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Publication numberUS3575326 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 20, 1971
Filing dateMay 27, 1968
Priority dateMay 27, 1968
Publication numberUS 3575326 A, US 3575326A, US-A-3575326, US3575326 A, US3575326A
InventorsChappell Walter G
Original AssigneeChappell Walter G
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Infant carrier
US 3575326 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent Inventor Walter G. Chappell 1425 C. Spartan Village, East Lansing, Mich. 48823 Appl. No. 732,279 Filed May 27, 1968 Patented Apr. 20, 1971 INFANT CARRIER 6 Claims, 4 Drawing-Figs.

U.S. Cl. 224/6 Int. Cl A47d 13/02 Field olSearch ..224/6, 5.14,

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 009 9/1912 Averill 224/6 473 l 1/1926 Schneidau 224/6X 721 11/1946 Hancock 224/6 340 5/1951 Maxwell 224/6 358 2/1953 Neils 224/6X 864 10/1954 Dautermann.... 224/6 914 6/1967 Abram 224/6 670 l/ 1969 Hansson 224/6 FOREIGN PATENTS 141 l l/ 1948 Switzerland 224/6 OTHER REFERENCES 1 Circular From Baby Lift, Inc. P.0. Box 3275 Grand Central Station, N.Y. 17, NY. Received in office l-8-l963 Copy-In- Art-Unit 314, Class 224/6 Primary ExaminerAlbert J. Maltay Att0rneyRobert E. Breidenthal ABSTRACT: An infant carrier for supporting an infant from a person's shoulder comprising a flexible pouch centrally disposed with respect to its fore-and-aft direction within and attached to a part of the length of an endless flexible shoulder sling or strap, such part of the strap as well as the part thereof that extends over the shoulder being formed of a flattened tube of fabric within which a resilient cushioning material is secured. The strap is provided in its endless extent with means for adjusting its length. A flexible hood is detachably secured to the top rear and sides of the pouch for selectively sheltering the infants head when the hood is attached. A slide closable pocket is provided on the rear exterior of the pouch, the same having a flexible waterproof liner, and a slide fastener closable slot opening is provided in the top front of the pouch. A bottle pocket is provided on the exterior of the strap along one side of the pouch. Leg openings in the lower front of the pouch are provided with resilient annular bands for snug embracement of the infants thighs, and the upper margin of the pouch is inwardly foldable to lessen the height thereof while reducing the internal diameter of the upper end of the pouch. The seat and the opposite sides of the pouch are formed of a single piece of fabric having its forward and rear edges stitched respectively to single pieces of fabric constituting the front and rear of the pouch.

Patented April 20, 1971 INVENTOR.

WALTER G. CHAPPELL ATTORNEY INFANT CARRIER The present invention relates to new and useful improvements in infant carriers, and pertains particularly to three-piece formation of a pouch or sac, special pockets on the pouch for a feeding bottle and infant-minding accessories, and a flexible wide strap that incorporates internal cushioning for both the infants seat and the shoulder ofthe person carrying the infant.

Numerous proposals for infant carriers have heretofore been made; however, none of these has proven to be entirely satisfactory, their being subject to producing discomfort in use, excessive cost of manufacture, etc.

An appreciation of the field to which the present invention relates may be had upon inspection of US. Pat. No. 2,376,657 entitled infant Carrier which issued May 22, 1945 to Lyida Chamberlain and US. Pat. No. 2,690,864 entitled. Infant Carrying Device which issued Oct. 5, 1954 to Evaline W. Dautermann et al., the present invention constituting improvements on the disclosures of such patents, with such disclosures being incorporated in this specification by reference.

The paramount object of this invention is to provide a secure infant carrying device that will be highly adaptable to infants of differing size and weight, so as to accommodate with the passage of time growth of an infant, and which device will afford comfort for the infant while causing a minimum of discomfort to the person carrying the infant.

It is another important object of this invention to provide an infant carrier of the character specified above which will additionally furnish carrying space for a conveniently located infant feeding bottle as well as for infant-minding accessories such as diapers and the like.

Still another object of this invention is to provide an infant carrier of the character specified above which includes a detachable hood, which hood when attached can be alternatively placed in operative position sheltering the infants head or in a depending, wrong-side-out condition embracing or partially surrounding the pouch or sac in which the infant's lower torso is disposed. The expression lower torso as employed in this specification and in the claims is meant to include the infants torso to as great a height as'its arm pits, and also to include the upper portions of its thighs.

Yet another important object of this invention is to provide a carrying device of the character specified above which is of simple, durable and inexpensive construction, which device can be easily put to use, and the operation of which device can in all its functions be readily learned.

lt is an objective of the invention to realize all the objects set forth above while providing a device that is pleasing in appearance so as not to detract from any desire to employ the same, and to provide such a device that will serve to displace the infant in a most advantageous fashion for inspection and care by those desirous of viewing the infant.

A broad aspect of the invention involves an infant carrier comprising a flexible pouch or sac adapted to receive the lower torso of an infant, such pouch including a flexible seat wall peripherally contiguous with and integral with an upstanding flexible endless wall having a substantially horizontal upper edge, said upstanding wall including front and rear portions joined by opposite side portions,said front portion of the upstanding wall being provided with a pair of horizontally spaced leg openings adjacent the seat wall, and an elongated and endless flexible supporting strap, said strap having a continuous part of its longitudinal extent disposed externally of and attached to the pouch, said-part of the strap including longitudinally spaced portionsconnected by an intermediate portion, saidintermediate portion of the strap extending transversely across the underside of the seat wall and being'attached thereto, with the spaced portions of the strap extending upwardly from their junctures with the opposite extremities of the intermediate portion along the opposite side portions of the upstanding wall and being attached to said side portions.

Other important aspects of the invention characterized in the preceding paragraph involve the carrier having the portion of the flexible strap extending about the underside of the bottom or seat wall of the pouch and such-bottom wall having a resilient cushioning material sandwiched therebetween; the flexible strap being in the form of a flattened tube of fabric, and having a resilient cushioning material therein for distributing stresses applied to the person supporting the carrier; the strap incorporating in its extent means for adjusting the length thereof; a bottle pocket disposed externally of the strap on one side of the pouch; an accessory pocket at the rear of the pouch that is provided with a closure means and which has an internal waterproof liner; and a hood structure detachably secured to the pouch.

An important feature of the invention resides. in the formation of the flexiblestrap to include an internal resilient cushioning material, with the latter being secured therein in a manner resistant to medial transverse bending or folding that would result in uncomfortable stress concentrations on the shoulder.

Another very important feature of the invention resides in the carrying sling or strap extending continuously about the side and underside of the pouch, with a cushioning or stressdistributing means secured between the strap and the underside of the pouch.

Yet another important feature of the invention resides in a panel being secured to the exterior of the strap at one side of the pouch to define jointly with the strap an expansible opentopped pocket suitable for receiving a baby-feeding bottle, a talcum powder container, or the like.

Another feature deemed of importance resides in the provision of a hood structure detachably secured to the top of the pouch, such hood structure being such as to selectively shelter the head of an infant, or to being turned inside out so as to surround the rear and a portion of the underside of the pouch.

A final feature to be specifically enumerated resides in the provision of a resilient annular band secured in each of the leg openings so as to embrace the thighs of an infant with moderate snugness.

These and other objects, aspects and features of the invention will become manifest in the light of the ensuing description of a preferred embodiment of the invention, such description to be taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, wherein:

FIG. 1 is an elevational view of the infant carrier of the invention showing the same in use with an infant disposed in the pouch, and the supporting strap or sling disposed in carrying position about the shoulder of a partially illustrated person carrying the infant;

FIG. 2 is a perspective view of the infant carrier, the view being taken from the left front of the carrier and showing the front opening of the pouch in an open condition, and showing a feeding bottle in the bottle pouch;

FIG. 3 is another perspective view of the carrier shown in FIGS. 1 and 2, this view being taken from the left rear of the same, andshowing the accessory pocket open and the bottle pocket empty; and,

FIG. 4 is a vertical sectional view of the carrier, this view. being taken upon a plane parallel to the fore-and-aft axis of the pouch with such plane passing through the center of one of the leg openings, and this view additionally showing a hood attached to the pouch.

Referring now to the drawings wherein like numerals designate like parts throughout the various views, the

reference numeral 10. designates the infant carrier d'evice' generally, such device 10 comprising a flexible pouch or sac designated generally at, 12 and a wide carrying sling or strap designated generally at 114. j

The pouch or sac is comprised of a bottom or seat wall 16, sidewalls lb and 20, front wall 22 and rear wall 24. The'walls 16 through 2& are made of strong textile fabric such as cotton denim, such material affording sufficient strength and stiffness and yet being sufficiently flexible as to readily conform to the contours of the lower torso of an infant 26 positioned therein as shown in FIG. 1, while being pervious for adequate air ventilation or passage therethrough.

In the preferred construction, the pouch 12 is of three-piece construction, a first piece forming the bottom or seat wall 16 and the sidewalls l8 and 20, such center single piece of textile fabric having its front and rear edges secured to the contiguous edges of the front wall 22 and the rear wall 24 as by the stitching seams 28 and 30. The rows of stitching or stitching seams indicated at 28 and 30 can conveniently be French seams or fell seams, for example, or any form of stitching affording substantial strength, and preferably a sufficient degree of smoothness to the interior of the pouch 12. The sidewalls 18 and 20, the front wall 22 and the rear wall 24 constitute an endless upstanding wall contiguous at its lower end with the bottom or seat wall 16, and the so-defined upstanding endless wall has a substantially horizontal upper edge 32 which is finished by a strip of cotton denim 34 folded over such edge 32 and stitched to the upper marginal portion of the endless wall by a row of stitching 36, as is conventional in the case of finishing edges with conventional binding tape.

The front wall 22 is provided with a central vertical opening 38 from the upper edge thereof as clearly shown in FIG. 2, and a slide fastener means 40 together with a flap 42 and snap button elements 44 being provided for selectively closing the opening 38. As will be evident, opening of the opening 38 facilitates positioning the infant 26 in the pouch 12.

The front wall 22 is provided with a pair of horizontally spaced leg openings 46 and 48 adjacent the lower edge of the front wall 22. A pair of flexible and resilient annular bands 50 and 52 are disposed respectively in the openings 46 and 58 and are peripherally stitched to the front wall 22 about the openings as indicated at 54 in FIG. 4 with respect to the leg opening 46 and the annular leg band 50. The annular leg bands 50 and 52 are of a fabric having such a weave as to be known as a stretch material; hence, the prior use of the term resilient, and a suitable material for such annular bands 50 and 52 may be made of what is commonly referred to as Spandex stretch material. As will be appreciated, the upper portions or thighs 56 and S8 of the infant 26 extend through the leg openings 46 and 52 and the respective leg bands 50 and 52, and the stretch or resilient character of the material of which the bands 50 and 52 results in the thighs 56 and 58 being gently though snugly embraced thereby. Such arrangement, of course, entirely eliminates or greatly reduces any chafing of the infant's legs by the edges of the front wall 22 about the opening 46 that could otherwise occur. Additionally, the annular bands 50 and 52 of stretch material by virtue of their snug encirclement of the infant's thighs 56 and 58 preclude any objectionable air drafts through the leg openings 46 and 48.

The pouch 12 is optionally though preferably provided with a hood structure designated generally at 60. The hood structure 60 is also made of a flexible textile fabric such as cotton denim and has a generally half-dome configuration including sidewalls 62 joined by a rear wall 64 being arched upwardly and inwardly to constitute a top wall portion 66. The forward edges of the sidewalls 66 are finished by a binding strip 68 stitched thereto in a manner analogous to that of the finishing of the upper edge 32 of the pouch 12. The lower edge margin of the hood 60 is detachably secured to the upper marginal portion of the sidewalls l8 and 20 and the rear wall 24 by means of snap buttons, two snap buttons such as the snap button indicated at 70 being spaced along the upper margin of the rear wall 24, and a single snap button being positioned at the center of the upper margin of each of the sidewalls 18 and 20 of the pouch or sac 12 such as the snap button indicated at 72 in FIG. 4 in association with the sidewall 18. It will be obvious to those having a modicum of familiarity with the art that equivalent conventional slide fastener means, not shown, can be employed in lieu of and for the same functions as the snap button fastening means 70 and 72.

In view of the foregoing the hood 60 can be attached to or removed entirely from the pouch 12 by means of the snap buttons 70 and 72 or equivalent fastening means as desired. When the hood structure 60 is attached to the pouch or sac 12 as shown in FIG. 4, it will be appreciated that the upper portion and particularly the top wall 66 of the hood 60 will shelter the head 74 of the infant 26. It will be noted that the forward edges of the sidewalls 62 of the hood 60 are concave as indicated at 76 to afford freedom of movement of the arms 78 and 80 of the infant 26. The hood 60 is shown in FIG. 4 in what may be termed its operative or infant head-sheltering position. If operative use of the hood 60 is not desired, the same can, without being detached from the pouch 12, be swung downwardly and rearwardly and turned inside out, so to speak, so that the hood 60 partially surrounds the rear and lower portion of the pouch 12 in which condition the exterior surface of the top wall 66 thereof as shown in FIG. 4 underlies and is faced toward the bottom of the pouch or sac 12, as will be understood.

The flexible sling or strap 14 is in its overall transverse configuration generally rectangular in the sense of having substantially greater width than thickness, the width of the strap 14 being as will be noted on inspection of the drawings approximately that of the fore-and-aft extent of the sidewalls 18 and 20, and the bottom wall 16 of the pouch or sac 12. The strap 14 is made of an elongated strip of textile fabric such as cotton denim that is preferably folded twice upon itself and stitched together by spaced rows of stitching 96 and 98 as to be in the fonn of a flattened tube of triple wall thickness intermediate the rows of stitching 96 and 98 having opposite sidewalls 82 and 83, with an additional intermediate wall 84 between the rows of stitching 96 and 98. The wall 84 is flush with the wall 82 throughout the length of the strap 14. The stitches of each of the rows of stitching 96 and 98 extend through all three walls 82, 83 and 84 through out the entire longitudinal extent of the strap 14. An extent 86 of the strap 14, specifically such extent of the strap 14 that extends over the shoulder region 88 of the person 90 carrying the infant 26 by means of the device 10, is provided with resilient cushioning or stress distributing means to be presently described. Preferably, the extent 86 of the strap 14 is such as to not only pass over the shoulder region 88 of the person 90 but also the front and rear parts of the upper torso 92 of the person 90.

The previously mentioned resilient cushioning or stress distributing means with which the extent 86 of the strap 14 is provided comprises the interior of the extent 86 of the strap 14 (between the walls 82 and 84 on one hand and the wall 83 on the other hand) having disposed therein an elongated strip of foam rubber or the like 94, such elongated strip of foam rubber having a rectangular cross section when in repose. The foam rubber cushioning means 94 is attached to and prevented from bunching or creeping by means of the longitudinally extending parallel and spaced rows of stitching 96 and 98. As will be noted on inspection of the section of the strap 14 shown in FIG. 4 that the tension of the threads constituting the stitching of the rows 96 and 98 through the walls 82, 83 and 84 of the strap 14 and the intervening foam rubber 94 is sufficient to substantially compress the portions of the foam rubber 94 through which the rows of stitching 96 and 98 extend. Such mode of stitching serves to maintain the extent 86 of the strap 14 in a generally rectangular transverse configuration and also to maintain the entire transverse extent of the foam rubber 14 under some degree of compression between the walls 82, 83 and 84 tensioned somewhat thereover.

It is deemed a matter of considerable importance that the rows of stitching 96 and 98 are spaced substantial intervals to the opposite sides of the transverse midpoint of the width of the strap 14; this being of importance for the reason that the extent 86 of the strap 14 is of optimum thickness throughout its transverse central region, and is therefore resiliently resistant to media] bending or folding that would otherwise tend to occur when the strap 14 is tensioned over the soft shoulder regions M of the person 911, it being understood that such media] bending or folding would result in the imposition of uncomfortable stress concentrations upon the shoulder region 22 of the person 911. Accordingly, the provision of the resilient cushioning means 94 in the extent d6 of the strap 14 together with the illustrated and described preferred manner of securing such means within the strap 14 assures an optimized and therefore much more comfortable stress distribution insofar as the shoulder regions 88 of the person 90 and the upper parts of such person's torso 92 are concerned.

The sling or strap 14 is continuous and a portion 1110 of its length is disposed to extend about the external surfaces of the sidewalls 1% and 211, and the bottom wall 16 of the pouch or sac 12. A resilient cushioning or stress distributing means is interposed between the seat or bottom wall 16 of the pouch or sac 12, such means being designated at 102 in FIG. 4. The means 1112 is a strip of foam rubber that is rectangular in transverse section when in repose. The portion 100 of the strap 14 disposed about the external surfaces of the sidewalls 11 and 211 and the bottom wall 16 is securely attached to such walls by stitching along its edges and by a plurality of rows of stitching such as those indicated at 1114 and 1116, whereby the foam rubber 102 has the transverse configuration shown in FIG. 4. The foam rubber 1112 can be extended to be interposed between the strap M and the sidewalls 1d and 20 to whatever extent desired. The strap 14 is not attached to the pouch 12 entirely up to the upper edge 32 of the pouch 112, the upper terminus of such attachment being terminated in spaced relation below the upper edge 32 as by cross-stitching such as indicated at 1118, the arrangement being that the entire upper marginal portion 110 of the pouch 12 is free of attachment to the strap 14. The arrangement is therefore such that the upper marginal portion 110 of the pouch 12 can be folded inwardly so as to lessen the overall height of the pouch 12 while additionally somewhat reducing the internal diameter of the upper end of the pouch or sac 12, both of which functions are obviously desirable when the device is to be employed in the carrying of a particularly small infant 26. It will be observed that the use of the hood structure 611 is not precluded when the upper marginal portion 116 of the pouch 12 is folded downwardly and inwardly, it being noted that such folding results in the lowering of the height of the top wall 66 of the hood 60. 7

Means is provided whereby the effective length of the strap M can be adjusted, such type of adjustment being desirable to accommodate a particular device 10 to the use of different sized persons 911 as well as to enable any given person 90 to support the infant 26 at a position upon their body deemed to be especially preferred by them. Such adjustment means in supporting slings or straps is well known, and the strap M is provided with a conventional form of such means designated at 114 generally. The conventional strap length adjustment means 114 is such that the length of a doubled-over portion 116 is variable. It will be appreciated that when the strap 14 is not under tension, the same can be manipulated with respect to the means 114 so as to vary the amount of the strap 14 constitutes the doubled-over portion 116. Also it will be understood that after such adjustment of the length of the doubled portion 116, the strap 14 can be tensioned through the means 114 to retain the strap 14 fixed at its adjusted length. It is important to note that the conventional securing means 114 is of such character that the continuity that is the endless character of the strap 14 is never broken or interrupted, and therefore there is no possibility of inadvertent interruption or breaking of the endless continuity of the strap 14 such as could result in dropping the infant 26. As suggested previously, the provision of means for adjusting strap length in the art of infant carriers is not new as may be seen on reference to U.S. Pat. No. 2,411,721 entitled Device for Carrying Children" which issued Nov. 26, 1946 to William A. Hancock et al.

An open topped expansible bottle pocket 118 is provided at one side of the pouch 12, such pocket 118 being comprised of a rectangular panel of flexible material such as cotton denim being disposed exteriorly of the strap M at one side of the pouch 12, and such panel 120 having its side edges secured to the strap 14 adjacent the lateral edges of the latter by means of vertical rows of stitching such as the row of stitching indicated at 122. The side margins of the panel 120 are infolded so as to have the bellowedlike configurations indicated at 124, and the lower edge of the panel 120 including its infolded side margins are stitched to the strap 14 by means of a row of stitching indicated at 126. The arrangement is such that the panel 120 jointly with the exterior surface of the strap M defines the pocket 118. it will be seen that the structure of the pocket 11b is such that, when empty, the same lies flat and inconspicuous against the exterior of the strap M, but can be opened in an expansive manner so as to accommodate a baby feeding bottle 128 or objects such as talcum containers and the like. It will be readily understood by these conversant with the art that if deemed necessary or expedient, the opposite side of the pouch 12 can be provided with an expansible pocket identical with the illustrated and described pocket 11b.

The device 10 additionally includes means for storing other articles or accessories needed in the minding of an infant, such as diapers and the like, or suited alternatively for storage of soiled diapers. Such means comprises a pocket 130 at the rear of the pouch 12. Such pocket is comprised of a generally rectangular panel 132 of flexible material such as cotton denim. The lateral side margins and the connecting bottom edge margin of the panel 132 are secured to'the back wall 24 of the pouch 12 by means of a U-shaped row ofstitching 134. It will be noted that the upper edge of the panel 132 is parallel to but spaced substantially below the upper edge of the rear wall 24 so as to not interfere with the previously described foldability of the upper margin 110 of the pouch or sac 12. As thus far described, the panel 132 in conjunction with the rear wall 24 define an open topped pocket. In the preferred construction, the pocket is provided with a water-impervious liner, and for this purpose a flexible plastic bag 136 is disposed within the pocket defined by the panel 132 and the rear wall 24, and such plastic bag 136 is generally conformable to the dimensions of such pocket, and is retained therein by having the lower and side edges thereof secured in position by means of the previously described row of stitching 134. The arrangement is as thus far described to define an open-topped pocket with a water-impervious liner including front and rear walls 132 and 140, respectively. Means is provided for selectively closing the open-topped and lined pocket, such means comprising slide fastener means designated generally at 142 which includes a pair of conventional toothed strips 144 ,and M6. One of the toothed strips 144 of the slide fastener means 142 is stitched to the rear wall 24 by a row of stitching 147 with the upper edge margin of the forward liner wall 138 interposed therebetween, and the other of such toothed strips 146 is stitched at 148 to the upper edge of the panel 132 with the upper edge of the rear liner wall interposed therebetween. The arrangement is such that the slide fastener means 142 enables selective opening and closing of the pocket 130 including the water-impervious lining thereof.

It is believed that the structure, the mode of fabricating, and the use of the infant-carrying device 10 will all be fully comprehended by those familiar with the art.

It is to be stressed that the pouch or see 12 of the device 10 is conformable by virtue of its flexible character as well as by the foldability of the upper margin 110 of the pouch 12 to infants of varying size, it being noted that the stretchability of the leg bands or cuffs 50 and 32 affords ready and comfortable accommodation of the device 10 to infants having widely varying thicknesses of the upper portions or thighs 36 and 58 of their legs.

The provision of cushioning and stress distributing means in association with the section 100 of the strap 14 disposed about and secured to the pouch or sac 12 results in materially contributing to the comfort of an infant 26 resting his weight thereon. Also it is to be particularly pointed out that the stress through the section of the strap 14 constituting a part of the pocket 118 coupled with the cushioning means 102 secured between the strap 14 and the pouch l2 precludes the presence of a bottle 128 in the pocket 118 from causing any undue force concentration upon the body of the infant 26 such as could cause discomfort.

As mentioned previously, the adjustment means 114 enables the infant 26 to be carried at a height most comfortable to the person 90 carrying the infant 26. It will be noted that portions of the strap 14 immediately adjacent the means 114 do not include any resilient cushioning means therein as such provision in the strap 14 would at least interfere with if not entirely preclude proper operation of the adjustment means 114.

It will be apparent to those skilled in the art that the foam rubber 102 interposed between and secured in position by stitching through the strap 14 and the pouch 12 can alternatively be disposed within and secured within the section 100 of the strap 14 in the same manner as the foam rubber 94 is disposed within and secured within the section 86 of the strap 14 with the section 100 of the strap 14 with the foam rubber 102 therein being secured to the pouch or sac 12.

Though not shown, it will be evident to those familiar with the art that if deemed necessary or expedient, a sheet of foam rubber or the like can be positioned in the bottom of the pouch 12 to overlie the bottom wall thereof, and the same could be either unattached to or permanently attached to the pouch 12.

Manifestly, the illustrated and described preferred embodiment of the invention is susceptible to numerous and various modifications without departing from the spirit of the invention. it is emphasized that the detailed illustration of the preferred embodiment as well as the elaborate description thereof are intended to convey a full and complete understanding of the principles involved, and no inference of narrowness of scope of invention is to be drawn. Accordingly, attention is directed to the appended claims in order to ascertain the actual scope of the invention.

lclaim:

1. An infant carrier comprising a flexible pouch adapted to receive the lower torso of an infant, said pouch including a flexible seat wall peripherally contiguous with and integral with an upstanding flexible endless wall having a substantially horizontal upper edge, said upstanding wall including front and rear portions joined by opposite side portions, said front portion of the upstanding wall being provided with a pair of horizontally spaced leg openings adjacent the seat wall, and an elongated and endless flexible supporting strap, said strap having a continuous part of its longitudinal extent disposed externally of and attached to the pouch, said part of the strap including longitudinally spaced portions connected by an intermediate portion, said intermediate portion of the strap extending transversely across the underside of the seat wall and being attached thereto, with the spaced portions of the strap extending upwardly from their junctures with the opposite extremities of the intermediate portion along the opposite side portions of the upstanding wall and being attached to said side portions, an extent of the strap being disposed above the pouch, such extent of the strap being comprised of a tubular length of flexible material of generally rectangular transverse configuration having a width that is at least three times as great as the thickness thereof, a resilient cushioning member filling the interior of the tubular extent of the strap, and means for securing the cushioning member to the tubular extent of the strap and also for maintaining the latter in said generally rectangular transverse configuration with said extent of the strap being of greater thickness at a position centered between the lateral edges thereof, said last recited means comprising a pair of longitudinal rows of stitching extending entirely through the thickness of the strap and the cushioning member disposed therein, such rows of stitching being of sufficient tightness to at least partially compress the thickness of the cushioning member through which they extend, said rows of stitching being spaced from the lateral edges of the strap and also being spaced on opposite sides of the midpoint between said lateral edges, whereby the strap is resistant to folding along a longitudinal centerline thereof.

2. The combination of claim 1, wherein means is interposed in the strap intermediate said extent thereof and one of said spaced portions thereof for enabling variance to the effective length of the strap while positively limiting the maximum length thereof and also for releasably fixing the effective length of the strap at any selected value within the range of variance.

3. An infant carrier comprising a flexible pouch adapted to receive the lower torso of an infant, said pouch including a flexible seat wall peripherally contiguous with and integral with an upstanding flexible endless wall having a substantially horizontal upper edge, said upstanding wall including front and rear portions joined by opposite side portions, said front portion of the upstanding wall being provided with a pair of horizontally spaced leg openings adjacent the seat wall, and an elongated and endless flexible supporting strap, said strap having a continuous part of its longitudinal extent disposed externally of and attached to the pouch, said part of the strap including longitudinally spaced portions connected by an intermediate portion, said intermediate portion of the strap extending transversely across the underside of the seat wall and being attached thereto, with the spaced portions of the strap extending upwardly from their junctures with the opposite extremities of the intermediate portion along the opposite side portions of the upstanding wall and being attached to said side portions, a flexible hood having a lower edge portion, and means for detachably securing the lower edge portion of the hood to the rear and sidewalls of the pouch adjacent the upper edge of the latter, said hood and said pouch being so constructed and arranged that the hood can be moved between positions overlying and underlying the pouch while attached to the latter.

4. An infant carrier comprising a flexible pouch adapted to receive the lower torso of an infant, said pouch including a flexible seat wall peripherally contiguous with and integral with an upstanding flexible endless wall having a substantially horizontal upper edge, said upstanding wall including front and rear portions joined by opposite side portions, said front portion of the upstanding wall being provided with a pair of horizontally spaced leg openings adjacent the seat wall, and an elongated and endless flexible supporting strap, said strap having a continuous part of its longitudinal extent disposed externally of and attached to the pouch, said part of the strap including longitudinally spaced portions connected by an intermediate portion, said intermediate portion of the strap extending transversely across the underside of the seat wall and being attached thereto, with the spaced portions of the strap extending upwardly from their junctures with the opposite extremities of the intermediate portion along the opposite side portions of the upstanding wall and being attached to said side portions, a generally rectangular flexible panel overlying the external surface of one of the spaced portions of the strap and being secured thereto along its lower and side edges with the side margins thereof being pleated in an arrangement that the panel and said one of the spaced portions of the strap defined jointly an outwardly expansible open-topped bottle pocket adapted to receive an infantfeeding bottle therein.

5. The combination of claim 4, including a second generally rectangular flexible panel overlying a portion of the external surface of the rear wall of the pouch, said second panel being secured to the rear wall along its lower and side edges to define therewith an open-topped accessory pocket adapted to receive infant-minding accessories such as diapers, a flexible and moisture-impervious liner for and disposed in said accessory pocket, said liner being secured to the rear wall and the second panel, and slide fastener means fixed to the rear wall and the second panel for selectively closing the top of the accessory pocket.

6. An infant carrier comprising a flexible pouch adapted to receive the lower torso of an infant, said pouch including a flexible seat wall peripherally contiguous with and integral with an upstanding flexible endless wall having a substantially horizontal upper edge, said upstanding wall including from and rear portions joined by opposite side portions, said front portion of the upstanding wall being provided with a pair of horizontally spaced leg openings adjacent the seat wall, and an elongated and endless flexible supporting strap, said strap having a continuous part of its longitudinal extent disposed externally of and attached to the pouch, said part of the strap including longitudinally spaced portions connected by an intermediate portion, said intermediate portion of the strap extending transversely across the underside of the seat wall and being attached thereto, with the spaced portions of the strap extending upwardly from their junctures with the opposite extremities of the intermediate portion along the opposite side portions of the upstanding wall and being attached to said side portions, said seat wall and the sidewalls of the pouch being formed of a single first piece of fabric having forward and rear edges, said front wall being formed of a single second piece of fabric having opposite side edges and a lower edge with the side edges and the lower edge of the second piece being stitched to the front edge of the first piece, and said rear wall being formed of a third single piece of fabric having opposite side edges and a lower edge with the side edges and the lower edge of the third piece being stitched to the rear edge of the first piece.

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Non-Patent Citations
Reference
1 *Circular From Baby Lift, Inc. P.O. Box 3275 Grand Central Station, N.Y. 17, N.Y. Received in office 1-8-1963 Copy-In-Art-Unit 314, Class 224/6
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
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Classifications
U.S. Classification224/159, D03/214, 224/602, 224/148.7, 224/148.5
International ClassificationA47D13/02, A47D13/00
Cooperative ClassificationA47D13/025
European ClassificationA47D13/02B