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Publication numberUS3574876 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 13, 1971
Filing dateOct 31, 1968
Priority dateOct 31, 1968
Publication numberUS 3574876 A, US 3574876A, US-A-3574876, US3574876 A, US3574876A
InventorsCohen Eli
Original AssigneeCohen Elie
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Electric-motor-operated shoe polisher
US 3574876 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [72] Inventor Eli Cohen 3S0 Continental Ave, Paramus, NJ. 07652 [21 Appl. No. 777,974 [22] Filed Oct.31, 1968 [45] Patented Apr. 13, 1971 Continuation-impart of application Ser. No. 632,281, Apr. 20, 1967, now abandoned.

[54] ELECT RIC-MOTOR-OPERATED SHOE POLISHER 10 Claims, 6 Drawing Figs.

[52] US. Cl 15/97, 15/230. 18 [51] int. Cl A471 23/02 [50] Field of Search 15/97. 1, 97,

FOREIGN PATENTS 11.938 5/1911 GreatBritain Primary ExaminerWalter A. Scheel Assistant ExaminerLeon G. Machlin Attorney-Towson Price ABSTRACT: A hollow frame generally cylindrical. but with its outer surface curved axially, a polishing sleeve of fabric fitted over the open end, one end of said sleeve being connected to the central interior portion of the closed end of said frame, means stretching said sleeve and causing an end portion to contract around said closed end toward the axis, said closed end portion being mounted on the output shaft of a motor to be rotated about its axis, and a shelf for supporting a shoe so that said cloth may polishingly engage selected portions of said shoe while being worn.

Mm; A ril 13, 1971 3 Shuts-Shut 1 IN l E N TOR EL} COHEN 8V ATTORNEY Pm d April 13, 1971 j 3,574,876

3 shobt'sshdpt 2 INVENTOIR EL COHEN 8y 7m m ATTORNEY Patented April 13, 1971 3,574,875

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INVENTOR E L I COH E N BYJ f ATTORNEY ELECTRIC-MOTOR-OPERATED SHOE POLISHER This application is a continuation-in-part of my application Ser. No. 632,281, filed Apr. 20, 1967 and similarly titled, and now abandoned.

This invention relates, in general, to power-operated shoe polishers, and is particularly concerned with buffing means for parts of shoes visible while being worn, not only the upper and heel portions but also the sides thereof.

Otherwise stated, the invention is embodied in a shoepolishing mechanism having power means, such as an electric motor, for driving buffing means to polish leather goods such as shoes and the like.

An ancillary object of the invention is to provide a new and improved power-operated shoe polisher which is adapted to be economically manufactured and which is designed to permit the manufacture and assembly thereof in accordance with present day large-scale mass production methods of construction and assembly.

The invention also seeks to provide a power-operated shoe polisher mechanism particularly characterized by a design arrangement to more advantageously and satisfactorily perform the functions required of it and to provide a compact unit which will successfully combine the factors of structural simplicity and durability, while being economical to manufacture.

It is also an object to provide a portable structure having a novel polishing element and mounting therefor, the element being a sleeve open at only one end, interengaged at its open end edge with a mounting frame and stretched along said frame.

These and other objects and advantages will become.

apparent from the following detailed description when taken with the accompanying drawings. It will be understood that the drawings are for the purposes of illustration and do not define the scope or limits of the invention, references being had for the latter purpose to the appended claims.

In the drawings, wherein like reference characters denote like parts in the several views:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a shoe polisher embodying my invention.

1 FIG. 2 is a fragmentary vertical axial sectional view of the polisher of FIG. I, on the line IIII thereof in the direction of the arrows, but before a shoe has been inserted.

FIG. 3 is a view corresponding to FIG. 2, but also showing the toe portion of a shoe inserted for being polished by the interior portion of a polishing sleeve.

FIG. 4 is a view like that of FIG. 3, butshowing the heel portion of such a shoe engaging the exterior portion of a polishing sleeve in order to be buffed thereby.

FIG. 5 is a side elevational view, with parts in axial section, of another embodiment of my invention.

FIG. 6 is a view corresponding to FIG. 5, but showing a modification.

Referring to the drawings in detail, and first considering the embodiment illustrated in FIGS. 1 to 4, inclusive, there is shown a polishing machine I1 especially adapted to polish the upper and heel portions of shoes while being worn. The present embodiment comprises a base 12 carrying an electric motor 13 on an upstanding portion 14 thereof. The motor 13, which may be supplied with power through a suitable flexible cord, illustrated in FIG. I, has an output shaft 15 carrying a frame 16 disposed coaxially therewith. It will be understood that this shaft 15 may be either the armature shaft or there may be gearing between it and the motor armature. The frame I6 may be formed of imperforate or mesh material, as desired. It is generally hollow cylindrical with one end closed, as indicated at I7, and the other end open with reinforced edge or rim as indicated at 18. However, the hollow cylindrical portion is inwardly curved axially thereof, as indicated at 19, so that it is smaller in section intermediate its-ends than at its ends.

A polishing device 21, desirably of cloth or other fabric, like abag with a closed end and an open end, is stretched from the center of the end wall 17 where it is removably connected by suitable means extending from the inner surface of the closed end of the frame here shown as a snap fastener 22, outwardly around the reinforced rim portion 18 of the frame. It is then reversely drawn over the concavoconvex portion 19 and its open end portion contracted over the closed end I7 of the frame 16 as illustrated. The means for contracting the open end portion of the sleeve 21 over the closed end of the frame is desirably an elastic band 23.

Upstanding from the other end portion of the base 12 is a foot and shoe support 24, desirably terminating in a generally horizontal shelf portion 25 provided with a shoulder 26 serving as a stop for the heel of a shoe 27 being polished as illustrated in FIG. 3.

The manner of using the illustrated embodiment of my invention is shown in FIGS. 3 and 4. After a suitable amount of polish has been applied to a shoe 27, desirably while on the foot of the wearer, or if the application of polish is not then needed, the power to the motor I3 is turned on, as by inserting the plug 28 in a suitable electrical outlet socket, to cause the frame 16 to rotate, desirably at a speed of I00 to 200 rpm. and the toe portion of said shoe is inserted into the polisher 11. The interior portion of the sleeve 21, while stretched over the shoe 27 as illustrated, polishes or buffs the forward or toe portion of said shoe to the desired extent.

The heel portion of the shoe 27 may be buffed or polished as viewed in FIG. 4. That is, the wearer turns at right angles to the position he takes in FIG. 3 and applies the heel of his shoe to the exterior portion of the sleeve 21, where it is stretched over the concavoconvex portion 19 of the frame, thereby contouring said stretched portion to the shape of the heel of the shoe and buffing or polishing the same while the frame is being rotated and the shoe oscillated from side to side by the wearer. The other shoe may have its toe and heel portions polished in a similar manner.

Referring now to the embodiments illustrated in FIGS. 5 and 6, there are shown shoe polishing machines 11a and llb. The machine 11a of FIG. 5 will first be described. It comprises a base or kick plate carrying an electric motor 13a on an upstanding portion 14a thereof. The motor 13a, shown provided with a suitable power supply cord terminating in a plug 28a, has. an output shaft 15a, corresponding with that designated 15 in the first embodiment, except that here it is longer, carrying a frame 16a disposed coaxially thereof.

A frame 16a, desirably generally circular in outline or end view, has its outer edge or peripheral portion formed generally hollow cylindrical, but axially curved, like a toroid or torus, to reinforce it. It thus forms a cup opening away from the motor and the closed end 17a thereof. The frame is desirably formed of stiff sheet metal, such as steel, and may be imperforate or apenured, as desired. The output shaft 15a is extended coaxially through and from the inner surface of the closed end portion 170, to which it is suitably secured as by welding or brazing 29, and its end pointed and provided with barbs or the like 31.

A softball 32, formed of suitable material such as foam plastic or rubber, is secured to said pointed end as by being impaled thereon, so that the barbs 31 are embedded therein and then hold it in place, as illustrated. A polishing device 21a, desirably of cloth or other fabric, like a bag with a closed end and an open end, is stretched over and from the ball 32 to the end wall 17a, where its open end is contracted thereover and so removably connected by suitable means, here shown as an elastic band 23a.

The manner of using the embodiment illustrated in FIG. 5 is as follows. After a suitable amount of polish has been applied to a shoe 27a, desirably while on the foot of the wearer, or if the application of polish is not then needed, the power to the motor 13a is turned on, as by inserting the plug 28a in a suitable electrical outlet socket, to cause the frame 16a to rotate at a suitable speed, as specified in connection with the operation of the first embodiment. The toe portion of said shoe is then inserted between the kick plate 12a and that portion of the fabric device 21a thereabove. Thus, the kick plate 120 also functions like the shelf portion 25 of the first embodiment and so is designated 25a.

The heel portion of the shoe 27a may be buffed or polished in the same way as in the first embodiment, as viewed in FIG. 4. That is, the wearer applies the heel of his shoe to the exterior portion of the sleeve 21a, thereby contouring said stretched portion to the shape of the heel of the shoe and buffing or polishing the same while the frame is being rotated and the shoe oscillated from side to side by the wearer. The sides of the shoe may be polished by placing them against said sleeve and around the convex surface of the sleeve-covered ball 32. The other shoe may have its toe, heel and side portions polished in a similar manner.

The embodiment of FIG. 6 is like that of FIG. 5 except that the ball 32b is formed hollow and of elastic material soft rubber being an example. The output shaft b here terminates in an outwardly concave end portion in which the adjacent portion of the ball 32b fits or mates and to which it is secured in a suitable manner as by an adhesive. Other parts of the embodiment of FIG. 6 may correspond with those of FIG. 5 and are identified by corresponding characters ending in b rather than in a.

The embodiment of FIG. 6 may be used for polishing shoes in the manner described for that of FIG. 5.

The following isa list of some of the advantages in the second and third embodiments over the first embodiment.

l. The convex surface of the ball permits the polishing of the side of the shoe without removing it from one s foot.

2. The need for a separate kick stand is eliminated.

3. The shortening of the metal cup permits use of a lighter motor transmission.

4. The fabric polishing sleeve is shorter and less expensive.

5. The need to clip the sleeve at one end is eliminated and so attachment and removal is facilitated.

Having now described my invention in detail in accordance with requirements of the Patent Statutes, those skilled in this art will have no difficulty in making changes or modifications in the individual parts of their relative assembly in order to meet the specific requirements or conditions. Such changes and modifications may be made without departing from the scope and spirit of the invention, as set forth in the following claims. It will also be understood that the parts in FIG. 5 corresponding with parts in FIGS. 1 to 4, inclusive, are identified by similar characters which terminate in a, while those in FIG. 6 corresponding with parts in the FIGS. preceding it, are identified by similar characters which terminate in b.

Iclaim:

l. A shoe-polishing machine comprising a hollow rotatable frame curved about its axis of rotation, with an open end and a closed end, a polishing sleeve of fabric with a closed end portion and an open end portion, the latter portion being fitted over the open end of said frame, means for producing a contraction in the open end portion of the sleeve over the exterior of the closed end of the frame, means extending from the closed end of the frame for stretching the sleeve from the contraction produced by said means, allowing said sleeve to be contoured by the forward portion of a shoe while being polished, an electric motor for rotating said frame about its axis, the closed end of the frame being mounted on the output shaft of the motor so that said frame extends axially thereof, and a shelf adjacent said machine to support a shoe while being polished.

2. A shoe-polishing machine as recited in claim 1, wherein the means extending from the closed end of the frame for stretching the sleeve does it removably to the interior portion thereof, and the shelf projects along said axis into the open end of the frame and is provided with a heel stop to limit movement for polishing purposes of a shoe into said frame.

3. A shoe-polishing machine as recited in claim 1, wherein the means for contracting the open end of the sleeve about the closed end portion is an elastic band.

4. A shoe-polishing machine as recited in claim 2, wherein the means removably securing one end portion of said sleeve to the central interior portion of the closed end is a snap fastener.

5. A shoe-polishing machine as recited in claim 2, wherein the hollow rotatable frame is inwardly curved axially thereof so that its section is smaller intermediate its ends than at its ends.

6. A shoe-polishing machine as recited in claim 5, wherein the polishing sleeve drawn between the larger end portions of the frame is spaced from the smaller section, allowing it to be contoured to the shape of a heel being polished.

7. A shoe-polishing machine as recited in claim 2, wherein the hollow rotatable frame is inwardly curved axially thereof, so that its section is smaller intermediate its ends than at its ends, the sleeve is drawn between the larger end portions of the frame so as to be radially spaced from the midportion of the reduced section, the means removably securing one end portion of said sleeve to the central interior portion of the closed end is a snap fastener, and the means contracting the open end of the sleeve about the closed end portion is an elastic band.

8. A shoe-polishing machine as recited in claim 1, wherein the output shaft of the motor is extended through and beyond said closed end, a soft ball-like tip carried on the end of said shaft beyond the frame, and the sleeve covers said tip and is drawn between it and said frame.

9. A shoe-polishing machine as recited in claim 8, the balllike tip is of plastic foam and the shaft has a barbed end embedded in said tip for holding it in place.

10. A shoe-polishing machine as recited in claim 8, wherein the ball-like tip is hollow and the shaft has an outwardly concave end portion mating therewith and secured thereto by an adhesive.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US707703 *Jun 12, 1902Aug 26, 1902Moritz LevyShoe-polishing machine.
US1182162 *Mar 20, 1914May 9, 1916United Shoe Machinery AbTool for use in the manufacture of shoes.
US1288561 *Apr 17, 1916Dec 24, 1918United Shoe Machinery CorpBurnishing-tool.
US2150837 *May 27, 1936Mar 14, 1939Magnus Automatic Machine CompaShoe polishing machine
US2189472 *Sep 27, 1937Feb 6, 1940Peterson Edward GBuffing device
US2227588 *Apr 18, 1939Jan 7, 1941United Shoe Machinery CorpFinishing tool
US2660010 *Sep 18, 1952Nov 24, 1953Steger Products Mfg CorpBuffing wheel
US3031702 *Dec 17, 1959May 1, 1962Smith Kline French LabApparatus for removing printing from ampules
US3068503 *Aug 22, 1958Dec 18, 1962Sunbeam CorpFloor conditioner
GB191111938A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7934285Sep 13, 2004May 3, 2011Boxwood IndustriesMultifunctional shoe care apparatus
Classifications
U.S. Classification15/97.2, 15/230.18
International ClassificationA47L23/00, A47L23/02
Cooperative ClassificationA47L23/02
European ClassificationA47L23/02