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Publication numberUS3587201 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 28, 1971
Filing dateJul 10, 1968
Priority dateJul 10, 1968
Publication numberUS 3587201 A, US 3587201A, US-A-3587201, US3587201 A, US3587201A
InventorsStrayer John Joseph
Original AssigneeJohns Manville
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Pipe-insulation packaging system
US 3587201 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [72] Inventor JohnJosephStrayer Defiance,0hio [21] AppLNo 743,720 [22] Filed July 10,1968 [45] Patented June28, 1971 I [731 Assignee Johns-ManvilleCorporation.

New "ork. N11".

[54} PIPE-INSULATION PACKAGING SYSTEM 7 Claims, 12 Drawing Figs.

[52] U.S.CI 53/24, 53/32,93/36.9 [51] 1nt.Cl. .B65b 13/20, B651; 11/58, B31b 1/72 [50] FieldofSearch....-.., 53/24,32; I 93/36.9

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 410,553 9/1889 Lang 53/24 1,694,954 12/1928 Stack... 53/24 1,726,927 9/1929- Shaffer.... 53/24X 3,307,320 3/1967 Harriss.... 53/24 3,315,435 4/1967 Gunyou 53/32X 3,330,089 3,380,221 4/1968 Thiele 3,383,825 5/1968 Titchenal 3,404,058 10/ 1 968 Fink 3,319,394 5/1967 Talalay 995,939 6/1911 Anderson 3,429,095 2/1969 Huson 3,458,966 8/1969 Dunbar 3,053,715 9/1962 Labino 3,063,887 11/1962 Labino 3,162,895 12/1964 Pusch.... 3,321,085 l/1966 Flores.... 3,245,432 4/1966 Pusch 3,516,217

Attorneys-John A. McKinney and Robert M. Krone 7/1967 Uematsu 6/1970 Gildersleeve FOREIGN PATENTS 3/1965 France reduced volume.

PATENTEU JUN28|97| 3; 5 7,201

sum 1 0F 2 INVEN'IOR. LIOHN d. STRAYER A T TORNEV PATENTEuJuuzslan 3581201 SHEET 2 OF 2 INVENTOR. JOHN d STRAYER BY A T TORNE PIPE-INSULATION PACKAGING SYSTEM BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION The shipment of very low density materials as exemplified by typical fibrous thermal insulation products has been a costly matter due to the relatively great volume to weight ratio encountered with such materials which commonly are of densities of less than l pounds per cubic foot and frequently as low as 2 or 3 pounds per cubic foot or even less. The economics of transporting such bulky low weight material is of particular concern in ocean freight wherein the charges are based upon a cubage basis rather than by weight. And in addition to the normally very low densities of compositions utilized in thermal insulation materials, many of these products are of a configuration containing substantial void areas or sections such as in conventional insulation products for pipes or conduits and the like which are of generally tubularlike construc tion, formed either by one encircling piece or two complementary half or hemicycle, or more, individual sections, with insulating walls commonly of thicknesses ranging from onehalf to 3 or 4 inches of very low density materials and shaped with inside diameters or internal void areas of one-half inch up to in the order of 30 inches extending therethrough to accommodate pipes and the like cylindrical bodies ranging through these given sizes. Products made up of half or multiple sections, unlike a single piece tubular construction, can be packaged one within the other or through other apt arrangements such as in U.S. Pat. No. 3,23l,085. However, this technique of conserving space obviously is not possible with a one-piece or tubular construction. Moreover, materials of or in a form providing very low density which is normally a basic prerequisite for effective thermal insulating properties, are commonly inherently of very low strength properties which is a significant consideration in packaging and handling.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION This invention is concerned with an improved method of packaging bulky and resilient low density mineral fiber products of unitary or single piece, generally tubular construction comprising glass fiber thennal-insulating products for pipe, conduit, tanks and the like similar cylindrical objects, and it consists of effectively compacting and consolidating their original overall volume to facilitate shipping and handling.

It is the primary objective and advantage of this invention to provide effective means of markedly reducing the bulkiness of very low density products of tubular and in turn hollow construction which appreciably decreases the overall volume of the products in both consolidation of the mass of low density material and in reduction of the size of the internal void, all without discernibly diminishing its high resilience and propensity to effectively return to its original density and tubular configuration or degradation of the product, and which forms a compact and enduring package of more economical size and convenience in handling. BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS Further objects and advantages of this invention will become apparent from the following specification and drawings in which:

FIGS. 1A, 1B and IC are perspective views of an insulation product in its original form, partially compressed and in its final consolidated state, respectively;

FIGS. 2A and 28 comprise diagrammatic illustrations of an assembly of insulation products prior to compression and as compressed and consolidated for packaging;

F IGS. 3A, 3B and 3C illustrate the formation of a protective covering for containing, or wrapping about the compressed product in the formation of the package;

FIG. 4 comprises a perspective view of one type of package according to this invention; and,

FIGS. 5A, 5B and 5C illustrate the formation of an optional container or wrapper for the packaging of the consolidated product of the invention.

DESCRIPTION OF PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS This invention consists of an effective and innocuous means of packaging bulky and resilient low density mineral fiber products of generally tubular or hollow construction comprising the application of a compressive force in at least one direction substantially uniformly along the length of the generally tubular article to consolidate the same to a form of significantly reduced volume of generally flat elliptical configuration and with walls of increased density. To render the invention practical and appropriate for effective packaging commensurate with the requirement of uniform application of compression, pressure is applied simultaneously to a plurality of assembled units of the bulky and resilient low density mineral fiber products of generally tubular construction arranged juxtapositional with the longitudinal axis of the tubular construction of each unit generally parallel and forming collectively a generally rectangular body or assemblage. Thus arranged, the compressive force can be uniformly applied over at least one surface of the assembled generally rectangular body adjacent to and/or composed of the longitudinal side of the amassed units and uniformly along the length of each tubular unit and in turn transmitted uniformly along the length of each abutting and/or underlying unit. Following the uniform compression and united consolidation of the assentblage to a state of substantially reduced volume of abutting flat elliptical units of increased density, retaining means such as straps, tape, cord, a confining box or the like packaging device can be utilized to maintain the compressed and consolidated condition without damage or diminishing the resilient property or propensity of the flattened units to substantially return to their original tubular construction and low density.

Referring to the drawings, FIGS. IA through C illustrate the compression and consolidation upon an individual unit of bulky and resilient, low density mineral fiber product consisting of a typical pipe insulation section or sleeve of unitary tubular construction. In FIG. IA, the insulation section 10 is in its original or natural state of configuration and density following manufacture. It is compressed by the application thereof of a substantially unifon'n force applied or distributed along its axial length, as represented in the drawings by the line and arrows 11. As shown in FIG. 1B, the originally cylindrical section of the tubular constructed unit is compressed to a generally flat elliptical configuration, and thereafter as shown in FIG. 1C to a consolidated flat elliptical configuration and of increased density of the wall mass providing a compacted unit Id of significantly decreased volume and of a configuration more amenable to packaging. An important feature of this invention is that the tubular constructed insulation of mineral fiber in very low densities of less than 10 pounds per cubic foot and preferably less than about 5 pounds per cubic foot possesses the inherent resilience and propensity to substantially completely recover its initial generally tubular configuration and low density whereby either its intended use or original properties of strength or insulating characteristics are not discernibly impaired.

FIG. 2A diagrammatically illustrates an assembly of a plurality of units of the bulky and resilient low density glass fiber pipe insulation product or sections 10 of one-piece generally tubular configuration juxtapositional to each other with the longitudinal axis of each tubular construction arranged generally parallel to the others. To facilitate the operation, the pipe insulation units or sections 10 are assembled within a press cavity as shown diagrammatically as 12 comprising a rectangular enclosure with at least one wall thereof functioning as a press platen capable of moving with force towards its opposite wall or downwardly as illustrated to apply pressure uniformly over the length of the tubular constructed pipe insulation sections I0 and thereby consolidate each unit to a flat elliptical shape and of reduced density as shown in FIG. 28 as 14 upon completion of the compression and consolidation.

Preferably a sheet of durable protective packaging material such as heavyweight paperboard or cardboard is employed to wrap or box the consolidated pipe insulating sections or sleeves as a means of preventing damage during handling or shipping or resulting from the restraining means retaining the consolidated product in its compressed condition against its inherent tendency of recovery. Most conveniently, the protective sheet material is placed both in the press cavity underneath the assemblage of the pipe insulation sections to and superimposed over the assembly or under the compressing wall or platen whereby the sheets are substantially coextensive with the following opposing compressive forces and upon completion of consolidation are in position protecting the relatively weak and fragile low density products against the restraining means inhibiting their possible cutting or fracturing of the pipe sections due to the force of their inherent propensity to return to their original generally cylindrical construction and low density, and also against external blows or abrasion in following handling and shipping. The sheets of durable protective packaging material E5 of FIG. 3A through 3C optionally and preferably are provided with one or more flaps or sections 16 which extend beyond the area of the surface of the generally rectangular assembly of units of pipe insulation sections 10, indicated by the dotted lines, and are adaptable to be folded either upwardly or downwardly, depending upon whether the sheet is positioned on the bottom or the top of the assembly, so as to fold about the sides of the assembly as shown in FIG. 4 at l6, providing overall protection against the resisting binding straps 18. Of course, a single flap on each the upper and the lower protective sheet can be designed of adequate length and positioned on opposite sides of the assembly so that each opposing flap itself extends completely across the respective sides of the assembly to envelop the same on each of the four sides thereof.

A further optional construction for the protective packaging material 15 is to provide, in addition to opposing flaps to intended to extend as illustrated in H0. 4 over the sides formed by the longitudinal sides of the tubes, end flaps l7 illustrated in FIGS. 5A, 5B and 5C which upon being appropriately folded as illustrated in FIGS. 58 and 5C provide cooperating boxlike structures to completely envelop the as sembled and consolidated products on all sides including the end portions of the tubular construction of the insulating sections 10 giving protection on all sides for shipment and handling.

Bulky and resilient low density products of generally tubular construction to which this invention applies typically comprise thermal insulations designed for applications of cylindrical bodies such as pipe, conduit, small diameter tanks, etc. which are principally constructed of bonded common mineral fibers of the class consisting of glass fibers, rock and mineral wool, high temperature refractory fibers such as those primarily composed of alumina-silica and the like conventional synthetically manufactured insulating fibrous materials. Such compositions are typically inherently highly resilient and have been found to effectively recover upon distortion or compression. Thermal-insulations comprising these materials and to which this invention is particularly applicable comprises products of the type set forth in US. Letters Pat. Nos. 3,063,887, 3,053,715, 3,162,895 and 3,245,432. Such products are typically formed by convolutely winding to provide a continuous wall which may be applied by slipping onto the pipe or by cutting the wall completely through on one side and forcibly separating the tubular construction at the location of the cut and pennitting it to close about the pipe, or by molding a single piece such as illustrated in the aforesaid US. Pat. Nos. 3,162,895 or 3,245,432 with an abutting edge comprising the longitudinal slit which obviates the necessity for cutting for application to a pipe.

It will be understood that the foregoing details are given for the purpose of illustration, not restriction, and the variations within the spirit of this invention are intended to be included within the scope of the appended claims.

I claim:

1. Method of packaging bulky and resilient low density, bonded mineral fiber products consisting of a generally tubular hollow single piece construction without discernibly diminishing their resiliency and propensity to effectively return to their original density and tubular configuration, said method consisting of compressing and consolidating their original volume, comprising:

a. assembling a plurality of units of bulky and resilient low density, bonded mineral fiber products of generally tubular hollow single piece construction juxtapositional to each other with the longitudinal axis of each of the tubular constructed products arranged generally parallel and forming an assemblage of the units in a generally rectangular body;

b. applying a compressive force uniformly over at least one of the surfaces of said generally rectangular assembled body of units of the juxtapositional parallel tubular hollow products which is adjacent to the longitudinal side of the tubular construction of the units and with the compressive force directed perpendicular to their longitudinal axes whereby said compressive force is transmitted in turn to each underlying unit of the assembly uniformly along the length and width and consolidating the assemblage of units of bulky and resilient low density, bonded mineral fiber products compressing each abutting unit along its length and width from its generally tubular hollow single piece construction and low density to compact each of said units to a reduced volume of flattened configuration and of increased density of the mass of the bonded mineral fiber; and,

. applying restraining means to the consolidated assemblage of abutting units each comprising a flattened configuration and of increased density of bonded mineral fiber to contain the thus consolidated assemblage of units of bulky and resilient low density, bonded mineral fiber products in their said compressed condition and resist substantial recovery to the tubular construction and original low density; and wherein the bulky and resilient low density, bonded mineral fiber products of generally tubular hollow single piece construction are of an original wall thicknesses of approximately 0.5 inches to approximately 4 inches and of a density of less than about 10 pounds per cubic foot; and wherein a durable protective sheet of packaging material is superimposed upon at least one surface of the generally rectangular assembled body of units of the juxtapositional parallel tubular products to which the compression forces is uniformly applied and upon the surface of the said generally rectangular assembled body opposite thereto to shield the resultant compressed and consolidated assemblage of abutting units of flattened configuration and increased density from damage due to the inherent force of recovery thereto to substantially the tubular single piece construction and original low density to the bulky and resilient, bonded mineral fiber products resisting the subsequently applied restraining means.

2. The method of claim 1 wherein the durable protective sheet of packaging material superimposed upon at least one of thesurfaces of the generally rectangular assembled body of units of the juxtapositional parallel tubular products to which the compressive force is uniformly applied and upon the surface of the generally rectangular assembled body opposite thereto is provided with at least one flap extending beyond the said superimpomd surface of the generally rectangular assembled body which is adaptable to be folded around the adjacent side of the generally rectangular assembled body and extend over at least a portion of the surface of the adjacent side thereof, and folding said extending flaps of the durable protective sheet of packaging material around the adjacent side of the generally rectangular assembled body positioning the flaps over at least a portion of the surfaces thereof prior to applying the restraining means to the compressed and consolidated assemblage of abutting units of flat elliptical configuration and increased density of the bulky and resilient low density, bonded mineral fiber products of single piece construction.

3. The method of claim 1 wherein the durable protective sheet of packaging material superimposed upon at least one of the surfaces of the generally rectangular assembled body of units of the juxtapositional parallel tubular products to which the compressive force is uniformly applied and upon the surface of the generally rectangular assembled body opposite thereto is provided with at least one flap extending beyond the said superimposed surface of the generally rectangular assembled body which is adaptable to be folded around the adjacent side of the generally rectangular assembled body and extend over at least a portion of the surface of the side thereof, and following application of the compressive force uniformly over at least one of the surfaces of the generally rectangular assembled body of units of the juxtapositional parallel tubular products of single piece construction and perpendicular thereto and the consolidation of the assemblage of units of bulky and resilient low density, bonded mineral fiber products from their generally tubular single piece construction and low density to abutting units of fiat elliptical configuration and increased density, thereafter folding said extending flaps of the durable protective sheet of packaging material around the adjacent side of the generally rectangular assembled body and applying the flaps over at least a portion of the surface thereof prior to applying the restraining means.

4. The method of claim 1 wherein the bulky and resilient low density, bonded mineral fiber products of generally tubular hollow single piece construction consist of fibrous pipe insulation of an original wall thickness of 0.5 inches to approximately 3.0 inches and of a density of about 2 to about 5 pounds per cubic foot.

5. The method of claim 4 wherein the restraining means applied to the consolidated assemblage of abutting units of flat elliptical configuration and increased density to contain the consolidated assembly of units of bulky and resilient low density, bonded mineral fiber products of single piece construction in a compressed condition and resist their recovery to substantially original tubular construction and low density comprises packaging straps.

6. The method of claim 4 wherein the restraining means applied to the consolidated assemblage of abutting units of flat elliptical configuration and increased density to contain the consolidated assembly of units of bulky and resilient low density, bonded mineral fiber products of single piece construction in a compressed condition and resist their recovery to substantially original tubular construction and low density comprises packaging tape.

7. The method of claim 4 wherein the durable protective sheet of packaging material superimposed both upon at least one of the surfaces of the generally rectangular assembled body of units of the juxtapositional parallel tubular constructed products to which the compressive force is uniformly applied and upon the surface of the generally rectangular assembled body opposite thereto is each provided with at least two flaps on opposite sides thereof with each flap extending beyond the said superimposed surfaces of the generally rectangular assembled body have edges thereof adjoining a surface of the assembled body of the longitudinal sides of the tubular single piece constructed units and adapted to be folded around said adjacent sides of the generally rectangular assembled body of units and cover at least a portion of the surface thereof, and upon compressing and consolidating the generally rectangular assembled body of juxtapositional parallel tubular single piece constructed units of the bulky and resilient low density, bonded mineral fiber products to abutting units of flattened configuration and increased density, folding the flaps of the durable protective sheet of packaging material extending from opposite sides thereof around and covering the adjoining surfaces of the assembled body of units of the longitudinal side of the tubular single piece construction, said flaps of each durable protective sheet of packing material su rimposed over 0 ite surfaces of the enerall rectangular assembled body bq iinits of the juxtap ositiona parallel tubular constructed product being of such proportions as to complement each other to at least abut along their outer edge and thereby provide complete protective coverage over the adjoining surface of the assembled body of units of the longitudinal side of the tubular construction.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3865325 *Jul 2, 1971Feb 11, 1975Dylaker Computer Systems IncFlexible tape reel
US4401218 *May 7, 1982Aug 30, 1983Insulation Systems, Inc.Package for hermetically storing a shrinkable elastomeric sleeve
US4444311 *Sep 23, 1982Apr 24, 1984Isover Saint-GobainMulti-roll package of compressible materials
US4535587 *Aug 23, 1983Aug 20, 1985Isover Saint-GobainMulti-roll package of compressible materials
US4595093 *Jan 6, 1984Jun 17, 1986The Procter & Gamble CompanyPackage of compressed resilient articles and concomitant method of unpackaging
US4886167 *Apr 14, 1989Dec 12, 1989The Procter & Gamble CompanyCompact, core-wound paper product
US4909388 *Apr 7, 1989Mar 20, 1990Kouzou WatanabeCompressed roll paper, method of and apparatus for producing same
US5027582 *Aug 30, 1989Jul 2, 1991The Procter & Gamble CompanyCompact, core-wound paper product and method of making
US5195300 *Mar 17, 1992Mar 23, 1993Hayssen Manufacturing CompanyCompressed roll packaging method and apparatus
US5651236 *Aug 4, 1994Jul 29, 1997Metal Box South Africa LimitedPackaging of articles
US5732544 *Jun 4, 1996Mar 31, 1998Ferguson, Sr.; John H.Textile yarn tube stripper
US8132393Mar 3, 2009Mar 13, 2012Sealed Air CorporationRadial compression system for rolls of material and associated method
US8196744Mar 1, 2011Jun 12, 2012Saint-Gobain IsoverPackaging unit for pipe sections
CN101180226BMay 4, 2006Mar 27, 2013圣-戈班伊索福公司Packaging device for pipeline portions
DE2426471A1 *May 31, 1974Dec 11, 1975Continental Gummi Werke AgVerpackung einer vielzahl von fahrzeugluftreifen
DE102005020892A1 *May 4, 2005Nov 9, 2006Saint-Gobain Isover G+H AgVerpackungseinheit für Rohrschalen
EP0392581A1 *Mar 26, 1990Oct 17, 1990THE PROCTER & GAMBLE COMPANYCompact, core-wound paper product and method of making
WO2006117233A1 *May 4, 2006Nov 9, 2006Saint Gobain IsoverPackaging unit for pipe sections
Classifications
U.S. Classification53/438, 206/499, 493/386, 206/446, 53/397
International ClassificationB65B19/34, B65B19/00, B65B25/14, B65D85/08
Cooperative ClassificationB65B19/34, B65D85/08
European ClassificationB65D85/08, B65B19/34