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Publication numberUS3583123 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 8, 1971
Filing dateSep 25, 1968
Priority dateSep 25, 1968
Publication numberUS 3583123 A, US 3583123A, US-A-3583123, US3583123 A, US3583123A
InventorsHolmgren Robert E, Knight Richard E
Original AssigneeRobertson Co H H
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Foamed-in-place double-skin building construction panel
US 3583123 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [721 Inventors Robert E. iiolmgren;

Richard E. Knlght, both 01 Connersvllle, Ind. [21] Appl. No. 762,551 [22] Filed Sept. 25,1968 [45] Patented June 8, 1971 [73] Assignee II. II. Robertson Company Pittsburgh, Pa.

[54] FOAMED-IN-ILACE DOUBLE-SKIN BUILDING CONSTRUCTION PANEL 8 Claims, 11 Drawing Figs.

[52] U.S. Cl. 52/584, 52/309, 52/593, 52/618, 161/121, 161/161 [51] Int. Cl. E04c 1/10, 1504c 2/20 [50] Field 01 Search 52/309, 450, 584,593, 404, 451, 618, 453, 615; 161/161, 160, 159, 123, 120, 121, 133, 135; 264/45; 220/9 F [56] Reierences Cited- UNITED STATES PATENTS 995,069 6/1911 Lewen 52/58'7 Primary Examiner-John E. Murtagh Attorney-Harry B. Keck ABSTRACT: A double skin construction panel having a foamed-in-place core and having its outer facing sheet spaced apart from its inner facing sheet. The panels are adapted to be assembled with fasteners which are substantially hidden from view. Plural positive mechanical connections between the outer facing sheet and the foamed-in-place core and between the inner facing sheet and the foamed-in-place core are provided.

FOAMIEllB-llN-FLACIE DOUBLE-SKIN BUILDING CONSTRUCTION PANEL BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION 1. Field of the Invention This invention relates to double skin building construction panels having a foamed-in-place core, and more particularly to a building construction panel of the type described wherein positive mechanical connections are provided between each facing sheet and the foamed-in-place core.

2. Description ofthe Prior Art Double-skin construction panels are well known in the prior art for use in the construction of buildings. See U.S. Pat. No. 2,284,229. Such double-skin panels have utilized thermal-insulation materials such as glass fiber batts, lightweight foamed plastic blocks and the like to maintain the outer sheet and inner sheet in spaced-apart relation. When building panels with spaced-apart facing sheets are applied to a building framework, some means is provided to secure the inner sheet to the framework such as rivets, self-tapping screws, welding, etc. The retention of the outer sheet is not always reliable. By providing metal fasteners extending entirely through the outer sheet, the core and the inner sheet, the resulting through-conduction path for thermal transfer minimizes the effectiveness of the thermal-insulating properties of the core material.

Some double-skin construction panels, e.g., U.S. Pats. No. 2,730,210; No. 3,276,626, provide for the mating of the outer sheet and the inner sheet at the side edges of the panel; this feature provides an objectionable through-conduction path for thermal transfer.

Some panels utilize different materials, e.g., relatively low thermal conductivity materials such as polyvinyl chloride, wood, rubber, to serve as side rails for the panels to maintain the inner and outer facing sheets in a relatively rigid, spacedapart relationship which avoids the high thermal conductivity of metal but does not achieve the exceptionally low thermal conductivity which is desirable. See U.S. Pat. No. 3,1 13,401.

In some building panels the outer sheet is maintained in its intended relation by an adhesive film, U.S. Pat. No. 3,235,040. In other panels tee outer sheet is auto-adhered to the foamed-in-place panel core. In both of these instances, subsequent weather exposure tends to deteriorate the adhesive bond and thereby to jeopardize the structural integrity of the panel.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The principal object of the invention is to provide a foamedin-place double-skin building construction panel wherein plural positive mechanical connections are provided between the outer and inner facing sheets and the foamed-in-place core, whereby the facing sheets do not depend solely for their structural integrity upon the auto-adhesive bond between the foamed-in-place core and the outer and inner facing sheets.

Another object of this invention is to provide a foamed-inplace double-skin building construction panel wherein the outer facing sheet and the inner facing sheet are physically separated by the foamed-in-place core whereby no throughconduction path for thermal transfer is present.

A further object of this invention is to provide foamed-inplace double-skin building construction panels which may serve as load-bearing elements and thereby eliminate the need for certain structural steel framework components.

The present invention provides a building construction panel comprising an outer facing sheet, an inner facing sheet spaced from the outer facing sheet, and a foamed-in-place core filling the space between the sheets and bonding the outer facing sheet to the inner facing sheet. Each of the facing sheets includes a web having first and second longitudinal edges. Spaced-apart, generally parallel longitudinal ribs are provided in the web. The ribs project from the web into the foamed-in-place core. Each of the ribs of each facing sheet include a base portion confronting the web of the other facing sheet and sidewalls diverging from the web toward the base portion. The configuration of the ribs is such that the ribs provide plural positive mechanical connections between each of the facing sheets and the foamed-in-place core. To facilitate erection of the building construction panel, means is provided by each of the facing sheets for connecting the first and second longitudinal edges thereof to corresponding longitudinal edges of adjacent ones of the building construction panels.

The outer and inner facing sheets are physically separated from one another. Accordingly, no through-conduction path for thermal transfer is present in the building construction panel.

The connecting means of each facing sheet provides a positive mechanical engagement between the outer facing sheets of adjacent building construction panels and between the inner facing sheets of the same adjacent building panels.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a fragmentary isometric view of a wall, partly in cross section, formed from the building construction panels of this invention;

FIG. 2 is a fragmentary isometric view of a facing sheet useful in the production of the present building construction panel;

FIGS. 3 through 6 are end views illustrating alternative embodiments of facing sheets useful in the production of the present building construction panel;

FIG. 7 is a fragmentary isometric view of a building construction panel of this invention utilizing the facing sheet of FIG. 2;

FIG. 8 is a fragmentary cross-sectional view, on an enlarged scale, taken along the line 8-8 of FIG. '7;

FIG. 9 is a cross-sectional view taken along the line 99 of FIG. 1; and

FIGS. 10 and 11 are fragmentary isometric views, similar to FIG. 7, illustrating alternative arrangements of the facing sheets of the building panel of this invention.

DESCRIPTION OF THEPREFERRED EMBODIMENT (S) Referring to FIG. 1, there is illustrated a wall structure 10 formed from a plurality of building construction panels 12 of this invention. Each of the panels 12 comprises outer and inner facing sheets 14, 15 spaced from each other, and a plastic foam core 16 filling the space between and bonding the outer and inner facing sheets l4, 15 one to the other.

The outer and inner facing sheets 14, 15 have identical profiles. The facing sheets 14, 15 preferably are fabricated from sheet metal, e.g., aluminum alloy; galvanized steel; painted steel; aluminized steel; protected metal sheets. Other materials having structural integrity may be employed as facing sheets, e.g., reinforced plastic sheets.

The plastic foam core 16 is formed by foamed-in-place techniques preferably from polyurethane.

Referring to FIG. 2, the facing sheet l4 (15) includes a web 18 presenting an essentially flat surface 20 and having first and second longitudinal edges 22, 24, respectively. The web 18 is provided with a plurality of spaced-apart generally parallel, longitudinal ribs 26 which project from the web 18. The ribs 26 are generally trapezoidal in cross section. Each of the ribs 26 includes a base portion 28 and sidewalls 30 connecting the base portion 28 to the web 18. The sidewalls 30 of each of the ribs 26 diverge from the web 18 toward the base portion 28. Alternatively, it may be said that the sidewalls 30 of each of the ribs 26 converge toward the web 18 and have a maximum separation presented at a location spaced from the web 18.

A first partial rib 32 is formed along the first longitudinal edge 22. The first partial rib 32 includes a first base portion 34, a first sidewall 36 connecting the first base portion 34 to the first longitudinal edge 22, and a sidewall fragment 38 formed along the opposite edge of the first base portion 3 6.

A second partial rib 40 is formed along the second longitudinal edge 24. The second partial rib 40 includes a second base portion 42 and a second sidewall 44 connecting the second base portion 42 to the second longitudinal edge 24. As will be more fully described later in the specification, the first and second partial ribs 32, 40 are shaped to form a complete rib, such as the rib 26, when a pair of the facing sheets 14 (15) are assembled in side-by-side relation.

FIGS. 3 to 6, inclusive, illustrate facing sheets 46, 48, 50 and 52, respectively, of various alternative profiles. Certain elements are common to all of the facing sheets 14 (15), 46, 48, 50 and 52 and corresponding numerals will be employed to identify those common elements.

Referring to FIG. 3, the essentially flat surface 20 is interrupted by longitudinal openings 27 defined by ribs 54. The ribs 54 of the facing sheet 46 are generally trapezoidal in cross section, including outwardly convex arcuate sidewalls S5. The first and second longitudinal edges 22, 24 of the facing sheets 46 are provided with first and second partial ribs 56, 58, respectively.

Referring to FIG. 4, the facing sheet 48 is similar to the facing sheet 46 (FIG. 3), including ribs 54 defining longitudinal openings 27 in the web 18, and first and second partial ribs 56, 58 provided along the first and second longitudinal sides 22, 24, respectively, of the web 18. In this embodiment, the ribs 54 include outwardly concave sidewalls 57.

Referring to FIG. 5, the essentially flat surface 20 or the facing sheet 50 is interrupted by longitudinal openings 27 defined by ribs 60 which are generally arcuate in cross section. The first and second longitudinal edges 22, 24 of the facing sheet 50 are provided with first and second partial ribs 62, 64, respectively.

Referring to FIG. 6, the essentially flat surface 20 of the facing sheet 52 is interrupted by longitudinal openings 27 defined by ribs 66 having a polygonal configuration. The first and second longitudinal edges 22, 24 of the facing sheet 52 are provided with first and second partial ribs 68, 70 respectively.

Referring to FIGS. 2 to 6, it will be noted that the ribs 26, 54, 54, 60, 66 of the facing sheets 14 (15) 46, 48, 50 and 52 are wider than the longitudinal openings 27. For example, in the facing sheets l4 (15), 46 and 48 of FIGS. 2, 3, 4, respectively, the base portions 28 are wider than the longitudinal openings 27. In the facing sheets 50, 52 of FIGS. 5 and 6, respectively, the maximum width of the ribs 60, 66 is indicated by the dimension lines 72. The maximum width 72 is greater than the width of the longitudinal openings 27.

The above-described configurational characteristic of the ribs is important since, for example, when a pair of the facing sheets I4 is assembled as shown in FIG. 7 to form the panel 12, the ribs 26 of each of the facing sheets 14 (15) are embedded in the plastic foam core 16. The embedment of the ribs 26 provides plural mechanical connections between each of the facing sheets 14 (15) and the plastic foam core i.e., each rib 26 has a maximum widthin this instance the base portion 28-presented within the foam core 16. Moreover, the sloping configuration of the first and second sidewalls 36, 44 of each of the facing sheets 14 (15) is such that additional mechanical connections are provided thereby between the facing sheets I4 (15) and the plastic foam core 16.

REFERRING STILL TO FIG. 7, it will be seen that the first longitudinal edge 22 of each of the facing sheets 14, 15 is laterally spaced apart from the second longitudinal edge 24 of the other facing sheet in a direction parallel with the webs 18 whereby the facing sheet 14 is entirely spaced-apart from the facing sheet 15. A gap 74 is provided between adjacent ones of the first and second base portions 34, 42 of the facing sheets 14, 15. The gap 74 is filled by the plastic foam core 16. Accordingly, the panel I2 presents no through-conduction path for thermal transfer.

In the arrangement of FIG. 7, the ribs 26 are equidistantly spaced from one another as indicated by the dimension lines labeled D.

Referring to FIG. 8, the base portions 28 of each rib 26 of each of the facing sheets I4, 15 confronts the web 18 of the other facing sheet 15, I4. The base portions 28 of the facing sheet 14 have surfaces residing in a plane indicated by the dash dot line labeled P,. Also, the base portions 28 of the facing sheet I5 have surfaces residing in a plane indicated by the dash dot line labeled P The arrangement is such that the plane P (facing sheet 14) intersects the sidewalls 30 of the ribs 26 of the facing sheet 15. Similarly, the plane P, (facing sheet 15) intersects the sidewalls 30 of the ribs 26 of the facing sheet 14. The arrangement may also be described by stating that the base portions 28 of the ribs 26 of each facing sheet I4 (15) are at a level between (a) the web 18 of the other facing sheet 15 (I4) and (b) a plane P,(P,) containing the surfaces 20 of the base portions 28 of the ribs 26 of the other facing sheet 15 (14). In the region between the base portions 28 and the confronting web 13, the foam core 16 may have a minimum thickness of about one-half inch.

Referring to FIG. 9, there is shown a typical connection between adjacent building construction panels 12A, 128. In the instance where the panels 12A, 12B are to be erected without extrinsic structural steel, fasteners 76, preferably of the self-tapping variety, may be installed to secure the first base portion 34B to the second base portion 42A and to secure the first base portion 34A to the second base portion 428. When the panel 12B is installed, the first partial rib 328 will nest in the second partial rib 40A of the panel 12A while the second partial rib 40B of the panel 128 receives the first partial rib 32A of the panel 12A. Thereafter, a plurality of the fasteners 76 are installed to secure the panels 12A, 128 in side-by-side relation.

It will also be noted that the first and second partial ribs 328, 40A form a rib 78 and the first and second partial ribs 32A, 403 form a rib 80. The rib 78 corresponds with one of the ribs 26 (not shown) of the facing sheets 15A, 158, while the rib 80 corresponds with the ribs 26 (not shown) of the facing sheets 14A, 1413. Accordingly, the connection between adjacent ones of the panels 12A, 128 can not readily be discerned. Moreover, the fasteners 76 are substantially hidden from view within the ribs 78, 80.

Referring still to FIG. 9, the panels 12A, 12B may be secured to a girt 82 shown in dotted outline, of a building structural framework. In this instance, a fastener 84 is installed in the region of the gap 74A of the panel 12A. The fastener 84 extends through the plastic foam cores 16A, the web 18A of the facing sheet 14A, into threaded engagement with the girt 82. The fasteners 76 are applied to the panels 12A, 123 in the region between the girts 82.

Alternative arrangements of the present building construction panel are illustrated in FIGS. 10 and 11. Corresponding numerals will be employed to identify corresponding parts heretofore described.

Referring to FIG. 10, a building construction panel 86 is illustrated which is similar to the building construction panel 12 of FIG. 7. The panel 86 includes facing sheets 14, 15 having ribs 26. In this arrangement, the facing sheet 14 is displaced laterally toward the facing sheet 15 in a direction parallel with the webs 18 such that the ribs 26 of the facing sheet 14 are closely adjacent to the ribs 26 of the facing sheet 15. That is to say, the ribs 26 of the facing sheet 14 are not equidistantly spaced from the ribs 26 of the facing sheet 15. The panel 86 has all of the advantages of panel 12 FIG. 7 and, in addition, there is a reduction in the amount of plastic foam core material required to fill the space between the facing sheets 14, 15.

Referring to FIG. 11, there is illustrated a building construction panel 88 comprising facing sheets 14, 15 and a plastic foam core 16 disposed therebetween. In this arrangement, the facing sheet 14 is entirely spaced from the plane P of the facing sheet 15. The panel 88 is considerably thicker than the panels 12, 86 of FIGS. 7 and 10, respectively.

The panels 86, 88 of FIGS. 10, 11, respectively, are erected in the same manner as the panel 12.

As indicated in FIG. 10, the building construction panel of this invention has a length L, a thickness T, and a width W. The width W corresponds with the actual coverage provided by the panel and is not to be confused with the overall width of the panel. By way of example, the building construction panel of this invention may be produced in lengths up to 50 feet; in thicknesses from about 2 to 6 inches; and in widths from 18 to 48 inches. The facing sheets may have a thickness in the range of 16 to 28 gauge.

If desired, a sealant material may be applied in the region of the ribs 78, 80 (FIG. 9), between the engaged surfaces of the first and second partial ribs 328, 40A and/or between the engaged surfaces of the first and second partial ribs 32A, 408 for sealing the connections between the adjacent panels 12A, 128.

If desired, the facing sheets illustrated in FIGS. 2 to 6 may include three or more of the full ribs and one each of the first and second partial ribs.

The present invention provides a building construction panel wherein plural mechanical connections are provided between each facing sheet and the plastic foam core; which may be erected to the structural framework of a building as an exterior wall of the building or as a roof component of the building; which may be erected as load-bearing elements thereby eliminating the need for structural steel framework components in certain instances; wherein no through-conduction path for thermal transfer is possible between the outer facing sheet and the inner facing sheet; and wherein fasteners employed to connect adjacent ones of the building construction panels are positioned entirely within the ribs provided in the facing sheets and therefore are substantially hidden from view.

We claim:

1. A building construction panel comprising an outer facing sheet, an inner facing sheet spaced fromsaid outer facing sheet, and a foamed-in-place core filling the space between and bonding said outer facing sheet to said inner facing sheet; each said facing sheet including:

a web having first and second longitudinal edges;

spaced-apart, generally parallel, longitudinal ribs projecting from said web into said foamed-in-place core, each of said ribs of each facing sheet including a base portion confronting the web of the other said facing sheet and sidewalls connecting said base portion to said web, said sidewalls of each of said ribs converging toward said web and having a maximum separation presented within said foamed-in-place core, whereby said ribs provide plural positive mechanical connections between each said facing sheet and said foamed-in-place core;

the base portions of said ribs of each said facing sheet being at a level between (a) the web of the other facing sheet and (b) a plane containing surfaces of the base portions of said ribs of the other facing sheet; and

means provided by each said facing sheet for connecting the said first and second longitudinal edges thereof to corresponding longitudinal edges of adjacent ones of the building construction panels.

2. A building construction panel comprising an outer facing sheet, an inner facing sheet spaced from said outer facing sheet, and a foamed-in-place core filling the space between and bonding said outer facing sheet to said inner facing sheet; each said facing sheet including:

a web having first and second longitudinal edges;

spaced-apart, generally parallel, longitudinal ribs projecting from said web into said foamed-in-place core, said ribs of each facing sheet being laterally offset from the ribs of the other facing sheet, each of said ribs of each facing sheet including a base portion confronting the web of the other said facing sheet and sidewalls connecting said base portion to said web, said sidewalls of each of said ribs converging toward said web and having a maximum separation presented within said foamed-in-place core, whereby said ribs provide plural positive mechanical connection between each said facing sheet and said foamed-in-place core;

the said first longitudinal edge of each facing sheet being laterally offset from the said second longitudinal ed e of the other facing sheet whereby the said outer facing s eet is entirely spaced-apart from the said inner facing sheet; and means provided by each said facing sheet for connecting the said first and second longitudinal edges thereof to corresponding longitudinal edges of adjacent ones of the building construction panels. 3. The building construction panel of claim 2 wherein each of said ribs is generally trapozoidal in cross section.

4. The building construction panel of claim 2 wherein each of said ribs is generally arcuate in cross section.

5. The building construction panel of claim 2 wherein each of said ribs has a polygonal configuration.

6. The building construction panel of claim 2 wherein said means comprises:

a first partial rib formed along said first longitudinal edge;

and a second partial rib formed along said second longitudinal edge; said building construction panel adapted to be engaged side by side with others of said building construction panel, with the said first partial rib of each facing sheet engaged with the said second partial rib of a corresponding facing sheet of an abutting building construction panel whereby the outer facing sheets are mechanically engaged with one another. 7. A building wall structure comprising a plurality of building construction panels according to claim 2 erected in side-by-side overlapped relation; said means comprising a first partial rib formed along the said first longitudinal edge of each said facing sheet, and a second partial rib formed along the said second longitudinal edge of each said facing sheet; the said first partial rib of each facing sheet interfitting the second partial rib of a corresponding facing sheet of an abutting building construction panel; and fastener means for securing the said first partial rib of each facing sheet to the second partial rib of said corresponding facing sheet of an abutting building construction panel. 8. The building wall structure of claim 7 wherein said first partial rib of each facing sheet includes a first base portion; said second partial rib of each facing sheet includes a second base portion engaged with the said first base portion; and said fastener means extends through the said first base portion and the said second portion into said foamed-inplace core.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification52/588.1, 52/783.11, 428/167, 428/319.1, 52/309.5
International ClassificationE04C2/292, E04C2/26, E04C2/32
Cooperative ClassificationE04C2/322, E04C2/292
European ClassificationE04C2/292, E04C2/32A