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Publication numberUS3576751 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 27, 1971
Filing dateMay 10, 1968
Priority dateMay 10, 1968
Publication numberUS 3576751 A, US 3576751A, US-A-3576751, US3576751 A, US3576751A
InventorsKyros George C, Noznick Peter P
Original AssigneeBeatrice Foods Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Drain cleaner
US 3576751 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent No Drawing. Filed May 10, 1968, Ser. No. 728,318 Int. Cl. (109d 9/00; Clld 7/22, 7/50 US. Cl. 252-162 10 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A drain cleaner composition is prepared containing finely divided sodium hydroxide in a chlorinated hydrocarbon solvent, preferably 1,1,1-trichloroethane, or N- methyl-Z-pyrrolidone. Preferably, powdered aluminum is included. A hydrocarbon diluent can be added and silica can be added as a thickener to get the requisite body and retard sludge formation.

The present invention relates to a novel drain cleaner.

The available commercial drain cleaners do not perform adequately. Dry alkali, such as Drano; liquid alkali, such as Liquid Plumr; or trichloroethylene, a fat solvent; and acid drain cleaners, such as sulfuric acid, are the ones that are presently used. Acid drain cleaners are corrosive; alkali drain cleaners do not form soaps unless they are heated to a substantially high temperature; solvents perform inadequately.

It is the object of the present invention to prepare a novel drain cleaner.

A further object is to invent a drain cleaner which creates a high temperature due to an exothermic reaction which will aid in melting the fats, and in the presence of sodium hydroxide saponification will occur.

Another object is to prevent alkali soap formation from clogging the drain.

Still other objects and the entire scope of applicability of the present invention will become apparent from the detailed description given hereinafter; it should be understood, however, that the detailed description and specific examples, while indicating preferred embodiments of the invention, are given by way of illustration only, since various changes and modifications within the spirit and scope of the invention will become apparent to those skilled in the art from this detailed description.

It has now been found that these objects can be attained by dispersing finely divided sodium hydroxide in certain fat solvent inert to sodium hydroxide but capable of solubilizing it. The finely ground particles of sodium hydroxide are held in suspension.

The choice of solvents is critical since it has been found that not all fat solvents are operative. The preferred fat solvent is 1,1,l-trichloroethane. Other chlorinated hydrocarbons can be used such as trichloroethylene, perchloroethylene, methylene chloride, 1,l,2-trichloroalkane. N- rnethyl-Z-pyrrolidone has also been used successfully. These solvents are heavier than Water; they will replace the water and will come in contact with fats present in clogged drains and will dissolve them.

For best results there is incorporated into the composition powder aluminum, e.g. of 20 micron size. Also, but less preferably, tin, sodium, and potassium alloys which generate heat in contact with sodium hydroxide and water can be used.

While the 1,1,l-trichloroethane or other chlorinated hydrocarbon or N-methyl pyrrolidone can be used as the sole solvent, hydrocarbon solvents can be incorporated as fillers. The preferred hydrocarbon solvents are liquid paraffin boiling above 212 F. and are generally octanes or above.

ice

The inclusion of the powder aluminum or other metals has the advantage that aluminum or other metal react with water and sodium hydroxide to initiate the heat needed to melt the fats accumulated in the drain.

The drain cleaner composition of the present invention has the advantages of being non-caking, convenient, easily measured, generating a high temperature due to an exothermic reaction, e.g. to reach the temperature of 160 P. which will melt the fats. The presence of the sodium hydroxide provides an excellent protein degrading material which aids in dissolving hair. The fat solvent dissolves fats while sodium hydroxide reacts with fats t0 form water soluble soaps.

It is desirable to add finely divided silica as a thickener e.g. in an amount of 0.5 to 2%, and to prevent sludge formation. The use of the thickener is required for best results since it retards separation of the sodium hydroxide particles from the solvent.

When a hydrocarbon diluent is employed, it normally is not over 40% of the total composition.

Unless otherwise indicated, all parts and percentages are by weight.

The composition can contain 20-40% sodium hydroxide and 60 to of solvent. As previously stated, the solvent can be chlorinated hydrocarbon, 1,1,1-trichloroethane or other chlorinated hydrocarbon or N-methyl pyrrolidone, or a portion of the solvent up to 60% of the total solvent can be replaced by a liquid parafiinic hydrocarbon as a filler.

When aluminum or other metals are employed, they are present in an amount of 0.5 to 1.5%.

Typical drain cleaner formulations within the invention are given below. The formulation of Example 2 is superior to that of Example 1, but the formulation of Example l is more economical.

EXAMPLE 1 Percent Sodium hydroxide (finely ground flakes) 32 1,1,1-trichloroethane 33.8

Isopar H (a hydrocarbon solvent containing 93.8% paraflins, 6% naphthalenes and 0.2% aromatics and having a B.P. range of 348370 F.) 33.5 Aluminum dust (20 microns) 0.7

EXAMPLE 2 Sodium hydroxide (finely divided) 32 1,1,l-trichloroethane 67.3 Aluminum dust 0.7

EXAMPLE 3 Sodium hydroxide (finely divided) 32.7 1,1,l-trichloroethane 67.3

EXAMPLE 4 Sodium hydroxide (finely divided) 30 1,1, l-trichloroethane 40 Liquid parafiins (octaues and higher) 28.5 Aluminum (powder) 1 Silica (finely divided) 0.5

EXAMPLE 5 Sodium hydroxide (finely divided) 34 N-methyl pyrrolidone 65 Aluminum (finely divided) 1 Pyrogenic silica 1 EXAMPLE 6 Sodium hydroxide (finely divided) 33 N-methyl pyrrolidone 30 Aluminum powder 1.5 Isopar H 35.5

3 EXAMPLE 7 Percent Sodium hydroxide 32.0 Trichloroethylene 30.0

Varsol 1 (parafiinic solvent with a minor amount of aromatics) 37.3 Aluminum (powder) 0.7

What is claimed:

1. A drain cleaner consisting essentially of 2040% of finely divided sodium hydroxide and 0.5 to 1.5% of finely divided aluminum dispersed in 60 to 80% of a solvent or mixture of solvent and diluent, the solvent being selected from the group consisting of a chlorinated hydrocarbon of 1 to 2 carbon atoms and N-methylpyrrolidone, the diluent being a liquid hydrocarbon boiling above 212 F., and being present in an amount of up to the amount of the solvent.

2. A composition according to claim 1 including 0.5 to 2% of finely divided silica as a sludge preventative.

3. A drain cleaner according to claim 1 wherein the composition includes a liquid hydrocarbon diluent boiling above 212 F.

4.. A drain cleaner according to claim 3 consisting essentially of sodium hydroxide 20-40%, aluminum 0.5- 1.5% and solvent and diluent together 80 to 60% with the diluent being not over 40% of the total composition.

5. A drain cleaner according to claim 1 wherein the solvent is a chlorinated hydrocarbon.

6. A drain cleaner according to claim 5 wherein the sodium hydroxide is to 40%, the aluminum is 0.5 to 1.5% and the balance is essentially the solvent and a paraffin diluent present in an amount of 0% up to about the amount of the solvent.

7. A drain cleaner according to claim 1 wherein the solvent is a chlorinated hydrocarbon, the sodium hydroxide is 20 to and there is present a hydrocarbon diluent in an amount of 0% up to about the amount of the solvent.

8. A drain cleaner according to claim 1 wherein the solvent is N-methyl pyrrolidone.

9. A drain cleaner according to claim 1 wherein the solvent is a chlorinated hydrocarbon having two carbon atoms and 3 to 4 chlorine atoms.

10. A drain cleaner consisting essentially of 20'40% of finely divided sodium hydroxide and 0.51.5% of a metal selected from the group consisting of aluminum, tin, sodium alloy and potassium alloydispersed in to of a solvent or m xture of solvent and diluent, the solvent being selected from the group consisting of a chlorinated hydrocarbon of 1 to 2 carbon atoms and N-methyl pyrrolidone, the diluent being a liquid hydrocarbon boiling about 212 F., and being present in an amount of 0% up to the amount of the solvent.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,938,560 12/1933 Hunter 252157 2,509,197 5/1950 Borus et al 252162 2,662,837 12/1953 Duncan 252158 2,956,910 10/1960 Giammaria 134-22 LEON D. ROSDOL, Primary Examiner W. E. SCHULZ, Assistant Examiner US. Cl. X.R.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3875083 *Jun 27, 1973Apr 1, 1975Drackett CoHeat-producing compositions
US3928065 *Dec 19, 1973Dec 23, 1975Lever Brothers LtdComposition for cleaning metal cookware
US4453983 *May 3, 1982Jun 12, 1984Hysan CorporationDiphase drain cleaner
US4498933 *Mar 15, 1984Feb 12, 1985Hysan CorporationDiphase drain cleaner with halogenated aliphatic solvent
US4600522 *Apr 26, 1982Jul 15, 1986At&T Technologies, Inc.Detergent cleaning composition
US4687798 *Jan 27, 1986Aug 18, 1987King Lloyd H SrSolvent cement
EP0021149A1 *Jun 3, 1980Jan 7, 1981International Business Machines CorporationCleaning composition, process for its production and its use
EP0294353A1 *Jun 2, 1988Dec 7, 1988Göran Henry FreijProcess for the cleaning of articles or surfaces and a cleaner bath to be used in the process
WO1983002624A1 *Dec 27, 1982Aug 4, 1983Western Electric CoDetergent cleaning composition
Classifications
U.S. Classification510/196, 510/407, 252/364, 106/311, 252/183.14, 510/500, 252/183.12, 510/508, 510/412
International ClassificationC11D7/28, C11D7/32, C11D7/50, C11D7/22, C11D7/06, C11D7/24, C11D7/02
Cooperative ClassificationC11D7/24, C11D7/06, C11D7/32, C11D7/28, C11D7/5013
European ClassificationC11D7/50A4, C11D7/06