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Publication numberUS3578738 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 18, 1971
Filing dateFeb 25, 1969
Priority dateFeb 25, 1969
Publication numberUS 3578738 A, US 3578738A, US-A-3578738, US3578738 A, US3578738A
InventorsHughes Martin Robert
Original AssigneeBissell Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Floor mat
US 3578738 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [72] Inventor Martin Robert Hughes Grand Rapids. Mich. [211 Appl.No. 802,147 [22] Filed Feb.25,1969 [45] Patented May 18,1971 [73] Assignee Bissell Inc.

GrandRapidsMich.

[54] FLOORMAT 6 Claims, 5 Drawing Figs.

[52] U.S.Cl 15/215 [51] lnt.Cl ..A47l23/22, A47g27/02 [50] FieldofSearch 15/215-7; 4/185 (F), I;296/l (F);180/90.6; 206/.8; 280/1641; 74/563, 564

[5 6] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,810,672 10/1957 Taylor 296/1-FX 2,919,456 1/1960 Spivey 15/215 3,300,275 H1967 Lonnan 15/215 FOREIGN PATENTS 51,618 5/1910 Switzerland 15/238 OTHER REFERENCES also consd.-3387315 15/215, 3435481 15/215, 3435480 15/215, 3400421 15/215, 2503174 15/215, 3424265 180/906, 2258238 ISO/90.6, 2850423 296/1FX Primary ExaminerWalter A. Scheel Assistant Examiner-Leon G. Machlin Attorney-Andrus, Sceales, Starke & Sawall ABSTRACT: A floor mat having a thin perforate water-absorbent top layer for wiping the feet on. An intermediate spongy layer receives water, but no appreciable dirt, from the top layer and also reinforces the top layer against side loads. An imperforate tray supports both layers and serves as a water receptacle. Ribs on the tray assist in preventing sliding of the intermediate layer thereon. The tray is snap fit onto a clamping frame which also holds the edge portions of both layers in place.

FLOOR MAT This invention relates to a floor mat, and more particularly to an improved mat for wiping off dirty and wet shoes, boots and the like, and which includes a plurality of layers with the top layer being disposable.

In accordance with the invention, the floor mat includes a top layer which functions to hold dirt and debris wiped onto it from the shoe or boot. A resilient intermediate layer soaks up moisture which may pass through the top layer and also serves to strengthen the top layer when the latter is stepped on. The bottom layer supports the two top layers and serves as a receptacle for water. A frame surrounds the three layers and removably holds the assembly in place.

The accompanying drawing illustrates the best mode presently contemplated by the inventor for carrying out the invention.

In the drawing:

FIG. I is an exploded perspective view of a floor mat constructed in accordance with the invention;

FIG. 2 is a perspective section of the moisture tray taken on line 2-2 of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a fragmentary perspective of the underside of the frame;

FIG. 4 is an enlarged section of the assembled mat; and

FIG. 5 is an enlarged fragmentary perspective view of a second embodiment of moisture tray.

As shown in the drawings, the floor mat generally comprises an assembly which includes a disposable top layer 1, an intermediate spongelike layer 2, a bottom layer or tray 3, and a frame 4.

Top layer 1 is made of a thin sheet of flexible, tearable, wettable, slightly moisture absorbent material such as nonwoven paper. It's surface should not be extremely smooth, but slightly rough surfaced. Layer 1 is perforate and is provided with a plurality of small holes or openings 5 for purposes to be described.

Middle layer 2 supports layer 1 on tray 3 and comprises a resilient spongelike sheet of relatively rough texture. A suitable material for layer 2 has been found to be polyester urethane foam. Layer 2 is of the open cell type. That is, moisture and water can pass therethrough in any direction.

Tray 3 serves as a moisture or water-receiving and retaining receptacle and comprises a thin elongated rectangular imperforate sheet of plastic or other suitable substance. Tray 3 includes a flat planular central surface 6 having a plurality of raised corrugations or ribs 7 for purposes to be described. As shown, ribs 7 extend both transversely and longitudinally of the tray, although they might also extend in other directions.

The edge portion of moisture tray 3 comprises a continuous raised reinforcing rib 8 separated by a channel 9 from a raised rim or edge portion 10 which curves downwardly to form a downwardly facing edge 11.

Frame 4 is made of thin plastic or the like and is adapted to hold the floor mat assembly together. The frame comprises a generally vertical rim 12 which merges into an inwardly and upwardly curved central portion 13, which in turn merges into an inner edge portion 14 which is relatively flat and horizontal. Locking means are provided to secure frame 4 and moisture tray 3 together. For this purpose, a thin rib 15 extends downwardly from the junction of frame portions 13 and 14, with rib 15 having a plurality of spaced inwardly facing locking lugs 16 thereon. Lugs 16 are provided with upwardly curved inner surfaces 17 and flat top faces 18, for purposes to be described.

In addition, means are provided to secure layers 1 and 2 and frame 4 together. For this purpose, a plurality of spaced spears or nibs 19 extend downwardly from the inner edge portion 14 of the frame.

As shown, top layer 1 and intermediate layer 2 are generally coextensive with moisture tray 3. However, when the parts are assembled for securement together, layer 2 preferably extends to justinwardly of rim 10, while top layer 1 overlaps layer 2 and extends slightly beyond the edge of the latter.

The floor mat is easily assembled and secured together in the following manner: Layers l and 2 are placed on tray 3, in the position described above. Frame 4 is then placed thereover and the edges of the frame and tray are squeezed together. As this is done, nibs l9 pierce or penetrate through layers 1 and 2. At the same time, tray rim 10 rides up the curved surfaces 17 of lugs 16 until the rim edge 11 snaps over the lug edge and rests on top face 18. The outer edge portions of layers 1 and 2 will be held securely by nibs 19, while the extreme outer edge of layer 1 will be clamped between tray rim l0 and frame portions 14 and 15.

Disassembly of the mat is relatively easy, since the entire assembly is somewhat flexible. The mat may be flexed and tray 3 pushed away from frame 4 until edge 11 is released from looking lugs 16.

The floor mat of the invention provides a unique combination of elements which cooperate to provide a new interaction of parts.

When the mat is placed on the floor and a person stands on it to wipe his feet, top layer 1 serves as means to pick up and hold particles of dirt and mud on its slightly rough surface. The edges of openings 5 serve to provide slight additional surface roughness to assist in picking up the dirt particles scraped thereagainst. Minor quantities of moisture will be picked up and absorbed by layer 1.

In many instances, especially in winter, large amounts of water will be wiped off onto the mat. This water will tend to saturate layer 1. Openings 5 will serve as passage means to assist flow of water directly down through layer 1 to middle layer 2, but the openings are small enough to prevent anything but very minute quantities of dirt particles from penetrating below the top layer. Layer 1 is thus penetrable by water but relatively impenetrable by dirt.

Water and moisture which penetrates down through layer 1 will now pass into middle layer 2, where it will be soaked up by the spongelike quality thereof. When layer 2 becomes saturated, or when layer 2 is squeezed by a person's weight on the mat, water will then pass downwardly onto imperforate tray 3 which will act as a water-holding receptacle.

As a person wipes his feet on the mat, he is apt to apply strong forces parallel to the plane of the mat which tend to slide one layer over the other. To overcome this problem, means are utilized to provide a relatively high friction interface between middle layer 2 and moisture tray 3. In the embodiment shown in FIGS. 1, 2 & 4, corrugations or ribs 7 sup port layer 2 and provide a plurality of raised edges extending in different directions which are engaged by sponge layer 2 under pressure and tend to hold the latter in place. FIG. 5 shows another embodiment wherein a substantially infinite number of multidirectional edges are provided by a rough sandylike finish or coating 20 on the upper surface of tray 3.

In addition, top layer 1 tends to cling to supporting middle layer 2, due to the rough interface. The spongelike resilient quality of layer 2 absorbs a substantial portion of the vertical and side loads applied to layer 1, and prevents the latter from tearing since downward pressure on layer 1 squeezes it into the surface of layer 2. The tensile strength of layerl can therefore be less than if layer 2 was not present, since the tensile strength of layer 2 is, in effect, added to the tensile strength of layer 1 and reinforces the latter.

The lower face of center surface 6 and channel 9 serve as the primary support for the mat on the floor. To prevent sliding of the mat thereon means to increase the friction therebetween may be provided. As shown in the drawing, a plurality of rubberlike feet 21 may be secured in the concave depressions forming the underside of corrugations 7.

Layer 1, being relatively inexpensive, may be disposed of when a significant amount of dirt has accumulated thereon, and a new replacement layer utilized. When tray 3 has become sufficiently full of water, the mat may be disassembled, spongy layer 2 squeezed out, tray 3 emptied, layer I cleaned or replaced, and the mat reassembled.

While the mat is shown as rectangular, it may also be circular or any other suitable shape.

Various modes of carrying out the invention are contemplated by the inventor.

I claim:

1, A floor mat comprising, in combination:

a. a thin top sheet for wiping the feet thereon, said top sheet being penetrable by water but relatively impenetrable by particles of dirt,

b. an intermediate sheet of resilient spongelike material disposed beneath and supporting said top sheet and with said intermediate sheet being constructed to hold water therein which has passed downwardly from said top sheet,

0. said top sheet being provided with a plurality of small openings therein, said openings providing surface roughness for trapping dirt particles scraped thereagainst as well as providing direct passage means for water to flow downwardly to said intermediate sheet,

. said intermediate sheet being of the open cell type so that water can pass therethrough, the surface of said intermediate sheet being of relatively rough texture,

e. a moisture tray disposed beneath and supporting said intermediate sheet, said tray being imperforate and constructed as a receptacle means for water which has passed downwardly from said intermediate sheet,

f. and means removably securing said tray and sheets together into a complete assembly.

2. The floor mat of claim 1 which includes friction increasing means at the interface between said moisture tray and said intermediate sheet to reduce sliding of said latter sheet on said tray upon application of forces parallel to the plane of the mat.

3. The floor mat of claim 2 in which said friction increasing means comprises a plurality of multidirectional edges raised from the surface of said tray and engaged by said intermediate sheet.

4. The floor mat of claim 2 in which said friction increasing means comprises a rough sandylike surface on said tray and engaged by said intermediate sheet.

5. A floor mat comprising, in combination:

a. a thin top sheet for wiping the feet thereon, said top sheet being penetrable by water but relatively impenetrable by particles of dirt,

b. an intermediate sheet of resilient spongelike material disposed beneath and supporting said top sheet and with said intermediate sheet being constructed to hold water therein which has passed downwardly from said top sheet,

c. a moisture tray disposed beneath and supporting said intermediate sheet, said tray being imperforate and constructed as a receptacle means for water which has passed downwardly from said intermediate sheet, said moisture tray comprising:

1, a sheet of thin material having a flat planular central surface,

2. and a plurality of multidirectional raised ribs in said surface which support said intermediate sheet and reduce sliding of said latter sheet on the tray,

3. the edge portion of said tray curving downwardly to form a downwardly extending edge,

d. and means removably securing said tray and sheets together into a complete assembly, said securing means comprising:

1. a frame,

2. a rib extending downwardly from said frame.

3. a plurality of spaced lugs snap-fittingly locking the said downwardly extending tray edge thereover,

4. and a plurality of spaced nibs penetrating through said top and intermediate sheets.

6. The floor mat of claim 5 wherein said raised ribs are formed by concave depressions in the bottom surface of said tray, and which includes a rubberlike mat-supporting foot disposed in at least one of said depressions.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2810672 *Jun 8, 1956Oct 22, 1957Don A TaylorFloor mats for automobiles
US2919456 *Apr 11, 1958Jan 5, 1960Spivey Walter FDoor mat
US3300275 *Dec 23, 1963Jan 24, 1967Lorman Alfred FGermicidal hospital mat
CH51618A * Title not available
Non-Patent Citations
Reference
1 *ALSO CONSD.-3387315 15/215, 3435481 15/215, 3435480 15/215, 3400421 15/215, 2503174 15/215, 3424265 180/90.6, 2258238 180/90.6, 2850423 296/1FX
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3696459 *Feb 12, 1971Oct 10, 1972Kucera Alfred JShoe cleaning mat assembly
US3808628 *Jun 15, 1972May 7, 1974Specialties ConstFloor mat
US4684562 *Mar 19, 1985Aug 4, 1987Robert HartkemeyerMat for absorbing oil and other liquids
US4727697 *Apr 23, 1986Mar 1, 1988Vaux Thomas MImpact absorbing safety matting system
US5018235 *Sep 12, 1989May 28, 1991Kimberly-Clark CorporationMat holder
US5071628 *Jan 31, 1989Dec 10, 1991Jean AlazetDevice for disinfection of soles of shoes
US5142733 *Dec 14, 1990Sep 1, 1992Kimberly-Clark CorporationMat holders
US5170526 *Feb 18, 1992Dec 15, 1992Milliken Research CorporationDust control mat with improved cleat
US5227214 *Mar 27, 1992Jul 13, 1993Milliken Research CorporationAnti-creep mat
US5254384 *Apr 16, 1991Oct 19, 1993Gordon Winston LHeatable car foot mat
US5297309 *Nov 12, 1990Mar 29, 1994Antonio RotoliDevice for disinfecting and cleaning parts of persons, animals and objects passing over it and contacting the ground
US5500267 *Aug 22, 1994Mar 19, 1996Canning; GeorgeSlip-resistant mat for absorbing oil and other liquids
US5881427 *Feb 14, 1997Mar 16, 1999Offner; JohannaShoe-cleaning assembly
US5962350 *Mar 6, 1998Oct 5, 1999Krotine; Gilbert MichealFloor mat
US6129402 *Jan 30, 1998Oct 10, 2000Vanliner Technologies Inc.Plastic floor liner for van or like vehicle with a central removable rubber panel flanked by ribbed side portions
US6219876May 4, 1999Apr 24, 2001Tech Mats, L.L.C.Floor mat
US6233776Apr 19, 2000May 22, 2001Tech Mats, L.L.CAdvanced floor mat
US6417778Jan 24, 2001Jul 9, 2002Tech Mats LlcAdvanced floor mat
US6507285May 3, 2002Jan 14, 2003Intellimats, Llc.Floor mats used for removal of dirt and moisture from footwear, having liquid crystal displays for graphics and prints
US6735806May 11, 2001May 18, 2004Eggs In The Pipeline, LlcTacky roller for improved surface cleaning
US6844058Nov 2, 2001Jan 18, 2005Tech Mats, LlcFloor mat including tacky surface with tacky-when-dry and tacky-when-wet properties
US6873266Nov 1, 2002Mar 29, 2005Intellimats, LlcElectronic floor display
US6886209Aug 14, 2001May 3, 2005Tech Mats, LlcAdvanced floor mat
US6886210 *Aug 7, 2002May 3, 2005Saratoga Hotel Group, LlcAnti-microbial floor mat
US6917301Oct 10, 2003Jul 12, 2005Intellimats, LlcFloor display system with variable image orientation
US6940418Feb 26, 2003Sep 6, 2005Intellimats, LlcElectronic floor display cleaning system and protective cover
US6982649May 16, 2003Jan 3, 2006Intellimats, LlcFloor display system with interactive features
US7009523Jun 5, 2003Mar 7, 2006Intellimats, LlcModular protective structure for floor display
US7109881Sep 22, 2005Sep 19, 2006Intellimats LlcElectronic floor display with weight measurement and reflective display
US7145469Dec 3, 2004Dec 5, 2006Intellimats, LlcDisplay system for use on horizontal or non-horizontal surfaces
US7205903Jan 20, 2004Apr 17, 2007Intellimat, Inc.Interactive and dynamic electronic floor advertising/messaging display
US7358861Aug 9, 2005Apr 15, 2008IntellimatsElectronic floor display with alerting
US7416771 *Apr 27, 2005Aug 26, 2008Racemark International, Inc.Modulator interchangeable floor mats
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US7841151 *Jan 15, 2008Nov 30, 2010The Matworks Company, LLCEdge-molding system for floor coverings
US8163367 *Sep 11, 2009Apr 24, 2012Szu-Hsien LeeWater absorbing mat
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Classifications
U.S. Classification15/215
International ClassificationA47L23/26, A47L23/00
Cooperative ClassificationA47L23/266
European ClassificationA47L23/26C