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Publication numberUS3585821 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 22, 1971
Filing dateNov 5, 1968
Priority dateNov 5, 1968
Publication numberUS 3585821 A, US 3585821A, US-A-3585821, US3585821 A, US3585821A
InventorsBeltramini Warren E
Original AssigneeBeltramini Warren E
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Apparatus for preparing dyed textile warps
US 3585821 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [72] Inventor (54] APPARATUS FOR PREPARING DYED TEXTILE WARPS 2 Claims, 4 Drawing Figs.

[52] US. Cl. 68/l9.l, 28/75, 68/5, 68/20, 68/22, 68/175, 118/420 [51] lnt.Cl ..B05c 3/138, D06c 1/06 [50] Field ofSearch 8/148, 149, 149.1, 151.2, 14; 68/175, 5-4, 5-5,19.1, 20, 22; 28/75; 118/420 [56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 345,382 7/1886 Hill 118/420 1,929,127 10/1933 Turner 118/412 2,108,188 2/1938 Batchelder 8/151.2 2,173,998 9/1939 Camp etal 8/151.2UX 2,587,619 3/1952 Hofmann.... 8/151.2 UX 2,628,884 2/1953 .lacoby 8/149.3 3,137,056 6/1964 McClure et al. 8/151.2 X FOREIGN PATENTS 695,407 10/1964 Canada 28/75 16,453 8/ 1905 Great Britain 8/15 1.2

718,460 ll/1954 GreatBritain 428,134 12/1947 Italy Primary Examiner-Daniel Blum Attorneys-Robert S. Dunham, P. E. Henningcr, Lester W. Clark, Gerald W. Griffin, Thomas F. Moran, Howard .1. Churchill, R. Bradlee Boal and Christopher C. Dunham ABSTRACT: A method of preparing a warp including the steps of simultaneously and continuously advancing a plurality of initially undyed yarn threads along a finite path while applying dye to the threads at a first locality in the path, drying the dyed threads at a second locality in the path, and winding the dried threads in side-by-side array on a beam at the end of the path. To produce a multicolor warp, dyes of selected different colors are applied to selected different threads at the first 1ocality, the threads to be dyed each of the colors being selected so as to provide a desired sequence of threads of different colors on the beam; as the threads are advanced from the first locality to and through the second locality, threads dyed each of the colors are kept away from contact with threads dyed each other color. Apparatus for preparing a dyed warp comprising means for simultaneously and continuously advancing a plurality of threads along a defined path, including means for winding the threads in side-by-side array on a beam at the path terminus; at least one dyeing station including a dye trough through which the threads pass at a first locality in the path, and a pair of rollers for expressing excess dye from the threads emerging from the trough; and a confined drying chamber through which the dyed threads pass, in exposure to a heated drying atmosphere, before being wound on the beam.

APEARATUS FOR PREPARING DYE!) TEXTILE WARPS BACKGROUND OF THE lNVENTlON This invention relates to the manufacture of woven textiles having a warp of dyed yarn threads, and more particularly to apparatus for preparing a dyed warp. In an important specific sense, the invention is directed to apparatus for preparing a multicolor dyed warp, i.e. a warp constituted of dyed yarn threads of differing colors arranged in a predetermined color sequence across the width of the warp so as to provide in the produced textiles a desired pattern of warp stripes.

ln the art of textile weaving, a warp of yarn threads in sideby-side array, equal in width (i.e. number of warp threads) to the strip of fabric to be woven is assembled on a beam prior to the weaving operation and the warp is introduced to the loom from the beam. A conventional procedure for assembling a beam involves positioning a plurality of separate cones or bobbins of yarn, equal in number to the desired number of warp threads, on a suitable frame or creel, leading a thread from each bobbin to the beam, and winding the threads in side-byside array on the beam until the warp has achieved the desired length.

Frequently it is desired to produce a fabric wherein the warp comprises threads having different colors, in a particular sequence, so as to provide cloth having striped, checked or other multicolor pattern when the warp is introduced to the loom and woven. Heretofore, in production of such multicolor textiles, it has been necessary to assemble on the beam an array of predyed warp threads of yarn of the various selected colors in the particular sequence required to produce the desired pattern. For example, to produce a fabric having alternate warp stripes of blue, yellow and red, each three threads wide, it has been necessary to assemble in side-by-side array on a beam three blue threads, three yellow threads, three red threads, three blue threads again, and so forth, continuing across the full width of the beam.

in accordance with the conventional procedure referred to above, such assembly has been accomplished by initially arranging the requisite plurality of predyed bobbins of yarn of the several colors on a creel and leading threads from each of these bobbins to the beam in the desired sequence. The described multicolor beam assembling operation involving the steps of first dyeing the yarn (i.e. either by dyeing the fiber stock from which the yarn is subsequently spun, or by dyeing the yarn after spinning), then positioning on a creel the requisite number of bobbins of each of the several colors, and finally manually leading the threads in the desired color sequence from the plural bobbins to the beam, is a laborious and time-consuming operation. Moreover, a separate beam must be assembled for each pattern or set of colors to be woven. In the textile business, future demand for particular patterns and colors is highly unpredictable. Accordingly, it is not practicable to stockpile assembled multicolor beams, i.e. to produce particular multicolor warps in lengths or quantities greater than needed for a specific order. Thus, each time an order is received for a particular multicolor fabric, a special beam or beams must be assembled of the length required to meet that order. Unless quantities of dyed yarn of the various different colors required are stockpiled, filling of a particular order is delayed not only for assembly of the beam or beams but also for dyeing of the yarn prior to such assembly.

An especially inconvenient aspect of the conventional multicolor beam-preparing procedures described above is the necessity for arranging on a creel the requisite plurality of bobbins of predyed yarns of the different colors to be used. Typically, a warp may be constituted of several thousand individual threads, and the creel must carry a separate predyed yarn bobbin for each thread. Thus, each time one multicolor warp is completed and another having different colors and/or pattern is to be assembled, hundreds or even thousands of bobbins must be manually replaced on the creel.

Even in the case of assembly of single-color warps, a different set of bobbins must be positioned on the creel for each particular color of warp to be produced; and, again, stockpiling of single-color beams or predyed yarns is often undesirable owing to the unpredictability of future orders. Another difficulty, common to preparation of single-color and multicolor warps, is attainment of uniformity of shade of threads of a particular color across the width of the warp, since threads from different predyed yarn bobbins sometimes differ from each other in shade even though they are dyed with the same color.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The method of the present invention broadly contemplates procedure for preparing a dyed warp, comprising the steps of simultaneously and continuously advancing a plurality of initially undyed yarn threads along a finite path, and into a sideby-side array at the terminus of the path, while dyeing the threads at a first locality in the path, drying the dyed threads at a second locality in the path, and winding the dried threads on a beam in the aforementioned side-by-side array at the terminus of the path. As employed to produce a multicolor warp, selected different threads of the array are respectively dyed with dyes of the selected different colors respectively the first locality in the path, for providing in the array a predetermined sequence of threads respectively dyed the different colors, and the dyed threads of each color are maintained away from contact with the dyed threads of each other color during advance of the threads from the first locality to and through the second locality.

In one embodiment of this procedure, the undyed threads are initially assembled in side-by-side array on a supply beam. In another embodiment, the plural threads are drawn from a corresponding plurality of bobbins of undyed yarn arranged on a frame or creel. From the supply beam or creel, the undyed threads which are to receive each of the several colors are led through separate dyeing stations (each arranged to impart one particular color to the threads passing through it), thence through the drying region, and finally to the beam on which the dyed threads are to be wound.

As a further and particular feature of the invention, at each dyeing station the threads to be dyed at that station pass continuously through a body of liquid dye and, after emerging from the dye, pass through means such as a pair of resilient (e.g. padded) roller for expressing excess dye from the threads. The use of this particular dyeing step enables advantageously rapid drying of the dyed yarn in the drying region, wherein the dyed threads are advanced through a confined chamber in exposure to a suitable heated drying atmosphere.

In each of the described embodiments, the warp is initially assembled as an array of undyed threads equal in number to the desired number of warp threads. The fact that this array is made up of identical (undyed) threads across its width greatly facilitates initial assembly of the warp as compared with the former practice of manually selecting and assembling predyed threads of different colors in a particular sequence. In particular, the present method eliminates the necessity for preassembling a large plurality of bobbins of dyed yarn on a creel and for changing the bobbins each time it is desired to produce a different-colored warp, because in the practice of the invention each warp (regardless of its ultimate color or colors) is assembled from bobbins of undyed yarn. Any suitable yarn or combination of yarns, capable of providing a satisfactory textile fabric when used as a warp therein, may be employed in the present method.

The dyeing of the yarn in the beam-assembling operation of the invention, rather than prior to assembly of the beam as in procedures heretofore known, not only reduces the overall production time (i.e. including both the dyeing of the yarn and assembly of the beam) but also enhances uniformity of color shade across the width of the beam and obviates undesired stockpiling of predyed yarn. Also, beams may be preassem bled in large quantities; upon receipt of an order for a particular fabric pattern, a preassembled beam need only be dyed to the particular length ordered and the remaining undyed portion of the beam may subsequently be dyed with different colors and/or patterns. Such preassembly of the beam significantly reduces the time required to produce a fabric in response to an order.

The invention further contemplates apparatus for preparing a dyed warp, suitable for the practice of the above-described method and comprising, in combination, means for simultaneously and continuously advancing a plurality of yarn threads along a defined path and winding the threads in side-by-side array on a beam at the terminus of the path; at least one dyeing station positioned at a first locality in the path, the dyeing station comprising an upwardly opening trough extending transversely of the path for containing a body of liquid dye and receiving threads advancing along the path in such manner that the threads pass through the dye body, and a pair of resilient rollers having contiguous surfaces and extending in axially parallel relation transversely of the path in such position that the threads pass between the rollers after emerging from the trough, for expressing dye from the threads; and means positioned at a second locality in the path intermediate the first locality and the path terminus for drying the dyed threads, such means including a confined chamber through which the threads pass and means for providing in the chamber a heated atmosphere effective to dry the threads.

Further features and advantages of the invention will be apparent from the detailed description hereinbelow set forth together with the accompanying drawings.

BRlElF DESCRlPTlON OF THE DRAWING FIG. il is a schematic plan view of one form of apparatus for preparing a multicolor warp beam in accordance with the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a side elevational view of the apparatus of FIG. 1;

H6. 3 is a fragmentary schematic plan view of an alternative form of apparatus for preparing a multicolor warp beam in accordance with the present invention; and

H6. 41 is a fragmentary perspective view of the dye trough of the apparatus of Fig. 3.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION Referring first to l-lGS. H and 2, the apparatus there shown is illustrated as arranged for preparing a multicolor warp having three colors of threads wound in predetermined sequence in side-by-side array on a beam for introduction to a loom for weaving. In this apparatus, a plurality of undyed yarn threads (equal in number to the desired number of threads in the ultimately produced warp) are advanced from a rotatably mounted supply beam M1, on which they are mounted in sideby-side array, along a finite path to a rewind beam 12 on which they are wound in the same side-by-side array. Throughout the path of advance of the threads, they maintain the same side-by-side relationship as seen in plan view in FIG. 1.

Disposed in the path of advance of the threads are three dyeing stations respectively designated E4, 15 and 16 and shown as spaced apart both horizontally and vertically to facilitate advance of separate threads through different ones of these dyeing stations. Each of the dyeing stations includes an upwardly open horizontal dye trough l8 extending transversely of the path of advance of the threads across the full width thereof, and adapted to contain a supply of liquid dye. Within each dye trough is mounted a rod 19 axially parallel to the long dimension of the trough, and so disposed in the trough as to be at least partially immersed throughout its length in the body of liquid dye contained in the trough. Beyond the trough at each dyeing station are disposed a pair of resilient rollers 20 also extending transversely of the path of advance of the threads across the full width thereof, mounted for rotation about parallel vertically spaced axes so positioned that the surfaces of the two rollers are in contact. A thread to be dyed is passed beneath the rod 19 of the trough 18, for assured full immersion in the dye, and after emerging from the trough the thread passes between the rollers 20, which are suitably padded and serve to remove excess dye from the thread.

Beyond the three dyeing stations in the path of advance of the thread there is provided a suitable drying device 22 for effecting rapid and continuous drying of the dyed threads. In FIGS. 1 and 2, the drying device is shown in simplified form as comprising an enclosed, confined chamber 23 through which the threads pass from an inlet slot 24$ to an outlet slot 25, these slots being disposed in the opposite end walls of the chamber 23 and extending transversely of the path of advance of the threads across the full width thereof. A horizontal bar 27 extends along the lower edge of the inlet slot 243 and bears a plurality of vertically projecting guide elements 28 for keeping individual threads or groups of threads separate from each other as they enter the drying chamber. Each of the guide elements 28 is shown as a relatively thin metal plate member extending in the direction of advance of the threads and slidably supported on the bar 27 so that the spacing between adjacent guide elements may be varied (by sliding the guide elements along the bar relative to each other) to accommodate different numbers of threads.

Within the chamber and beyond the bar 27 is disposed a conveyor belt 311 mounted on rollers 31 for horizontal movement in the direction of advance of the threads and wide enough to carry simultaneously all the threads of the array. Means shown for simplicity as a plurality of nozzles 33 are also included in the drying device for supplying to the interior of the chamber a continuous flow of heated gas, such as steam (e.g. superheated steam) or dry heated air.

Beyond the outlet slot of the drying chamber, but ahead of the rewind beam 112, there may be provided means for cleaning the threads such as a trough 35 and associated pair of rollers 36 (similar in arrangement to each of the dyeing stations described above) through which the threads pass, for cleaning by a body of liquid solvent contained in the trough 35, excess solvent being expressed from the threads by the action of the rollers 36.

Very preferably, the supply beam ill and the rewind beam 12 are positively driven in the directions indicated in FIG. 2 to effect unwinding and rewinding of the threads, respectively. Also, the rollers 20 at each of the dyeing stations, and the rollers 36 associated with the cleaning trough 35, are preferably positively driven, as are the rollers 31 supporting the conveyor belt 30, all in synchronized relation and at such relative speeds as to prevent the advancing threads from being subjected to any substantial tension.

The method of the invention may be described as practiced with the apparatus of FIGS. ii and 2, for production of a threecolor warp having alternate blue, yellow and red stripes each three threads wide; i.e. a warp constituted of three blue threads, three yellow threads, three red threads, three blue threads again, and so forth, in a side-by-side array across the width of the warp. initially, a plurality of undyed yarn threads 10 equal in number to the desired number of warp threads are assembled and wound on a supply beam 11 in side-by-side array. From the supply beam, the threads are led through the apparatus so that the first three threads of the array pass through the first dyeing station 14 and thence directly to the drying device 22; the next three threads pass through the second dyeing station 15 and thence to the drying device; the third set of three threads pass through the third dyeing station 16 and thence to the drying device; the fourth set of three threads pass through the first dyeing station and to the drying device, and so forth, the described sequence being repeated across the full width of the warp. All the threads are led from the drying device 22 through the cleaning station comprising trough 35 and rollers 36, to the rewind beam 12 to which they are secured for rewinding in the same sequence in side-by-side array. in the drying device, the guide elements 28 are so positioned as to separate adjacent sets of three threads from each other. As shown in H6. 2, intermediate the supply beam Ell and the drying device 22, the threads being conducted through each dyeing station may be led over or under suitable guide structures such as bars 37, 38 and 39 which hold them vertically away from each of the other dyeing stations and from the threads advancing to and from the other dyeing statrons.

The troughs of the dyeing stations 14, and 16 are respectively filled with blue, yellow and red dyes so as to impart the desired different colors to the threads respectively passing therethrough. Thus each set of three threads passing through station 14 is dyed blue, while each set of three threads passing through station 15 is dyed yellow and each set of three threads passing through station 16 is dyed red.

As thus arranged, all the threads of the warp are simultaneously and continuously advanced from the beam 11 to the beam 12 by the positive drive imparted to the beams and rollers, each set of three adjacent threads passing through a particular one of the three dyeing stations and being there dyed with the color of dye contained in the trough of that station. From thedyeing stations, all the threads are simultaneously and continuously delivered to the drying device 22, and are carried through the chamber 23 by the conveyor belt 30 on which they rest, in exposure to heated dry air. After emerging from the drying chamber and passing through the cleaning trough 35, they are rewound on the beam 12 as dyed and dried threads in side-by-side array and in the desired sequence of colors.

The vertically spaced disposition of the three dyeing stations (together with the guide rods 37, 38 and 39) serves to keep the threads dyed with different colors away from contact with each other until they arrive at the drying device, where the guide elements 28 (positioned on bar 27 to separate adjacent sets of three threads) maintain the threads of different colors away from contact with each other as they advance to and are received on the conveyor belt. Thus from the time they are dyed until after they are dried, the threads'dyed each color are kept apart from the threads dyed each other color to prevent undesired transfer of colors between adjacent threads. The absence of tension on the wet threads, achieved by proper synchronization of the positively driven rollers and by use of the belt 30 to convey the threads through the drying chamber, prevents dimensional distortion or loss of tensile strength in the threads.

The drying device 22 may be arranged to provide drying conditions of the same type as in a so-called color fixation zone of apparatus heretofore known and employed for dyeing yarns, and may, for example, employ dry heat and hot air, or superheated steam, or air or other gas at superatmospheric pressure together with heat, to effect drying of the dyed threads. Exposure of the continuously advancing threads to the drying conditions in the chamber of the drying device 22 is effective to solidify the dye stuffs in the threads and render them adequately dry for handling and rewinding within an advantageously short period, enabling practicably rapid production of a multicolor warp. The particular dyeing operation employed facilitates rapid drying of the threads in the device 22.

The described advance of the threads from the beam 11 to the beam 12, successively through the dyeing stations and the drying chamber, is continued until a desired length of multicolor warp is produced. The dyed warp is then severed from the remaining undyed portion of the threads on the supply beam 11, and this remaining undyed portion may subsequently be dyed with a different pattern if desired, by changing the colors of dye in the troughs of the dyeing stations. The width (i.e. number of adjacent threads) and sequence of warp stripes may be adjusted by altering the number and sequence of threads led through each dyeing station, each station being arranged to dye threads in any position in the array of threads across the full width of the warp; and the spacing of the guide elements 28 on bar 27 may be correspondingly adjusted to accommodate stripes more or less than three threads wide. Also, to enable dyeing of warps of different lengths with advantageous economy in quantity of dye employed, the troughs of the dyeing stations may be made variable in capacity (as by providing them with removable or adjustable false bottoms, not shown) to enable them to accommodate varying quantities of dye as required for warps of different lengths.

By the procedure set forth above, a multicolor warp of any desired length may be rapidly prepared in a facile and convenient manner, from preassembled supply beams of undyed yarn which may be sufficient in length for production of plural warps in succession from a single supply beam. For example, whereas 3 to 4 hours (including yarn-dyeing time) have heretofore been required to produce a thousand yards of multicolor warp by conventional procedures, the same quantity can be produced in as little as 1 hour with the present method.

While the invention has been described above as used to produce a multicolor warp, the apparatus of FIGS. 1 and 2 may also be employed to produce a single-color dyed warp. For such operation, only one of the dye troughs may be filled (i.e. with dye of the desired color) and all the threads of the array may be conducted through this trough. In other respects, the dyeing procedure is as as described above. Particular advantages of use of the present invention to produce a singlecolor warp, apart from convenience and rapidity of operation, are the attainment of uniformity of color shade across the full width of the warp, and avoidance of the necessity for stockpiling predyed yarn.

As shown in FIG. 3, in place of the preassembled supply beam 11, the undyed yarn threads 10 may be supplied from an array of bobbins 40 of undyed yarn, e. g. mounted in vertically and horizontally spaced arrangement on a suitable frame or creel (not shown), the bobbins being equal in number to the desired number of warp threads. The plural threads are led from the bobbins simultaneously and continuously in side-byside array successively through dyeing stations and a drying device to a rewind beam, in the same manner as the undyed threads from the supply beam 11 in FIGS. 1 and 2.

Also as shown in FIG. 3, in place of the plural dye troughs and associated plural sets of rollers 20, the dyeing stations for imparting different colors to different threads may be provided by a single dye trough 18a, generally similar in construction and arrangement to each of the dye troughs 18 described above but having a plurality of partitions 42 which divide the trough 18a into plural separate chambers or compartments 43 for holding dyes of different colors. For example, to produce a warp having alternate stripes of blue, yellow and red each three threads wide, the trough 18a may be divided by the partitions 42 into a plurality of separate dye-containing compartments equal in number to the desired number of different colored stripes and each having sufficient width (transversely of the direction of thread advance) to accommodate three threads. The first three threads of the warp array are led through the first of the compartments 43, which is filled with blue dye; the next three threads are led through the adjacent compartment 43, which is filled with yellow dye; the next set of three threads are led through the next compartment 43, which is-filled with red dye; and so forth across the width of the warp. For assured full immersion of the threads in the dye, each thread passes under a rod 19a mounted in the trough 18a and corresponding in structure and function to the rods 19 in the troughs 18 of the three dyeing stations shown in the apparatus of FIGS. 1 and 2. The dyed threads emerging from the trough pass between a single pair of rollers 20 which extend across the full width of the warp, for removal of excess dye, and are then advanced to a drying device and a rewind beam in the same manner as the dyed threads in FIGS. 1 and 2.

As shown in FIG. 4, the partitions 42 are fitted in slots 44 provided in the inner walls of the trough 18a to effect liquidtight separation of adjacent dye compartments 43 and a sufficient number of slots 44 are provided to enable the spacing of the partitions 42 to be changed to accommodate different numbers of threads in the various dye compartments for producing a warp having stripes of various different widths (i.e. numbers of threads).

in the illustrated embodiments of the invention, all the threads are shown as disposed in their final parallel side-byside array throughout the length of the path of thread advance. However, the threads need not be parallel, or be brought into their final array, until after they advance through the drying region.

It is to be understood that the invention is not limited to the procedures and embodiments hereinabove specifically set forth but may be carried out in other ways without departure from its spirit.

lclaim:

1. ln apparatus for preparing a dyed warp, in combination,

a. means for simultaneously and continuously advancing a plurality of yarn threads along a defined path, said means including means for winding said threads in side-by-side array on a beam at the terminus of said path;

b. at least one dyeing station positioned at a first locality in said path, said dyeing station comprising i. an upwardly opening trough extending transversely of said path, containing a body ofliquid dye and receiving threads advancing along said path in such manner that said threads pass through said dye body in said trough, said trough being divided transversely of its long dimension into plural chambers for containing separate bodies of dye of respectively different colors and receiving different threads advancing along said path, and

ii. a pair of resilient rollers having contiguous surfaces and extending in axially parallel relationtransversely of said path in such position that said threads pass between said rollers after emerging from said trough, for expressing dye from said threads; and

c. means positioned at a second locality in said path intermediate said first locality and said terminus for drying the dyed threads, said means including i. a confined chamber through which said threads pass, v

ii. means for providing in said chamber a heated atmosphere effective to dry said threads, and

iii. means for maintaining dyed threads of different colors separated from contact with each other.

2. ln apparatus for preparing a dyed warp, in combination,

means for simultaneously and continuously advancing a plurality of yarn threads along a defined path, said means including means for winding said threads in side-by-side array on a beam at the terminus of said path; b. a plurality of dyeing stations positioned at a first locality in said path for receiving different threads advancing along said path, each of said dyeing stations comprising i. an upwardly opening trough extending transversely of said path, containing a body ofliquid dye and receiving threads advancing along said path in such manner that said threads pass through said dye body in said trough, and

ii. a pair of resilient rollers having contiguous surfaces and extending in axially parallel relation transversely of said path in such position that said threads pass between said rollers after emerging from said trough, for expressing dye from said threads; and

. means positioned at a second locality in said path intermediate said first locality and said terminus for drying the dyed threads, said means including i. a confined chamber through which said threads pass and ii. means for providing in said chamber a heated atmosphere effective to dry said threads.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4416124 *Dec 22, 1980Nov 22, 1983Godau EckhardtSheet-dyeing apparatus
US4501039 *Jul 15, 1983Feb 26, 1985Eckhard GodauSheet-dyeing method and apparatus
US5133279 *Jan 10, 1991Jul 28, 1992Gebruder Sucker And Franz Muller Gmbh & Co.Apparatus for drying a web of textile material
US5802649 *Aug 21, 1997Sep 8, 1998FyproMethod and apparatus for dyeing a traveling textile strand
US5868010 *May 26, 1998Feb 9, 1999Fypro Thread Company, Inc.Method for dyeing a traveling textile strand
US5881411 *Dec 23, 1996Mar 16, 1999Fypro Thread Company, Inc.Twisted, dyed and bonded filaments
DE4314402A1 *May 3, 1993Nov 10, 1994Sucker & Franz Mueller GmbhProcess and apparatus for indigo dyeing
DE4314402B4 *May 3, 1993Feb 2, 2006Moenus Textilmaschinen GmbhVorrichtung zum Indigofärben
DE8907384U1 *Jun 16, 1989Oct 11, 1990Ipf Interpatent + Franchise Ag, Luzern, ChTitle not available
Classifications
U.S. Classification68/19.1, 28/166, 68/20, 118/420, 68/175, 68/22.00R, 28/169, 68/5.00D
International ClassificationD06B11/00, D06B3/04, D06B3/00
Cooperative ClassificationD06B3/04, D06B11/0036
European ClassificationD06B11/00D6, D06B3/04