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Publication numberUS3584402 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 15, 1971
Filing dateApr 8, 1970
Priority dateApr 8, 1970
Publication numberUS 3584402 A, US 3584402A, US-A-3584402, US3584402 A, US3584402A
InventorsSilverman Jack J
Original AssigneeSilverman Jack J
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Sandal for foot cast
US 3584402 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

J 1971 J. J. SILVERMAN 3,534,402

SANDAL FOR FOOT CAST Filed April 8, 1970 d j. S/Q/EQMAI/ BY a g United States Patent O US. Cl. 36-115 6 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A sandal adapted to accommodate a foot encased in a surgical cast. The sandal is of non-bendable construction and is formed by a generally rectangular platform of highdensity foam plastic which is laminated to an underlayer of relatively rigid tread material. The forepart of the platform, from a transverse line lying below the ball of the foot and extending to the front edge, is of diminishing thickness to define a wedge facilitating a rocking motion. Interposed between the platform and the tread is a fabric piece having complementary flaps extending from opposite sides of the sandal, the flaps being contoured to define the vamp portion and the ankle cufi" portion of a full shoe when the flaps are tied together against the cast.

BACKGROUND OF INVENTION This invention relates generally to sandals or clogs, and more particularly to a non-bendable sandal adapted to accommodate a left or right foot encased in a surgical cast.

In order to immobilize a fractured or broken foot, it is the usual practice to encase the foot in a surgical cast which extends well above the ankle and takes the form of a rigid dressing made from gauze impregnated with plaster of Paris. Such casts, although somewhat fragile, are relatively heavy and cumbersome. However, in most instances, one having a foot in a cast is still capable of walking. In fact, some exercise is desirable to stimulate circulation and promote the healing process.

It is not ordinarily possible to step directly on a cast. The usual practice therefore is to walk with the assistance of a crutch so that the encased foot is not brought down on the ground. This makes walking very diflicult. Moreover, the cast remains unprotected, and should one inadvertently take a step with it, the cast will be soiled and possibly damaged.

While it may be possible to place an oversize shoe over the cast, this is not advisable, for conventional shoes are relatively flexible, whereas foot casts are inflexible, so that the shoe would not protect the cast. On the other hand, should one use wood clogs for this purpose, the total absence of cushioning chracteristic of such clogs would make walking on an injured foot diflicult.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF INVENTION Accordingly, it is the main object of this invention to provide a sandal which is attachable to a cast-encased foot, the sandal protecting the cast while facilitating walking.

More specifically, it is an object of the invention to provide a non-bendable walker sandal of the above type whose configuration is such that the sandal is capable of a rocking motion, thereby making walking possible despite the non-bendable character of the cast. This rocking motion may be of the heel or ball type or a combination thereof.

Yet another object of the invention is to provide an inexpensive sandal having contoured flaps which are laceable, making it possible to quickly and firmly attach the sandal to surgical casts of different size.

Also an object of the invention is to provide a sandal of the above type which may be used as a post-surgical 3,584,402 Patented June 15, 1971 shoe without a cast or as a rester shoe which may be worn on any painful foot.

Briefly stated, these objects are accomplished in a sandal of effectively non-bendable construction formed of a generally rectangular platform of high-density foam plastic laminated to an underlayer of tread material. The forepart of the platform, from a transverse line underlying the ball of the foot and extending to the front edge, is of diminishing thickness to define a wedge. This facilitates a rocking action when the weight of the encased foot is brought to bear on the sandal. A similar wedge may be provided on the heel of the platform.

Interposed between the tread and platform and laminated thereto is a fabric piece having two complementary flaps extending from opposite sides of the sandal, the contours of the flaps being such that when placed against the cast and laced together, the flaps define the vamp and ankle portions of a full shoe.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF DRAWING For a better understanding of the invention as well as other objects and further features thereof, reference is made to the following detailed description to be read in conjunction with the accompanying drawing, wherein:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a foot encased in a surgical cast and having a sandal in accordance with the invention bound thereto;

FIG. 2 shows the sandal removed from the cast, with the flaps of the sandal outstretched;

FIG. 3 is a side elevation of the sandal bound to the cast,

FIG. 4 is a transverse section take in the plane indicated by line 44 in FIG. 3; and

FIG. 5 is a perspective view of a sandal similar to that of FIG. 1, but in boot size going above the ankle.

DESCRIPTION OF INVENTION Referring now to FIG. 1, there is shown an injured foot 10 which is encased in a rigid plaster-of-Paris cast 11. The coverage of the cast is such as to expose the extremity of the heel and the leading portion of the toes, the cast otherwise extending well up the leg to immobilize the injured foot. Attached to the encased foot is a sandal in accordance with the invention and generally designated by numeral 12.

The sandal is constituted by a platform .13, formed of high-density foam plastic material such as polyethylene or vinyl foam, having a slight degree of resilience to provide some measure of cushioning and springness. The platform is generally rectangular in form, with a squaredoff rear edge 13A and a squared-off front edge 13B, the corners at the front edge being chamfered to impart a clog-like appearance to the sandal.

The thickness of platform 13, as been seen in FIG. 2, is uniform throughout, except that from a transverse line X underlying the ball of the foot and extending to the front edge 13B, the thickness diminishes progressively to provide a wedge formation. In walking, the weight of the foot is brought to bear on the platform and because of the wedge formation, this causes a rocking motion at the ball of the foot. Such motion facilitates movement without bending of the sandal and without imposing stresses on the encased foot. A similar wedge formation may be provided at the heel of the sandal.

Laminated by a suitable cement or adhesive to the underside of platform 13 is a layer 14 of relatively rigid tread material which may be formed of hard rubber havmg a good wearing surface which is ribbed to improve traction. The exposed face of platform 13 is planar to receive the plantar area of the foot cast. The weight of the encased foot bears down on platform 14 which provides cushioning to minimize shock, but the laminated 3 platform and tread combination, when secured to the cast, is relatively inflexible and resists bending action in the course of walking.

Interposed between platform 13 and tread 14 is a fabric piece 15, preferably made of canvas, the edges of the piece being reinforced with a bead. The piece is provided with two complementary flaps 15A and 15B which extend from opposite sides of the sandal and which, when brought up against the cast, define the vamp portion and ankle cuff portion of a full shoe. The vamp portion margins of the flaps are provided with rows of eyelets 16 for receiving lacing 17 and the ankle cuff portion margins are provided with rows of eyelets 18 for receiving lacing 19. When the flaps are laced together, the sandal is firmly secured to the encased foot and the wearer is then able to walk with reasonable comfort. But because the attached sandal is unbendable, only a rocking motion is permitted about the wedge portion at the ball of the foot. Should a wedge also be provided at the heel of the sandal (not shown), one may rock both heel and ball.

While laces have been shown as the means to hold the flaps to the cast, other known means may be used for this purpose, such as a Velcro fastener or strap and buckle arrangements.

The sandal is also useable as a post-surgical shoe without a cast, in which case one may turn down the cuff and use the sandal in the form of a half shoe. But when used as a walker for a foot in a cast, it is important to keep the ankle cuff turned up to prevent any relative motion between the cast and sandal. The sandal may also be worn, cuff up or down, as a rester shoe on any painful foot.

While there have been shown and described prefererd emobidments of the invention, it will be appreciated that many changes and modifications may be made therein without, however, departing from the essential spirit of the invention.

I claim:

1. A non-bendable sandal adapted to accommodate a foot encased in a surgical cast, said sandal comprising:

(A) a generally rectangular platform formed or foam plastic material, the forepart of the platform being of diminishing thickness from a transverse line underlying the ball of the foot and extending to the front edge to define a wedge facilitating a rocking motion, the upper surface of the platform being planar to receive the plantar area of the cast,

(B) a relatively stiff tread layer laminated to the underside of the platform,

(C) a contoured piece interposed between the p atform and layer and laminated thereto, said piece having complementary flaps extending from oposite sides of the sandal, said flaps, when brought together against the cast, defining the vamp portion and ankle cuff portion of a full shoe, and

(D) means to connect the flaps to each other to secure the sandal to the cast.

2. A sandal as set forth in claim 1, wherein said platform is formed of high-density polyethylene foam having a slight resilience.

3. A sandal as set forth in claim 1, wherein said tread layer is formed of hard rubber which is ribbed.

4. A sandal as set forth in claim 1, wherein said means are constituted by laces.

5. A sandal as set forth in claim 1, wherein said piece is formed by canvas.

6. A sandal as set forth in claim 1, wherein the heel portion of the platform is of diminishing thickness to define a wedge facilitating a rocking motion.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,642,677 6/1953 Yates 36-115 2,725,648 12/1955 Kirk et a1 367.5X 3,228,124 1/1966 Schwarz 36-115 PATRICK D. LAWSON, Primary Examiner U.S. Cl X.R. 367.5

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3798803 *Jul 18, 1973Mar 26, 1974Kennedy MCast sandal
US3802424 *Mar 13, 1972Apr 9, 1974Newell ACast protective device
US3821858 *Sep 12, 1973Jul 2, 1974Haselden TProtector for athletic shoes
US3889400 *Sep 9, 1974Jun 17, 1975Atzinger Mary TShoe attachment for operating organ pedals
US4155180 *Feb 27, 1978May 22, 1979American Fitness, Inc.Footwear for more efficient running
US4188735 *Mar 27, 1978Feb 19, 1980Hahn John EAdjustable semi-flexible health shoe
US4206558 *Oct 10, 1978Jun 10, 1980Vin-Lyn Enterprises, Inc.Exercise shoes for simulated jogging
US4226031 *Jun 19, 1978Oct 7, 1980Wong James KSandal
US4265033 *Mar 21, 1979May 5, 1981Pols Sidney RShoe to be worn over cast
US4300256 *Aug 31, 1979Nov 17, 1981R. G. Barry CorporationClog-type shoes and method for their production
US4378793 *May 26, 1981Apr 5, 1983Kenneth D. DriverRemovable ankle brace
US4414759 *Dec 9, 1980Nov 15, 1983Morgan R DeanOrthopedic shoe
US4505269 *Jul 21, 1983Mar 19, 1985Davies John RAnkle splint
US4526365 *Mar 18, 1983Jul 2, 1985Zelik ZiegelbaumExercising device suitable for physical therapy and the like
US4546557 *Oct 8, 1982Oct 15, 1985Etablissements Mayzaud MauriceShoe, more especially for patients having undergone a surgical operation on the fore-foot
US4567678 *Apr 20, 1981Feb 4, 1986Morgan R DeanOrthopedic shoe
US4602626 *Jul 13, 1984Jul 29, 1986Johnson J BarryPost-surgical foot splint
US4727660 *Jun 10, 1986Mar 1, 1988Puma Ag Rudolf Dassler SportShoe for rehabilitation purposes
US4897935 *Mar 18, 1987Feb 6, 1990Fel Jean LouisNon-slip means and their uses on shoe soles
US4899468 *Jan 29, 1986Feb 13, 1990Richbourg Henry LSole for cast shoe
US5452527 *Feb 11, 1993Sep 26, 1995Medical Specialties, Inc.Shoe for a foot cast
US5483757 *Feb 3, 1994Jan 16, 1996Frykberg; Robert G.Healing sandal
US5836090 *Nov 12, 1996Nov 17, 1998Korkers, Inc.Non-slip sandal with wholly replaceable parts
US5946737 *May 20, 1996Sep 7, 1999Fleege; RobertCombined elbow and foot protector
US8201346 *Jun 30, 2008Jun 19, 2012Darco International, Inc.Medical shoe system
US8407917 *Apr 2, 2010Apr 2, 2013Michael BarrickApparatus, system, and method for shoe cover
US20100251562 *Apr 2, 2010Oct 7, 2010Michael BarrickApparatus, system, and method for shoe cover
US20130008052 *Jan 10, 2013Steven RosenRunning Shoe Having a Progressive Compression Attachment
EP0077713A1 *Oct 8, 1982Apr 27, 1983Louis Samuel BaroukShoe, in particular for patients having undergone a surgical foot operation
EP0248964A1 *Jun 9, 1986Dec 16, 1987Louis Samuel BaroukHeel-supporting shoe with minimal contact of the frontal part, especially for post-surgical or post-traumatic use
WO1986004229A1 *Oct 8, 1982Jul 31, 1986Louis Samuel BaroukFootwear, particularly for patients whose fore part of the foot has been operated
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/11.5, 36/7.5
International ClassificationA61F13/04
Cooperative ClassificationA61F13/043
European ClassificationA61F13/04C2