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Publication numberUS3583558 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 8, 1971
Filing dateJul 31, 1969
Priority dateJul 31, 1969
Publication numberUS 3583558 A, US 3583558A, US-A-3583558, US3583558 A, US3583558A
InventorsRachel D Davis
Original AssigneeRachel D Davis
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Bib
US 3583558 A
Images(1)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent l l3,583,558

[72] invento R ch l D- Davis 3,299,440 1/1967 Grable. 2/49 111 E. Gordon SL, Kinston, N.C. 2850! 3,328,807 7/1967 Strauss 2/49 [2 1] Appl. No. 846,427 $332,547 7/1967 Rowe et al. Z/49X ggf than??? Primary Examiner-Alfred R. Guest Attorney-Mason, Fenwick & Lawrence [54] BIB 4 Claims, 4 Drawing Figs @BSTRACT. A plurality of disposable blbS formed consecutively on sheet material and having a perforated tear line form- UsS- n 4 t A i r y t ing each and also forming a pair of fies are formed 2/49 between the perforations of the bib and the perforated tear [51] Int. Cl A41d 13/04 line to be placed around the neck f a wearer and tied i Field of Search 2/49, 52; Each of the perforated tear lines extends outwardly from 21 206/56 A31 58 centrally located nadir toward the outer edges at an angle less than 40 between the outer edges and the end of the per- [56] References Cited forated tear line. The distance between adjacent nadirs is 1.5- UNITED STATES PATENTS 3 times the depth of the perforated tear line, and the width 3,032,773 5/ I962 Piazze 2/49 of the bib is l-3 times the depth of the same perforated tear 3,221,341 12/1965 Hummel 2/49 line.

2s 16 to K (G l6 K r K PATENTEUJUH srsm 3583; 558

QACHEL. D. DA\H5 ATTORNEYS BIB This invention relates generally to disposable bibs. More particularly, this invention relates to disposable bibs formed from a roll of sheet material which may be individually torn from said sheet material.

The principal object of the present invention is to provide a plurality of disposable bibs formed on a roll of disposable sheet material.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a plurality of disposable bibs formed on a roll of disposable sheet material wherein the bibs are easily torn from the roll.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a plurality of disposable bibs of a simple design which is effective to be held in place by a pair of mutually opposed ties that are adapted to be received and secured around the wearers neck.

A further and more particular object of the present invention is to provide a unique perforated tear line on the disposable sheet material wherein the tear line provides, a) a pair of ties, b) forms the upper or neck portion of the bib and, at the same time, c) forms the bottom of the next succeeding bib.

A further and more general object of the present invention is to provide a plurality of disposable bibs which are easily and simply used and which are far more economical than other forms of packaging bibs.

These and other objects of the present invention will become apparent upon careful perusal of the following specification and claim, including the the accompanying drawing wherein:

FIG. 1 is a plan view of the disposable sheet stock illustrating the position of the perforated tear line forming the successive bibs.

FIG. 2 is a perspective view of a bib being torn along the perforated tear line from the roll of disposable sheet material.

FIG. 3 is a view in elevation of the bib as it would be secured around the neck of the wearer FIG. 4 illustrates the bib positioned upon and around the neck of an infant wearer.

Referring to FIGS. 1 and 2, it may be seen that there is a roll of disposable sheet material generally provided with an inner core 12 to facilitate the rolling of the sheet material. The sheet material is provided with a unique perforated tear line 14 in successive and identical curved shapes along the sheet material to form a plurality of sections 16 which, when torn along the perforated tear line 14, forms the bib I8 as shown in FIGS. 2, 3 and 4 particularly.

The disposable sheet material that may be used includes but is not limited to the polyvinyl synthetic resins of a thermoplastic nature such as polyvinyl chloride, polyvinyl acetate, polyvinyl acetal, polyvinyl alcohol, polyvinylidene chloride, polyethylene, polypropylene, as well as the various polyesters well known to form sheet materials. Additionally, there may be any one of the various cellulose derivatives such as cellulose acetate, butyrate, cellulose nitrate, ethyl cellulose, methyl cellulose, the polycarbonates, and even nylon. Also, the commonly used paper products that are formed into sheet material may be utilized to provide the disposable bibs of the present invention. In fact, the material that is usable is not in any way limited for use as the disposable sheet material.

The perforated tear line 14 is a unique score line that may be impressed into the sheet material by any suitable mechanical means well known in the art. The shape and form of the scoreline is unique in and of itself, particularly with its relationship to successive perforated tear or score lines 14. The tear line 14 is positioned between the outer edges 20 of the sheet material and is essentially a convex curved semioval. As shown, the perforated tear line 14 is convex downwardly towards the playout of the roll. However, the perforated tear line may be simply reversed in mirror image that, viewing FIG. 1, the roll would be at the left hand end of the figure rather than at the right-hand end as is presently illustrated in FIG. 2.

The semioval perforated tear line 14 has its nadir centrally located between the outer edges 20 and the tear line extends upwardly in a smooth curve from the nadir 22 to meet the outer edges 20 at an angle alpha not greater than 40. With such a small angle, there IS formed a tie means 24 composed of should pair of land 28 which are mutually opposed on each side of the sheet material, and which form the ties that may be secured as by a knot 30, as shown in FIG. 3, around the neck of the wearer such as the infant of FIG. 4.

The shape of the perforated tear line 14 must be in the general shape of a substantial semioval. The depth as measured from the nadir vertically to a line joining the ends of the perforated line 14 is shown as the distance X and is important to define the other proportions of the bib. For instance, the distance between the adjacent nadirs should be 1 52 to 3 times the distance X, and the width of the sheet material between edges 20 should be between 1 to 3 times the depth of the perforated tear line 14, or as shown, the distance X.

As may be clearly seen, the incorporation of the peculiar and novel shape of the perforated tear line 14 forms ties 28 and 30 between the outer edges which are of a length X, that is, the depth of the perforated tear line. The depth X of the perforated tear line may vary in commercial use between 5 and 15 inches although such sizes are not critical.

In use, the roll of disposable bib sheet material is placed in a suitable dispenser in hospitals or institutions or in the home, and at any time a bib is desired, it may be torn from the remaining bibs on the sheet material, as shown in FIG. 2. Once removed, the ties 26 and 28 are positioned around the neck of the wearer, as shown in FIGS. 3 and 4, and tied in a knot 30 or otherwise secured together in any convenient fashion to hold the bib 18 secure on the chest of the wearer. It may be seen that with the simple roll of disposable bibs, the convenience facilitates the frequent use and disposing of the bibs after use by the attendant or mother without necessity of washing or cleaning the bib, and always providing a fresh clean sanitary surface to be secured for protection of the wearer.

From the foregoing detailed description, it will be evident that there are a number of changes, adaptations and modifications of the present invention which come within the province of those skilled in the art. However, it is intended that all such variations not departing from the spirit of the invention be considered as within the scope thereof as limited solely by the appended claims.

Iclaim:

l. A plurality of disposable bibs comprising a roll of disposable sheet material, a plurality of sections successively formed in said sheet material each said section being defined by parallel sides constituting the outer edges of said sheet material, the top and bottom of each section each being defined by mutually identically-shaped convex curved perforated tear lines, each perforated tear line having its nadir centrally located between said outer edges, each said perforated tear line extending outwardly toward said outer edges and intersecting said outer edges at an angle less than 40, the distance between adjacent nadirs being 1.5 to 3 times the depth of said perforated tear line, and the width of said bibs being I to 3 times the depth of said perforated line, tie means formed on said sheet material between each said outer edge and said perforated tear line and being shaped to conform to be tied around the neck of the wearer, bib means formed on said sheet material within and partially bounded at the bottom by said perforated tear line, whereby individual disposable bibs are removable from said roll by tearing said perforated line.

2. The disposable bibs of claim 1 including said sheet material being composed of a thermoplastic.

3. The disposable bibs of claim 1 including said sheet material being composed of paper.

4. The disposable bibs of claim 2 wherein said thermoplastic is polyvinyl chloride, polyvinyl acetate, polyvinylidene chloride, polyethylene, polyester, a cellulose derivative, polypropylene, polyvinyl acital, polyvinyl alcohol, and copolymers thereof.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3032773 *Nov 12, 1959May 8, 1962Continental Can CoContainer pouch and bib
US3221341 *Jun 24, 1964Dec 7, 1965H & H Plastics Mfg CoPlastic bib construction
US3299440 *Aug 20, 1964Jan 24, 1967Gene T GrableBib
US3328807 *Feb 4, 1965Jul 4, 1967Kurt StraussDisposable protective bib
US3332547 *Jun 15, 1965Jul 25, 1967Kimberly Clark CoDisposable bib
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3696443 *Nov 16, 1970Oct 10, 1972Kendall & CoSmock or gown with adjustable belt
US3949875 *Apr 18, 1974Apr 13, 1976Catania Anthony VShampoo neck strip
US3956782 *Sep 19, 1974May 18, 1976Morrison Medical Products CompanyContour mattress cover
US4034853 *Apr 16, 1975Jul 12, 1977Buford Bryan SmithStrip or roll of plastic film gloves
US4121004 *Nov 4, 1974Oct 17, 1978Ab Turn-O-MaticStrip roll for use in dispensing tickets
US4233688 *Jan 9, 1979Nov 18, 1980Jonna HjerlBib
US4293301 *Jun 18, 1979Oct 6, 1981Bengt MattssonDental absorptive pads and dispensing means therefor
US4536423 *Aug 16, 1984Aug 20, 1985Travis E ClaytonWall ornament for shower and bathtub enclosures
US4793004 *Feb 5, 1988Dec 27, 1988Unico Products, Inc.Disposable bib construction
US4883197 *Sep 18, 1987Nov 28, 1989Revlon, Inc.Sample strip and dispensing apparatus therefor
US4884299 *Mar 8, 1985Dec 5, 1989Connie RoseDisposable bibs, packaging and affixing tabs
US4884719 *Dec 30, 1986Dec 5, 1989Revlon, Inc.Single-sample dispensing
US5205454 *May 18, 1992Apr 27, 1993James River Ii, Inc.Paper towel dispensing system
US5497913 *Dec 15, 1993Mar 12, 1996Denny D. BakerMixing bag arrangement and method
US5530968 *Apr 11, 1995Jul 2, 1996Crockett; Wendy P.Commuter's apron
US5618105 *Dec 1, 1995Apr 8, 1997Denny D. BakerMethods of mixing ingredients in a bag
US5802811 *Apr 18, 1997Sep 8, 1998Danzig; Jan QuinnMethod and apparatus for dispensing baby bibs
US5809568 *Feb 28, 1997Sep 22, 1998Morris-Jones; MurielDisposable bibs
US6151716 *Oct 22, 1999Nov 28, 2000Patterson; Melanie S.Disposable paper bib
US6282716 *May 24, 2000Sep 4, 2001Melanie S. PattersonDisposable paper bib
US7143448Mar 24, 2006Dec 5, 2006Gottehrer Jonathan MBib for catching waste
US8268429Jun 21, 2010Sep 18, 2012The Procter & Gamble CompanyPerforated web product
US8283013Jun 21, 2010Oct 9, 2012The Procter & Gamble CompanyUniquely perforated web product
US8287976Jun 21, 2010Oct 16, 2012The Procter & Gamble CompanyUniquely perforated web product
US8287977Jun 21, 2010Oct 16, 2012The Procter & Gamble CompanyUniquely perforated web product
US8443725Jun 21, 2010May 21, 2013The Procter & Gamble CompanyMethod of perforating a web
US8468938Jun 21, 2010Jun 25, 2013The Procter & Gamble CompanyApparatus for perforating a web material
US8535483Jun 21, 2010Sep 17, 2013The Procter & Gamble CompanyApparatus for uniquely perforating a web material
US8545376 *Mar 20, 2009Oct 1, 2013Xerox CorporationPunched out tabs
US8757058Jun 21, 2010Jun 24, 2014The Procter & Gamble CompanyProcess for perforating a web
US8763523Jun 21, 2010Jul 1, 2014The Procter & Gamble CompanyMethod of perforating a web material
US8763526Jun 21, 2010Jul 1, 2014The Procter & Gamble CompanyApparatus for perforating a web material
EP2650229A1Dec 21, 2009Oct 16, 2013Intercontinental Great Brands LLCSeverable film package for stacked confectionery product pieces
WO2010077797A1Dec 14, 2009Jul 8, 2010Cadbury Adams Usa LlcRupturable blister package
Classifications
U.S. Classification242/160.1, 225/106, 206/820, 2/49.1, 493/375, 428/43, 428/906, 206/390, 24/9, 206/278
International ClassificationA41B13/10
Cooperative ClassificationA41B13/10, Y10S206/82, A41B2400/52, Y10S428/906
European ClassificationA41B13/10