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Publication numberUS3586113 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 22, 1971
Filing dateMar 19, 1969
Priority dateMar 19, 1969
Publication numberUS 3586113 A, US 3586113A, US-A-3586113, US3586113 A, US3586113A
InventorsLouis A Grant
Original AssigneeGrant Inc Louis A
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Demolition and scooping machine
US 3586113 A
Images(3)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [72] Inventor Louis A. Grant 7886 Saltburg Road, Pittsburgh, Pa. 15239 [21] Appl. No. 808,607 [22] Filed Mar.19,1969 [45] Patented June 22, 1971 [54] DEMOLITION AND SCOOPING MACHINE 14 Claims, 6 Drawing Figs.

52 us. Cl 173/34, 173/43, 173/46, 173/52, 299/70 [51] lnt.Cl. E211: 11/00 50] Field Search 299/69, 70; 173/34, 43, 46, 52

[56] References Cited UNlT ED STATES PATENTS 2,715,525 3/1955 Gleason. 173 43x 3,231,027 1/1966 Viau 173/46 3,370,654 2/1968 Skendrovic 173/52 X 3,389,755 6/1968 Grant 299/70 X 3,436,120 4/1969 Armstrong 299/70 3,471,888 10/1969 Grant et al [73/52 X Primary Examiner-Ernest R. Purser Attorney-Buell, Blenko 8L Ziesenheim ABSTRACT: A demolition and scooping machine comprises a rigid supporting structure with a rotatable turntable mounted thereon. A clamp mechanism is provided for clamping the supporting structure to external supports. A boom assembly including an elbow section is pivoted on an upper surface of the turntable, and includes extensible boom structure pivoted at one of its ends to the outer end of the elbow section. Either a demolition tool or a scoop can be pivoted to the outer end of the extensible boom structure. The extensible boom structure and the elbow section are shaped such that the scoop or demolition tool can reach every point of at least the area directly beneath the supporting structure.

DEMOLITION AND SCOOPING MACHINE My present invention relates to a combined demolition and scooping or high-lift machine and more particularly to a machine of the character described which is capable of both rough and fine adjustment of a demolition tool and/or scoop over a wide work area without resetting the machine and which can be readily adjusted and/or anchored as required by a specific job size and location.

The invention is particularly adapted for dislodg ing and removing the extremely hard debris which accumulates on the bottoms of soaking furnaces widely used in connection with steel making processes. Such soaking pits are usually arranged in aligned rows thereof and vary between 12 and feet in depth. The soaking pit is usually constructed with a very heavy steel bottom and steel sidewalls, and pig iron, steel ingots or slabs are placed in the pits where they are bathed with gas flames or the like to maintain them at elevated temperatures until they can be delivered at the next station in the steel manufacturing or fabricating process, as the case may be.

Maintaining the ingots or slabs at elevated temperatures not only conserves heat previously imparted thereto but in addition prevents cracking or spalling or other malformation resulting from overrapid cooling. During the soaking process and during handling of the ingots as when inserting and removing them from the pit, slag and other surface contamination and foreign matter are removed which collect on the bottom of the pit where, due to the elevated temperatures, these materials are melted, partially melted or sintered into an extremely hard mass. Frequently, the soaking pits become overheated through negligence of production exigencies, and the slabs or ingots "wash to add molten metal to the collected debris. Naturally this hardens and toughens the debris and further complicates its removal.

Heretofore, a particularly difficult task has been entailed in the removal of such debris from the bottoms of soaking pits. To avoid production delays, when such pits need cleaning, removal of the debris must be done while the walls and floors of the pits are still at rather high temperatures.

Previously, it has been the practice in most cases to send maintenance personnel into the pits to manipulate manually within the pits the heavy pneumatic drills, chisels, hammers or the like required to break up the very hard debris covering the floors and lower wall surfaces of the pits. The use of such tools is rendered quite hazardous because of the high-temperature environment, and the time during which a given individual can remain in the pits without impairment of health and efficiency is severely limited.

More recently, a crawler-mounted carrier and manipulator structure or chipper carrying one of the aforementioned tools has been proposed for breaking up the hardened material. Such structures had to be rested on the walls dividing the pits and required considerable and expensive wall reinforcement to support the added weight of the crawlers. Moreover, these crawler-mounted structures were cumbersome to move, and difficult to position for accurate control of the tool carried thereon. This equipment, moreover, could not reach all points of the pit floors effectively and is cumbersome and slow in moving along a given pit or from one pit to the next. Moreover, additional separation between adjoining rows of pits was necessary in some cases to accommodate the crawler. As a result, the widened areas between the pits required additional structural reinforcement to accommodate the weight of the wider crawlers. Finally, the weight of the cantilevered portions of the crawler-mounted equipment rendered it difficult to make fine adjustments in the placement and in the inclination of the tool to a given location in the floor ofthe pit.

Still more recently, soaking pit chippers of specialized construction including one or more depending, extensible booms with demolition tools thereon have been developed. These demolition machines are intended to cooperate with rails placed along opposite sides of the soaking pit. in one arrangement, the machine is mounted on wheel-supported trucks for engaging the rails and moving the machine along the pits. In newer developments, demolition machines are provided with filed Jan. 3, 1966, Ser. No. 518,215, entitled SOAKlNG PIT CHIPPER now US. Pat. No. 3,471,888, and in my copending application entitled DEMOLITION MACHINE, filed Sept. 22, 1966, Serial No. 581,273 now' U.S. Pat. No. 3,458,396, on which my present invention constitutes an improvement.

The demolition machines described in the aforesaid applications have proven to be very successful in practice, in comparison with the prior art, particularly where the soaking pits are constructed with fioor or bottom cleanouts and access passages beneath their floors. The demolition tools, then, are replaced with a spade or scoop for scraping the dislodged debris into a waiting trunk of fiat car driven into the access passages. In soaking pits without bottom cleanouts however the dislodged debris must be hoisted upwardly and out of the top pit opening. This entails either considerable manual labor or the use of a separate scooping machine or the like. In any event the container or receptacle for the removed debris usually must be placed some distance from that one of the array of pits being cleaned out which further complicates handling of the dislodged debris through the top soaking pit openmg.

The usual rectangular configuration of the pits requires a relatively large number of moves or placements of prior demolition machines in order to reach all areas of a given pit. The particular arrangement of the extensible booms of the earlier machines utilized relatively complex extending means and associated components, all of which are bulky and of complex construction. For the most arduous pit chipping tasks, the boom arrangement lacks sufficient structural rigidity particularly when extended. This applies also to the knuckle joint whereat the demolition tool is pivotally supported. Further, as noted previously, existing demolition machines, particularly for soaking pit operations, are incapable of lifting the dislodged debris out of the top soaking pit opening, owing to the formation of the boom structure and the turntable or other pivoted mechanism to which the boom structure is attached. Finally, prior machines of this character usually have been constructed with exposed operating components such as valves, pumps, breaker boxes, which are easily damaged in the use of the machines.

I am aware of course of the many and varied types of drilling and demolition machines which have been disclosed in the past. Examples of these are: USSR Pat. Nos. 135,224; Elliot, W. H. 208,228; Fobes, R. 468,486 Kinney, S. P. et al. 2,405,546; Mosena, R. L. et al. 2,423,787; Bles, M. .1. 3,075,754; Modrak, F. et al. 3,090,983; Skendrovic, L. 3,354,967; and Skendrovic, L. 3,370,654.

With the exception of Skendrovic, USSR Pat. No. 3,370,654 and the Modrak et al. and USSR patents, none of these patents are directed to soaking pit cleaning operations. Instead they are designed for excavating, rock drilling, crust breaking, or delining vertical furnace linings. On the other hand, the Skendrovic USSR Pat. No. 3,370,654, Modrak'et al. and the USSR apparatus suffer from the disadvantages pointed out previously and from the additional and most important disadvantage of being incapable of applying the necessary prying forces to the demolition tool-which are necessary for removal and breaking up of the very hard soaking pit debris.

Attention is also called to my previous U.S. Pat. Nos. 2,983,496; 3,302,976; and 3,346,300 relating to demolition apparatus. In general, and for the particular applications for which the present invention is designed, my patented demolition apparatus is subject to the same disadvantages pointed out in connection with the aforementioned copending applications.

I am also aware-of the excavating apparatus of Mrozck US. Pat. No. 3,129,831. The Mrozek apparatus is incapable of demolition operations or of prying operations particularly in the area directly beneath the apparatus. Moreover, the boom structure of Mroz .ek is not capable of the degree of manipulation required in soaking pit demolition and debris removal. The Mrozek apparatus is not capable of being clamped to soaking pit coping rails or to other structure. Finally, this prior apparatus is not capable of both demolition and scooping manipulations without making major changes in the structure.

I overcome the disadvantages of the prior art by providing a combination demolition and scooping machine, which, in the described application, is capable of prying loose and breaking up the extremely hard soaking pit debris and of scooping or lifting the debris out of the soaking pit and into a suitable receptacle. Because of the boom assembly formation, my present invention is capable of operating over a considerably wider area of the soaking pit. In consequence, in many cleaning operations the demolition and scooping machine does not have to be moved at all while in other operations the number of moves is reduced considerably. The formation of the boom structure of my novel machine considerablyfacilitates prying operations even when the demolition tool is operated directly beneath the machine.

In other operations of my invention, a double-boom arrangement can be used for performing the respective demolition and scooping operations.

Most importantly, my present demolition and scooping machine is compact in construction, can be quickly and easily installed over the soaking pit furnaces and is capable of rugged usage without damage to the component parts thereof. The supporting framework of my machine is capable of being quickly and securely clamped to the coping rails or other securance means normally provided adjacent the top opening of the soaking pit. Such clamping means are capable of quick and easy manipulation to facilitate rapid insulation and removal of the machine and to absorb the application of prying forces particularly when the disclosed type of boom assembly is mounted on the machine. 7

I also provide an improved structure for rotating the turntable or similar structure to which the boom assembly or assemblies are connected. In this connection the novel means can be provided in certain applications for protecting the various hydraulic or pneumatic connections made to or through the turntable.

l accomplish these desirable results by providing a demolition and scooping machine comprising a rigid supporting structure, a turntable rotatably mounted upon said supporting structure, means for rotating said turntable, means for relatively rigidly clamping said support structure to external supporting means, a boom assembly including an elbow section pivotally joined at one end to the upper surface of said turntable, extensible boom means pivotally joined at one end to the other end of said elbow section, and means for pivotally joining a selected one of a demolition tool and scoop to the other end of said extensible boom means.

I also desirably provide a similar machine wherein said supporting structure includes a pair of spaced generally parallel beams and extensible beam sections slidably mounted on each end of .each of said beams, and said clamping means include a clamping mechanism mounted on the outward end of each of said extensible beam sections for clampingly engaging said external supporting means.

I also desirably provide a similar machine wherein said turntable protrudes through each side of said supporting structure, and a second boom assembly is pivotally mounted on-the lower surface of said turntable.

I also desirably provide a similar machine wherein said supporting structure additionally includes a pair of plates secured to opposed surfaces of said beams, and operating components for said machine are enclosed within the space between said plates. 1

I also desirably provide a similar machine wherein said turntable is rotatably mounted within a stabilizing tube extending through and secured to said plates.

I also desirably provide a similarmachine wherein said turntable includes a supporting tube rotatably mounted on said supporting structure and terminating in a cage structure at its remote end from said turntable surface, and a plurality of connecting conduits are extended through said turntable tube and cage to a plurality of swivel couplings mounted in said cage.

During the foregoing discussion, various objects, features and advantages of the invention have been set forth. These and other objects, features and advantages of the invention together with structural details thereof will be elaborated upon during the forthcoming'description of certain presently preferred embodiments of the invention and presently preferred methods of practicing the same.

In the accompanying drawings I have shown certain presently preferred embodiments of the invention and have illustrated certain presently preferred methods of practicing the same, wherein:

FIG. 1 is an end elevational view of one form of demolition and scooping machine arranged in accordance with a doubleboom arrangement of my invention;

FIG. 2 is a top plan view of a similar structure but provided with a single boom assembly;

FIG. 3 is a partial cross-sectional view of the machine as shown in FIG. 2 and taken along reference line III-III thereof;

FIG. 4 is a partial elevational view, partly in section, of an alternative modification of the turntable structure of the machine and showing one arrangement of clamping mechanism; and

FIG. 4A is a partial, cross-sectional view of the apparatus as shown in FIG. 4 and taken along reference line IVA-IVA thereof; and

FIG. 5 is a partial elevational view of an alternative, upper boom assembly for use with my novel machine.

Referring initially to FIG. 1 of the drawings, the exemplary demolition and scooping machine 20 shown therein comprises a supporting structure or a platform 22 including a pair of supporting beams 24, 26. The platform 22 is essentially completed by a pair of spaced supporting plates 28, 30 (FIG. I with the lower plate 30, as viewed in FIG. 1, being spaced beneath the supporting beams 24, 26 by means of spacers 32. Thus, the space 34between the plates 28, 30 is used to house a pump 36, an accumulator tank 38, breaker box 40, valves 42 and other components of the hydraulic and electrical circuits of the machine 20. Thus, a compact supporting and housing structure 22 is afforded for the demolition and scooping machine 20.

The supporting structure 22 further includes a telescoping beam section slidably mounted on, or in this example inserted into each end of each supporting beam 24 or 26 as better shown by the FIG. 2 modification. The four telescopic beam sections 44, which desirably are similar in cross section to the supporting beams 24, 26 are each joined to a operating cylinder 46 extended through the telescopic beam 44 and joined at its other end to the associated supporting beam 24 or 26 at a point 48 beyond the inmost position of the inward extremity of the telescopic beam section.

At the other, outer extremity of each of the telescopic beams 44 a clamp mechanism 50 is mounted for engaging the associated soaking pit coping rail 52 or 54 (FIG. 2). Desirably, thesupport beams 26 and the extensible beams 44 are of similar noncircular tubular configuration so that the clamp mechanisms are keyed to a given attitude relative to the coping rails 52, 54. In the present arrangement each clamp structure 50 includes an actuating cylinder 49 having a clamp shoe 51 mounted on the distal end of piston rod 53. Actuation of the cylinder 49 clamps the coping rail 52 or 54 between the shoe 5] and the bottom surface of the telescopic beam 44. The four clamp mechanisms 50 thereby afford the relatively large holddown forces required in certain operations of the demolition machine 20. With this arrangement the tremendous prying forces and, of course, the weight of the boom structure and associated components described below, transferred to turntable 56 and in turn to the supporting platform 22, are absorbed by the coping rails 52, 54 or other external support means. Use of the external supports or rails 52, S4 and the clamp mechanisms 50 together with the shape of the upper boom assembly 84 described below permits the demolition tool 110 (with the application of prying forces when necessary) or the scoop or bucket 112 to be moved to any point in the adjacent area between the external supports and at least directly beneath the platform 22.

The turntable 56 can be provided substantially in the form illustrated more particularly in FIG. 3, save that the turntable 56 (FIG. 1) protrudes from both sides of the supporting structure 22, whereas turntable 56a protrudes from only one side of supporting structure 22a for single boom use. In the latter arrangement the central areas of the top and bottom supporting plates 28, 30 are connected by a tubular stabilizing member 58a to the upper portion of which is joined an annular sleeve bearing support 60 and stationary sleeve bearing 62. At the lower end of the stabilizing sleeve 58a, a conventional X-type radial and thrust bearing arrangement 64 is mounted on retaining ring 66, which in turn is secured to the stabilizing tube 58a. The outer race 68 of the X-bearing 64 is secured to turntable plate 70 to which a supporting tube 72a is secured for rotation therewith. By rotatably mounting the turntable plate 70 on the stabilizing tube 58a, a larger and sturdier X- bearing 64 can be used. Alternatively, the upper end portion of the turntable tube 72:: can be rotatably mounted directly on the stabilizing tube 58a by a similar but smaller X-bearing (not shown).

For cooperation with the upper or sleeve bearing 62 a mating sleeve bearing 74 is secured to the supporting tube 72. For driving the turntable 70-72a sprocket 76 is secured to the supporting tube 72a for rotation therewith by means of drive chain 78 and motor 80.

Referring again to FIG. 1 the stabilizing tube can be ex tended downwardly as denoted by the stabilizing tube 58b and with the turntable support tube 72!). A second X-type bearing 64a can be mounted on a second or lower turntable plate 82 and on the lower end of the extended stabilizing tube 58!) as shown. With the alternative arrangement of FIG. 1 an upper boom assembly denoted generally by reference character 84 can be secured to the upper turntable plate 70 while a second or lower boom assembly 86 can be secured to the lower turntable plate 82.

The lower boom assembly 86 can be constructed similar to one of those described in my aforementioned, copending applications and will not be further described in detail.

The boom assembly 86 therefore is normally provided with a demolition tool and cradle denoted generally by reference character 88. Alternatively a scoop or spade, not shown, can be substituted for scraping the loosened debris in the bottom of the soaking pit through the aforementioned bottom opening where provided. With the aforedescribed clamp and telescop ic beam arrangement 44-50 the platform or supporting structure 22 can be clamped on the coping rails 52,54 or other external support means for the application of demolition and prying forces to dislodge soaking pit debris.

Alternatively or in conjunction with the lower boom structure 86a, a scorpionlike boom assembly 84 can be secured to the upper turntable plate 70. In order to make this connection the turntable 70 is providedwith a clevis or similar pivot structure including a pair of spaced upstanding plates 90 which are pivoted respectively to the end portions of spaced plates 92 forming the elbow section 94 of the boom assembly 84 as better shown in FIG. 2 which uses a single, upper boom assembly 84. The boom assembly 84 is raised and lowered, i.e., pivoted through a vertical plane relative to the upper turntable plate 70 by a suitable actuating means, for example a pair of cylinders 96 secured in this example to additional clevis connections, 98, 100 respectively on the upper turntable plate 70 and on the elbow boom section 94.

To the outward end of the elbow section 94, an extensible or telescopic boom assembly 102 is connected, the base section 104 of which desirably is provided with one or a plurality of trunnions 106 for this purpose. A plurality of trunnions 106 desirably are afforded so that the elbow section 94 can be joined at a selected position along the length of the telescopic base section 104 in order to vary the overall length of the upper boom assembly 84 as desired.

A second extensible boom section 108 is slidably mounted on the base boom section 104 and its outer end portion is provided with a pivot bracket 110.

As denoted in the chain outline position 111 of the upper boom assembly 84 (FIG. 1) a scoop or bucket 112 can be pivotally joined to the bracket I10 and pivoted by a cylinder 114 or other suitable actuating means. The upper boom assembly 84, then, is equipped for scooping and lifting dislodged debris out of the soaking pit and into a suitable receptacle. As evident from FIG. I the receptacle (not shown) can be placed a considerably distance from the demolition and scooping machine 20.

Returning now to the solid outline representation of the upper boom assembly 84, the extensible boom sections 104- -l08 are pivoted relative to the elbow section 94 by suitable actuating means such as hydraulic cylinder 116. The cylinder 116 is connected between clevises 118, 120 mounted near the midpoint of the elbow section 94 and in this example on the end surface 122 of the base boom section 104. This arrangement permits a maximum of annular displacement of the extensible boom section 104-108 as denoted by the solid outlines and chain outline 124 thereof in FIG. 1. The extensible boom section 108 is, in this example, telescoped in and out of the base section 104 by means of cylinder 126 mounted within the hollow passages of the beams comprising the extensible boom sections 104-108.

For demolition operation with the upper boom assembly 84, a demolition tool 128 and tool cradle 130 are pivotally connected to a bracket 110 and pivoted by means of cylinder 114 after the manner disclosed in the aforementioned copending applications. The structural rigidity of the upper boom assembly 84 and of the turntable structure 56a or 56b and associated components as such that the upper boom assembly 84 likewise can be used for prying, breaking and other demolition operations. The use of the upper boom assembly 84 for this purpose, however, offers the additional advantage that such demolition operations can be carried out at considerable distances from the supporting structure 22 of the demolition and scooping machine 20. In consequence, in many soaking pit cleaning operations, it is not necessary to move the machine 20 after it is first centrally positioned over the soaking pit coping rails 52, 54. When cleaning larger soaking pits the number of required moves of the machine 20 obviously is considerably reduced.

It will be understood of course that the machine 20 of FIG. 1 can be operated without the lower boom assembly 86 and the lower turntable plate 82, for example as exemplified by the modification 20' as illustrated in FIGS. 2 and 3 of the drawings. In this case the demolition tool and cradle 128, 130 can be replaced with the bucket or scoop 112 as shown in FIG. 1 in changing from demolition to scooping operations.

Alternatively, the bucket 112 can be more or less permanently connected to the upper boom section 84 and all of the demolition operations performed by the lower boom assembly 86. When the demolition operation is completed the lower boom assembly 86 cam be raised as shown in FIG. 1 to a position which cannot interfere with subsequent operation of the upper boom assembly 84 for removing the dislodged debris, although the latter may lie directly beneath the supporting structure 22 of the machine 20.

In FIGS. 4 and 4A of the drawings an alternative turntable construction 132 is utilized with a single boom assembly machine such as that shown in FIGS. 2 and 3. In this arrangement the large swivel coupling (such as that shown in my copending application, Ser. No. 58l,273) is obviated through the use of individual swivel couplings (of conventional construction) for the several hydraulic and pneumatic leads 136 to the actuating means mounted on the boom assembly 84. The turntable support is extended in the form of a cage structure 138 having a bottom plate 140 and vertical posts 142. Conventional holding valves 141 for the hydraulic circuit are mounted on the bottom plate 140. The cage structure 138 facilitates assembly of the hydraulic system and also permits a sufficient vertical run of the conduits 136 to permit the necessary twist to be imparted thereto as the turntable revolves, without damage to the conduits.

in FIG. 5, of the drawings, alternative connection means between certain components of the upper boom section 84 are illustrated. Thus, the outward end of the elbow section 94' is pivoted to a clevis 144 secured to the adjacent side of the base boom section 104'. If desired, additional clevises as denoted by chain outlines 146 can be provided for selective connection of the base boom section 104' along its length to the elbow section 94. A similarly disposed clevis 148 is secured near the end of the base section 104' for connection to actuating cylinder 116'. The FIG. arrangement otherwise functions substantially as described in connection with H08. 1 and 2.

From the foregoing it will be apparent that novel and efficient forms of demolition and scooping machine have been described herein. While I have shown and described certain presently preferred embodiments of the invention and have illustrated presently preferred methods of practicing the same, it is to be distinctly understood that the invention is not limited thereto but may be otherwise variously embodied and practiced within the scope of the following claims.

lclairn:

l. A demolition and scooping machine comprising a rigid supporting structure shaped to span a pair of spaced external supports, a turntable rotatably mounted upon said supporting structure, means for rotating said turntable, means for relatively rigidly clamping said support structure to each of said external supports, a boom assembly including an elbow section pivotally joined at one end to an upper supporting surface of said turntable, extensible boom means pivotally joined at one end to the other end of said elbow section, and means for pivotally joining a selected one of a demolition tool and a scoop to the other end of said extensible boom means, said elbow section and said extensible boom means being shaped so that said boom means other end can be moved to any point in the adjacent area between said supports and at least directly beneath said supporting structure, whereby said boom assembly can apply prying forces to said demolition tool when so joined.

2. The combination according to claim I wherein said extensible boom means are provided with a plurality of pivot connections spaced along the length thereof for selective connection to said elbow section.

3. The combination according to claim 1 wherein said turntable includes a supporting tube rotatably mounted on said supporting structure and terminating in a cage structure at its remote end from said turntable surface, and a plurality of connecting conduits are extended through said turntable tube and cage to a plurality of swivel couplings mounted in said cage.

4. The combination according to claim 1 wherein said supporting structure includes a pair of plates spacedly mounted thereon and said turntable is rotatably mounted within a stabilizing tube extending through apertures in said plates and secured thereto.

5. The combination according to claim 1 wherein said turntable is rotatably mounted within a stabilizing tube, said stabilizing tube being rigidly joined to said supporting structure and coextending substantially with said turntable, said turntable being rotatably mounted within said stabilizing tube.

6. The combination according to claim 1 wherein said turntable is double ended so as to provide a bottom supporting surface in addition to said upper supporting surface, said turntable protruding through each side of said supportin structure, and a second boom assembly 15 pivotally mounte on said bottom turntable surface.

7. The combination according to claim 6 wherein a demolition tool is pivotally joined to one of said boom assemblies and a scoop is pivotally joined to the other of said boom assemblies.

8. The combination according to claim 1 wherein said turntable includes a supporting tube extended substantially through said supporting structure and rotatably mounted on spaced bearing means mounted on said supporting structure.

9. The combination according to claim 8 wherein said supporting tube and bearing means are mounted within a stabilizing tube extended through said supporting structure and rigidly joined thereto.

10. The combination according to claim 1 wherein said supporting structure includes a pair of spaced generally parallel beams and extensible beam sections slidably and independently mounted on each end of each of said beams, and said clamping means includes a clamping mechanism mounted on the outward end of each of said extensible beam sections for clampingly engaging said external supporting means.

11. The combination according to claim 10 wherein said supporting structure additionally includes a pair of plates secured to upper and lower surfaces respectively of said beams, and operating components for said machine are enclosed within the space between said plates.

12. The combination according to claim 10 wherein said supporting structure additionally includes a pair of plates secured to upper and lower surfaces respectively of said beams, and said turntable is rotatably mounted within a stabilizing tube extending through apertures in said plates and secured thereto.

13. The combination according to claim 10 wherein said parallel beams are of tubular, noncircular cross section, and said extensible beam sections are of similar configuration to key said extensible sections therein and to maintain said clamping mechanisms in a given attitude relative to said external supports.

14. A demolition and scooping machine comprising a rigid supporting structure, a turntable rotatably mounted upon said supporting structure, means for rotating said turntable, means for relatively rigidly clamping said support structure to external supporting means, a boom assembly including an elbow section pivotally joined at one end to an upper surface of said turntable, extensible boom means pivotally joined at one end to the other end of said elbow section, means for pivotally joining a selected one of a demolition tool and a scoop to the other end of said extensible boom means, said turntable being protruded through each side of said supporting structure, a second boom assembly pivotally mounted on a lower surface of said turntable, a demolition tool pivotally joined to one of said boom assemblies, and a scoop pivotally joined to the other of said boom assemblies, said turntable being rotatably mounted within a stabilizing tube, said stabilizing tube being rigidly joined to said supporting structure and coextending substantially with said turntable, said turntable being rotatably mounted within said stabilizing tube by means of radial and thrust bearings mounted at each end of said stabilizing tube.

Patent No. 3,586,113 Dated June 22, 1971 Louis ,A. Grant Inventor(s) It is certified that error appears in the above-identified patent and that said Letters Patent are hereby corrected as shown below:

In Fig. l, the lead line from 102 should be an arrow, 72b should be added above 58b with a dash lead line from 72b to the dash line on element 58b, 40 should be added with a lead line to the structure above and to the left of 42 and 34 should be added with a lead line to the structure to the immediate left of 42. In Fig. 2, a lead line should be added from 94 to the upper plate 92 and a dash lead line should be added from 76 to the dash showing of pulley structure. In Fig. 3, 56a should be added with an arrow at the left side of plate 70, the line from 58a should extend to the tube atthe left rather than the right, 28 with a lead line should be applied at 81m left to the intermediate plate, 56a and lead line to the central tube 72a should be erased, 62 should be added below the location of 56a with a lead line to the short tube at the immediate right, and 30 with a lead line should be applied to the lower plate. In Fig. 5, the lead lines from 148 and 144 should extend to the next bracket above and the existing lead line cancelled and a lead line should be added from 146 to the bracket immediately thereabove. On the cover sheet [72], "7886 Saltburg Road" should read 7886 Saltsburg Road In the Abstract, first line, "comprises" should read comprising Column 4, line 66, after "beams", first occurrence, insert 24 and Column 5, line 20, "upper" should read lower line 22, "lower" should read upper line 33, "upper" should read lower line 35, after "72a" insert a comma; line 62, "86a" should read 86 line 65, after "90" insert to line 66, after "respectively" cancel "to". Column 6, line 19, "considerably" should read considerable line 40, after FORM PO-1 (10-69) uscoMM-oc wan-Poe 9 VS, GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFCE: IBIB 0-366-334 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION Patent No. 3,5 ,113 Dat June 22 1071 Inventor-( LOuiS A. Grant It is certified that error appears in the above-identified patent and that said Letters Patent are hereby corrected as shown below:

I2- "structure" insert 56 or same line 40, cancel "or 56b"; line 56, after "modification" cancel "20', as"; line 64, "cam" should read can Signed and sealed this 30th day of May 1972.

(SEAL) Attest:

EDWARD M.FLETCHER,JR. ROBERT GOTTSCHALK Attesting Officer Commissioner of Patents FORM PO-1050 (10-69) a u.s. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 1 nu o-su-su

Referenced by
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EP0960981A2 *Apr 9, 1999Dec 1, 1999Spitznas Maschinenfabrik GmbHMobile working apparatus and assembling set for an operating arm for a mobile working apparatus
Classifications
U.S. Classification173/34, 173/195, 299/70, 173/46, 173/52, 37/403
International ClassificationE02F9/12, E02F3/96, E02F3/42, E21C27/20, E02F3/38, E02F3/30, E02F9/02
Cooperative ClassificationE02F3/32, E02F3/38, E02F9/121, E02F9/022, E02F3/306, E02F3/966, E02F3/964, E21C27/20
European ClassificationE02F3/32, E02F3/96H, E21C27/20, E02F3/38, E02F9/12B, E02F9/02B, E02F3/30K, E02F3/96D2