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Publication numberUS3578525 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 11, 1971
Filing dateJun 5, 1968
Priority dateJun 5, 1968
Publication numberUS 3578525 A, US 3578525A, US-A-3578525, US3578525 A, US3578525A
InventorsMueller Roger
Original AssigneeTextile Marking Machine Co Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method of marking textile articles
US 3578525 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 11, "197-1 MU v 3,578,525

METHOD OF MARKING TEXTILE ARTICLES Filed June 5. 1968 JATICIZOH YMUH R R R EFSIQSiQ IIISiIiIWIY/QIME H 33 INVENTOR. EIMQ EMEHUFZAE 40 ROGER MUELLER.

BY 44 H63 069M W.

ATTORNEY.

United States Patent 3,578,525 METHOD OF MARKING TEXTILE ARTICLES Roger Mueller, Syracuse, N.Y., assignor to Textile Marking Machine Co., Inc., Syracuse, N.Y. Filed June 5, 1968, Ser. No. 742,112 Int. Cl. B41m 3/00 US. Cl. 156-238 3 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A dry transfer is applied to the textile article by a heating iron and simultaneously, additional indicia is printed on the article by selected type fixedly located relative to the iron. The transfers are provided at areas spaced along a carrier strip and print ink is provided on the same strip, or on another strip. By using interchangeable type, any form of additional indicia may be printed on the article simultaneously with the application of the transfer thereto.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION Articles of textile material such, for example, as bed linen used in establishments as hospitals, hotels and the like, are marked to indicate the name and location of the establishment and it is desirable to include in the marking additional indicia, such as the date the article was put into use and the section, or department, of the establishment to which the particular article has been assigned. The many advantages of marking such articles, by the use of transfers, have been recognized for years. In addition to the words, the transfer can include various designs. Also, the transfers can be had in any color, or a transfer may include a plurality of different colors. These ad vantages have been enhanced with the development of so-called dry transfers, which are applied only by heat and pressure, not requiring any activating solutions.

Transfers, however, are relatively expensive, and the only marking obtained is that which is incorporated in the transfer. As stated above, it is not only important, but necessary, to include in the marking indicia further information pertaining to a specific article, such as the date the article was acquired and the department in which it has been assigned for use. For example the transfer would include the name and location of a hospital. The additional indicia would indicate that the article was for use in surgery, or in Ward B, etc.

In order to provide the additional indicia in marking the articles only by use of transfers, it is necessary for the establishment to acquire a very large inventory of transfer rolls, and the operator would have to continuously change the transfer rolls in order to apply the additional indicia to different articles.

BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION In the practise of my invention, an area of a carrier strip, having transfer material applied thereto, is placed in overlying relation to a heating iron. A carrier strip provided with print ink is positioned in overlying registration with print type. The textile article is pressed against the transfer material and the print ink. Preferably, a single carrier strip is used which is provided with the transfers and print ink, although it will be apparent from the detailed description of the invention that the transfers may be carried on one roll of the strip, or tape, and the print ink carried on a separate strip, or tape, either at spaced areas, or continuous.

In the preferred form, I provide the carrier, or backing strip, at intervals spaced therealong with transfer material in the form of a design and/ or words constituting what might be termed a house mark, to indicate the ownership of the article.

'ice

This carrier strip is also coated in areas complemental to, or pre-oriented with, the areas containing the transfers, with printing ink which preferably is of the same material as that in the transfer. The carrier strip is advanced from a supply roll to position'a transfer area in overlying relation to the heating iron. The complemental area coated with the printing ink is positioned in front of the print type, which is in fixed relationship to the heating iron. The textile article is pressed against the face side of the carrier strip by a platen, whereby the transfer and printing is eifected simultaneously. Upon each operation of the platen, the carrier strip is advanced automatically to position the next transfer and ink print area in registration with the heating iron and the type.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is an isometric view of a machine suitable for the practise of my invention.

FIG. 2 is a face view of the carrier strip illustrating the arrangement of the transfer and the print ink areas.

FIG. 3 is an enlarged face view of the transfer applying iron and print type.

FIG. 4 is a view taken on line 4-4, FIG. 3.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION Referring to FIG. 2, 10 designates a single carrier strip to which transfers, indicated generally at 11, are applied at spaced intervals along the strip. In the drawings, the transfer consists of a rectangular outline design 12 within which are letters indicating the name of a hospital. The strip 10 also has print ink, indicated at 13, applied to an area complemental to, or pre-oriented in relation to, transfer 11.

As in conventional practise, the strip 11 is of considerable yardage in length, containing a great number of transfers and print ink areas. The strip is sold in roll form.

Referring to FIG. 1, a roll 15 of the transfer strip is positioned on a support carried by the frame of, the applying and printing machine. The strip 10 is fed transversely from roll 15 across the flat surface 17 of a heating iron 18 fixed in the machine. The strip 10 is wound up on a spool 20. The textile article is positioned on a platen 23 which is mounted on the free end of an arm 25 pivotally mounted in the machine frame. The arm 25 is provided with handles 27, by means of which the operator can conveniently swing the platen 23, with the article positioned thereon, upwardly toward the heating iron 17. The face side of the carrier strip 10, having the transfer and print ink applied thereto, is faced outwardly for contact by the article.

When the platen 23 has been moved upwardly to position the article in proximity to the strip 10, power is applied to the arm 25 to move the article against the carrier strip, and move the rear surface thereof against the surface 17 of the heater iron under pressure. The pressure is maintained for a selected period of time by adjustment of a timer. Upon return movement of the arm 25, the roll 20 is automatically rotated to advance the next transfer in overlying registration with the heating iron for application of the transfer to the next article.

The machine referred to is satisfactory for use in cat'rying out my method of marking. However, it will be apparent that machines embodying a different specific arrangement could be used. The basic philosophy in the machine, as above described, is conventional in machines for the application of transfers. This machine departs from the conventional in that the heating iron 18 is, in addition to the fiat surface 17, provided with means by which print type can be interchangeably attached to the heating iron. The iron is formed with a surface 30 located inwardly of the surface 17 The surface 30 is formed with transversely extending dove-tailed slots 31 to receive print Patented May 11, 1971 type 33, spacer slugs 35, and retaining slugs 37. The print type and slugs are ton-med at their base, or inner ends, with a dove-tailed configuration complemental to the slots 31, whereby the print type and slugs are freely slidable in the slots. When a row of type is set, a retaining slug 37 is positioned at each end of the row. The retaining slugs are provided with set screws 40 which, when tightened, lock the retaining slugs in the slots 31 to maintain the type in the set row in proper location.

The transfers 11 and the print areas 13 are so dimensioned and arranged that upon each advancement of the strip 10, a transfer is positioned in overlying registration with the surface 17 of the heater iron, and a print ink area 13 is positioned in registration with the print type 33. It will be apparent that the print ink, in conjunction with the type 33, imprints indicia on the textile article simultaneously with the application of the transfer thereto.

As previously stated, the print ink 13 may be applied continuously on the strip 10, or on a separate strip indicated by the dotted line 45, FIG. 2, in which event the strip and the print ink strip can be advanced simultaneously by the roll 20.

What I claim is:

1. The method of marking articles consisting in positioning an area of a carrier strip bearing transfer material in overlying registration with a heating iron, positioning a print ink carrier in overlying registration with print type, and pressing the textile article against said transfer material and print ink simultaneously.

2. A method of marking textile articles consisting in providing a carrier strip with transfer material at areas spaced along said strip on the face side thereof, applying printing ink to the face side of said strip in areas associated with said transfer material areas and pre-oriented in respect thereto, moving said strip to position a transfer area in overlying registration with a heating iron arranged to engage the rear side of said strip, and an associated ink print area in registration with print type, positioning 'a textile article in overlying relation to the face side of said strip and compressing said strip between said textile article and said iron and print type.

3. The method of marking textile articles consisting in providing a first carrier strip with transfer material at areas spaced along said strip on the face side thereof, applying print ink to the face side of a second strip, moving said first strip to position a transfer area thereof in overlying registration with a heating iron arranged to engage the rear side of said strip, positioning said second carrier strip in overlying relation to print type, positioning a textile article in overlying relation to the face sides of said strips and compressing said strips between said article and said iron and print type.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,516,487 7/1950 Schlicksupp 156238 2,764,934 10/1956 Kaplan 156385X 3,128,219 4/1964 Ounmings 156-238X LELAND A. SEBASTIAN, Primary Examiner U.S. Cl. X.R.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4042445 *May 17, 1976Aug 16, 1977Delkor Industries, Inc.Stamp and legend applicating machine
US4284456 *Oct 24, 1979Aug 18, 1981Hare Donald SMethod for transferring creative artwork onto fabric
US4440590 *Feb 24, 1982Apr 3, 1984Letraset Corp.Transferring indicia to temporary support, building up and applying to transparent acrylic plastic sheet
US4543766 *Feb 24, 1983Oct 1, 1985Hobart CorporationPackaging system
US4773953 *Jan 17, 1986Sep 27, 1988Hare Donald SMethod for applying a creative design to a fabric from a Singapore Dammar resin coated transfer sheet
WO1987004393A1 *Jan 16, 1987Jul 30, 1987Donald S HareA method of and transfer sheet for applying a creative design to a fabric of a shirt or the like
Classifications
U.S. Classification156/238, 156/385, 101/34, 156/277, 156/240
International ClassificationB41F19/06, B41F19/00
Cooperative ClassificationB41P2219/32, B41F19/06, B41P2219/40
European ClassificationB41F19/06