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Publication numberUS3588019 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 28, 1971
Filing dateJul 7, 1969
Priority dateJul 7, 1969
Publication numberUS 3588019 A, US 3588019A, US-A-3588019, US3588019 A, US3588019A
InventorsAnthony J Cozeck, Ruben Q Otero, Walter E Pierce
Original AssigneeAnthony J Cozeck, Ruben Q Otero, Walter E Pierce
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Bracket for electrical boxes
US 3588019 A
Images(4)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent inventors Anthony J. Cozeck 2410 S. Calle Cordova. Tucson. Ariz. 85710; Ruben Q. Otero, 4956 S. Liberty Ave., Tucson, Arlz. 85706; Walter E. Pierce, 11822 E. Wagon Trail Road Rte #2, Box

8l2-D, Tucson, Arizt 85715 Appl. No. 839,387 Filed July 7, 1969 Patented June 28, 1971 BRACKET FOR ELECTRICAL BOXES 5 Claims, 6 Drawing Figs.

Int. CL. [102g 3/08 Field of Search .6 248/228,

226.5, 205, 72, 300, 229, 221, 271, (OB Digest); 220/33,3.92;52/484,483;24/84,8l

[56] References Cited UNlTED STATES PATENTS 2,962,252 1l/l960 Frank 248/226 FOREIGN PATENTS 1,039,646 8/!966 Great Britain 248/72 Primary Examiner-J. Franklin Foss Attorney-James A. Eyster ABSTRACT: A bracket made of thin spring sheet steel carries a hook on the end of one leg and an inward 90 bend on the other. The length of this leg is sufficient to span the edge of a metal stud used in building construction. A second leg extends in the direction of the stud width, and is provided with teeth so that, once the bracket is snapped onto a stud the bracket cannot be moved or removed. Means are provided for attaching an electric outlet box or an expandible bar hanger to the bracket.

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BRACKET FOR ELECTRICAL BOXES BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION board, usually x-inch plaster board, sometimes termed drywall, or are faced with metal lath and plaster.

The studding may consist of wood columns, nominally 2 inches by 4 inches in cross section, particularly where the studs must bear weight. When the studs do not carry weight they may be made of thin section metal channels, l-beams or other shapes having sufficient strength and stiffness for use in partition walls.

Electrical wiring usually consists of metallic or nonmetallic raceways with wires installed therein, or nonmetallic cable, secured to the studs. The wiring, together with electrical dis tribution and outlet boxes, is generally installed before application of the wall board.

In order to place each electrical box 'in the position shown in the building plans the box must be secured to a stud or in a fixed position between studs. In the latter case an expandible bar hanger is secured at its ends to two studs and the box is fastened to the hanger.

When wood studs are used the box or the expandible bar hanger is, in present practice, nailed to the studding. But when metal studding is used the electrician is presented with the problem of fastening the box or hanger to the metal studding.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The present invention is designed to solve the problem of fastening an electrical box to or between metal studs. The invention provides a metal bracket, preferably made of steel sheet having approximately clock spring temper. The bracket is bent to form a first side having an inwardly bent hooked edge at one end and at the other an inward bend to an angle of 90 or somewhat less. The length of the side is equal to the width of an edge of a metal l-beam or channel stud, this edge corresponding to the nominal 2-inch face of a wood two-byfour stud. On a second face, adjacent to the 90 or less bend, the edges of the metal sheet are cut and formed to have two or more inwardly bent teeth which, after the bracket is snapped onto a stud, prevent removal and assist in eliminating slippage. Various means are provided for securing a box to the bracket and holding the box rigidly and securely in its position.

The principal object of this invention is to provide a bracket for securing an electrical outlet box to a building stud, for rapid attachment without nails or tools, and for locking the bracket in place after attachment.

Another object is to provide a bracket for attachment of a box to or between two metal channel studs.

Another object is to provide a bracket for attachment of a box to or between metal I-beam studs.

Another object is to provide a bracket for attachment to a metal channel or I-beam stud when wall board has previously been secured to form one side of the partition.

DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING Further understanding of the invention may be secured from the detailed description and the drawing, in which:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of one form of bracket.

FIG. 2 is a plan view showing use of two of the brackets of FIG. I to support an expandible bar hanger which supports a box between studs.

FIG. 3 is a perspective view of another form of bracket.

FIG. 4 illustrates in plan the application of the bracket of FIG. 3 to an l-beam stud.

FIG. 5 is a perspective view of a Z-bracket.

FIG. 6 is a plan view showing application of the bracket of FIG. 5.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS Referring now to FIG. 1, a bracket formed from spring metal, such as steel, has a first straight and flat leg 11 bearing at one end a hook l2 and terminating at the other end in a bend 13 to form an angle of or somewhat less. The length of this first leg is approximately equal to the width of the edge of a metal channel stud, of an I-beam stud, or of any other type of stud, whichever the bracket is designed for. A second leg 14 commences at the 90 bend and extends a distance of about an inch and a half or more. This second leg is slit on its two edges, near the 90 bend, and the slit metal is bent inward to form two teeth, 16 and 17, which project inward and toward the 90 bend. The function of these teeth is to bite into the stud and prevent removal of the bracket. 7

The bracket's second leg 14 is provided with a metal threaded post, 18, which may be bolted to the leg about at its center but is preferably welded to the leg. The post extends outwardly from the second leg 14.

Application and use of this bracket are illustrated in FIG. 2. Two metal channel studs 19 and 21 are shown with their open sides faced away from each other, although the bracket of the invention can be used equally well when either or both studs are faced inward.

One bracket, 22, is secured to stud 21, with the bracket hook 23 curled around one edge of the channel, and the two bracket teeth, 24, bearing against the long side of the channel so that, once the bracket has been snapped onto the stud, it cannot be easily moved and cannot be removed without distorting the bracket.

A second, similar bracket, 26, is secured to the stud 19, into which the teeth 27 bite to prevent removal.

An expandible bar hanger 28 is secured at its two ends to the brackets by inserting the threaded post 29 through a hole in one end of the hanger and by inserting the threaded post 31 through a hole in the other end of the hanger. The hanger is adjusted to proper length and the ends secured by nuts 32 and 33. A box 34 is secured in the desired position on the hanger. Dashed lines 35 illustrate the position which wall board will occupy when installed.

This bracket can be used equally well to hang a box between the two I-beam studs, or between a channel stud and an I- beam stud, by making the first leg of the bracket the proper length to fit the narrow edge of the stud.

FIG. 3 illustrates an embodiment of the bracket for use in securing a box to the side of a metal I-beam nailer stud. A first side 34 has a length approximately equal to the width of a flange of an l-beam stud, and is provided with a hook 36 formed by bending the free end of the side. The other end of the side is bent to form an angle 37 embracing 90 or somewhat less. The second side 38 of the bracket is flat and approximately 3 inches or less in length, and is provided at its free end with a leg 39 bent at a right angle to side 38 and having such length that, when in place on an I-beam stud, the'side 38 will be parallel to the web of the stud and leg 39 will press against the web. The constant width of the bracket is such as to provide an adequate surface upon which a box may be bolted or welded. Slotted holes 41 are provided by which a box or an expandible bar hanger can be adjustably bolted to the bracket. Alternatively, a box can be welded to the bracket. Holes 42 permit the bracket to be nailed to the nailer stud-if desired.

In FIG. 4 the bracket 43 shown in FIG. 3 is snapped onto an I-beam stud 44, with the first side 46 of the bracket secured I tightly to one flange of the l-beam stud by means of the hook 47 and two teeth 48. The leg 39 presses firmly against the web of the l-beam stud to provide solid support for the second side of the bracket. A box 49 is secured to the second side of the bracket by bolting or welding.

FIG. 5 illustrates another embodiment of the bracket for use in attaching a box to a metal stud after one wall board facing has been installed.

The bracket includes a first side 51 formed into a hook 52 at one end and terminated in a bend 53 of 90 or less at the other end. A second side, 54, begins at the bend 53 and is terminated, 1% or more inches away, in a 90 bend 56 which extends oppositely to the bend 53. Beyond bend 56 the bracket forms a third side, 57, provided with four holes, 58, 59, 61 and 62. These holes are spaced to match the nail holes in the bottom of a box and may be slotted to accommodate more than one style of box. The length and width of the side 57 is such as to accommodate the holes.

The second side 54 is provided with two teeth, 63 and 64, bent to secure the box when placed.

FIG. 6 illustrates the attachment of the bracket of FIG. 5 to a metal channel stud 66 after a plaster board 67 has been placed. The first side 51 of the bracket is secured to one narrow side of channel 66 by hooking the hook 52 over one edge and pressing in, when the teeth 63/64 will engage the metal of the stud and lock the bracket in place, with the second side 54 of the bracket pressing firmly against the web of the channel. A box 68 is secured to the third side of the bracket by bolting through holes 58, 59, 61, 62, or the box may be welded to side 57, bringing the face of the box to the inner surface of the plaster board 67. A hole of the proper size is cut in the plaster board to permit installation of devices in the box and a box plate on the outer plaster board surface. 69 indicates a plaster ring of a depth appropriate to the thickness of the finished wall.

We claim:

1. A box bracket for securing an electric outlet box to a metal stud comprising:

a strip of thin elastic metal;

one end thereof bent into a hook;

the portion of said strip adjacent to said hook being flat to form a first side having a length equal to the width of an edge of said metal stud;

a first inward bend of approximately 90 in said strip terminating said first side;

a flat portion of said strip commencing at said first inward bend forming a second side;

at least two teeth formed and bent inwardly at the edges of said second side adjacent to said first inward bend whereby when bracket is snapped onto a stud the teeth lock the bracket to the stud and prevent removal; and means for securing a box to said bracket.

2. A box bracket in accordance with claim 1 in which said metal stud is of the channel type and in which the bracket second side is provided at its distal end with an outwardly turning third side forming a angle with the second side.

3. A box bracket in accordance with claim 1 in which said box bracket is an L-bracket having only first and second sides, and in which means are provided on said second side for attachment to an electrical wiring component, whereby an electrical outlet or switch box or expandible bar hanger can be secured to the second side.

4. A pair of box brackets in accordance with claim 3 including the combination therewith of an expandible bar hanger, whereby a box can be placed atany location between two metal studs.

5. A box bracket for securing an electric outlet box to a metal l-beam stud comprising:

a strip of thin elastic metal;

one end thereof bent into a hook;

the portion of said strip adjacent to said hook being flat to form a first side having a length equal to the width of an edge of said metal stud;

a first inward bend of approximately 90'in said strip terminating said first side;

a flat portion of said strip commencingat said first inward bend forming a second side; at least two teeth formed and bent inwardly at the edges of said second side adjacent to said first inward bend whereby when bracket is snapped onto a stud the teeth lock the bracket to the stud and prevent removal;

a second inward bend at the distal end of the said second side to form a third side comprising a standoff support, whereby the second side is held rigidly in place and parallel to the web of the l-beam stud; and

means for securing a box to said bracket.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3720395 *Aug 18, 1971Mar 13, 1973Fastway FastenersClip for securing conduit boxes to metal dry wall studs
US3767151 *Nov 12, 1971Oct 23, 1973G SealElectric wiring box positioner
US3780209 *Sep 27, 1972Dec 18, 1973Fastway FastenersClip for securing conduit boxes to metal dry wall studs
US3950054 *Nov 7, 1974Apr 13, 1976Gte Automatic Electric Laboratories IncorporatedAdapter bracket for connecting blocks
US3972498 *Jul 30, 1975Aug 3, 1976Eaton CorporationDevice for attaching electrical boxes to metal studs
US4135337 *Sep 12, 1977Jan 23, 1979Medlin Lewis BMounting means for electric outlet box
US4561615 *Oct 11, 1983Dec 31, 1985Medlin Jr Lewis BMounting bracket for a junction box
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US4787587 *Oct 13, 1987Nov 29, 1988Fl Industries, Inc.Universal bracket for metal or wood studs
US4943022 *Apr 12, 1989Jul 24, 1990B-Line Systems, Inc.Bracket for mounting an electrical box on a wall stud
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US5004199 *May 14, 1990Apr 2, 1991American Electric Fl Industries, Inc., DivisionFor mounting electrical boxes to wall studs
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US5188318 *Aug 15, 1991Feb 23, 1993Newcomer Charles HStud engaging electrical wiring clip
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US5873553 *Jul 14, 1997Feb 23, 1999Herman Miller Inc.Mounting bracket assembly for an outlet box
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Classifications
U.S. Classification248/228.6, 248/205.1, D08/364, D08/373, 248/906, 220/3.9
International ClassificationH02G3/12
Cooperative ClassificationY10S248/906, H02G3/126
European ClassificationH02G3/12F4