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Publication numberUS3576277 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 27, 1971
Filing dateJun 19, 1969
Priority dateJun 19, 1969
Publication numberUS 3576277 A, US 3576277A, US-A-3576277, US3576277 A, US3576277A
InventorsBlackman Herbert S
Original AssigneeDon Curl
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Sterile scrub apparatus with selection of washing liquid, and method
US 3576277 A
Images(7)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [72] Inventor Herbert S. Blackmon also known as Steve Blackmon Fort Worth, Tex. [2l] Appl. No. 834,717 [22] Filed June 19, 1969 [45] Patented Apr. 27, 1971 [73] Assignee Don Curl Memphis, Tex. fractional part interest [54] STERILE SCRUB APPARATUS WITH SELECTION OF WASHING LIQUID, AND METHOD 14 Claims, 11 Drawing Figs. [52] US. Cl. 222/1, 4/1, 137/606, 222/52, 222/76, 222/ 144.5 [51] Int. Cl B67d 5/60 [50] Field 0t Sea rch IIIIIIII:I:I:IIIIIIIIIII: 222/1, 144.5, 145, 52, 76, 504; 4/1; 137/637.l, 606

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,908,017 10/1959 Whaley 4/] 3,505,692 4/1970 Forbes 222/ 5 2X Primary Examiner-Robert B. Reeves Assistant Examiner-H. S. Lane Attorney-Ely Silverman ABSTRACT: Apparatus for control of wash water at different temperatures for scrubbing or washing with avoidance of contamination by contact with nonsterile surfaces and the steps accomplished therewith using radiant energy sensing and control means to easily, selectively, rapidly, and fully start and stop flow of a selection of one or another or both of the streams of washing liquid.

PATENTEU 777127197 3.576277 SHEET 1 OF 7 INVENTOR.

H. S. BLACK/WON A TT RNEY PATENTEU APR27 I97! SHEET 2 [IF 7 INVENTOR. H. S. BLACK/WON BY AT TORNEY PATENTEUAPRETIQYI 3.576277 sum 3 UF 7 INVENTOR.

H. S. BLACKMON BY ATTORNEY LO Q LL PATENTEU m2? 1911 3576.277 SHEET 5 OF 7 INVENTOR. /;1'. S. BLACK/WON ATTORNEY PATENTEUAPRZYIHYI 31-57627? Q31 ac INVENTOR.

H. S. BLACK/WON BY ATTORNEY STERILE SCRUB APPARATUS WITH SELECTION OF WASHING LIQUID, AND METHOD BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION vantages are overlooked, the flow of water for such scrubbing isnot rapidly and easily or completely changed and effort is required by the surgeon or technician to maintain the flow of washing liquid.

By this invention washing liquid is turned on rapidly and fully; no effort is required to maintain the flow of washing liquid and the flow of liquid is turned off rapidly, easily, and completely without soiling, wetting or contamination of the hands or arms or gown of the user. Either hand can be used to effect such washing liquid control.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION Temporary breaking of one of a set of light beams selective ly routes power to one selection of a plurality of corresponding valves and causes full and immediate delivery of one selection of washing liquid while disconnecting power to all other selections of valves controlling flow of a corresponding plurality of washing liquids to a dispenser therefor; that one light 1 beam reforms and a second breaking thereof selectively removes power from said one selection of valve and resets apparatus for full and immediate delivery of a subsequent selection of washing liquid.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. I is a front view of the overall assembly 20 according to this invention with parts thereof broken away.

FIG. 2 is a side view partly shown in section along the planes 2A and 2B of FIG. 1 and showing the assembly 20 with an operator 26 using the apparatus.

FIG. 3 is an upward oblique view along the direction of arrow 3A of FIG. 2 with a panel 55 of the control assembly housing subassembly removed to show the'structures to the rear thereof.

FIG. 4 is a schematic overall wiring diagram of the control assembly of the invention in the shutoff array of parts thereof wherein no water is delivered to the sink 25 from the water outlet line 30.

FIG. 5 is a schematic overall wiring diagram of the control assembly of the invention in the array of parts thereof wherein hot water is delivered to sink 25 by water outlet line 30.

FIG. 6 is a schematic overall wiring diagram of assembly in' the array of parts thereof wherein medium temperature .water is delivered to sink by water outlet line 30.

FIG. 7 is a schematic overall wiring diagram of assembly 20 in a third array of the parts thereof wherein cold water is delivered to sink 25 by water outlet line 30.

FIG. 8 is an enlarged view of zone 8A of FIG. 3 taken along the direction of arrow 88 of FIG. 11.

FIG. 9 shows the details of the circuit connections to boxes I06, 106M, 106C in the array of parts shown in FIG. 5.

FIG. 10 is a schematic wiring diagram of the photoelectric circuit 103.

FIG. 11 is a perspective view along the direction of the arrow 11A of FIG. I with the left sidewall of the upper housing subassembly removed to provide a side view into the interior of the upper control assembly housing subassembly in position of parts shown in FIG. 4.

" Linear dimensions of the particular embodiment shown are provided in Table I. The electrical characteristics of the components shown in FIG. I'-"1I are set out in Table II.

The accompanying text discusses and explains the significance of the referent numerals used in the above-mentioned FIGS. as well as description of the structures and zones identified by the referent numerals. The symbols used in the wiring diagram are those set out in the 1965 Rules of Practice in Patent cases unless otherwise specified in the accompanying text.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT The overall apparatus 20 comprises a sensing and control assembly 21 and water supply and disposal assembly 22 for manipulation and use by an operator 26. The sensing and control assembly 21 and the water supply assembly 22 are supported on a wall 29. An operator, 26, is able to project one (left) hand as 27 into a sensing zone of the sensing and control assembly 21 while his other hand 28 is below the discharge opening of the water outlet line 30.

The sensing and control assembly 21 comprises an upper housing subassembly 31, a lower housing subassembly 41, a rear housing subassembly 51, a water valve assembly 61, and sensing and control circuits 81, 84 and 87 for the hot, medium and cold water respectively.

The upper housing subassembly 31, the rear housing subassembly 51, and the lower housing subassembly 41 are rigid sturdy housing structures joined and supported on a rigid housing frame 40; frame 40 is located in a hole 50 therefor in the wall 29 and the upper housing subassembly 31 projects interiorly of the room 19 in which the apparatus 20 is located and the lower housing subassembly 41 also projects into that room the same amount. Housing subassemblies 31 and 41 are firmly attached to the wall 29 and supported thereby. Housing subassembly 51 is located within wall 29, i.e. interiorly of the wall 29 and exterior of the room 19 in which the operator as 26 is located.

The upper housing subassembly comprises, in operative combination an imperforate top wall 32, a front wall 33, a horizontal bottom wall 34, a vertical right sidewall 35, a vertical left sidewall (not shown) and a rear vertical wall 36. These walls are joined at their edges and, except as below described as to the openings therein, are imperforate and are joined at their edges as shown in the FIGS. 1-3 to form an imperforate and watertight housing except for openings as hereinbelow described. The bottom wall 34 has a left opening 37, a right opening 39 and a middle opening 38 therein for passage of light therethrough to the photoelectric components as 102, 102M and 102C respectively located thereabove. The upper housing subassembly 31 supports and houses phototube elements 102, 102M and 102C above the holes 37, 38 and 39 respectively. The front wall 32 supports colored signal lights, 57, 58 and 59 respectively in holes therefor to the front of each of the holes 37, 38 and 39 respectively.

The lower housing subassembly 41 comprises a horizontal top wall 42, a vertical front wall 43, a right vertical end wall 45, a similar left wall (not shown) a sloped bottom wall 44, a vertical rear wall 46. Walls 42-46 are rigid and firmly joined as shown in FIGS. 1 and 2 to form a rigid substantially imperforate and watertight compartment housing except for openings as hereinbelow described.

The top wall 42 of the lower housing subassembly 41 has transparent lenses 47, 48 and 49 firmly fixed thereto and fitted in watertight manner, into the openings therefor in that top wall 42 and below openings 37, 38 and 39 respectively. There is thereby provided a sensing space or zone between the top wall 42 of the lower housing subassembly and the lenses therein and the bottom wall 34 of the upper housing subassembly. This opening is large enough for an operator as 26 to conveniently put either his left or right hand located above one of the lenses as 47, 48 and 49. The centers of lenses 47, 48 and 49 are located in a vertical plane which plane is normal to the walls 34 and 42. The walls 33 and 43 extend an equal distance from the wall 29. Light generating lamps 1111, 101M and 101C are supported in subassembly 41 and located directly below the lenses 47, 48 and 49 therefor in the housing subassembly 41; other forms of radiant energy may obviously be used.

The rear housing subassembly 51 is composed of a horizontal top wall 52, a rigid vertical rear wall 53, a horizontal bottom wall 54, a rigid front panel 55. The walls 52,53 and 54 are rigid and firmly joined to each other to form a rigid housing structure which is in turn rigidly attached to a vertical frame 40. Frame 40 is rigidly attached to the rear vertical walls 36 and 46 as well as to the horizontal walls 52 and 54. The wall 52 is positioned slightly above the wall 34 and the wall 54 is located slightly below wall 42.

The vertical displacement of wall 52 relative to the wall 34 provides for passage of wires from the phototubes 102, 102M and 102C located in the upper housing subassembly 31 above the top of wall 46 to the rear housing subassembly 51. The rear housing subassembly 51 is provided with a removable front panel 55 on the left-hand side of which is located an onoff switch 56 and on-off indicator signal lamp 60.

A water valve assembly 61 is located in and supported on the walls 54 and 53 of the rear housing subassembly 51. The water valve assembly 61 comprises a hot water valve unit 62 and a cold water valve unit 72, each of which (62 and 72) is the same as the other in structure, hot water line 23, cold water line 24, and discharge manifold 70.

The hot water line 23 is connected through the hot water valve assembly structure 62, wherein is located in operative connection a conventional valve seat 66, valve seal 65, valve shaft 64, to a manifold pipe 70 which extends to the wall 29 and extends therefrom as water discharge pipe 30. The valve assembly 62 comprises a standard solenoid coil 63 which is fin'nly seated in assembly 51 and, on actuation operates on valve shaft 64 to seat seal 65 in valve seat 66. The shaft 64 and seal 65 are urged to the normally closed position by a biasing spring 67.

The cold water line 24 is connected through the cold water valve assembly structure 72, wherein is located in operative connection a conventional valve seat 76, valve seal 75, valve shaft 74, to the manifold pipe 70 which extends to the wall 29 and extends therefrom as water discharge pipe 30. Valve assembly 72 comprises a standard solenoid coil 73 which is firmly seated in assembly 51 and, on actuation, operates on the valve shaft 74 to seat the seal 75 in the valve seat 76 therefor. Element 75 and 74 are urged to the normally closed position by a spring 77.

The hot water sensing and control assembly 81 comprises an electromechanical control subassembly 82 in operative combination with a sensing photoelectric circuit 83. The medium temperature sensing and control assembly 84 comprises an electromechanical control subassembly 85 and a photoelectric sensing circuit 86; the cold water sensing and control assembly 87 comprises an electromechanical control subassembly 88 and a photoelectric sensing circuit 89; other forms of receptors with other forms of radiant energy may obviously be used.

The photoelectric circuit 83 for hot water, circuit 86 for medium temperature water and circuit 89 for cold water are the same in structure. Therefore the description of the hot water photoelectric circuits can be applied to that for the medium temperature photoelectric circuit and cold water photoelectric circuit with the understanding that a structure in i the circuit 86 with a given referent numeral and the letter M (e.g. 101M) is the same as or corresponds to the structure in circuit 83 with referent of same or corresponding number (e.g. 101) of the hot water circuit; and with the understanding that a structure in the circuit 89 with a given referent numeral and the letter C" (e.g. 101C) is the same as or corresponds to the structure in the circuit 83 with referent of same or corresponding number (e.g. 101) in the hot water circuit 83.

The electromechanical subassemblies 82 and 88 structurally are identical with only a small, but significant structural change therebetween in the medium temperature subassembly 85; the referent numbers given to the structures in the hot water subassembly 82 are also applied to similar structures given similar referent numbers in the cold water subassembly 88 and in the medium water subassembly with the exception that the additional referent letter C" applies to the corresponding structure in the cold water circuit and the additional referent M" applies to the corresponding structure in medium water circuit; structurally such correspondingly numbered elements so referred to are the same.

The sensing photoelectric circuit 83 comprises a connection to an AC power source 150, light source (incandescent lamp 101) which is operatively connected by a light beam as to a photoelectric tube 102 and a relay 104 connected thereto by a circuit 103. This circuit is a standard reverse alternating current photoelectric circuit (c.f. chapter 18, Phototube Relays, pages 33l354 of "Electronics for Electricians and Radio Men" Coyne Electrical School, Chicago, Ill, 1945). That phototube circuit relay 104 is provided with a relay switch arm 105 operatively connected thereto.

The hot water circuit photoelectric relay switch arm 105 is connected, when closed by action of the solenoid 104, to one end of a hot water electromechanical subassembly terminal box 106 which box is connected at its other end by a conventional wire conductor to one tenninal of the hot water control subassembly main relay solenoid 107; that solenoid is provided with a spring loaded rigid arm 108 which has a pivotal support at one end, 118, the spring loading of which ann urges that arm to a position distant from the solenoid 107 as shown in H6. 4. The arm 108 has pivotally attached to its free end a vertically depending rigid tongue 109; arm 109 has limited pivotal motion only about a horizontal axis at the juncture of arms 108 and 109. A spring 99 urges the bottom of arms 109 into contact with wheel 110. When arm 108 is pulled in by solenoid 107 the bottom of tongue 109 engages with a hot water control assembly drive ratchet wheel 110; wheel 110 has a plurality of eight radially equispaced teeth as 111; the bottom of the tongue 109 engages the teeth 111 seriatim during repeated operation of the solenoid 107. The normal position of each arm as 108 is spaced slightly but definitely from the coil 107 as shown in FIGS. 4 and 11. On activation of the solenoid 107 the arm 109 engages and moves the adjacent tooth 111 and rotates the wheel 110 counterclockwise, as seen in F105. 3 and 5, for the angular distance of (45) covered by one such tooth on each such stroke of a tongue 109.

The ratchet wheel 110 is firmly joined at its center and is concentric with a hot water electromechanical control subassembly ratchet drive shaft 112. This is a rigid straight, horizontally extending shaft which is rotatably mounted in journals as 117 and 117 for rotation about its longitudinal axis when urged by the tongue 109 as above described.

A first hot water control subassembly drived lobed cam 113 is fixed to the shaft 112 and is coaxial therewith; it has a series of four equispaced lobes or teeth as 114 and 116 each separated by a recess as 105 between neighboring lobes as 114 and 116. The lobes are equally spaced and the relationship of the number of lobes or teeth on the cam 113 to the teeth on the ratchet wheel 110 is that the angular distance between centers of one lobe or tooth as 114 on cam 113 and the next, as 116, is twice the angular distance between the neighboring teeth on the ratchet wheel 110 so that each actuation of arm 108 by the solenoid 107 moves the lobed cam 113 one half the angular distance between centers of adjacent lobes on the cam 113.

A second hot water control subassembly driven lobed cam 123 is fixed to the shaft 112 and is coaxial therewith. It has a series of four equispaced lobes or teeth as 124 and 126 separated by recesses as 125 between neighboring lobes as 124 and 126. The lobes or teeth are equally spaced and the relationship of the number of lobes or teeth on the cam 123 to the teeth on the ratchet wheel 110 is that the angular distance between centers of one lobe or tooth as 124 on cam 123 to the next as 126 is twice the angular distance between the neighboring teeth on the ratchet wheel 110 so that each actuation of arm 108 by the solenoid 107 moves the lobed cam 123 the same amount as cam 113. The lobes and recesses of each pair of cams as 113 and 123 are arrayed on each shaft as 112 so that when the radially exterior surface of a lobe of cam 113 extends to its maximum vertical height over shaft 112, the radially exterior surface of a lobe of cam 123 simultaneously extends to its maximum vertical height over shaft 112. All lobes and recesses on each cam as 113 and 123 are of the same size and shape; the lobes and recesses of cams 113 and 123 are identical in size and shape.

A hot water control assembly left lower switch arm 131 is pivotally supported at a pivot point 133 which is somewhat spaced away from a contact point 132, generally as shown in FIGS. 11 and 8 and schematically as shown in FIGS. 4 and 7..

The movable point of the arm 131 is slidably in contact with and rides on a tooth or ina recess of the first lobed cam 113, as shown in FIGS. 11, 4 and 5. Switch arm 131 is electrically conductive.

A hot water circuit left upper switch arm 134 is pivotally yet firmly attached to a pivot support 136 therefor and at the free end of that arm 134 is supported on an electrically insulating connector arm 137. The connector arm 137 is supported on and attached to the hot water circuit left lower switch arm 131 so that the arm 134 alternately moves away from and towards the shaft 112 as the lobed cam 113 contacts free end of the arm 131 at the lobe as 114 or at the recess as 115 of the lobed cam 113 (as shown in FIGS. 11, 4 and 5). In the tooth (or lobe of cam 113) contacting position of the arm 131 a fixed contact point 132 effects electrical contact with the arm 131 and a circuit is completed through the arm 131. When the arm 131 is at the position whereat it contacts a recess as 115 of the lobed cam 113 the circuit through contact point 132 is broken. When the contact is made through the am 131 with the contact point 132 concurrently an electrical circuit is made by contact of the arm 134 with a fixed contact point 136. The contact of arm 131 with point 132 connects AC power to and lights up the signal light 57. The contact of the electrically conductive switch arm 134 with the contact point 136 closes a circuit through the hot water solenoid coil 63 and draws in the shaft 64 and moves the seal 65 away from the seat 66, overcoming the force of the spring 67 and allows hot water to pass through the orifice in the seat 66 from hot water line 23 to the manifold pipe 70 and out the water discharge line 30. Arm 137 is rigid.

The hot water control assembly right lower switch arm 141 is electrically conductive and is pivotally supported at a pivotal support point 143 and is supported at its other end on either a tooth as 124 or in a recess as 125 of the second hot water circuit cam 123. In the position of the arm 141 whereat that arm contacts the raised tooth or lobe as 124 of the cam 123 as in FIG. 5 and 9 that arm is taken out of contact with the fixed contact point 142 and a circuit therethrough, below described in reference to the terminal boxes 106M and 106C, is broken or open.

Hot water circuit right switch arm 144 is pivotally connected at a fixed point 146 and is supported at its other, free, end by an insulated connector 147 so that the switch arm 144 moves parallel to and concurrently with the arm 14] on rotation of the shaft 112. In the position of arm 144 when the arm 141 is contacting a raised tooth of the lobed earn 124 as in FIG. 5, there is no electrical contact between the arm 144 and its fixed switch contact point 145 and the circuit therethrough, below described in relation to terminal box 106M is open. In the position of parts when arm 141 is in contact with a recess as 125 of the lobed cam 123 as in FIG. 4,- the arm 144 contacts the contact point 145 and a circuit therethrough is closed. Arm 147 is also rigid.

The circuits for actuation of the coil 63 of the hot water valve assembly 62 are shown in FIGS. 5 and 9.

FIG. 7 shows the actuation of the position of parts of the circuit when the solenoid 73 of the cold water valve assembly is actuated. FIG. 6 shows the position of parts in the overall circuit when the medium temperature water is to be delivered.

The hot water sensing and control assembly elements 101- 149 of assembly 81 and their connections are identical to that in the cold water sensing and control assembly 87 comprising elements 101C149C and medium temperature water sensing and control assembly 84 comprising elements 101M- 149M with the following exceptions:

a. as to elements 101C-149C, their connection and attachment to cold water solenoid 73 and signal lamp 39 instead of hot water valve solenoid 63 and signal lamp 37 for elements 10l149C',

b. and the connections in terminal boxes 106, 106C and 106M: the connections for terminal boxes 106, 106C and 106M are shown in FIG. 9 and below discussed;

c. the connection and relations of switch arm 144M does not parallel those of switch arms 144C and 144 and the relations of switch arm 141M differ slightly from those of switches 141 and 141C; details thereof are set out herebelow in description of FIG. 9 and also illustrated in FIGS. 4 and 6.

The connections and relations of switch arm 134C and 131C provide that, with switch 56 in on position, as shown in FIGS. 4, 2 and 1 interruption of beam of light 90C between lamp 101C and tube 102C causes, via circuit 83C, movement of shaft 112C as above described for shaft 112. Arm 134C then contacts point C and closes a circuit shown in FIGS. 4 and 7 that actuates solenoid coil 73 of cold water assembly 72 by connection thereof to voltage source 150. Concurrently, arm 131C then contacts point 132C and closes a circuit through signal lamp 59. The array of parts is then as shown in FIG. 7 and cold water passes out of line 30.

The connections and relations of switch arm 141M and 131M provide that with switch 56 in on position, as shown in FIGS. 4, 2 and 1 interruption of beam of light 90M between lamp 101M and tube 102M causes, via circuit 83M, movement of shaft 112M as above described for shaft 112. Accordingly, ann 131M then contacts point 132M and closes a circuit through signal lamp 58 and arm 144M contacts point M and concurrently switch arm 134M then contacts point 135M and closes a circuit that actuates a solenoid coil 73 of cold water assembly 72 by connection thereof to voltage source 150, and switch arm 144M then contacts point 145M and close a circuit that actuates a solenoid coil 63 of hot water valve assembly 62 by connection thereof to voltage source 150. The mixture of hot water and cold water passes into manifold 70 and to outlet line 30 and array of parts is as in FIG. 6.

As shown in FIG. 9 the pivotally fixed end of the switch arm 144 and fixed contact point 145 are operatively electrically connected to the terminal box 106M of the medium temperature water circuit and the switch arm 141 and the fixed switch contact point 142 are electrically connected to and, when closed, provide an electrical connection across points 127C and 128C of the terminal box 106C. Similarly one end of the switch arm 144C and the fixed contact point 145C are connected to and, when connected, close the electrical connection across terminals 129 and 130 of box 106 and, when in contact, the switch arm 141C and the contact point 142C close an electrical connection across the terminals 129M and 130M of box 106M.

As shown in FIG. 9 the pivotally fixed end of the switch arm 141M and contact arm 145M are operatively connected to the tenninals 127 and 128 of terminal box 106 of the hot water circuit and the pivotally fixed end of switch arm 141M and switch point 142 when closed provide a connection across points 127 and 128 of the terminal box 106. The pivotally fixed end of switch arm 141M and the contact point 145M are similarly connected to and close the connection across terminals 129C and 130C of box 106C and the closure of the switch arm 141M and the contact point 142M concurrently closes connections across the terminals 129C-l30C in box 106C and 127-128 in box 130. Accordingly, the calling into operation any one of the assemblies 81, 84 or 87 of the sensing and control assembly 21 prevents operation of any of the circuits of the other two assemblies by opening up (or breaking") the connection through the electrical series connected terminals in terminal boxes as 106, 106M and 106C through which the main relay solenoids as 107, 107M or 107C are actuated.

Each of the shafts as 112, 112M and 112C is at a stable position at each of their positions shown in FIGS. 5,6, 7, 4 and 11. When for instance the circuit through one (e.g. the hot water) circuit as 81 is closed, the circuits through the other (cold water and the medium temperature water) circuits are kept open as detailed in FIG. 9 so that only the (hot) water provided by that (81) circuit passes out of the discharge 30. The system 21 then is insensitive to moving the hands of the operator through zone 120 to interrupt any of the other beams of light as 90M (between the photoelectric elements as 102M and 101M of the assembly 84) or beam 90C, however, when the beam 90 is again interrupted and the photoelectric circuit 83 is thereby actuated by blocking the passage of light from element 101 to element 102 the system is brought to the array of parts shown in FIG. 4 and one of the other circuits may then be actuated. Similarly, when the circuit 84 has been actuated blocking the passage of light beam 90 from the elements from 101 to 102 and/or blocking the passage of lights from 101C to 102C will not cause any change in the temperature of the water discharged from the water discharge outlet 30 until the beam of light 90M from the elements 101M to 102M has again been interrupted to move the arm 109M from the position thereof shown in FIG. 6 to the position thereof shown in FIG. 4.

Each lobed cam as 113 has a series of flat faces as 121 at the bottom of each recess; the free end of each arm, as 131 resting on such cam holds the cam in place against radial movement (as the arm has some resiliency and force) until such stabilizing force is overcome by action of the tongue therefor, as 109, on the ratchet wheel, as 110, therefor overcoming such restraining force when the solenoid therefor, as 107 is actuated and the periphery of wheel 110 is moved the distance of the stroke of tongue 109.

FIG. 10 shows a reverse phototube circuit as 83 employing a type 205] gas tetrode 156 for relay 105 operation. (A circuit in which light or increased light on the phototube causes plate electron flow in the amplifier circuit is called a forward" circuit; when light or increased light at the phototube causes amplifier plate electron flow to decrease or stop, the circuit is a reverse" circuit.) The transformer 151 has, in addition to its 6.3-volt heater winding 152, a tapped secondary winding 153 providing 75 volts between plate 154 and cathode 155 of the gas tetrode tube 156 and 25 volts between anode 156 and cathode 157 of the phototube 102. Grid bias voltage for the gas tetrode is supplied by and adjusted by the adjustable voltage divider 161 since the grid 157 of the tube 156 is connected I through a resistor 162 to the slider 163 on voltage divider 161 and its cathode 155 is connected directly to the upper (as shown in FIG. 11) end 164 of the divider 161.

With the phototube 102 illuminated, its electron flow is from anode 156 to slider 163 through resistor 162, making the right (as shown in FIG. 11) end 165 of this resistor negative and the slider end positive: the negative potential is applied, as shown in FIG, 11, to the control grid 157 of the gas tetrode 156 and the positive potential to its cathode 155 through voltage divider 161. With the phototube illuminated, and the grid of the gas tetrode made negative as just explained, the slider 163 of voltage divider 161 is adjusted to a point just below that which allows the gas tetrode to break down." When illumination of the phototube 102 is reduced or cut off the reduction of phototube electron flow decreases the negative grid voltage being supplied from resistor 162 and this decrease of negative grid voltage allows the gas tetrode 156 to break down and pull in the relay 104. With the phototube 102 again illuminated, the grid voltage of the gas tetrode 156 again is made sufficiently negative to keep this tube from breaking down and the relay 104 drops out as the AC voltage applied to the plate circuit of tube 156 falls to zero on every half-cycle of alternating current. Source 150 is an AC source.

The sequence of operations of the apparatus 20 is as follows: Starting with the array shown in FIG. 4 wherein I10- l20 volt AC power source 150 is operatively connected by the switch 56 to actuate the power to the photoelectric circuits 83, 86 and 89 and signal light 60 is then lit. In the normal start position of the apparatus light 60 is on but the lights 57, 58 and 59 are extinguished indicating that no water is to come through the outlet 30. The operator may then pass a hand through beam 90, 90M or 90C below and interior of any corresponding indicator light therefor, as 37, 38 and 39 generally as is shown in FIG. 2, for any actuation of the water system which is desired to be started. The photoelectric circuits 83, 86 and 89 thereby selectively provide actuation to operate the corresponding electromechanical subassembly as 82, or 88 of the system 81 and provide hot, medium or cold temperature as indicated by lights 37, 38 or 39 respectively. When a change is desired the operator's hand interrupts the beam of light as 90, M or 90C behind the lighted signal light therefor, as 37, 38 or 39 respectively to stop that system from delivering water of that type. Flow of water of another type of temperature may then be started (when 56 is closed, as indicated by light 60 shining) from discharge outlet line 30 by interrupting another light beam as 90M or 90C.

Apparatus 20 incorporates the idea of a contamination free method of turning off and on the water in a hospital scrub sink 25, utilizing a beam of light for the switching apparatus as well as a more economical method of installation as compared to the present cost of the knee valve and wrist handles.

The whole system contains only eight (8) moving parts, the relays 104, 104C, 104M, 107, 107M and 107C are impulse type and are never on but just for a few milliseconds.

The medium temperature can be preset to the users liking never requiring further adjustment. The whole apparatus 20 may be connected to the emergency circuit with switch 56 permanently closed so it will never be off. The phototube circuit as 103 illustrated is exemplary and may be transistorized.

The sequence of operation may be summarized as follows: the light sources 101, 101M, 101C actuate the receivers 102, 102M 102C. As the beam 90 of light is broken, (assume hot water is needed) starting from array shown in FIG. 4 power is then routed through relay 104 energizing coil 107 at the same time making the contacts bringing on the red indicator light 57 and energizing the hot water solenoid 63 and at the same time opening the contacts 141 and 144 thus isolating relay coils 107M and 107C and providing array shown in FIG. 5.

For medium temperature water, the light beam 90M between 101M and 102M is broken, contact across 105M is made on the FIG. 4 array, thus putting power to 107M. When 107M is energized the contacts M, 132M and M are made energizing both the hot water and cold water solenoid and the indicator or light 58 and at the same time breaking the contacts l42Ml41M thus isolating relay coils 107 and 107C and providing array of FIG. 6.

For cold water, the light beam 90C between 101C and 102C is broken, starting from the array of FIG. 4, thus energizing the coil 107C. Contacts 135C and 132C are made bringing on the indicator light 59 and cold water solenoid at the same time contacts 144C145C and 141C--142C are broken thus isolating the coils 107 and 107M and providing array shown in FIG. 7.

Although the light beams (as 90) may be and usually are broken only for a very short time, of the order ofyg t0 l/20 of a second, i.e., substantially momentarily, the above described response of the relay as 104 to such breaking is complete and causes advance of the wheel 110 for the full stroke of the tongue 109. Thereafter, the beam as 90 is automatically reestablished. The reestablishment of the beam does not affect the phototube circuits as 83, 86 or 89 and the shafts as 112 (and/or 112M and/or 112C) are maintained for a period as permanent as desired in a stable position as above described with the switches in the array shown in FIG. 5, 6, or 7 until the light beam first broken is again broken and the resultant array of components shown in FIG. 4 are again achieved. Thereby one stream of water, e.g. hot water, is fully and rapidly turned on for as long as desired and then rapidly and completely turned off and another stream, e.g. cold water, is fully and rapidly turned on for as long as desired and then rapidly and completely turned off all with a brief wave of either hand of user or operator 26.

TABLE I-DIMENSIONS OF APPARATUS Points of Measure- Dimension measured measurement ment, in.

Thickness of assembly 31 Wall 33 to wall 36.... 15 Length of assembly 21.... Bottom 46 to top 36. 15 Zone 120, height Wall 34 to wall 42.... 5% Width of housing 31 and 41.. Wall 33 width 18 Depth of housing 51 Panel 55 to wall 53- 4 Height of housing 51 Wall 52 to Wall 54..-. 7 Panel 33 Height 2% Distance between light beams centers. 47-48, 48-49- 4% Panel 43 Height 2% Housing 51 Width, side to side- 16-12 Distance between signal lamps. 57-58, 58-59 4% Height of outlet over floor" Height over floor 50 Lights 57, 58, 59 Height over floor....

4. Process as in claim 3 comprising the further step of a. selectively locating a body member in another of said sensing zones and thereby b. locating another switch means in active position in response to such change and thereby i. routing power to another selection of said plurality of valves and i ii. disconnecting power to all other selections of said plurality of valves and iii. dispensing another selection of said liquids through said another selection of said plurality of valves and discharging another selection of said washing liquids from the dispenser therefor.

5. Apparatus for sterile scrubbing comprising a housing assembly, a radiant energy interruption sensing and valve control assembly and a water supply and dispensing assembly, the radiant energy interruption sensing and valve control assembly located and supported in said housing assembly and said water supply and dispensing assembly being operatively TABLE II-COMPONENTS OF APPARATUS 20 Reference No. Item Description and characteristics 62 Water valve G.E. Washing machine water valve, 120 v., 60 cycle, 11 watt,

3 g.p.m. size. 21 Housing walls Stainless steel, smooth surfaces. 107-119 Relay 120 v., 240 ohms, D.P.D.T. 50-60 Hz. nominal power18.5

VA 5 amp rating. Potter and Bmmfield Relay 4P 17A. Potter and Brurnfield Stock catalog 100, p. 5 issued .l'annary 1968 Form 130074 2-68. 101 Lamp Sigma Instruments, Braintree, Mass. 8L3-115, vV.A. series 8.

Series 8 catalogue 1156-R1-1167 pg. 5. 102 Phototube Westinghouse SR-l cesium oxide tube.

10,000 ohm resistance. 10 megohms. Resistance =50!) ohms.

6.3 v. at 0.6 amp. Red.

White.

. Green.

Signal lamp, on/o White. Phototubc receiver Type 2051 gas filled shield grid thyratron.

Sigma Instruments Braintree, Massachusetts Type 8P 9-115.

Series 8 Catalogue (1156-R1-1167) page 3.

1 Alternate.

I claim:

1. A process for providing washing liquid comprising the steps of:

a. supplying each of a plurality of sources of washing liquid to a dispenser therefor through each of a plurality of valves, and holding each of said valves in normally closed position; creating and passing each of a plurality of sources of radiant energy into a sensing zone and to a sensing and control assembly therefor sensitive to a change thereof produced by the presence of a body member, said sensing and control assemblies being operatively connected to said plurality of valves; c. producing said change in one of said plurality of sources by the presence of a body member; and locating a switch means in active position in response to such change and thereby i. routing power from said switch means to one selection of said plurality of valves, and

ii. disconnecting power to all other selections of said plurality of valves, and thereby iii. dispensing said washing liquids through said selection of said plurality of valves and discharging a selection of said washing liquids from the dispenser therefor.

22. Process as in claim 1 comprising the additional steps of a. removing said body portion from said sensing zone and b. relocating a body member in said sensing zone, thereby locating said switch means in another position, which connects power to all selections of said plurality of valves and 0. stops said discharge of said selection of washing liquid.

3. Process as in claim 2 wherein said change is a momentary change and said disconnecting of power provides a stable state of disconnection of said power to said valves.

connected to said radiant energy interruption sensing and valve control assembly,

said radiant energy interruption sensing mechanism comprising a plurality of sets of a radiant energy source and a reverse electric circuit sensitive to such radiant energy therefor and spaced apart from each other in each set, a beam of radiant energy connecting each said radiant energy source and said circuit for each set,

said valve control assembly comprising a plurality of valves,

each said circuit including means responsive to temporary changes in said beam of radiant energy in said set and, for each set of radiant energy source and circuit, switch means connectable in each of a plurality of positions and connectable in one position to actuate one of a selection of said valve means and to disconnect power from all other selections of said plurality of valve means, said switch means being operatively connected to said means responsive to temporary changes in said beam of radiant energy in each said set of radiant energy source and electric circuit sensitive to said radiant energy.

6. Apparatus as in claim 5 wherein, for each set of radiant energy source and electric circuit sensitive thereto, visual indicator means are located on the outer surface of the housing near to the said source of radiant energy of said set and are operatively connected to the said switch means.

7. Apparatus as in claim 6 which includes means stably holding said switch means in one or another position with a force less than the force applied to the switch means by said means responsive to temporary changes in said beam of radiant energy.

8. Apparatus as in claim 5 wherein said radiant energy interruption sensing and valve control assembly is a light interruption sensing and valve control assembly,

and wherein said radiant energy interruption sensing mechanism is a light interruption sensing mechanism and comprises a plurality of sets of a light source and a reverse photoelectric circuit therefor, and wherein a beam of light connects each said light source and said circuit for each set,

and wherein each said circuit includes a means responsive to temporary breaks in said beam of light in said set and, for each set of light source and circuit, said switch means is operatively connected to said means responsive to temporary breaks in said beam of light in each of said set of light and photoelectric circuit.

9. Apparatus as in claim 8 wherein for each set of light source and electric circuit sensitive thereto, visual indicator means are located on the outer surface of the housing near to the said beam of light of said set and are operatively connected to the said switch means.

10. Apparatus as in claim 9 which includes means stably holding said switch means in one or another position with a force less than the force applied to the switch means by said means responsive to temporary breaks in said beam of light.

11. Process as in claim 1 wherein said each of said plurality of sources of radiant energy creates a beam of light and the location of a body member in said sensing zone for each of said plurality of beams breaks said light beam, each of said sensing and controlling assembly is sensitive to the breaking of the light beam thereto, and wherein said location of a body member in each of said plurality of zone breaks said light beam in said sensing zone and wherein said switch means is located in an active position in response to such breaking.

12. Process as in claim 11 comprising the additional steps of a. reforming said beam of light and b. selectively breaking said beam of light and thereby i. locating said switch means in another position and ii. connecting power to another selection of said plurality of valves and c. stopping said discharge of said selection of said washing liquids.

13. Process as in claim 12 wherein said such breaking of said beam of light is a momentary breaking and said disconnection of power provides a stable state of disconnection of said power to said valves.

14. Process as in claim 13 comprising the further step of a. selectively breaking another of said beams of light and thereby b. locating another switch means in active position in response to such breaking and thereby i. routing power to another selection of said plurality of valves and ii. disconnecting power to all other selections of said plurality of valves and iii. dispensing another selection of said liquids through said another selection of said plurality of valves and discharging another selection of said washing liquids from the dispenser therefor.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification222/1, 4/668, 222/52, 4/676, 222/144.5, 137/606, 250/221, 4/623
International ClassificationH03K17/94
Cooperative ClassificationH03K17/941
European ClassificationH03K17/94L