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Publication numberUS3585764 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 22, 1971
Filing dateJun 10, 1969
Priority dateJun 10, 1969
Also published asCA930553A, CA930553A1, DE2025689A1, DE7019610U
Publication numberUS 3585764 A, US 3585764A, US-A-3585764, US3585764 A, US3585764A
InventorsHuisman Harry, Huisman James
Original AssigneeHuisman Harry, Huisman James
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Diamond cutting method
US 3585764 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent I 72] Inventors James Heisman;

lhrry Hulsman, both of 1:10 llulsrnan Bros. I270 Aves. of America, New York, N.Y. M020 [2]] Appl. No. 831,973 [22] Filed June 10, 1969 [45] Patented June 22, 19'" [54] DIAMOND CU'lTlNG METHOD 9 Claims, 14 Drawing Figs. [52] US. CL 51/283, 5 H327, 63/32, [25/30 [S l] Int. Cl B24b H00 [50] FieldoiSeareh 51/283, 229; l25/30; 63/32; 51/327 [56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 809,53l 1/1906 Schenck (63/32UX) 2,340,659 2/l 944 Goldstein (63/32) 2,364,03l ll/l944 Suderov (63/32) 2,579,666 l2/l95l Hans 51/229 2,654,979 Ill/1953 Grodzinski et al. 51/283 3,286,486 I l/l966 Huisman et al 63/32 3,394,692 7/ l 968 Sirakian 125/30 Primary Examiner-Lester M. Swingle Attorney-Stoll and Stoll ABSTRACT: A method of cutting a diamond to produce 72 pavilion facets comprising the steps of cutting four pavilion facets, then dividing the four into eight pavilion facets, then cutting the eight into 16 pavilion facets with substantially overlapping edges, then polishing the girdle to a 90 edge, then cutting a facet at 53 at each overlap and intermediate each overlap, then dividing each such latter facet into three facets such that each latter facet is provided with a diamond shape, and then cutting 38 facets into the girdle.

DIAMOND CUTTING METHOD BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION 1. Field of the Invention Diamond cutting.

2. Description of the Prior Art The art and science of diamond cutting is generations old but it is a curious fact that the pavilions of round cut diamonds have commonly for many years been provided with 24 facets cut and polished at an approximate 41 angle with respect to the plane of the girdle. Thus, as stated in Goldstein U.S. Pat. No. 2,340,659 dated Feb. I, I944, the pavilion normally has "conventional 24 facets. This common cut is well known in the trade as "brilliant cut.

Our U.S. Pat. No. 3,286,486, dated Nov. 22, 1966, shows a greatly improved stone in which the pavilion is provided with 72 facets or 48 more than the common brilliant cut.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The present invention provides an entirely novel method of making a diamond having 72 pavilion facets and 38 girdle facets.

One of the novel aspects of the method herein described and claimed is the making of facets with overlapping intermediate side edges, the overlap being an entirely new step. Also among the novel features of the method herein described and claimed is the intermediate girdle thickening and polishing step which not only provides a relatively thick girdle as opposed to the thin girdle of the brilliant cut but also promotes through the making of girdle facets the extraordinary fire and brilliance of the resulting gem.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING FIG. I is a bottom view ofa diamond after four facets have been cut into the pavilion.

FIG. 2 is a side view of the stone of FIG. I.

FIG. 3 is a bottom view showing eight facets cut into the pavilion.

FIG. 4 is a side view of the stone of FIG. 3.

FIG. 5 is a bottom view of a 24 facet pavilion which is developed from the pavilion of FIG. 3 by dividing each facet of the latter into three facets with two new and overlapping facets together with a portion of the original facet. The three facets are not necessarily equal in size or shape.

FIG. 6 is a side view of the stone of FIG. 5.

FIG. 7 is a bottom view ofa 4O facet pavilion created by the formation of 16 overlapping facets adjacent the girdle.

FIG. 8 is a side view of the stone of FIG. 7.

FIG. 9 is a bottom view of a 72 facet pavilion.

FIG. I0 is a side view of the stone of FIG. 9.

FIG. 11 is an enlarged fragmentary view ofa faceted girdle.

FIG. 12 is a side view of a girdle-polishing machine, partly in phantom.

FIG. I3 is a bottom view of a modified stone produced in accordance with the method of the present invention in which the pavilion has 88 facets.

FIG. 14 is a side view of the stone of FIG. I3.

DESCRIPTION OF PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS OF THE INVENTION It will be understood that the method of the present invention is intended to yield a diamond of substantially round cut which in earlier configurations is known as the brilliant cut to which reference has been made. It should also be noted that the apex I0 or lowermost portion of the pavilion (uppermost in FIGS. 2, 4, 6,8 and I0), while a cut and polished facet in its own right is not included in the numerical tabulation of facet numbers hereinbelow.

The first step of the method produces the four substantially triangular pavilion facets shown in FIGS. I and 2. The second step of the method comprises dividing each of the aforesaid four facets in half to yield the eight substantially triangular pavilion facets shown in FIGS. 3 and 4.

The third step in the method is the cutting of each of the eight pavilion facets into a substantially trifurcated configuration in which two new facets l8 adjoining the girdle I5 are cut with an overlapping intermediate side edge 20. Overlapping side edge 20 begins at a point approximately two-thirds of the way up from apex l0 and continues to girdle I5. If facets I8 did not overlap but met only at girdle 15, they would be substantially triangular; the result of overlapping at intersection 20 is that each facet I8 has an abridged triangular configuration as shown.

The fourth step in the method is the polishing of girdle 15 to a edge; that is, girdle 15 is polished to an annular ring concentric with and having its side edge parallel to the longitudinal axis of the stone. It is this step, inter alia, which is entirely different from any method known to the art heretofore. Prior methods involved the production of thin girdles and polishing, if any, was reserved as a last step. The present invention provides this intermediate step of polishing the girdle into a relatively broad member capable, as will be seen, of receiving cut facets.

The fifth step of the method is the cutting of a facet 30 adjacent girdle I5 at each overlapping side edge 20 and intermediate'each overlapping side edge 20 at an approximate 53 angle yielding l6 abutting facets with overlapping intermediate side edges 31.

The sixth step of the method of the present invention is the cutting of each facet 30 by two triangular facets 40, the height of which is coextensive with the height of each overlapping side edge 3] and the hypotenuse of which extends from the top of each such overlapping side edge 31 to girdle I5 centrally of facet 30. Each facet 30 is thereby cut into a diamond shape. There are 32 such triangular facets and the total number of pavilion facets at this stage is 72. Triangular facets 40 are cut at an angle of 5860.

The last step of the method is the cutting ofgirdle I5 into 38 facets as shown in FIG. 11. Due to pavilion facets 40, the girdle facets are trapezoidal and rectangular, there being two adjacent trapezoidal facets and one rectangular facet in series.

It will be noted that girdle I5, although polished in the fourth step of the method and faceted in the last step, nevertheless appears relatively thin. A primary reason is that when facets are cut adjacent the girdle such as in the fifth and sixth steps, they may be cut partially into the girdle thereby reducing the girdle's thickness from that resulting from the fourth step polishing.

The stone shown in FIGS. 13 and I4 is the result ofa slight modification to facets 30 as previously cut in accordance with the present invention. A further step is the division of each facet 30 into substantially similar halves 30a whereby the pavilion, excluding apex or culet 10, has 88 facets.

FIG. [2 is a representation of a girdle polishing machine such as may be utilized in the cutting and polishing of girdle 15. Cutting and polishing wheel 50 is, of course, a diamond wheel and the jaws which hold the diamond are rotationally driven either continuously to produce the polished facet in the third step of the method or intermittently to produce the faceted girdle of the last step of the method.

The girdle polishing machine provides several unique advantages not heretofore attainable. The first advantage is an ability to accurately cut stones weighing as little as 5 points (l/20 of a carat) which represents a marked advance over earlier methods which could make practical use of stones no smaller than 20 points 1/5 of a carat). Another advantage is the ability to cut the final facets at relatively deep angles.

What we claim is:

I. A method of cutting diamonds and other stones having pavilion, girdle and cutlet, comprising the steps of:

a. cutting the pavilion into four substantially similar facets;

b. bifurcating each of said four facets into two similar substantiallv triangular facets:

c. trifurcating each of said substantially triangular facets into three facets of which two are girdle-adjoining and one is culet-adjoining;

d. intermediate polishing of the girdle to a 90 edge;

e. cutting a further facet at each intersection of said girdleadjoining facets; and

f. cutting into a portion of each said further facet two substantially triangular girdle-adjoining facets.

2. A method of cutting diamonds and other stones having pavilion, girdle and culet in accordance with claim I, wherein: said two girdle-adjoining facets are cut with an overlapping intermediate side edge.

3. A method of cutting diamonds and other stones having pavilion, girdle and culet in accordance with claim 2, wherein:

said overlapping intermediate side edge extends from the girdle to approximately two-thirds of the distance to the culet.

4. A method of cutting diamonds and other stones having pavilion, girdle and culet in accordance with claim l,wherein: each said further facet is cut at an approximate 53 angle.

5. A method of cutting diamonds and other stones having pavilion, girdle and culet in accordance with claim 1, additionally comprising the step of:

cutting facets into the girdle.

6. A method of cutting diamonds and other stones having pavilion, girdle and culet in accordance with claim I, additionally comprising the step of:

cutting 38 facets into the girdle.

74 A method of cutting diamonds and other stones having pavilion, girdle and culet in accordance with claim 6, wherein:

said 38 facets comprise trapezoidal and rectangular facets.

8. A method of cutting diamonds and other stones having pavilion, girdle and culet in accordance with claim 6, wherein:

said 38 facets comprise trapezoidal and rectangular facets in repeating series of two trapezoidal and one rectangular facet per series.

9. A method of cutting diamonds and other stones having pavilion, girdle and culet in accordance with claim 1, additionally comprising the step of:

dividing each said further facet into substantially similar half-facets.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US809531 *May 3, 1904Jan 9, 1906Ernest G H SchenckDiamond.
US2340659 *May 5, 1943Feb 1, 1944Edward GoldsteinPrecious stone
US2364031 *Jul 21, 1944Nov 28, 1944Patented Diamond IncBrilliant type diamond and method of cutting the same
US2579666 *Mar 20, 1948Dec 25, 1951Jewel Smiths IncDiamond cutting machine
US2654979 *Aug 29, 1950Oct 13, 1953Karl Penkuhn Arno LudwigMethod of and device for producing specifically oriented polished faces on diamonds
US3286486 *Jan 10, 1964Nov 22, 1966Harry HuismanDiamond with specially faceted pavilion
US3394692 *Dec 16, 1964Jul 30, 1968Sirakian & Fils CCutting and assembly of precious stones
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4083352 *Jan 28, 1977Apr 11, 1978Dmetro AndrychukMethod for cutting ornamental transparent gemstones and products produced therefrom
US4372042 *Sep 12, 1980Feb 8, 1983Diamagnetics, Inc.Method for manufacturing diamond pick-up stylus
US5044123 *Mar 22, 1990Sep 3, 1991Douglas HoffmanConcave-convex faceting method and apparatus
US5072549 *Sep 5, 1989Dec 17, 1991Harold JohnstonMethod of cutting gemstones and product
US5437167 *May 12, 1994Aug 1, 1995Ambar; BetzalelInvisible setting for round diamond stone
US5462474 *May 24, 1994Oct 31, 1995Ronald W. SwagerMethod of facetting a gem
US5761929 *Sep 12, 1996Jun 9, 1998M. Fabrikant & Sons, Ltd.Facet cut structure for colored stones to enhance brilliance
US6305193Oct 17, 2000Oct 23, 2001Continental Jewelry (Usa) Inc.Gemstone
US6397832 *Nov 7, 2000Jun 4, 2002Naotake ShutoDiamond cutting method and new-cut diamond shape
US6401489Feb 12, 2001Jun 11, 2002Continental Jewelry (Usa), Inc.Gemstone
US6422039 *Dec 11, 2000Jul 23, 2002D. Swarovski & Co.Gem
US6578380Jan 24, 2002Jun 17, 2003DiacoHexagonal brilliant cut diamond
US6591827 *Jun 25, 2001Jul 15, 2003Roy FuchsMethod for preparing a diamond
US6604382Mar 15, 2002Aug 12, 2003Naotake ShutoNew-cut diamond shape
US6615611Sep 26, 2000Sep 9, 2003Michael SchachterHigh yield diamond
US6668585 *Nov 13, 2000Dec 30, 2003David MarkowitzMulti-faceted combined cut gemstones
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US6761044Apr 11, 2002Jul 13, 2004Premier Gem CorpGemstone cut
US6892720Apr 15, 2003May 17, 2005Michael SchachterMethod for cutting natural and/or man-made diamonds
US7228856 *Feb 12, 2004Jun 12, 2007Tokyo Shinzyu Co., Ltd.Diamond cutting method and diamond provided by the method
US8156760Jun 16, 2009Apr 17, 2012Albert Gad, Ltd.Gemstone cut
US9226554May 12, 2014Jan 5, 2016Yoshihiko KodamaCircular cut diamond
US20030181147 *Apr 15, 2003Sep 25, 2003Michael SchachterMethod for cutting natural and/or man-made diamonds
US20030188551 *Apr 15, 2003Oct 9, 2003Michael SchachterHigh yield diamond
US20050252241 *May 13, 2004Nov 17, 2005Israel OsterDiamond cut
US20060137674 *Feb 12, 2004Jun 29, 2006Takeshi AoyagiDiamond cutting method and diamond provided by the method
US20090308104 *Jun 16, 2009Dec 17, 2009Morris GadGemstone cut
US20110000259 *Jan 22, 2008Jan 6, 2011Strnad Iii Leonard JGemstone and method for cutting the same
US20150201720 *Apr 1, 2015Jul 23, 2015D. Swarovski KgCut for gemstone
WO2006085645A1 *Feb 13, 2006Aug 17, 2006Imagine Ltd.Gem
WO2014011124A1 *Nov 30, 2012Jan 16, 2014Surasith SriorathaikulDiamond-cut enamel
Classifications
U.S. Classification451/58, 125/30.1, 451/395, 65/61, 63/32
International ClassificationA44C17/00
Cooperative ClassificationA44C17/001
European ClassificationA44C17/00B