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Publication numberUS3587127 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 28, 1971
Filing dateJun 17, 1969
Priority dateJun 17, 1969
Also published asDE2028093A1, DE2028093B2, DE2028093C3
Publication numberUS 3587127 A, US 3587127A, US-A-3587127, US3587127 A, US3587127A
InventorsRosendall Henry J
Original AssigneeBissell Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Sweeper with inertia-operated combs
US 3587127 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [72] Inventor Henry J. Rosendall Grand Rapids, Mich. [211 Appl. No. 834,060 [22] Filed June 17, 1969 [45] Patented June 28, 1971 [73] Assignee Bissell Inc., Grand Rapids, Mich.

[54] SWEEPER WITH INERTIA-OPERATED COMBS 8 Claims, 6 Drawing Figs.

[52] US. Cl 15/48 [51] Int. Cl A471 11/33 [50] Field of Search 15/4l,48, 38, 49 (C), 50(C),79,142

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 503,107 8/1893 Allen 15/48 1,813,325 7/1931 Smith Primary Examiner-Edward L. Roberts Attorney-Andrus, Sceales, Starke and Sawall PATE'NTED JUN28 I971 SHEET 1 OF 2 SWEEI'ER WITH INERTIA-OPERATED COMBS BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This invention relates to a sweeper of the rotary brush type, wherein inertia-operated brush combs are utilized.

The invention is an improvement on copending application Ser. No. 597,962, and now U.S. Pat. No. 3,457,575, filed Nov. 30, 1966 by Gunter Bienek, entitled Sweeper For Carpeted and Smooth Floors," and assigned to a common assignee.

In that application, a pair of rotatable brushes are provided, with the dust pans disposed either between or outside the brushes. Each brush rotates unidirectionally to continuously sweep dust and debris into its respective dustpan, no matter whether the sweeper is being translated in a fore or aft direction over the floor, which may be either carpeted or smooth. When the sweeper is translated in one direction, one brush is driven while the other freely rotates. When the direction of sweeper translation is reversed, the formerly driven brush freely rotates and the formerly freely rotating brush is driven.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The present invention is directed to the addition of combs for the brushes of the above-identified sweeper. A comb is positioned adjacent each brush and normally hangs substantially free of the'brush while the sweeper is at rest. When the sweeper is moved in one direction, inertial forces will cause one of the combs to move into engagement with its adjacent driven brush to comb the same, and will cause the other comb to remain substantially free of its freely rotating brush. Reversal of movement of the sweeper will cause the comb positions to reverse.

DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS The accompanying drawings illustrate the best mode presently contemplated by the inventor for carrying out the invention.

In the drawings:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a floor sweeper constructed in accordance with the invention;

FIG. 2 is a top plan view of the sweeper with portions of the cover removed;

FIG. 3 is a transverse section taken on line 3-3 of FIG. 2, when the sweeper is at rest;

FIG. 4 is a section taken on line 4-4 of FIG. 3 and showing the comb mounting and stop means;

FIG. 5 is a section similar to FIG. 3, and showing the position of the combs when the sweeper is moving left; and

FIG. 6 is a section similar to FIG. 3 and showing the position of the combs when the sweeper is moving right.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT As shown in the drawings, the invention is embodied in a carpet sweeper having a frame which includes sidewalls I and a cover 2, as well as strengthening crosspieces 3 and a transverse web 4. A suitable bail 5 is attached to the frame, and has the usual handle, not shown.

A pair of spaced rotatable sweeper brushes 6 and 7 are mounted to the frame. Each brush is fixedly mounted on an axle 8, 9 mounted in suitable bores in sidewalls l.

Axle 8 is provided with a coupling means, such as wheel disposed between each outer brush end and the respective sidewall 1. In like manner, axle 9 is provided with a coupling wheel 11 disposed between each outer brush and the respective sidewall. Both pairs of wheels are freely rotatable on their respective axes. Wheels 10 and 11 are continuously engaged and driven by two pairs of sweeper drive wheels l2, 13 which support the sweeper on the surface for reciprocating translation thereover. Drive wheels l2, 13 are fixedly mounted on respective rotatable axles 14, 15 which are supported by and extend through crosspieces 3.

Frictional engagement means are provided between adjacent coupling and drive wheels. As shown in the drawings, the frictional engagement means comprises a rubberlike surface layer 16 on coupling wheels 10 and a similar layer 17 on drive wheels 12. If desired, the friction layer could be disposed on all drive wheels and/or on all coupling wheels without departing from the spirit of the invention.

Brushes 6 and 7 are adapted to sweep dust and debris from the surface of a floor 18 into suitable receptacles. For this purpose, a pair of dust pans 19, 20 are disposed between the brushes and are pivotally mounted adjacent drive wheel axles I4, 15 respectively. Pans I9 and 20 are provided with a closed floor, but are open at the top and along the side facing the respective brush. An inclined lip 21 on the open side of each respective pan assists the adjacent brush in its sweeping action. In addition, an inclined fluff trap 22 is secured to axles I4 and 15 to prevent debris from escaping the pans.

Brushes 6 and 7 are so constructed and controlled so that they continuously rotate in one direction only and thus sweep dirt and the like into their respective pans at all times, regardless of the direction or change of direction of reciprocal translation of the sweeper over a floor surface.

For the above purpose, each brush is adapted to rotate freely in one direction so that contact of the brush with floor 18 during translation will cause the brush to sweep into its respective pan. The direction of permissible free rotation for one brush is, however, opposite to the direction of free rotation for the other brush. Thus, brush 6 will rotate freely in counterclockwise direction during leftward sweeper translation, and brush 7 will rotate freely in a clockwise direction during rightward sweeper translation.

However, when one brush is rotating freely, the other brush is blocked from such free rotation and is actually positively driven by the sweeper mechanism in a direction opposite to that of the freely rotating brush. Upon reversal of the direction of sweeper translation, the free or driven actions of the brushes reverse.

In the embodiment shown in the drawings, a coil spring 23 is circumferentially wrapped counterclockwise about each end portion of brush axle 8 and is held in place within the bore in sidewall l. A second coil spring 24 is similarly wrapped counterclockwise about axle 8 inwardly from each spring 23, and is held in place within a bore in freely rotatable coupling wheel T0, with one spring end engaging the wheel. Clockwisewrapped coil springs 25 and 26 are similarly mounted about axle 9.

Upon leftward translation of the sweeper, brush 6 and axle 8 will tend to rotate counterclockwise, thus unwinding springs 23 and 24. This will release the spring connection of sidewall I and coupling wheel 10 with axle 8. Brush 6 can then rotate counterclockwise freely over the floor even though drive wheel 12 drives wheel 10 clockwise. At the same time, brush 7 may also tend to rotate counterclockwise, but this will tighten springs 25 and 26 onto axle 9, thus blocking the tendency for counterclockwise rotation. The tightening of the spring coupling between coupling wheel 11 and axle 9 will cause wheel I3 to positively drive brush 7 clockwise. In the event brush 7 does not tend to rotate counterclockwise, the normal tightening force of coil spring 26 will maintain the coupling to drive wheel 13.

Upon rightward translation of the sweeper, the abovedescribed actions are reversed. Thus, no matter what the direction of translation, brushes 6 and 7 will always continuously sweep into their respective pans.

In accordance with the invention, inertia-operated means are provided which cooperate with the continuously unidirectionally rotating brushes to clean threads and other debris from the brushes. For this purpose, an elongated comb 27 is disposed slightly inwardly of and on the dust pan side of brush 6. Comb 27 is parallel to brush 6 and disposed adjacent the upper inner quarter of the brush, and is provided with suitable teeth 28 along its lower edge. As shown, comb 27 is bent along its upper edge to form a lip 29, and tongues 30 extend from the ends of the bend into opposed openings 31 in crosspieces 3 to pivotally support the comb thereby.

A second comb 32, similar to comb 27 is disposed slightly inwardly of and on the dustpan side of brush 7. Comb 32 has the same elements as comb 27 and is parallel thereto.

The extent of pivotal movement in both directions of combs 27, 32 is limited by stop means comprising an opening or slot 33 in each crosspiece 3 adjacent each comb end. An ear 34 extends from each comb end and into each slot. Ears 34 extend generally parallel to but spaced downwardly from tongues 30.

The opposed edges of slot 33 are engaged by cars 34 to limit the comb movement. One limit of comb position is such that teeth 28 are positioned just free of the tips of the bristles of the brush. The other limit is such that teeth 28 are positioned within the bristles.

As shown in FIG. 3, when the sweeper is at rest, gravity causes both combs 27, 32 to pivot downwardly so that they are free of the bristle tips. As shown in FIG. 5, when the sweeper is moved leftward, the sweeper thrust creates inertia which maintains comb 27 free of brush 6, even though the free counterclockwise rotation of brush 6 causes its circumference to move toward the ends of comb teeth 28. At the same time, the thrust of the leftward movement will cause an inertia effect on comb 32 to cause it to pivot and enter the bristles of driven brush 7, where the speed of the clockwise moving bristles, which move toward the comb teeth, will keep comb 32 in its upward brush-engaging position. As shown in FIG. 6, when the sweeper is moving rightward, brushes 6 and 7 will continue rotating in the same direction, but brush 6 will now be driven and brush 7 will rotate freely. The position and action of combs 27, 32 will reverse themselves. That is, comb 27 will pivotally enter brush 6 while comb 32 will remain free of brush 7.

By maintaining a comb in engagement only with the power driven brush, and keeping a comb out of engagement with the freely rotating brush, there will be no interference with the free brush's rotation which might tend to slow it down or stop its free rotation altogether. That is, the frictional resistance of the comb on the freely rotating brush might overcome the frictional forces between the brush and the floor.

The inventive concept may also be usable in a sweeper having only a single unidirectional, alternately driven and freely rotating brush.

Modes of carrying out the invention are contemplated by the inventor.

The following claims particularly point out and distinctly claim the subject matter which is regarded as the invention.

l claim:

1. In a floor sweeper, the combination comprising:

at a rotary floor contacting brush disposed to deliver dust to a dust-receiving area upon reciprocal translation of the sweeper over a floor,

b. said brush being mounted to contact and freely rotate on the floor in a direction to deliver dust to the dust-receiving area upon translation of the sweeper in one direction,

c, means to positively drive said brush in the same direction as its aforementioned free rotation upon translation of the sweeper in the opposite direction,

d. a brush-cleaning comb disposed adjacent said brush,

e. and means responsive to the translational movement of the sweeper to move said comb into engagement with said brush when the latter is positively driven, and to maintain said comb out of engagement with said brush when the latter is freely rotating on the floor.

2. A floor sweeper comprising, in combination:

a. a pair of rotary floor-contacting brushes disposed to deliver dust to a dust-receiving area upon reciprocal translation of the sweeper over a floor,

b. each said brush being mounted to contact and freely rotate on the floor in a direction to deliver dust to the dust-receiving area upon translation of the sweeper in one direction, c. means to positively drive each said brush in the same direction as its aforementioned free rotation upon translation of the sweeper in the opposite direction,

d. a brush-cleaning comb disposed adjacent each said brush,

e. and means responsive to the translational movement of the sweeper to move each said comb into engagement with its respective brush when its brush is positively driven, and to maintain each said comb out of engagement with its respective brush when its brush is freely rotating on the floor.

3. The sweeper of claim 2 in which the direction of free and positively driven rotation of each brush is opposite to that of the other brush, and in which said translational-movementresponsive means moves one comb into engagement with the driven brush while at the same time maintaining the other comb out of engagement with the freely rotating brush.

4. The sweeper of claim 2 in which said translational-movement-responsive means is responsive to inertia of sweeper movement, and comprises a pivotal mount for each comb which permits inertia forces to pivot the comb into its respective brush when the latter is driven, and to hold the comb out of brush engagement when the latter brush is rotating freely.

5. The sweeper of claim 4 which includes stop means to limit the extent of pivotal movement of each comb.

6. A floor sweeper comprising, in combination:

a. a frame,

b. a pair of rotary floor-contacting brushes disposed on said frame to deliver dust to a dust-receiving area upon reciprocal translation of the sweeper over a floor,

c. each said brush being mounted to contact and freely rotate on the floor in a direction to deliver dust to the dust-receiving area upon translation of the sweeper in one direction,

d. means to positively drive each said brush in the same direction as its aforementioned free rotation upon translation of the sweeper in the opposite direction,

e. an elongated brush-cleaning comb disposed adjacent each said brush and pivotally mounted on said frame for movement into and out of cleaning engagement with its respective brush,

f. the construction being such that inertia of translational sweeper movement will move each said comb into engagement with its respective brush when its brush is positively driven, and will maintain each said comb out of engagement with its respective brush when its brush is freely rotating on the floor.

7. The sweeper of claim 6 in which the direction of free and positively driven rotation of each brush is opposite to that of the other brush, and in which said inertia moves one comb into engagement with the driven brush while at the same time maintaining the other brush out of engagement with the freely rotating brush.

8. The sweeper of claim 7 which includes stop means to limit the extent of pivotal movement of each comb, said stop means comprising:

a. a pair of opposed edges formed by an opening in said frame disposed adjacent an end of each comb,

b. and an ear extending from each comb into said opening for contacting said edges.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3842459 *May 2, 1973Oct 22, 1974Nippon Seal CoRotary type sweeper
US3871047 *Dec 22, 1972Mar 18, 1975Hukuba HiroshiFloor cleaner
US4084283 *Dec 17, 1976Apr 18, 1978Bissell, Inc.Floor sweeper
US7617557Oct 18, 2004Nov 17, 2009Royal Appliance Mfg. Co.Powered cleaning appliance
US7861352Jul 16, 2008Jan 4, 2011Royal Appliance Mfg. Co.Powered cleaning appliance
US7900310Aug 13, 2010Mar 8, 2011Royal Appliance Mfg. Co.Powered cleaning appliance
US8377218 *Apr 13, 2010Feb 19, 2013S.C. Johnson & Son, Inc.Fabric sweeper
US8726441 *Sep 28, 2010May 20, 2014Bissell Homecare, Inc.Floor sweeper with split brush assembly
US20050217042 *Oct 18, 2004Oct 6, 2005Royal Appliance Mfg. Co.Powered cleaning appliance
US20100192316 *Apr 13, 2010Aug 5, 2010Knopow Jeremy FFabric Sweeper
US20100325820 *Aug 13, 2010Dec 30, 2010Reindle Mark EPowered cleaning appliance
US20110154589 *Mar 8, 2011Jun 30, 2011Reindle Mark EPowered cleaning appliance
Classifications
U.S. Classification15/48
International ClassificationA47L11/33, A47L11/00
Cooperative ClassificationA47L11/33, A47L11/4069, A47L11/40, A47L11/4041
European ClassificationA47L11/40, A47L11/40J4, A47L11/40F4, A47L11/33