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Publication numberUS3585991 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 22, 1971
Filing dateNov 14, 1969
Priority dateNov 14, 1969
Publication numberUS 3585991 A, US 3585991A, US-A-3585991, US3585991 A, US3585991A
InventorsBalamuth Lewis
Original AssigneeUltrasonic Systems
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Psychophysiosonic system with multisensory aids
US 3585991 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

34F? 395852991 1 i CH'ROOM SEA United States m..." 1111 3,5 5,991

[72] Inventor Lewis Cl A6}?! 9/00 New York, NY. [50] Field of Search 128/24 A, [2|] Appl. No. 376,595 24.1, 32, 33, 66; 4/l78, 180 [22] Filed Nov. N, 1969 [45] Patented June 22. 1971 l l Rflelmm Cited (73] Assignee Ultrasonic Systems. lnc. UNITED STATES PATENTS Fm'mmgdak 2,097,952 11/1937 Lohr 128/66 ux P 2,970,073 1/1961 Prange 123/24 A W- 3,251,219 5/1966 Hertz et a1. 128/24 A a 729,317 5 1903 Fleetwood 128/32 ux ofapplicallml 219126, 2,82l,l9l 1/1958 Pall l28/33 1967, now Patent No. $499,437.

Primary Examiner-L, W. Trapp Attorney-Leonard W. Suroff [54] SYSTEM ABSTFKACT: The simultaneous application of a number of 46 CM 5 DUI stimuli to humans for therapeutic purposes involving audible Figs and inaudible sound vibrations introduced into the interior of [52] US. Cl 128/66, human beings by means of underwater projection, in combina- 128/24 A, 4/l 78 tion with sensory stimulation.

Y 55 1 12 91 66 2 I I, 7' I PAT EN 1 T H .nm? P um SHEET 3 0F 3 HEAD- AGITATOR UNQDESXJJ/STER VISUAL PHONES MEANS PRQJECTQR MEANS o o o AUDITORY TAPE HEAD CONTROL 3,

MEANS AMPUFIERS MEANS 1 T i i TAPE HEAD CHANNEL OUTPUTS I,I\'\'I'I.\I'()I\. 66 TAPE LEWIS BALAMUTH HEAD PSYCHOPHYSIOSONTC SYSTEM WITH MULTISENSORY AIDS This application is a continuation-in-part of my copending application Ser. No. 666,871, filed Sept. 11, 1967, now U.S. Pat. No. 3,499,437, dated Mar. 10, 1970, entitled Method And Apparatus For Treatment Of Organic Structures And Systems Thereof With Ultrasonic Energy, which invention is a continuation-in-part of my also copending application Ser. No. 622,126, filed Mar. 10, 1967, entitled Method And Apparatus For Treatment Of Organic Structures With Coherent Elastic Energy Waves, and now US. Pat. No. 3,499,437, dated Mar. 10, 1970, which entire subject matter of the copending applications are incorporated herein by reference as if fully herein set forth.

BACKGROUND OF THE lNVENTlON This invention relates broadly to the combined fields of physiotherapy and psychotherapy and is aimed at a broad spectrum of results from simple relaxation, both physically and emotionally, to treatment of more complex illnesses and maladjustments so common today.

in my copending patent applications, referred to above, the basic inventions of treating organic structures, such as humans, with sonic and ultrasonic coherent wave energy to obtain a micromassage of the cellular structure, for therapeutic purposes is disclosed. With respect to applicant's copending application Ser. No. 666,871, we have particular reference therein to a system as embodied in the present invention for treatment of humans and as contained in the following quotation therefrom. "For example, a patient submerged in a bathtub of warm water, being irradiated by modulated ultrasonic elastic waves such that the modulation will produce preselected musical compositions, will have psychosonic benefits added to the general toning-up stimuli. if the patient is a depressed individual in a mental hospital, then the music should be calculated to lift him out of the depressive state. It must be appreciated that music received in this way throughout the organism is a completely different phenomenon than the usual method of listening to aerial acoustic vibration.

lt is further evident that, if the patient were in an overexcited state, the modulation should be altered so as to produce music which is soothing and restful. This is completely in line with techniques currently used, whereby colors are utilized to aid altering the mood of a patient in a desired direction.

These same techniques may be extended and combined with colors through the use of swimming pools, and other special enclosures for general overall beneficial mieromassage to individuals."

Applicant has now discovered that the beneficial effects of the micromassage action may be combined with sensory producing stimuli to obtain physiotherapy and psychotherapy results for the treatment of humans as will hereinafter be described in detail, such combined effects being termed herein as "Psychophysiosonic."

Accordingly, this invention is an extension of applicant's copending applications referred to above and is based on applicants discoveries arising from preprogrammed multiscnsory stimulation combined with physiosonic "micromassage'.' therapy. To understand the basic principles of the invention it is necessary to distinguish clearly the physiological elements and the psychological elements and to set forth the interrelated connectedness of the phenomena involved.

We are living in an era where ecological problems and related problems of environmental pollution are of increasing concern, to such a degree that major govern mental, social and even international cooperative action appears imperative. In an analogous manner, individual man is a complex interrelated group of organisms his cells, nerves, internal organs, brain, sensory receptors, etc.) united in a single entity or per sonality, which is turn, is connected with an outer environment. As a matter of fact, when we speak of polution's effects on man, we generally refer to alterations in the atmosphere he breathes, the water he drinks and bathes in, the food he eats, and the various sensory stimuli received from the outside world of sounds, sights, tactile pressures, tensions, odors, tastes and so forth. Furthermore, it is being recognized more and more that what applicant calls energy" pollutions (such as noise, foul odors, overly tight shoes or girdles, etc.) can contribute to poor health and subnormal functioning in life situations. It is-not-always possible to separate the psychogenic and physiogenic factors arising in each case, but it is generally recognized today (cg. witness psychosomatic medicine) that the psychological and physiological determinants in a situation are mutually interconnected and each has a definite influence on the other.

Against this background of recognized principles applicant has invented a series of "environments each of which is a whole, and each of which is designed to provide interconnected and cooperating psychological and physiological treatment systems. It is of the greatest importance to appreciate that the combined "environments" are synergic in character, and in so being the total effect produced cannot be ascribed to each element separately. But, rather the system must be combined as a. whole, and the effects produced are uniquely the result of the whole environment.

It is this synergic effect, suggested in applicant's copending applications hereinabove referenced which is the dominant characteristic of the subject invention and which is responsible for the various beneficial effects set forth. By limiting the vibrations used in this invention to the sonic range, there is introduced automatically the sensory stimulation in addition to the micromassage" referred to above. Further, by controlling the sequence of vibrations to correspond to harmonious combinations of sound, not only is the interior of the body harmoniously micromassaged" but the psyche of the individual is also subjected to the psychological effects of harmonious sound. To produce such a result, it is necessary to provide one environment which will guarantee entrance of the vibrations to the interior of the individual body, and also an environment which will adequately capture" the auditory sensory apparatus of the individual. The production of an adequate acoustical auditorium for the micromassage effects has been set forth in the copending patent applications. The "auditory environment is accomplished by using stereo headphones which receive the harmonious vibrations which are simultaneously being projected into the acoustic auditorium for micromassage therapy. The use of headphones guarantees that the auditory environment" is controlled completely by the harmonic vibration program intended for treatment. Anyone, who has listened to good stereo headphones, will understand the extraordinary effect of isolation from all other auditory stimuli.

Now, the actual micromassaging occuring in the patients body is at a quite low level of intensity for safety purposes, and in the bath water no cavitation levels of vibration are per mitted. The patient therefore does not "feel" anything while the beneficial massage occurs. For many individuals, this absence of sensation creates a greater or lesser degree of concern as to whether the equipment is really functioning and therefore whether the treatment is proceeding. To allay such concerns, it is important to interconnect a suitable water agitator system with the auditory and acoustic auditorium environment creating elements. Thus, whenever the patient hears the harmonious sound program selected, he will see the bath water vibrate" at the same time. The sound program selected is from a series of special tapes which are prerecorded and selected in accordance with known principles for inducing desired psychological effects, especially in the areas calculated to relieve anxiety, tension, fears, fatigue and the like.

As a matter of fact, sound programs calculated to produce desired effects have become an establi hed industry on an international scale. For example, prerecorded music programs in offices, factories, restaurants, etc. have been shown to produce calculated beneficial effects. It is beginning to be understood that the road to good health and good living must be paved with psychic environments calculated to breed comfort, security and pleasure, and beneficial motivation.

OBJECTS OF THE INVENTION An object of the present invention is to provide a method and apparatus for the treatment of humans for therapeutic purposes.

Another object of the invention is to provide a method and apparatus for treating a human with a simultaneous number of stimuli involving audible and inaudible sound vibrations introduced into the interior of the treated human in combination with sensory stimulation.

Another object of the invention is to provide a method and apparatus for the treatment of humans by physiotherapy and psychotherapy effects through sensory producing stimuli.

Other objects of the invention will become obvious as the disclosure proceeds.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The outstanding and unexpected result obtained by the practice of the method and apparatus of this invention are attained by a series of features, steps and elements assembled and working together in interrelated combination to obtain the treatment ofhuman beings.

Briefly the applicant has now discovered the use of baths and swimming pools wherein provision is made to provide the person or persons being treated with high-fidelity sound received auditorily by means of stereo speakers, either as headphones or as part of a general sound system, and simultaneously with the reception by ear of the sound vibrations, provision is also made to use underwater speakers or sonic wave reproducers, which will inundate the submerged individual or individuals with water transmitted vibrations produced by the same source as is producing the high-ii air borne sound.

The underwater waves provide a micromassage treatment of coherent elastic waves in a harmonious pattern, example of such pattern would be various musical compositions such as Mozart chamber music, or poplar music or the like. The stereo headphones, or speakers, provide a psychosonic stimulus which reinforces the physiosonic micromassage. Since psychological overtones are included in one embodiment of the invention of physiosonic stimulation, it is clear that there is produced an effect on the emotional tonus of the patient. Thus, it becomes possible to take into account whether the patient is in a depressed" or an "excited state. The music selected should take this factor into account, especially when use is made of the invention in sanatoria, mental institutions, or hospitals. When used in the latter referenced types of applications, further reinforcement is obtained by the use of harmonically flowing colors either in projected and controlled illumination, or as a specially colored environment. For example, warm red, orange, yellow hued colors are appropriate for depression,"while blue, lavender, green, etc. are appropriate for overexcitation. In combination with the above the visual effect s may be obtained by the use ofa color television screen fed by closed circuit tapes or a motion picture camera projected on a screen. The tapes are especially formulated to provide an audio visual display which may range from the most abstract sort of modeto the presentation of actual drama of scenes from plays, stories, operas, etc.

In further combination with the above a whirlpool-type bath is used to provide a gross massage to the other components of multisensory stimulation with multiexercise or physical massage stimulation. The physical part has a direct physical action on biological tissue, be it muscle, bone or nerve tissue, while the multisensory part has an indirect action on the organism by stimulating the senses in a controlled manner,

thereby producing mental and emotional memory bank mechanisms in the body, complete the total psychosomatic circuit setup by the combined action ofthe invention's various parts. When seen in this way for example, it is seen and contemplated that the odor produced in the environment (bath oils or salts, or incense or atomizer means) as well as the bath temperature also become factors on the overall effects produced.

The invention includes the concept of "programmed en vironments" so coordinated as to produce synergic effects. It should also be emphasized that synergy itself is that property of a system which it enjoys as a whole. The invention is really the discovery of a combination of "preselected environments," of which the total effect is to benefit the patient. These environments" are created in the body and in the mind of the patient. The synergic effects arise because'the induced environments"are coexistent with the preexistent with the preexisting complex and conditioned "environments" already in the patient in the form of memory banks, established codes and matrices of behavior (either learned, instinctive or inherited).

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE VIEWS OF THE DRAWINGS Although the characteristic features ofthis invention will be particularly pointed out in the claims, the invention itself, and the manner in which it may be made and used, may be better understood by referring to the following description taken in connection with the accompanying drawings forming a part hereof, wherein like reference numerals refer to like parts throughout the several views and in which:

FIG. I, shows a perspective view in somewhat schematic form of apparatus for treating humans in accordance with the present invention;

FIG. 2, is a cross-sectional view taken along line 2-2 of FIG. I illustrating the apparatus construction;

FIG. 3 is an enlarged cross-sectional view taken along line 3-3 of FIG. 2 illustrating the light projection system;

FIG. 4, is another embodiment ofthe invention illustrating a visual display; and

FIG. 5, is diagrammatic schematic of the various components ofthe invention.

PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS OF THE INVENTION Referring to the drawings in detail, and initially to FIGS. 1 3 thereof, it will be seen that an apparatus 10 for treating a human 12 by producing an interrelated set of environments being capable of producing sensory and psychological effects in the human 12 may include an acoustic auditorium or chamber, for example, in the form of a swimming pool, shower, or tub as illustrated. Since this invention permits the treatment of one or more humans, the size, shape, and construction of the acoustic auditorium 14 will vary. The physical characteristics of the acoustic auditorium are also related to the properties of the elastic medium 15 through which the acoustic energy is transmitted. If the elastic medium 15 is a liquid, such as water then the acoustic auditorium may be in the form ofa bathtub or rectangular tank having a bottom 16, and a left inner end wall 18, right inner end wall, or biosonic wall 20, a left vertical outer end wall 22, a right outer end wall 24, spaced apart inner sidewalls 26 and outer sidewalls 28 with a top wall 30 joining them together and having sufficient space therebetween for incorporating some of the equipment. One of the spaced apart walls 18 may act as a reflector surface so that the elastic energy waves, which may be at a level ofintensity below the cavitational threshold of the fluid 15, passing through the organic structure 14 may be reflected for multiple treatment of the organic structure. The tub 14 may be provided with a conventional faucet 31 and control knobs 32 and 33.

To provide the complete system the various interrelated components of the audiovisual environment and micromassage effect may be substantially concealed and controlled from control means 35, having a display panel 36 that may provide for individual adjustment of the various related aspects of the invention or if fully programmed then some of these adjustments need not be employed. As illustrated in FIG. 1, control switches are provided to adjust the music by control switch 37, the volume by switch 38, the ultrasonic micromassage by switch 39, the visible movement of liquid by i switch 40, and a timer for the complete system by switch 41. if lights are used then the switch 42 is used, the electrical wiring of these type of components is well known in the art and a general schematic ofsame is illustrated in H6. 5.

Once the human 12 is placed in the acoustic auditorium 14 with the fluid medium 15 therein then a transmission through the fluid medium of acoustic vibrations may occur to obtain a micromassaging of at least a portion ofthe human body so that the energy penetrates pervasively into the acoustically accessible inner region of the body for physiotherapy effects.

The ultrasonic elastic waves of a compressional waveform are produced by first generating means or transducer 45 which is energized by an oscillation generator 46, with a power cable 48 connecting the two together. The generator 46 is an oscillator adapted to produce electrical energy having an ultrasonic frequency which for the purposes of this invention is defined between the approximate range of 500 cycles per second to 10,000,000 cycles per second. The transducer 45 may be one of a variety of electromechanical types, such as electrodynamic, piezoelectric, magnetostrictive or hydrodynamic. The hydrodynamic type needs a compressor and is entirely mechanical except for motors to run the compressor. The operating frequency may be in the higher sonic or ultrasonic ranges when treating humans.

Preferably the transducer 45 and generator 46 may be operated at both a fixed frequency, modulated or pulsed over a defined frequency range. The specific oscillation generator 46 and transducer 45 for accomplishing the result may be conventional, and as a detailed description thereof need not be included in this disclosure since it is known to those skilled in the art. The transducer 45 is mounted in energy coupling relationship to the biosonic wall of the acoustic auditorium 14 and when energized will transmit a path consisting of a series of coherent elastic energy waves 50 through the elastic medium 15 and into the human 12. The transducer 45 and generator 46 are shown contained between the walls 20 and 24 so that they are hidden from view. The generator 46 is powered by 60 cycles current and by a chord 51 extending through the wall 24 and inserted in a conventional electrical wall outlet.

As seen in FIG. 2, the human is placed in a path of coherent energy waves 50 between the biosonic wall 20 and the opposite sidewall 18. The opposite sidewall 13 for certain frequencies acts as an acoustic reflector so that the energy waves 50 move along a generally linear path that may pass through the human 12 and are reflected and again are transmitted through the elastic medium 15 and human 12. The human may enter the acoustic auditorium 14 subsequent to the biosonic wall 20 being vibrated. The duration of the treatment will be dependent upon the portion ofthe body requiring the stimulation or micromassage as well as the physical condition of the patient.

The frequency of elastic waves 50 may be modulated or pulsed over a defined frequency and wavelength band to prevent the settling of permanent foci of energy. At the same time this permits the generation of effects due to possible resonances in the organic system. This is highly desirable when treating biological systems ofa complex nature to obtain a sufficient stimulation of a variety of body organisms that have different acoustical characteristics.

The micromassaging treatment may be combined with audiovisual effects, as the underwater speakers or sonic wave transducer 45, of which one or many may be used, will inundate the submerged individual or individuals with water transmitted vibrations which may be produced by the same source as is producing the high-fi airborne sound. The underwater waves provide a micromassage treatment of coherent elastic waves in a harmonious pattern, examples of such patterns would be various musical compositions such as Mozart chamber music, or popular music or the like. The stereo headphones, or speakers, provide a psychosonic stimulus which reinforces the physiosonic micromassage. Since psychological overtones are included in one embodiment of the invention of physiosonic stimulation, it is clear that there is produced an effect on the emotional tonus ofthe patient.

In addition to the micromassage action it has been found beneficial in creating a visible movement of the fluid 15 in the acoustic auditorium 14 for psychoreinforcement of the micromassaging action to the human 12 contained therein for physiotherapy effects. The gross movement of the fluid 15 may be obtained by placing a water agitator system such as a whirlpool type of unit, or second generating means 52 that is electrically connected to the complete system and is automatically energized when the transducer 45 is. The unit 52 is electrically connected to switch 40. it is important for the patient to see visible movement of the fluid or he might reach the conclusion that the micromassage action is not functioning.

Accordingly it is important to interconnect a suitable water agitator system 52 with the other elements of the invention. Thus, whenever the patient hears the harmonious sound program selected, he will see the bath water vibrate at the same time. The sound program selected is from a series of special tapes which are prerecorded and selected in accordance with known principles for inducing desired psychological effects, especially in the area calculated to relieve anxiety, tension, fears, fatigue and the like.

Sound transmitting means 55 is operatively associated with the acoustic auditorium 14 for creating an auditory environment to provide audible sound to the human. The auditory environment is selected for inducing desired psychological effects when combined with the physiotherapy effects provided by the vibrations transmitted through the fluid medium so that the combined effects are beneficial to the human. The auditory means 55 may be in the form of speakers in the room or as illustrated the human by a headset including earphones 56 operatively associated with the acoustic auditorium 14 as by being mounted on a strap 60 coupled to a support member 57 that extends through the top wall 30 and into a clamp 58 having an adjustment knob 59 to permit vertical positioning together by the strap 60. The earphones are connected by electrical cable 62 to auditory means 65 for creating audible sound to be transmitted via the earphones 56 for psychological effects. The auditory means 65 may be in the form of any sound producing equipment such as a phonograph, tape player, etc., and if in the form ofa tape player then a cassette 66 with prerecorded sound tracks may be selected for inducing desired psychological effects in the areas calculated to relieve anxiety, tension, fears, fatigue or the like.

To obtain the desired total interrelated set of environment it is possible to simultaneously produce a visual environment color viewable by the human 12 in the acoustic auditorium 14 complementary to the auditory environment in obtaining the desired psychological effects. In accordance with one aspect of the invention the visual environment is produced by visual means 70, as seen best in FIG. 3, the unit is positioned between the inner sidewall 26 and outer sidewall 28 and ineludes an electrically powered motor '71 having electrical leads 72 connected thereto with the motor mounted on a bracket 73 extending from the wall 23. Mounted on the motor shaft 74 is a wheel 75 having a plurality of axially spaced apart color discs 76 mountedthereon and when the wheel 75 is rotated by the motor 71 the discs 76 are rotated. The discs 76 will pass between the light generated by bulb 78, that is mounted on support 79 and wired to the system by leads 80 in a conventional manner. The wall 26 has therein lenses or window panes 81 that are mounted in sealed relation to the wall 26 in a conventional manner and through which the colored light will pass.

The color sequence and the music makes it possible to take into account whether the patient is in a depressed or an excited state. The music selected should take this factor into account, especially when use is made of the invention in sanatoria, mental institutions or hospitals. When used in the latter referenced types of applications, further reinforcement is obtained by the use of the harrnonically flowing colors in projected and controlled illumination by the colored light into the fluid 15. For example warm red, orange, yellow, hued colors are appropriate for overexcitation. ln combination with the above the visual effects may be obtained by the use ofa color television screen, fed by closed circuit tapes or a motion picture camera projected on a screen. The tapes are especially formulated to provide an audiovisual display which may range from the most abstract sort of mode to the presentation of actual drama of scenes from plays, stories, operas, etc.

An additional aspect of the environment for a human is his sense of smell and towards this end we have odor-producing environment means 85 which may take the form of atomizer means that produces various fragrances. The odor-producing environment means 86 although illustrated to be manually operated may be incorporated into the system to be automatically operated in conjunction with the other environment producing means.

The auditory means may be the console that also houses the programming means that in conjunction with the control means 35, the auditory environment means 65, visual environment means 70, acoustic vibration generating means 45, and means for creating visible movement of the fluid by unit 52 may be automatically programmed together. If the system is automatically programmed together then some of the switches on the control means 35 need not be used, except perhaps for the volume control switch 38, if on the other hand the system is not automatically programmed then the user 12 may individually adjust the respective switches upon say the insertion of a desired cassette 66.

Accordingly, the programmed environments are so coordinated as to produce synergic effects. It should also be emphasized that synergy itself is that property of a system which it enjoys as a whole. These preselected environments, of which the total effect is to benefit the patient are created in the body and the mind of the patient. The synergic effects arise because the induced environments are coexistent with the preexisting complex and conditioned inner environments already in the patient in the form of memory banks, established codes and matrices of behavior either learned, instinctive or inherited.

FIG. 4, illustrates the present invention wherein the visual environment is produced on a screen 88 viewable by the human from the acoustic auditorium 14. The screen may form the front of a television set, or as illustrated a projecting means 90 may be contained in a wall 91 of the room forming the area where the acoustic auditorium is placed. The projecting means 90 may be programmed with the control means 35 to be synchronized with the auditory means 65 as the sound is transmitted from the headphones.

The visual means 70 may be in the form ofthe color projection illustrated in FIG. 3 and contained within the acoustic auditorium or as well as in a wall 92 to provide a complete color saturation of the environment. in allother respects the system illustrated in FIG. 4 may be similar to that described in FIGS. 1-3.

FIG. 5, is a schematic diagram of the combined environmental control systems and as illustrated the cassette 66 used in the auditory means 65 may have one or more channel outputs that are wired to control at a selected sequence of programming the sound transmitting means 55, agitator means 52, underwater sound projector 45 and visual means 70. The control means 35 may be used for manually controlling certain aspects of the system as explained above. Additional channels may be used for other controlled functions.

Many other changes could be effected in the particular constructions, and in the methods of use and construction, and in specific details thereof, hereinbefore set forth, without substantially departing from the invention intended to be defined herein, the specific description being merely of an embodiment capable ofillustrating certain principles ofthe invention.

lclaim:

1. The method oftreating a human by producing an interrelated set of environments, said environments being capable of producing sensory and physiological effects in the human, said sensory effects being produced primarily with audiovisual environments and said physiological effects primarily with acoustic vibrations transmitted through a liquid and engaging the interior of the human's body in a micromassaging action, said acoustic vibrations being provided in a harmonious pattern of frequencies.

2. The method as defined in claim 1, micromassaging action is produced by a. placing the human in an acousticauditorium environment containing a fluid medium therein,

b. transmitting through the fluid medium acoustic vibrations that will enter the interior of the human's body for micromassaging of same for physiotherapy effects, and

c. creating a visible movement of the fluid in the acoustic auditorium for psychoreinforcement of said micromassaging to the human contained therein for physiotherapy effects.

7 3. The method as defined in claim 1, wherein said audiovisual environment is produced by a. producing an auditory environment of audible sound for inducing psychological effects to be received by the cars of the human, whereby said psychological effects combined with said physiotherapy effects are beneficial to the human for treatment thereof, and

b. producing a visual environment of color viewable by the human in the acoustic auditorium complementary to the auditory environment in obtaining the desired psychological effects.

4. The method as defined in claim 3, wherein said visual environment is produced on a screen viewable'by the human in the acoustic auditorium.

5. The method as defined in claim 3, wherein said visual environment is produced by changing colors projected into the fluid in the acoustic auditorium.

6. The method as defined in claim 3, wherein said visual environment is programmed with said auditory environment from the same source.

wherein said 7. The method as defined in claim 3, wherein said auditory environment, said visual environment, and said acoustic vibrations for producing said micromassaging are programmed from a common source.

8. The method of treating a human by producing an interrelated set ofcnvironments, comprising:

A. placing the human in an acoustic auditorium environment containing a liquid medium therein,

8. transmitting through the fluid medium acoustic vibrations that will enter the interior of the human's body for micromassaging of same for physiotherapy effects, said acoustic vibrations being provided in a harmonious pattern of frequencies C. creating visible movement of the liquid in the acoustic auditorium for psychological reinforcement of said micromassaging to the human contained therein for physiotherapy effects, and

D. producing an auditory environment of audible sound for inducing psychological effects to be received by the ears of the human, whereby said psychological effects combined with said physiotherapy effects are beneficial to the human for treatment thereof.

9. The method as defined in claim 8, wherein said audio environment is elected for inducing desired psychological effects in the areas calculated to relieve anxiety, tension, fears, fatigue or the like.

10. The method as defined in claim 8, wherein said audible sound is transmitted to the human by earphones operatively associated with the acoustic auditorium.

11. The method as defined in claim 8, wherein said micromassaging by acoustic vibrations is produced by generating elastic wave energy and transmitting same through the liquid so that said energy penetrates pervasively into the acoustically accessible inner region of the human.

12. The method as defined in claim 11, wherein the acoustic vibrations are at least in part in the range of 5,000 c.p.s. to 2,000,000 c.p.s.

13. The method as defined in claim 11, wherein said acoustic vibrations are at a level of intensity below the cavitational threshold of the liquid in the acoustic auditorium.

14. The method as defined in claim 8, wherein said auditory environment and said acoustic vibrations for producing said micromassaging are programmed from a common source.

15. The method as defined in claim 8, and further including the step of producing a visual environment of color viewable by the human in the acoustic auditorium complementary to the auditory environment in obtaining the desired psychologi- 'cal effects.

16. The method as defined in claim 15, wherein said visual environment is produced on a screen viewable by the human in the acoustic auditorium.

17. The method as defined in claim 15, wherein said visual environment is produced by changing colors projected into the fluid in the acoustic auditorium.

18. The method as defined in claim 15, wherein said visual environment is programmed with said auditory environment from the same source.

19. The method as defined in claim 15, wherein said auditory environment, said visual environment, and said acoustic vibrations for producing said micromassaging are programmed from a common source.

20. The method of treating a human by producing an inter related set of environments, said environments being capable of producing psychotherapeutic effects in the human, comprising the steps of:

A. placing the human in an acoustic auditorium,

B. providing a liquid medium in the acoustic auditorium,

C. micromassaging at least a portion of the human body by generating elastic wave energy and transmitting same through the fluid so that energypenetrates pervasively into the acoustically accessible inner region of the body for physiotherapy effects, said elastic wave energy being provided in a harmonious pattern of frequencies.

D. creating a visible movement of the fluid in the acoustic auditorium for psychological reinforcement of said micromassaging to the human contained therein, for physiotherapy effects,

E. producing a visual environment of color viewable by the human in the acoustic auditorium to produce desired psychological effects, and

F. generatingaudible sound energy vibrations adapted to be received by the ears of the human in the acoustic auditorium to create an audio environment for inducing psychological effects, whereby said psychological effects combined with said physiotherapy effects are beneficial to the human for treatment thereof.

21. The method as defined in claim 20, wherein said elastic wave energy and said audible sound energy are generated from a common source.

22. The method as defined in claim 20, wherein said elastic wave energy indicates the submerged human with fluid transmitted vibrations.

23. The method as defined in claim 20, wherein the source of said energy is a prerecorded musical composition.

24. The method as defined in claim 20, wherein said visual effects are provided on a screen adapted to be viewed by the human in the acoustic auditorium.

25. The method as defined in claim 20, wherein said visual effect is produced by the use of harmonically flowing colors.

26. The method as defined in claim 25, wherein said harmonically flowing colors are generated on a screen viewable by the human in the acoustic auditorium.

27. The method as defined in claim 25, wherein said harmonically flowing colors are projected into the liquid in the acoustic auditorium.

28. The method as defined in claim 20, wherein said audio environment is selected for inducing'desired psychological effects in the areas calculated to relieve anxiety, tension, fears, fatigue or the like.

29. The method as defined in claim 20, and further including the step of selecting the audiovisual environment for stimulating the senses in a controlled manner.

30. The method as defined in claim 20, wherein said acoustic auditorium is in the form ofa bathtub.

31. Apparatus for treating a human by producing an intcrrelated set of environments for physiotherapeutic and psychotherapeutic effects in the human, comprising:

A. an acoustic auditorium environment containing a liquid medium adapted to receive the human therein,

B. first generating means operatively associated with the acoustic auditorium for producing ultrasonic vibrations of coherent elastic energy waves in a harmonious pattern of frequencies and propagating them through the fluid for micromassaging the human for physiotherapy effects,

C. second generating means operatively associated with the acoustic auditorium for producing visible movement in the fluid to provide psychological reinforcement of said micromassaging physiotherapy effects, and

D. means operatively associated with said acoustic auditorium for creating an auditory environment to provide audible sound to the human, said auditory environment is selected for inducing desired psychological effects when combined with the physiotherapy effects produced by said vibrations transmitted through the fluid medium, wherein the combined effects are beneficial to the human.

32. Apparatus as defined in claim 31, and further including control means operatively associated with said first generating means and said auditory environment means to regulate the relationship therebetween.

33. Apparatus as defined in claim 31, wherein said first generating means produces vibration at least in part in the range of 5,000 c.p.s. to 2,000,000 c.p.s.

34. The method as defined in claim 31, wherein said acoustic vibrations are at a level of intensity below the cavitational threshold ofthe liquid in the acoustic auditorium.

35. Apparatus as defined in claim 31, wherein said audible sound is transmitted to the human by earphones operatively associated with the acoustic auditorium.

36. Apparatus as defined in claim 31, and further including means operatively associated with said acoustic auditorium for producing a visual environment of color viewable by the human in the acoustic auditorium complementary to the auditory environment in obtaining the desired psychological effects.

37. Apparatus as defined in claim 36, wherein said visual environment is produced on a screen viewable by the human in the acoustic auditorium.

38. Apparatus as defined in claim 36, wherein said visual environment is produced by means for projecting colors into the fluid in the acoustic auditorium.

39. Apparatus as defined in claim 36, wherein said visual environment is programmed with said auditory environment.

40. Apparatus as defined in claim 36, wherein said auditory environment, said visual environment and said first generating means producing said micromassaging, are programmed by control means.

41. Apparatus for treating a human by providing an interrelated set of environments to provide physiotherapeutic and psychotherapeutic effects in the human, comprising:

A. an acoustic auditorium environment containing a liquid medium adapted to receive the human therein,

B. first generating means operatively associated with the acoustic auditorium for producing ultrasonic vibrations of coherent elastic energy waves in harmonious pattern of frequencies and propagating them through the fluid for micromassaging the human for physiotherapy effects,

C. second generating means operatively associated with the acoustic auditorium for producing visible movement in the fluid to provide psychological reinforcement of said micromassaging in the human for physiotherapy effects,

D. means operatively associated with said acoustic auditorium for creating an auditory environment to provide audible sound to the human for psychological effects,

E. means operatively associated with said acoustic auditorium for producing a visual environment of color viewable by the human in the acoustic auditorium complementary to the auditory environment for obtaining the desired psychological effects, and

F. control means operatively associated with said first generating means, said auditory environment means and said visual means, to regulate the relationship between said physiotherapy and psychological environmental ef- 45. Apparatus as defined in claim 41, wherein said visual environment is produced on a screen viewable by the human in the acoustic auditorium.

46. Apparatus as defined in claim 41, wherein said visual environment is produced by means for projecting colors into the fluid in the acoustic auditorium.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification601/157, 360/80, 360/79, 310/334, 4/541.1, 348/61, 348/844
International ClassificationA61H33/00, A61H23/02, A61M21/00
Cooperative ClassificationA61M2021/0027, A61M2021/0016, A61M21/00, A61H33/0087, A61M2021/0044, A61H33/00, A61H23/0245, A61M2021/005
European ClassificationA61M21/00, A61H33/00