected in a trough or other disposing device. Slot sizes in the range of 0.003 to 0.0l5 inch through which the air is delivered have been successfully used.

In order to support the web as it passes under the air jet and to insure that it remains in close proximity thereto, a foraminous supporting member may be provided which by reason of its openness will not interfere with the flow of liquid out of the web.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING FIG.v 1 shows in diagrammatic fonn an elevation view of a preferred embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 2 shows in diagrammatic form an elevation view of an alternative embodiment of the web support.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT Referring to FIG. I, the textile web 1 flows from a preceding operation represented, for example, by the squeeze rolls 2 from which rinse solution is removed. A pressure nozzle 10 having a slot 11 is superposed above and directed downwardly in the path of the textile web 1. The slot is positioned transversely to the direction of flow of the web I along its entire width. The nozzle 10 is connected to a source of compressed air (not shown). A continuous open weave wire belt 12 is disposed to travel below the nozzle and is installed on a takeup roll 14 and a drive roll 16.

A drain trough 18 is positioned between the rolls 14 and 16 and under the upper run of the belt 12 and has an opening directly opposite an, air jet 24 which emanates from the slot II. The opening should be larger than the slot 11 because the liquid-air flow may be somewhat dispersed after it has passed through the web and the belt. Lips 22 are disposed on the opposed sides of an opening in contact with the undersurface of belt 12 to wipe liquid which may collect on the undersurface of the belt 12 and to provide additional support for the web 1 as it passes under the nozzle 10.

After passing through the squeeze rolls 2, the web 1 still contains a considerable amount of the final rinse solution. The web 1 moves onto the belt 12 and is supported thereon as it passes closely under the slot 11. The high pressure air jet 24 blows through the web I, passing between the fibers or filaments of each thread of the web and blows a high percentage of the remaining liquid out of the web. The jet 24 containing entrained liquid from the web continues through the foraminous belt 12 and enters the drain trough 18 as a fine mist. The drain trough l8 acts as an expansion chamber so that the liquid droplets coalesce and condense on its inner surface. Undesirable chemicals resident in the liquid rinse medium are concurrently removed from the web 1 and deposited in the trough 18. Exhaust blowers (not shown) may be provided to facilitate removal of the liquid from the trough 18.

As the web I and the underlying belt 12 move under the slot 11, the force of the air jet 24 tends to impress the textile web against the open weave of the belt which may cause an undesirable pattern formation on the web. To overcome pattern formation the belt I2 is driven at a linear speed slightly differing from that of the web 1 so that they are in constant relative motion.

In the embodiment of FIG. 1 a speed difference between the web I and the belt 12 on the order of 1 inch per linear yard of web has sufficed to prevent pattern formation.

In many fibers, the air jet will have a facing" effect on the web compacting the fibers on one side and causing fiber ends to project on the other. In order to avoid this facing effect a second identical apparatus may be provided to blow air through the web from the inverse side. This may be done, for example, by inverting the web I over a roll 26 (FIG. 1). The web I is then drawn through a second identical apparatus having its opposite face adjacent to the air jet. In this way the facing effect may be equalized.

The second apparatus is shown in FIG. 1 having a second nozzle 10a a second open weave wire belt 12a which carries the web I under the second nozzle 10a and which is supported at that point by a second pair of lips 22a on a second drain trough 184. As the opposite face of the web 1 is drawn under an air jet 24a emanating from a slot 11a in nozzle 10a the facing effect is reversed, the fibers of the yarn being blown back to their original orientation. In addition, any remaining liquid is blown off into the trough 18a.

Translation of the web may be accomplished by any number of conventional means known in the textile industry, and such means is not part of the present invention although it is of course necessary in order to use the apparatus and process. One such means is illustrated in FIG. 1 where the web passes in the nip formed by a drive roll 30, driven from a power source (not illustrated) by a belt 32 and an idler roll 34.

An alternative embodiment is shown in FIG. 2 where the belt 12 is absent and the web 1 is instead supported under the slot 11 by a fixed support member 28 such as a plate. The plate may be attached to the trough 18 by any convenient means. The support member 28 may be foraminous as in the case of the wire belt 12 of FIG. 1 or may have an opening such as a slot conforming to the shape of the emanating air jet 24.

The embodiments herein contained consist of a horizontally flowing or translating web and a foraminous support in a similar orientation so that the air jet blows downwardly through them. However, the invention comprehends an orientation of the web to any direction of flow with equivalent adjustments in the other members. Thus the web may flow vertically or at any intermediate angle and the air jet is adjusted to blow through it. ln particular, in the case of the second identical apparatus used to equalize the facing effect, the web may continue to flow horizontally and the relative positions of the foraminous support 120 and the nozzle a reversed so that the slot 11a blows the air jet 24a upward. Such versatility is useful in solving plant layout problems where economy of space is an important factor.

I claim:

1. The method of expunging liquid retained in a textile web comprising; translating the textile web past a transverse nozzle, blowing a jet of relatively high pressure air out of the nozzle and through the textile web while supporting the web opposite the nozzle on a foraminous belt which is translating at a linear speed difi'ering from that of the web so that patterning of the web against the belt is avoided.

2. The method of expunging liquid retained in a textile web comprising; translating the textile web past a transverse nozzle; blowing a jet of such high pressure air out of the nozzle and through the web as to entrain the liquid in a fine mist on the opposite side of the web; and supporting the web opposite the nozzle on a foraminous belt which is translated past the nozzle at a linear speed differing from that of the textile web.

3. The method of claim 2 further comprising; coalescing and condensing the fine mist in a confined chamber as it emerges from the web and through the foraminous surface.

4. An apparatus for removing liquid retained in a textile web which is adapted for translation through the apparatus comprising; a foraminous belt for supporting the textile web; a nozzle disposed transversely to the direction of movement of the web and directed to inject a relatively high pressure air jet through the textile web and the foraminous belt and further wherein the foraminous support belt is adapted to be drawn under the air jet at a speed slightly differing from that of the textile web so as to avoid patterning of the textile web by the support belt as it passes the nozzle.

5. An apparatus for removing liquid retained in a textile web which is adapted for translation past the apparatus comprising; a foraminous support member for supporting the textile web which support member is adapted to translate at a linear speed differing from that of the web so that patterning of the web against the support member is avoided, a nozzle disposed transversely to the direction of movement of the web and directed to inject such high pressure air jet through the textile web as to entrain liquid contained therein in fine mist emanating on the opposite side of the web and the foraminous support member.

6. The aPparatus of claim 5 further comprising; an expansion chamber positioned under the foraminous belt opposite the air jet for coalescing and condensing the liquid as the fine mist expands into the chamber.

7. The apparatus of claim 5 wherein the foraminous support member is a belt adapted to translate at a linear speed differing from that of the web so that patterning of the web against the belt is avoided. l

8. An apparatus for removing liquid retained in a moving textile web comprising a nozzle disposed transversely to the direction of movement of the web and directed to inject a high pressure air jet downwardly through the textile web; a

foraminous support belt drawn horizontally under the nozzle and in close proximity thereto as it supports the moving web, means positioned to collect the expunged liquid; means for inverting the textile web to place its opposite face upward; a second transversely disposed nozzle directed downwardly through the opposite face of the textile web; a second foraminous belt drawn horizontally under the air jet and the textile web as it passes under the air jet; and a second means for collecting the expunged liquid.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1375663 *Aug 9, 1919Apr 26, 1921Ainsworth William AMethod of cleaning knitted or like fabrics
US1954098 *May 1, 1931Apr 10, 1934Powers Frank TPaper coating machine
US2242144 *Oct 23, 1937May 13, 1941Leslie A RuntonApparatus for drying porous textile material
US2689196 *Apr 2, 1951Sep 14, 1954Joseph S DanielsWeb drier
US2760410 *Jul 31, 1953Aug 28, 1956Esther M GillisMethod and apparatus for drying paper
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3786574 *May 26, 1972Jan 22, 1974Eastman Kodak CoMethod for removing water from tow
US3841910 *Mar 12, 1973Oct 15, 1974Bird Machine CoLiquid extracting apparatus and method
US3910320 *Dec 13, 1973Oct 7, 1975Eastman Kodak CoTow dewatering jet device
US4011124 *Jul 9, 1975Mar 8, 1977E. I. Du Pont De Nemours And CompanyApparatus for continuous hot air bonding a nonwoven web
US4011623 *Jan 21, 1976Mar 15, 1977A. Monforts MaschinenfabrikApparatus for mechanically removing moisture from web-formed material
US4120713 *Jun 14, 1977Oct 17, 1978A/S Weston TaeppefabrikProcess and apparatus for the continuous production of a fibrous web-like pile product
US4137045 *Mar 28, 1977Jan 30, 1979Brugman Machinefabriek B.V.Method for treating a textile web with steam
US4183147 *Jan 13, 1978Jan 15, 1980Kabushiki Kaisha San GikenDehydration apparatus for fabrics
US4643775 *Jun 29, 1984Feb 17, 1987Crown Zellerbach CorporationFabric conditioning and cleaning system
US4854004 *Dec 28, 1987Aug 8, 1989Orc Manufacturing Co., Ltd.Device for clearing the hole blockage of a liquid resist substrate
US4897202 *Jan 25, 1988Jan 30, 1990Pure-Chem Products, Inc.Process and apparatus for recovery and recycling conveyor lubricants
US4897203 *Feb 26, 1988Jan 30, 1990Pure-Chem Products, Inc.Process and apparatus for recovery and recycling conveyor lubricants
US4956024 *Aug 7, 1989Sep 11, 1990The Perkin Elmer CorporationNon-contacting method of cleaning surfaces with a planoar gas bearing
US5008968 *Jul 27, 1989Apr 23, 1991Markel Industries, Inc.Sheet material cleaning machine
US5012547 *Nov 27, 1989May 7, 1991Adolph Coors CompanyApparatus for removing fluid particles from containers
US5030292 *Jan 16, 1990Jul 9, 1991Tokyo Electric Co., Ltd.Method for cleaning a thermal head
US5099542 *Jul 30, 1990Mar 31, 1992The Boeing CompanyHoneycomb core dust removal system
US5304254 *Jul 26, 1991Apr 19, 1994Fuji Photo Film Co., Ltd.Method of removing dust from a web involving non-contact scraping and blowing
US6080279 *Apr 23, 1999Jun 27, 2000Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Air press for dewatering a wet web
US6083346 *Oct 31, 1997Jul 4, 2000Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Method of dewatering wet web using an integrally sealed air press
US6096169 *Oct 31, 1997Aug 1, 2000Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Method for making cellulosic web with reduced energy input
US6143135 *Jun 17, 1998Nov 7, 2000Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Air press for dewatering a wet web
US6149767 *Oct 31, 1997Nov 21, 2000Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Method for making soft tissue
US6187137Oct 31, 1997Feb 13, 2001Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Method of producing low density resilient webs
US6197154Oct 31, 1997Mar 6, 2001Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Low density resilient webs and methods of making such webs
US6228220Apr 24, 2000May 8, 2001Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Air press method for dewatering a wet web
US6306257Apr 23, 1999Oct 23, 2001Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Air press for dewatering a wet web
US6318727Nov 5, 1999Nov 20, 2001Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Apparatus for maintaining a fluid seal with a moving substrate
US6331230Apr 24, 2000Dec 18, 2001Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Method for making soft tissue
US6430972 *Dec 21, 1999Aug 13, 2002Baldwin Grafotec GmbhDevice for remoistening a dried paper web
US6579418Jul 5, 2001Jun 17, 2003Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Leakage control system for treatment of moving webs
US6629540 *Aug 30, 2001Oct 7, 2003Alps Electric Co., Ltd.Wet treatment apparatus
US6655195 *Dec 31, 2001Dec 2, 2003Voith Paper Patent GmbhMoisture cross profile
US9354090 *May 22, 2013May 31, 2016Honeywell LimitedScanning sensor arrangement for paper machines or other systems
US20040259750 *May 5, 2004Dec 23, 2004The Procter & Gamble CompanyProcesses and apparatuses for applying a benefit composition to one or more fabric articles during a fabric enhancement operation
US20090301679 *Jun 9, 2008Dec 10, 2009Thermal Sterilization Specialties, Inc.Paper currency cleansing/reconditioning/sanitizing system and method
US20140345397 *May 22, 2013Nov 27, 2014Honeywell Asca, Inc.Scanning sensor arrangement for paper machines or other systems
CN102493253A *Dec 19, 2011Jun 13, 2012河南省江河纸业有限责任公司Novel blanket dehydrating device and blanket dehydrating method by using same
CN102493253B *Dec 19, 2011Nov 18, 2015河南江河纸业股份有限公司毛毯脱水装置及利用该装置进行毛毯脱水方法
DE19951794A1 *Oct 27, 1999May 3, 2001Voith Paper Patent GmbhVerfahren und Vorrichtung zur Entwässerung einer Faserstoffbahn
EP0005443A2 *Apr 6, 1979Nov 28, 1979Brückner Apparatebau GmbHApparatus for forcing a treating fluid through a continuously moving pervious sheet-like material
EP0005443A3 *Apr 6, 1979Dec 12, 1979Bruckner Apparatebau GmbhApparatus for forcing a treating fluid through a continuously moving pervious sheet-like material
EP0179932A1 *Oct 27, 1984May 7, 1986Samcoe Holding CorporationMethod and apparatus for drying tubular knitted fabric
Classifications
U.S. Classification34/465, 15/309.1, 134/37, 68/20
International ClassificationD06B15/04, D06B15/00, D06B15/09
Cooperative ClassificationD06B15/04, D06B15/09
European ClassificationD06B15/09, D06B15/04