Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3581378 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 1, 1971
Filing dateMar 3, 1969
Priority dateMar 3, 1969
Also published asDE2010464A1
Publication numberUS 3581378 A, US 3581378A, US-A-3581378, US3581378 A, US3581378A
InventorsJozens Victor
Original AssigneeGillette Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method and apparatus for assembling a porous point pen
US 3581378 A
Abstract  available in
Images(5)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 1, 1971 v, JOZENS A 3,581,378

METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR ASSEMBLING A POROUS POINT PEN Filed March 5, 1969 BARREL WICK FEEDER 116. 1.

Sheets-Sheet 1 FEEDER T" BATZEEL. WICK NK STAKE? IN EX INDEX FILLER Z DRUM DQUM d I60 OO T w|c| FEEDER PLUNGER I10. 15. L 0 L 50 INVEN7'0/. j @231 77c LIOZENJ *6 a mw flwma #7 roe/vac.

June 1, 1971 v, JOZENS 3,581,378

METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR ASSEMBLING A POROUS POINT PEN Filed March 5, 1969 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 I/vvE/vToe. Mara/ 2 JozE/vs Maggi /& Max

V. JOZENS June 1, 1971 METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR ASSEMBLING A POROUS POINT PEN 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 Filed March 3, 1969 I/vvE/vroe. Vx'crae JazEA/s By M, m {fwd fir TOE/V5518.

METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR ASSEMBLING A POROUS POINT PEN V. JOZENS June 1, 1971 5 Sheets-Sheet 4 IA/veA/rae. V/Z-rae J'azE/vs time? Filed March 5,

firmen/ss r.

V. JOZENS June 1, 1971 METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR ASSEMBLING A POROUS POINT PEN Filed March 5, 1969 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 bm W? r 3 ms Iv vew roe [icy-oz Jbzsus fiT Ole/VEVJ.

\W NN United States Patent US. Cl. 29-429 7 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A porous point pen assembly apparatus and method for rapidly and automatically assembling a pen; the apparatus includes a rotatable index drum for supporting pen barrels, a second drum for supporting porous wicks or reservoirs in split bushing so as to accommodate wicks of varying diameter, means for supplying ink to each wick so as to provide complete saturation thereof, and means for inserting the wick into the drum, supplying a tip to the pen barrel, staking the tip to the pen barrel, and performing these assembly operations in timed sequence so as to produce a partially assembly porous point pen.

The commercial success of the porous point pen has given rise to a requirement for automatic, rapid and reliable assembly of such pens. While mass production of other types of writing instruments has resulted in the construction and use of automatic assembly machines, the components and techniques required for assembly of porous point pens involve unique problems. Some fountain pens of the prior art contained porous, absorptive or capillary bodies in the reservoirs and the practice was to insert the capillary body into the barrel or reservoir portion and fill this body or wick from one end. This is unsatisfactory since in many instances it was possible that portions of the fibrous wick be entirely devoid of ink thereby reducing the ink carrying capacity of the pen. It was also found that this method was unsatisfactory for proper manufacturing inspection. Specifically, the porous point tips of pens assembled are visually inspected by an operator and an ink-filled tip can be easily distinguished from the normally light-colored porous tip not saturated with ink. However, when a wick is filled from one end it was found that the time required for complete saturation of the wick and tip often exceeded the remaining assembly time so that the porous point did not become saturated prior to inspection. Thus, although the wick has been filled with ink, the time required for saturation was so excessive as to result in rejection during inspection of such pens.

The term wick as used herein refers to an absorbant porous body, generally of synthetic or natural filaments (cellulose acetate, polyethylene, cotton are examples), which may be compressed or bonded by heat or pressure, with or without the use of resinous bonding agents, into a body or bundle which exhibits capillarity, absorbs a large volume of ink and releases that ink to a writing nib, point or marker of a completed pen during writing. The term porous point is used to distinguish the final writing instrument from a metal nib fountain pen and refers to a writing tip made of virtually or generally alligned yarns and filaments of organic polymers (polyamids, polyesters, etc.) or of particulated polymers, bonded into finely porous, relatively strong and rigid, shape-retaining writing points which provide capillary channels for the flow of ink from wick to paper (or other surface being written on).

Hand assembly of pens, besides the serious disadvantage of slowness, also suffers from the lack of reliability in proper assembly of the components. Accordingly, it is an object of the present invention to provide a method 35%,378 Patented June l, 1971 and apparatus for assembling porous point pens whereby such pens are rapidly and automatically assembled without human intervention.

It is another object of the present invention to provide a porous point pen assembly apparatus wherein fibrous wicks serving as a porous reservoir for the ink in the pen may be filled prior to insertion in the plastic pen barrel by supplying ink to a central location thereof whereby the ink flow proceeds in opposite directions to rapidly saturate the entire wick.

One more object of the present invention is to provide a porous point pen assembly apparatus including mechanism for carrying wicks of nominally different size prior to insertion within the pen barrel and for discharging ink to a central portion of the wick for rapid saturation.

Yet one more object of the present invention is to provide a porous point pen assembly apparatus including a plurality of generally cylindrical split bushings for carrying wicks, having an upper portion and lower portion defining a centrally located through-bore, the upper portion being expandable to accommodate wicks of different diameter and including a lateral opening through which ink under pressure may be supplied into the bore so as to saturate the wick.

Generally stated, the present invention includes an apparatus and method for assembling a porous point pen wherein a plurality of pen barrels are rotatably supported and a plurality of fibrous wicks may be supported in carrying means for accommodating wicks of varying diameter and including apparatus for supplying ink to the wick prior to insertion of the wick into the pen barrel and providing rapid and complete saturation of such Wick, the wick being inserted into the pen barrel and porous point tips being supplied to the pen barrels from the other end thereof, the tips being staked to the pen barrel, and all of these operations being performed in sequence so as to produce a partially assembled pen.

Other objects and many of the attendant advantages of this invention will be readily appreciated as the same become better understood by reference to the following detailed description when considered in connection with the accompanying drawings.

In the drawings:

FIG. 1 is a schematic view of a porous point pen assembly apparatus constructed in accordance with the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a sectional view of an exemplary main index drum of a porous point pen assembly apparatus;

FIG. 3 is a sectional view taken along the plane III-III of FIG. 2;

FIG. 4 is a sectional view taken along the plane IVIV of FIG. 3;

FIG. 5 is a partial sectional view taken along the plane V-V of FIG. 4;

FIG. 6 is a partial sectional view take along the plane VIVI of FIG. 4;

FIG. 7 is a sectional view taken along the plane VIIVII of FIG. 3;

FIG. 8 is a partial sectional view taken along the plane VIII-VIII of FIG. 7;

FIG. 9 is a partial sectional view taken along the plane IXIX of FIG. 7;

FIG. 10 is a partial sectional view taken along the plane X-X of FIG. 3;

FIG. 11 is a partial sectional view taken along the plane XIXI of FIG. 10;

FIG. 12 is a sectional view taken along the plane XII-XII of FIG. 3;

FIG. 13 is a sectional view taken along the plane XIIIXIII of FIG. 3;

FIG. 14 is a sectional view taken along the plane XIVXIV of FIG. 13;

FIG. 15 is a partial section view taken along the plane XV-XV of FIG. 3;

FIG. 16 is an elevation view of FIG. 15; and

FIG. 17 is a partial sectional view taken along the plane XVII-XVII of FIG. 16.

Referring now to FIG. 1, there is shown in diagrammatic form an exemplary porous point pen assembly apparatus constructed in accordance with the present invention and generally including: a barrel index drum, indicated generally at 20; a wick index drum, indicated generally at 40; a pen barrel feeder, indicated generally at 60; a fibrous wick feeder, indicated generally at 80; a wick ink filler, indicated generally at 100; a wick plunger for inserting an inked wick into a barrel, indicated generally at 120; a porous point tip feeder, indicated generally at 140; and a porous point tip staking apparatus indicated generally at 160.

Referring to FIGS. 2 through 6, the barrel index drum 20 is mounted on a common base 21 for all of the abovementioned sub-assemblies. The barrel index drum 20 and wick index drum 40 are mounted on a common shaft 22 supported at one end by hearing 23 mounted in vertical bearing support standard 24 secured on common base 21. The opposite end of shaft 22 is supported in bearing 25 secured in housing 26 also secured to common base 21.

The barrel index drum 20 includes cylindrical axial member 27, carrying spaced apart support flanges 28, 29 and means for supporting a plurality of pen barrels, which in the exemplary embodiment include circular drum portions 30, 31. Drum portions 30, 31, support flanges 28, 29 and the axial member 27 may be integrally formed or may be secured to one another by welding, as in the exemplary embodiment. The barrel carrying circular drum portion 31, as seen best in FIG. 5, is provided with a plurality of circumferentially spaced peripheral barrel receiving notches or indentations 32 having a U-shaped axially sloping wall 33 which generally conforms to the shape of the supported portion of pen barrel B. The other barrel carrying circular drum portion is also provided with a plurality of axially aligned barrel receiving notches or indentations 34 each of which has a wall 35 for supporting a portion of one of the pen barrels B. Wall 35 generally conforms to the exterior configuration of the forward end of pen barrel B. Specifically, wall 35 includes an axially extending cylindrical wall portion 36, a frusto-conical Wall portion 37, and an axially tapering wall portion 38.

It will be seen that the pen barrels B are supported by circular drum portions 30, 31 and may be maintained in notches 32, 34 as the drum indexes (counter-clockwise as viewed in FIG. 3) through suitable flexible guide means. Each of the pen barrels B are delivered and deposited onto the barrel index drum 20 in the uppermost notches 32, 34 of circular drum portions '30, 31. The barrel index drum 20 is rotated through 15 increments so as to position the pen barrel B in successive index positions.

The porous point pen assembly apparatus is also provided with a wick index drum indicated generally at 40. Referring to FIG. 2, the wick index drum includes a hub 41 fixedly mounted on shaft 22 through a key 42, a circular portion 43 mounted to one end of hub 41, and a cylindrical outer housing 44 secured to circular portion 43. As shown in the exemplary exbodiment, hub 41, circular portion 43 and cylindrical outer housing 44 may be integrally formed.

The cylindrical outer housing 44 comprises a wick carrying drum portion having a plurality of circumferentially spaced peripherally disposed wick carrying means indicated generally at 45, and coaxially positioned with respect to the barrel index drum notches 32, 34. Each of the wick carrying means 45 comprise a split bushing 46 having a through-bore 47 for receiving the fibrous wicks or pen reservoirs. Through-bore 47 is provided with a chamfered end portion 48 for facilitating the entry of the wicks W into the bushing 46. Bushing 46 includes a lower split bushing portion 48 and a loosely fitting upper bushing portion 49. The upper bushing portion 49 includes an ink passage or opening 50 disposed axially midway the length of the entire bushing 46. Ink passage 50 includes an inwardly converging conical wall 51 for receiving the conical tip of an ink supply tube, as described more fully hereinafter, and an adjoining inner cylindrical wall 52. A vinyl plastic collar 53 is inserted over the reduced diameter end portions 54 of the bushing which are inserted into the end of barrel B as further described hereafter.

The porous point pen assembly apparatus also includes means 60 for supplying a pen barrel to one of the barrel index drum notches when the drum is in a first index position. Such means includes a storage chamber where large quantities of barrels B may be manually dumped and stored in aligned side-by-side relation. The barrels exit from the chamber into a feed rack 61 Where they are maintained in vertical stacked relation. Means 62 is provided for depositing a barrel on index drum 20 in synchronism with the index movement of the drum.

The porous point pen assembly apparatus includes means for supplying a wick to one of said wick carrying means 45, which in the exemplary embodiment comprises fibrous wick feeder 80. The fibrous wick feeder may comprise a hopper (not shown) in which a large number of 'WlCkS W may be manually dumped. A wick feed guide 81, as shown in FIGS. 7 and 9, may be positioned axially adjacent one of the wick carrying means 45 when such means is in the first index position of the wick index drum 40. The wick feed guide 81 includes a base, 82, endwalls 83, 84 and sidewalls 85, 86. The end and sidewalls 83 through 86 and base 82 define a guide chamber for receiving a plurality of wicks W in stacked vertical relation as best seen in FIG. 9. The endwalls 83, 84 are provided with openings 85, 86 respectively, generally axially aligned with the lowermost wick W resting on the upper surface of base 82 which may the concave in shape for supporting the lowermost wick W in spaced relation to sidewalls 85, 86.

Means for ink filling one of the Wicks W carried by the wick carrying means 45 is also included in the porous point pen assembly apparatus and in the exemplary embodiment is indicated at 100. Ink filler generally includes an ink reservoir 101 supported by a standard 102 mounted on comon base 21. As seen best in FIG. 10, the ink reservoir 101 has an inlet pipe or line 103 in fluid communication therewith and attached at its free end to a vessel or container, for example a 100 gallon drum, of ink of a type suitable for use in porous point pens.

The ink filler 100 also includes an ink discharge tube 105 having a conical ink discharge end 106 for mating engagement with the split bushing upper portion conical wall 51 circumscribing the lateral ink passage 50. The ink discharge tube 105 has an ink discharge passage 107 through which ink is discharged through the ink opening 50 in the upper bushing portion of the wick carrying means 45 so as to provide ink to the Wick W. The ink discharge tube 105 is reciprocatingly mounted in reservoir 101 and is cyclically operated in synchronism with the movement of the wick index drum 40 so that as each wick carrying means 45 is moved to the second index position and is carrying a dry wick the ink discharge tube 105 is extended so that the conical ink discharge end 106 is in bearing engagement with the conical wall 51 of the upper bushing 49 of Wick carrying means 45. During the ink supply operation, the split bushing 46 is moved to the left, as viewed FIG. 10 so that the reduced diameter portion 53 of bushing 46 is inserted into the end of barrel B.

The porous point pen assembly apparatus also includes means for axially moving one of the Wicks into the wick carrying means 45 which in the exemplary embodiment comprises the Wick plunger 120. Wick plunger 120, as

seen in FIG. 12, comprises a supporting cylinder .121 suitably mounted on common base 21 in which is reciprocably mounted a piston 122. Piston 122 is axially aligned with the center line of the through-bore 47 in one of the wick carrying means 45 when the wick index drum 40 has been properly indexed. The piston has a length which exceds the length of the wick carrying means 45. Reciprocating movement of piston 122 is synchronous with the movement of the wick index drum 40. As seen in FIG. 12, a wick W that has been saturated with ink is axially moved out of the wick carrying means 45 and into the axially aligned pen barrel B while the bushing 46 is positioned so that the end portion 47 thereof is inserted within barrel B.

The exemplary embodiment of the porous point pen assembly apparatus also includes a porous point tip feeder as seen best in FIGS. 13 and 14. The porous point tip feeder 140 includes an agitated tip hopper (not shown) from which tips T are deposited into a tip guide indicated generally at 141 having a tortuous tip guide passage 142 for aligning the tips T in a vertical stacked relation as seen in FIG. 14. The tip guide 141 includes endwalls 143, 144, a base wall 145, and sidewalls 146, 147 defining tortuous path 142. The tip guide 141 is supported by a bracket 148 to reciprocating tip feeder 149 comprising a standard 150 mounted on common base 21 and a cylinder 151 in which is mounted a piston 152. Piston 152 is axially aligned with openings 153, in endwalls 143, 144, respectively, of tip guide 141. The openings 153, 154 are aligned with one of the index positions of barrel index drum 20. Reciprocating movement of piston 152 is synchronous with the indexing of barrel index drum 20. Extension of piston 152 axially moves one of the tips T out of the guide 141 and into the forward portion of a pen barrel B supported on barrel index drum 20.

It will be seen from FIG. 13 that each of the tips T have pointed ends, one end serving as the writing tip and the other end, which may be more blunt, pierces the forward end of the wick W when the tip is driven into the pen barrel B, as seen in FIG. 13.

Means for staking porous point tips T into the barrels B, indicated generally at 160, is also included in the exemplary porous point pen assembly apparatus. The staking apparatus 160, as seen best in FIGS. 15 through 17, comprises a guide 161 through which a continuous length of wire to be severed into staking pins S is fed. The wire is advanced through feed rollers 162, 163 and into a feed block 1 64. Feed block 164 includes a bushing 165 which the wire W is fed. The feed block 164 7 also includes a reciprocating shear member 166 for severing a fixed length of the continuous wire and transferring it from the feed bushing 165 to the guide bushing 167. Guide bushing 167 has a cylindrical opening in alignment with a forward portion of pen barrel B.

The staking apparatus 160 also includes a reciprocating stake drive means 170 including an elongated drive anvil 171 slidingly received in guide bushing 167 of feed block 164. Drive anvil 171 is mounted in drive piston 172 carrying a lug 173 in operative engagement with the bifurcated end 174 of hell crank 175.

Timed synchronous movement of shear member 166 and drive anvil 171 in synchronism with the movement of barrel index drum 20, effects the movement of a stake, comprising a severed portion of the continuous wire S, by punching a hole through the forward portion of the pen barrel B and through the tip T positioned therein so as to stake the tip into the forward end of the barrel.

From the above description of the sub-assemblies, it will be seen that the porous point pen assembly apparatus provides a device for rapidly and reliably assembling pens in near completed form. To complete assembly, a plug is mounted and staked on the rear end of the barrel and an ordinary cap is releasably secured to the forward end of the barrel. The method and sequence of operations for partially assembling one pen may be described as follows. First, a pen barrel B is positioned in the uppermost pen barrel receiving notches or indentations 32, 34, of barrel index drum 20. Preferably simultaneously, a dry fibrous wick is fed from a hopper through a guide into a wick carrying split bushing mounted on a wick index drum and axially aligned with the notches 32, 34 in index drum 20.

The aligned pen barrel and dry fibrous wick are moved to a second index position through rotation of the wick and barrel drums. In this second index position, the fibrous wick may be filled with ink through ink filling means including a reciprocating ink discharge tube which matingly engages the wick carrying split bushing. The wick carrying split bushing having an ink receiving opening in the central portion thereof when engaged by the ink discharge tube allows ink to be transmitted under pressure into the fibrous wick. The barrel and wick drums are then indexed to a third position wherein a wick plunger axially moves the ink-filled wick from the wick carrying means into the aligned chamber of pen barrel B. Simultaneously, the pen tip is fed from a hopper through guide means and is positioned and aligned with the tip portion opening in pen barrel B and is axially driven into the forward portion of the barrel so that the rearward pointed end thereof is embedded into the forward end of the wick.

The wick and barrel drums are indexed to a third position at which a stake is driven through the forward portion of the pen barrel B and through the tip T so as to secure the tip therein.

An important feature of the present invention is the provision of means for filling the fibrous wicks prior to insertion into the pen barrel. Through the split bushing wick carrier of the present invention, the wick may be filled laterally from a point substantially equally spaced from both ends thereof so as to assure the proper ink distribution throughout the wick. Moreover, the wick may be rapidly filled by supplying the ink to the wick under pressure. It will also be understood that fibrous wicks can be manufactured, as a practical matter, only with a nominal outside diameter. Accordingly, the device that carries the wick during the ink filling operation must accommodate wicks of slightly varying size while maintaining a fluid-tight container around the wick itself. In the present invention, these requirements are met through the split bushing which can accommodate wicks of varying size but which can be forced together so as to compress the wick if necessary during the actual ink filling operation.

From the preceding description of the apparatus and method for assembling a porous point pen, it will be seen that a device is provided for rapidly and reliably filling pens in large number as required for a successful manufacturing operation. Having thus described an exemplary embodiment of the porous point pen assembly apparatus and method according to the present invention, it should be understood that this embodiment is exemplary only and that various alterations, modifications and adaptations may be made thereon within the scope of the present invention which is defined and limited only by the following claims.

I claim:

1. A porous point pen assembly apparatus for rapidly and automatically assembling a pen barrel, ink-carrying wick, and tip so as to comprise a pen, comprising:

a main index drum supported for rotatable movement about a horizontal axis and including a barrel carrying drum portion having a plurality of circumferentially spaced peripheral notches for supporting a pen barrel in axial alignment with said drum axis and a wick carrying drum portion having an equal number of circumferentially spaced peripherally disposed wick carrying means coaxial with said barrel notches;

means for supplying a pen barrel to one of said drum notches when said drum is in a first index position;

means for supplying a Wick to one of said wick carrying means when said drum is in a first index position;

means for ink filling one of said wicks carried by one of said wick carrying means when said drum is in a second index position;

means for axially moving one of said ink-filled wicks into one of said coaxially disposed pen barrels when said drum is in a third index position;

means for supplying a porous point tip to one of the pen barrels carried by said drum when said drum is in a third index position; means for staking one of said tips and pen barrels when said drum is in a fourth index position; and

means for rotatably indexing said main drum and selectively operating each of said means when said drum is in a rest position.

2. The assembly apparatus of claim 1 wherein each of said wick carrying means comprises a generally cylindrical split bushing including an upper portion and a lower portion defining a centrally located through-bore for receiving a wick, said upper and lower portions being expandable to accommodate wicks of diiferent diameter, and said upper portion having a lateral opening through which ink, under pressure, may be discharged into said through-bore so as to saturate said wick.

3. The assembly apparatus of claim 2 wherein said ink filling means comprises a reservoir, and a reciprocating ink discharge tube in fluid communication with said reservoir and including an ink discharge end for mating engagement with said split bushing upper portion adjacent the lateral opening therein for providing a fluid tight connection between the discharge tube end and said split bushing upper portion when ink is discharged under pressure into said wick.

-4. The assembly apparatus of claim 2 wherein said lateral opening in said split bushing upper portion is centrally axially located whereby ink is discharged into the central portion of each of said wicks so as to flow through the wick in opposite directions towards the ends thereof to completely saturate said wick.

5. The assembly apparatus of claim 3 wherein said ink filling means discharge tube engages said split bushing upper portion so as to force said upper portion against said lower portion so as to circumferentially enclose the wick therein even when the diameter of the wick is normally greater than the internal diameter of said split bushing through-bore.

6. A method of rapidly and automatically assembly a writing instrument having an elongated, cylindrical porous fiber reservoir, comprising the steps of:

positioning an open-end generally cylindrical pen barrel in one of a plurality of circumferentially spaced pen barrel receiving indentations in a rotatable, hori Zontally disposed cylindrical index drum; positioning an elongated, cylindrical porous fiber reservoir in one of a plurality of circumferentially spaced elongated longitudinally split bushings mounted in a rotatable, horizontally disposed cylindrical index drum, each bushing having a centrally located through-bore for receiving a reservoir and an opening centrally disposed along the bushing axis through one of the split bushings; pressure filling the porous reservoir with ink through the split bushing opening; inserting the ink-filled reservoir in the pin barrel through one end thereof; inserting a writting tip in the other end of the pen barrel; and staking the writting tip in the pen barrel so as to fix the tip therein. 7. The method according to claim 6 wherein the porous reservoir pressure filling step comprises positioning an ink injector having an open tip in fluid communication with an ink source in bearing, sealed relation with the split bushing opening; and discharging ink under pressure from the injector tip through the bushing opening into the porous reservoir at a point intermediate its length, whereby oversize diameter reservoirs will be easily received in the split bushing and will be compressed and enclosed Within the bushing prior to filling so as to retain ink under pressure.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,972,184 2/ 1961 Andrew 29208 3,112,562 12/1963 Wilson. 3,241,224 3/1966 Banister et a1. 29429 3,520,048 7/1970 Esseluhn et al. 29429 3,461,535 8/1969 Avery et al 29208 3,468,613 9/1969 Strickler 401l99 CHARLIE T. MOON, Primary Examiner US. Cl. X.R.

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE CERTIFICATE OF CQRRECTION Patent No. ,581,378 Dated June 1, 1971 Inventor Victor Jozens It is certified that error appears in the aboveidentified patent and that said Letters Patent is hereby corrected as shown below:

Column 1, line 23, "assembly" should be aSsembled-.

Column 5, line 28, "15" should be --l54-.

Column 5, line 48, after "165" add -int0-.

Claim 6, line 1, "assembly" should be -assembling-.

Signed and'sealed this 21st day of September 1971.

(SEAL) Attest:

EDWARD M'FLETCHEH, ROBERT GOTTSCIIALK Attesting Officer Acting Commissioner of Patents

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4171983 *Nov 30, 1977Oct 23, 1979The Gillette CompanyCapillary type ink
US4259780 *Apr 9, 1979Apr 7, 1981Genevieve I. HanscomParts assembler for ballpoint pens
US4320575 *Apr 11, 1980Mar 23, 1982Karlsson Lars HApparatus for manufacturing candles
US4536930 *Mar 9, 1984Aug 27, 1985Commissariat A L'energie AtomiqueProcess and machine for inserting points in a mandrel
US4598457 *Aug 26, 1985Jul 8, 1986Allied CorporationMethod of constructing a brake pedal
US20130167973 *Dec 27, 2012Jul 4, 2013Beifa Group Co., Ltd.Ink-filling machine for wrap-around core
US20140223720 *Feb 12, 2013Aug 14, 2014Crayola LlcMarker Maker
CN102555597A *Dec 29, 2011Jul 11, 2012贝发集团股份有限公司Automatic assembling line for water pen
CN102555597B *Dec 29, 2011Dec 24, 2014贝发集团股份有限公司Automatic assembling line for water pen
DE3151088A1 *Dec 23, 1981Jul 7, 1983Sortimat Creuz & Co GmbhApparatus for assembling workpieces and applications of this apparatus
Classifications
U.S. Classification29/429, 29/785, 401/199, 29/432, 29/808, 29/788
International ClassificationB43K15/02, B43K15/00
Cooperative ClassificationB43K15/02
European ClassificationB43K15/02