Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3583185 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 8, 1971
Filing dateNov 3, 1969
Priority dateNov 3, 1969
Publication numberUS 3583185 A, US 3583185A, US-A-3583185, US3583185 A, US3583185A
InventorsJacobi Edward N
Original AssigneeBriggs & Stratton Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Key-controlled lock switch with reliable weather protection cover
US 3583185 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [72] Inventor Edward N. Jacobi Milwaukee, Wis. [21] Appl. No. 873,405 [22] Filed Nov. 3, I969 [45] Patented June 8,1971 [73] Assignee Briggs & Stratton Corporation Wauwatosa, Wis.

[54] KEY-CONTROLLED LOCK SWITCH WITH RELIABLE WEATHER PROTECTION COVER 4 Claims, 3 Drawing Figs.

[52] U.S. Cl 70/455 [5i] E05!) 17/18 [50] Field of Search 70/455, 55; 200/42, 168(9); ISO/52.9, 52.10

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,247,592 7/1941 Swift 70/455 2,670.623 3/1954 Haltenberger 70/455 2,904,985 9/1959 Murphy 70/51 FOREIGN PATENTS 861,805 l/l953 Germany 70/455 OTHER REFERENCES Popular Science; March, 1938; Page 93; Flap Ends Frozen Locks; W. E. W.

Primary Examiner-Marvin A. Champion Assistant Examiner-Robert L. Wolfe Attorney-Ira Milton Jones ABSTRACT: The bored case of a tumbler lock has a switch on its rear end to be actuated by a key-controlled cylinder in the bore of the case, and an elastically resilient flap carried by a bracket attached to the lock case covers the front end of the lock case and the front face of the cylinder to protect the same from the elements.

KEY-CONTROLLED LOCK SWITCH WITH RELIABLE WEATHER PROTECTION COVER This invention relates to key controlled tumbler locks and more particularly to locks which control switches by which alarm systems on automobiles can be activated and deactivated from the exterior of the automobile by means of a proper key.

Automobiles used by salesmen and others who must carry sizeable quantities of valuable goods with them, are customarily equipped with signal systems to protect against unauthorized entry into the automobile and the consequent possibility of theft, These signal systems are electrical and are controllcd-at least deactivated-by a lock switch mounted in some exterior wall of the automobile at a point where the uninformed would not expect to find a lock. Often they are mounted on a lower portion of a fender or on the grill at the front of the car, but wherever located they are subjected to the worst consequences of bad weather. Snow, slush and rain and the corrosive effects of salt used to minimize the hazards of winter driving cannot be kept from these locations. Hence, unless the lock switches are well protected from the elements, the danger of an authorized person being unable to enter his automobile without setting off the alarm is very real.

If the lock becomes frozen, jammed with dirt, or otherwise rendered inoperable by its key, the alarm cannot be deactivated. This presents the authorized driver with a most serious dilemma.

Ordinary dust covers with which key controlled automotive locks have been equipped for years do not provide sufficient protection at the locations where these lock switches are placed; and to improve their design and make them reliably weather proof and readily operable at those locations in all weather conditions would entail tooling costs far in excess of the amount warranted by the limited market for such special lock switches.

It is therefore the purpose and object of this invention to provide a simple and inexpensive way of protecting a lock switch from being rendered inoperable by adverse weather conditions, and to that end, the lock switch is equipped with an elastically resilient flap that firmly covers the exposed front end of the lock and especially the mouth of its keyway, but can be easily moved to permit insertion of the key into the lock and then snaps back to its operative position upon removal of the key.

With these observations and objectives in mind, the manner in which the invention achieves its purpose will be appreciated from the following description and the accompanying drawing which exemplifies the invention.

The accompanying drawing illustrates one complete example of the embodiment of the invention constructed according to the best mode so far devised for the practical application of the principles thereof, and in which:

FIG. I is a perspective view of a lock switch of the type with which this invention is concerned, illustrating the same mounted on a panel representative of an exterior wall or part of an automobile on which such switches are customarily placed and provided with the weather protection means of this invention, part ofits cover being broken away;

FIG. 2 is a side view of the structure shown in FIG. I; and

FIG. 3 is a view similar to FIG. 2, but with a key in the lock.

Referring to the accompanying drawing, the numeral 4 designates generally a key-controlled lock switch mounted in a wall or panel 5 which is representative of the fender, grill or other more or less unusual location on an automobile where such lock switches are customarily placed.

The lock switch comprises a bored case 6 with a flange 7 at its front end and a threaded mounting portion 8 directly behind the flange, and upon which a nut 9 is threaded. When mounted in position of use, the lock case is passed through a hole in the wall or panel 5 and is secured thereto by drawing the nut tightly against the back of the wall. In the rear end portion of the bored caseand hence behind the wall 5-is a switch 10 with exposed terminals 11 by which the switch may be connected in an alarm system with which the automobile is equipped to signal unauthorized attempted entry.

The switch of course has movable contact means (not shown) that are drivingly connected with a keycontrolled lock cylinder 12 mounted in the bore of the case. Rotation of the cylinder, which is possible upon insertion into its keyway I3 of a proper key by which the tumblers of the lock (not shown) are retracted, thus actuates the switch. Accordingly, when the driver wishes to leave his car unattended but protected by the alarm system with which it is connected, he can set the alarm by closing the lock switch after he has closed all of the car doors. Any unauthorized attempt to enter the car will thus set off the alarm.

But when the driver or other authorized person possessing the proper key wishes to enter the car, he first deactivates the alarm by opening the lock switch, provided that weather conditions have not rendered the lock inoperable. To ensure that the lock can be operated, it must be thoroughly protected from the elements. The attainment of this important objective is the purpose of this invention and it is achieved by the very simple but effective protective means, indicated generally by the numeral 14, with which the lock switch is equipped.

This protection means comprises an elastically resilient cover member 15, preferably a rectangular piece of relatively heavy rubber or the like, mounted in front of the lock switch in a particular way by means of a rigid bracket 16. The material of which the cover member is formed must endure or tolerate all ranges of weather conditions without cracking or losing its resilience. Neoprene of about durometer hardness has been found to be satisfactory.

The bracket I6, which is preferably stamped from stiff sheet metal, has a flat attaching arm I7 and an outwardly extending arm 18 to which the cover member is secured as by rivets 19. The fiat attaching arm has a hole through which the threaded portion 8 of the lock case passes, so that this arm of the bracket is clamped between the wall 5 and the flange 7 during securement of the lock case to the wall.

The other arm 18 of the bracket is fiat throughout its entire extent and is joined to the arm 17 by an intermediate portion 20 which projects substantially perpendicularly from the attaching arm 17 and holds the arm 18 at an oblique angle to the axis of the lock case.

The angle and also the spacial relationship between the two arms of the bracket is important. In the preferred condition, the plane of the outer arm 18 passes through the front end portion of the lock case and obliquely intersects the axis of the lock case at a point substantially in the plane of the attaching arm 17, as indicated in broken lines in FIG. 2. With this disposition of the bracket arms the anchored end portion of the cover member lies fiat against the arm 17 for part of its length and the opposite free end portion thereof-which may be considered a flap-bears firmly against the front face 21 of the lock cylinder which protrudes a slight distance ahead of the front end of the lock case. Not only does this disposition of the bracket arms ensure firm engagement of the cover member flap portion against the front face of the cylinder, but it also takes advantage of the natural bend in the flap portion produced thereby, to effect the most efficacious engagement between the cover flap and the front face of the lock cylinder in which the mouth of the keyway is located.

Complete surface-to-surface engagement between the cover flap and the front face of the lock cylinder is not attained because of the slight, though inevitable, tilt of the cover flap. However, as seen in FIG. 2, the cover flap will bear solidly against the upper marginal edge portion of the front face of the cylinder. Hence, any moisture that may run down the underside (back side) of the cover flap will not stand and gather on this upper marginal edge portion of the cylinder; and if any such moisture is drawn into a possible crevice by capillarity, it will fiow from the mouth of the keyway since, as shown in FIG. 1, the keyway opens to the bottom edge of the front end portion of the lock cylinder. Obviously, of course, for this drain outlet to exist, the key bittings must face downwardly.

When the key is to be inserted into the lock, the cover flap is easily lifted off the mouth of the keyway, as shown in FIG. 3; and upon removal of the key, the cover flap snaps back to its closed position.

Those skilled in the art will appreciate that the invention can be embodied in forms other than as herein disclosed for purposes of illustration.

The invention is defined by the following claims:

lclaim:

l. A key-controlled lock switch intended to be mounted on an exterior wall portion of an automobile which is subject to being seriously affected by inclement weather, said lock switch having 1. a bored case with a flange at its front end to overlie the exterior ofa wall in which the lock case is mounted,

2. a switch at the inner end of the lock case to be behind said wall, the switch being adapted to control an alarm system with which the automobile is equipped and to deactivate the system when said switch is actuated, and

3. a rotatable cylinder in the bore of the lock case connected with the switch to actuate it when rotated, the cylinder having tumblers to restrain the cylinder against rotation and a keyway to receive a key by which the tumblers may be retracted and the cylinder rotated, and having a front face in which the mouth of the keyway is located, and which like the front end of the case is ex posed to the weather when the lock switch is in use, said lock switch being characterized by weather protection means covering the front face of the cylinder and the front end of the lock case to prevent entry of moisture and dirt into the keyway and/or the bore in which the cylinder is received, said protection means comprising:

A. a rigid bracket having angularly disposed first and second arms, the first arm having a hole in which the portion of the lock case directly adjacent to its flange is received so that said first arm is clamped between the flange and a wall in which the lock case is mounted, the second arm having a flat outer end portion lying in a plane which passes through the front end portion of the lock case and obliquely intersects the axis of the lock case rearwardly of the front face of the cylinder; and

B. a normally flat cover member of elastically resilient material flatwise anchored to said second arm and having a free end portion providing a flap which flatwise engages the front face of the cylinder and is thereby flexed out of coplanar relationship with its anchored portion and by such flexure is firmly held against the front face of the cylinder. 2. A key-controlled lock having a bored case with a flange at its front end to bear against a wall in which the case is mounted when the lock is in use, and a cylinder rotatably,

received in the bore of the lock case with the front face of the cylinder being so positioned that no part thereof lies inwardly of the front of the lock case, the cylinder having a keyway, the mouth of which opens to the front face of the cylinder, said lock being characterized by weather protection means covering the front face of the cylinder and the front end of the lock case, said weather protection means comprising:

A. a rigid bracket having angularly disposed first and second arms, the first arm having a hole in which the portion of the lock case directly adjacent to its flange is received so that said first arm is clamped between the flange and a wall in which the lock case is mounted, the second arm having a flat outer end portion lying in a plane which passes through the front end portion of the lock case and obliquely intersects the axis of the lock case rearwardly of the front face of the cylinder; and

B a normally flat cover member of elastically resilient material flatwise anchored to said second arm and having a free end portion providing a flap which flatwise engages the front face of the cylinder and is thereby flexed out of coplanar relationship with itsanchored portion and by such flexure is firmly held against the front face of the c linder. 3. he key-controlled lock of claim 2, wherein the plane of the flat outer end portion of the second arm of the bracket intersects the axis of the lock case at a point substantially in the plane of the first arm of the bracket.

4. The key-controlled lock of claim 2, wherein the front face of the cylinder is forwardly of the front end of the lock case, and

wherein the mouth of the keyway extends to the periphery of the front end portion of the cylinder at a point which faces downwardly when the cylinder is in its key-inserting position of rotation, so that any moisture which might enter the mouth of the keyway despite the presence of the protective flap will drain from the keyway.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2247592 *Feb 9, 1939Jul 1, 1941Swift George LProtective device
US2670623 *Jan 31, 1950Mar 2, 1954Haltenberger JulesMotor vehicle door lock accessory
US2904985 *Jun 13, 1958Sep 22, 1959Murphy George EWeatherproof padlock
*DE861805A Title not available
Non-Patent Citations
Reference
1 *Popular Science; March, 1938; Page 93; Flap Ends Frozen Locks; W. E. W.
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4825673 *Jul 28, 1988May 2, 1989Drake William TMoisture protection device for key lock openings
US5615567 *Aug 30, 1995Apr 1, 1997Kemp; Alan D.Exterior door lock cover
US5697238 *Jan 18, 1996Dec 16, 1997Nissan Motor Co., Ltd.Key cylinder
US5743380 *Dec 2, 1996Apr 28, 1998Augat Inc.Rotary door lock switch assembly and method for manufacturing same
US6520141May 23, 2002Feb 18, 2003Briggs & Stratton CorporationRewind cover guard
US7591159 *May 28, 2008Sep 22, 2009Asahi Denso Co., Ltd.Ignition switch device
US7707863 *May 28, 2008May 4, 2010Asahi Denso Co., Ltd.Ignition switch device
US7735347 *May 28, 2008Jun 15, 2010Asahi Denso Co., Ltd.Ignition switch device
WO2002103175A1 *Jun 14, 2002Dec 27, 2002Briggs & Stratton CorpRewind cover guard
WO2013061148A1 *Oct 23, 2012May 2, 2013Conchiglia Societa´ Per AzioniDoor lock protection device
Classifications
U.S. Classification70/455
International ClassificationE05B17/18
Cooperative ClassificationE05B17/188
European ClassificationE05B17/18F