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Publication numberUS3588085 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 28, 1971
Filing dateMay 5, 1969
Priority dateMay 5, 1969
Publication numberUS 3588085 A, US 3588085A, US-A-3588085, US3588085 A, US3588085A
InventorsBailey Robert Charles, Eppard Maurice William, Estes Harry Albert, Higgins Jerry Allen, James Glen Stuart, Montillon Henry Aldrich, Myring Verne Vincent, Robertson Orville Herbert, Sargeant Blaine Walter, Sorensen Neal Edwin
Original AssigneeHolden Ind Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method of making magazine insert
US 3588085 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [72] Inventors Robert Charles Bailey Burnsville; Maurice William Eppard, Minneapolis; Harry Albert Estes, Edina; Jerry Allen Higgins, Minneapolis; Glen Stuart James, Excelsior; Henry Aldrich Montillon, St. Paul; Verne Vincent Myring, Minneapolis; Orville Herbert Robertson, West St. Paul; Blaine Walter Sargeant; Neal Edwin Sorensen, Minneapolis, Minn.

{21] Appl. No. 823,248

[22] Filed May 5, i969 [45] Patented June 28, 1971 [73] Assignee Holden Industries, Inc.

Minneapolis, Minn.

[54] METHOD OF MAKING MAGAZINE INSERT 20 Claims, 13 Drawing Figs.

[52] US. Cl 270/37, 270/53, 281/16, 283/56 [51] lnt.Cl B4ll43/14 [50] Field of Search 156/252,

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,114,920 l0/l914 Seeligson 281/3 2,322,647 6/1943 Luce 281/16 3,242,596 3/1966 Smith 28l/16X Primary Examiner-Robert W. Michell Assistant Examiner-Lewis Anton A!t0rney-Schroeder, Siegfried & Ryan ABSTRACT: A magazine insert and method of making same, the insert consisting of a plurality of superimposed pages, each connected to the other by adhesive applied therebetween along a pair of spaced parallel lines extending along their binding edges and each being perforated along a line parallel to and extending between the lines of adhesive so that the portion remote from the binding edge may be torn free to provide a bound article readily removable without damages to the binding of the primary magazine. The insert is made by applying adhesive at different locations to opposite sides of a sheet in ribbon form along and at opposite sides of a pair of spaced longitudinally extending perforations, the ribbon being folded upon itself transversely with standard folding machine equipment a number of times, depending upon the number of pages desired in the end product and, as desired, cut or folded longitudinally to produce an insert particularly adapted for securement into the primary magazine by perfect binding or saddle-stitchin g, respectively.

METHOD OF MAKING MAGAZINE INSERT This invention relates to a magazine insert. More particularly it relates to a magazine insert for securement within a primary magazine and adapted for ready removal therefrom.

Need for a magazine insert which can be readily removed from the primary or parent magazine without damage to the binding thereof or to the insert itself, caused in each case by the act of removing the same, is widely apparent. Modern economics provides a demand for inserts in magazines to advertise various products through the use of brochures or small magazines which can be readily torn from the primary magazine. Two desirable attributes of such an insert are that, upon removal from the parent or primary magazine, it not damage the binding of the primary magazine and that it provide a bound article acceptable in form and condition to the trade. Heretofore all known inserts fail in one or both of these respects.

Thus, there are a limited number of ways commonly accepted for binding a magazine. One is known as perfect binding wherein the edges of each sheet are burred to facilitate the absorption of glue applied thereto to hold all of the pages or sheets together and secure same to the cover. The other method most commonly used is known as saddle-stitching wherein each sheet is folded to produce two pages and the superimposed sheets are stitched with a staple or by other suitable means at the fold line. A third, and less commonly used method is known as side-stitching wherein the pages are aligned in superimposed relation and then stitched through from the side, with the cover thereafter glued to the back edge.

Each of the above methods has the disadvantage of requiring a separate operation for each insert in order to secure the insert to the primary magazine into which the insert is to be placed. For example, with perfect binding it is necessary to destroy or at least seriously damage the binding of the primary magazine if the insert is to be torn therefrom in bound form. In an effort to avoid this, some producers have glued a tab along the edge of the binding of the insert and then glued, in a separate operation, the tab into the binding of the primary magazine.

With saddle-stitching, a separate stitching operation of the insert is required and, moreover, the stitching of the primary magazine is destroyed or seriously damages when the insert is torn therefrom. ln side-stitching, the stitching is likewise destroyed and the insert will be damaged if and when the insert is removed. If a tab is secured to the binding of the insert and the tab is side-stitched in with the sheets of the primary magazine, then a separate operation is required to apply the tab. it is an object of the invention described and claimed herein to obviate these disadvantages.

It is a general object of our invention to provide a method of making a novel and improved magazine insert which is readily removable from the primary magazine as a bound article in a condition which is acceptable in the trade as such.

Another object is to provide a method of'making a novel and improved magazine which is equally suitable for use with either saddle or perfect bindings.

Another object is to provide a method of making a novel and improved magazine insert which can be readily removed from the primary magazine irrespective of the type of binding utilized, and will be accepted as such as a bound article in form and condition acceptable to the trade.

Another object is to provide a method of making a novel and improved magazine insert which can be readily removed from the primary magazine irrespective of the type of binding utilized without destroying or at least seriously impairing the binding of the primary magazine.

Another object is to provide a method of making a novel and improved magazine insert which can be readily removed from the primary magazine without destroying or seriously damaging the binding of the insert itself and thus destroying its acceptability insofar as the trade is concerned.

Another object is to provide a method of making a novel and improved magazine insert which will be more satisfactory and which can be produced while eliminating at least one additional step in production in comparison with methods heretofore required.

Another object is to provide a method of making a novel and improved magazine insert which is less expensive to produce. 7

Another object is to provide a method of making a novel and improved magazine insert which is more versatile and consequently more inexpensive to produce in that it eliminates a need for a variety of operations and necessary equipment.

Another object is to provide a method of making a novel and improved magazine insert which will permit production thereof in relatively large numbers in contrast to individual operations as required by methods heretofore known.

These and other objects of this invention will become apparent from a reading of the attached description, together with the drawings wherein:

FIG. 1 is a diagrammatic view of conventional folding apparatus commonly known as a web press jaw folder which with various slight modification may be utilized to perform the folding operations required to produce the magazine insert described herein;

FIG. 2 is a side elevational view of the web or ribbon showing the side upon which the adhesive in one form of the invention is applied intermittently;

FIG. 3 is a side elevation view of the opposite side of the web shown in FIG. 2 to which the adhesive has been applied in four continuous lines;

FIG. 4 is an end elevational view of the rotatable target for the electric eye utilized as shown in FIG. 1 to apply the adhesive intermittently to the side of the web shown in FIG. 2;

FIG. 5 is a longitudinal sectional view of the web or ribbon after the initial transverse fold thereof;

FIG. 6 is a longitudinal sectional view of the same ribbon after the second transverse fold has been performed thereon;

FIG. 7 is a plan view of a four-page magazine insert mounted within a primary magazine having a perfect binding;

FIG. 8 is a sectional view taken along line 8-8 of FIG. 7 and showing two pages of the primary magazine both above and below the magazine insert and broken away at the portions thereof which extend beyond the insert;

FIG. 9 is a sectional view of an eight-page magazine insert shown mounted within a primary magazine and secured therein by means of a saddle stitch, the pages of the primary magazine which extend beyond the insert being broken away;

FlG. 10 is a plan view of a web or ribbon wherein the adhesive has been applied to the edge portions of the ribbon in two spaced parallel lines with a parallel perforation therebetween;

FIG. 11 is a transverse sectional view of the ribbon shown in FIG. 10 after it has been folded once;

FIG. 12 is a side elevational view of a web or ribbon where the adhesive has been applied centrally in two spaced parallel lines with a pair of spaced parallel perforations therebetween; and

FIG. 13 is a transverse sectional view taken through onehalf of the ribbon shown in FIG. 12 after it has been cut longitudinally and folded transversely once.

The invention described and claimed herein can be produced in several forms and by several related methods as to be hereinafter described. Essentially, however, the end product consists of a magazine insert having the attributes hereinbefore set forth and characterized by a binding edge adapted to be secured by means of either perfect binding or saddle-stitching within the primary magazine and adhesive between the adjacent pages of the insert along a line extending generally parallel to the binding edge with each page being perforated throughout its length between the line of adhesive and the binding so that the magazine insert may be torn along the perforated edge free of the primary magazine and be utilized as a bound article acceptable to the trade after removal without seriously impairing or damaging the binding of the primary magazine. In the preferred form, the adhesive is applied continuously to one side of the web or ribbon and intermittently to the other side so that upon transverse folding through the use of conventional printing press machinery, each of the pages of the insert will be secured by adhesive to its next adjacent page at opposite sides of the line of perforations. Thus, as viewed in FIG. 1, the web or ribbon is shown passing downwardly from the printing machinery (not shown) to a plurality of rotating cylinders commonly known and recognized in the printing art as a web-press jaw folder. Such a webpress jaw folder is produced by American Type Founders Incorporated, Box 48, Nashville, Tenn. 37202 and bearing Seri al No. W-848. If preferred, the type of web-press jaw folder such as is manufactured by the The Miehle Division, The Miehle Goss Dexter Company, 5601 31st Street West, Chicago, II]. 60650, Serial No. RF-4 may be utilized. Anyone familiar with the trade will readily recognize and identify such equipment. We have added thereto, as illustrated in FIG. l, a plurality of four adhesive nozzles such as indicated by the numerals 16 and 17 at each side of the web 15, these nozzles 16 and 17 being juxtapositioned so as to apply adhesives to the opposite sides of the ribbon 15 in directly opposed parallel lines as the ribbon 15 moves downwardly (as viewed in FIG. 1) to the web-press jaw folder. The four nozzles 17 are each controlled by a solenoid valve 18 which is connected into an electrical circuit 19 which has a switch 20 interposed therewithin for manual operation. The nozzles 16 are each controlled by a solenoid valve such as indicated by the numeral 21 which likewise is electrically controlled by the circuit 19 and an electric eye 22. The electric eye 22 is governed by a rotating target 23 approximately one-halfofwhich is dark and the other half of which is light so as to cause the solenoid valve 21 to be opened during one-half of the time that it takes for the target 23 to complete one revolution. The target 23 is connected to the cylinders such as 24 so as to complete one revolution with each revolution of that cylinder and thus apply adhesive in four parallel lines to the side of the ribbon shown in FIG. 2 along one-half the length of the ribbon equal to the circumference of the cylinder 24. It will be readily appreciated that as a result the adhesive will be applied to the side of the web shown in FIG. 2 in four parallel lines as shown therein and intermittently so that half the length of each section of the ribbon will have adhesive applied thereto while the other halfwill be devoid of such adhesive.

The ribbon 15 is perforated by means of spring-loaded perforating wheels bearing against a roller (not shown) prior to the passage of the ribbon between the nozzles 16 and 17. This is conventional in printing operations and is not considered necessary to be shown in view thereof. The perforations are indicated in FIGS. 2 and 3 by the numerals 25 and 26. The same numerals are utilized in FIG. 3 to identify these longitudinally extending perforations. The intermittent lines of adhe sive are identified by the numeral 27 in FIG. 2 and the continuous lines of adhesive applied to the opposite side of the ribbon are indicated by the numeral 28 as shown in FIG. 3. It will be noted that the four nozzles 16 are positioned so as to apply the adhesive in two pairs of parallel lines along and at opposite sides of each of the perforated lines 25 and 26. Likewise, before nozzles 17 are positioned so as to apply continuous lines of adhesive 28 in two pairs of lines when each pair of which is at opposite sides of the perforated lines 25 and 26.

As is conventional in web-press jaw folders, cylinder 1 is provided with pins 29 which engage and secure the leading edge of the ribbon l5 and draw the ribbon through between the cylinders I and 2 until the folding tucker 30 is directly opposite the folding jaws 31 of cylinder 2. At this point the folding jaws 31 are open and the tucker 30 is caused to be extended by cams into the jaws of the folding jaw, causing the ribbon 15 to be folded thereover. The folding jaws 31 are then caused to clamp onto the folded ribbon and carry it around with cylinder 2. The folding jaws 31 whichformerly held the leading edge of the ribbon 15 are now retracted, releasing the leading edge and permitting the folded ribbon to go with cylinder 2 to the position shown at the left-hand side of that cylinder in FIG. 1. As the folding tucker 32 of cylinder 2 reaches the position shown in FIG. 1 it is caused to extend to a position within the folding jaws 33 of cylinder 3, causing the already once-folded ribbon 15 to be again folded thereover. The folding jaws 33 then clamp down upon the now twicefolded ribbon and carry it around to the position of the stripping fingers 34 which extend into grooves formed in the cylinder 3 to strip the folded inserts from cylinder 3. As folding jaw 33 of cylinder 3 grabs the now twice-folded ribbon 15, the folding jaws 31 of cylinder 2 release. The folding jaws 33 of cylinder 3 release just prior to the arrival of the twicefolded ribbon at the stripping finger position of the fingers 34. Vertically spaced powered conveyors carry the folded ribbon away to the delivery table. A knife (not shown) is carried by cylinder 1 and is correlated with the pins 29 so that at the point where the knife and pins meet cylinder 2, the knife precedes the pins and the pins ofcylinder l are projected radially outwardly through the ribbon and the spring-loaded knife immediately thereafter cuts the ribbon against a slot (not shown) in cylinder 2 to release the trailing edge of the leading signature and create the leading edge of the trailing signature. All of the above folding machinery and processes are well known in the art and are described herein only for the sake of enabling the reader to better understand the methods of production. The only modification to this machinery which has been made has been to provide annular grooves in the circumferential surface of the rollers 1 and 2 opposite the adhesive lines 27 and 28 so as to minimize collection of adhesive upon these cylinders.

From the above it will be seen that the first fold of the ribbon 15 is made at a point midway between the length of the ribbon which extends from the end of the ribbon shown in FIG. 3 and identified by the numeral 35 to the line identified by the numeral 36. The first fold is made midway between these ends along a fold line identified by the numeral 37 and toward the side of the ribbon shown in FIG. 3 so that the lines of adhesive 28 on the upper half of the ribbon as shown in FIGS. 2 and 3, will be applied and meet the same lines on the lower half thereof. Reference to FIG. 5 will show that in this manner the signature has been folded toward the lines of adhesive 28. It will be appreciated, of course, that desired adhesive could be applied throughout only half of the length of the ribbon if slightly slower drying adhesive were utilized. When this fold is accomplished it will be seen that one side of the once-folded ribbon 15 now bears the lines of adhesive 27. The second fold of the ribbon folds the signature toward the lines of adhesive 27, the fold being made along the line 38. It will be readily appreciated that if desired, the lines 27 of adhesive may extend along only approximately one-fourth of the length of the ribbon if adhesive having a slightly slower drying rate is utilized. From this it will be seen that we now have a twice-folded ribbon each page or sheet thereof of which is secured to its adjacent page along the lines of adhesive 27 and 28. If this folded signature is then cut along the line 39 which extends parallel to and between the two pairs of glue lines, it will produce two magazine inserts of four pages each adapted for perfect binding. If it is merely folded along line 39 it will produce one magazine insert having eight pages and adapted for being secured within a saddle-stitched magazine in the same manner and at the same time that the regular pages of the primary magazine are stitched. Thus by utilizing four parallel lines of adhesive, two each of which are at opposite sides of the perforated line, by these methods and this machinery one can produce as a part of the normal printing and folding operation, a magazine insert consisting of eight pages and adapted for saddle-stitching, or two magazine inserts consisting of four pages each and adapted for perfect binding.

It'will be readily understood that if three transverse folds are utilized and the lines of adhesive 27 extend along three-quarters ofthe length ofa ribbon, three transverse folds may be accomplished with proper machinery well known in the art to produce a single magazine insert consisting of 16 pages and adapted to be utilized in a saddle-stitched magazine and secured therein by the same means and at the same time as the conventional pages of the primary magazine. If such a thricefolded signature is cut longitudinally or on the line 39, it will provide two magazine inserts of eight pages each and adapted for perfect bindings.

It will also be readily recognized that if a single transverse fold is applied to the ribbon as shown in FIG. 5, it will produce a magazine insert, when folded longitudinally along the line 39, a single magazine insert consisting of four pages and adapted to be saddle-stitched into a saddle-stitched magazine in the same manner and at the same time as the conventional pages are stitched therein. If such a single folded signature such as shown in FIG. 5 is cut along line 39, then it will provide two magazine inserts having two pages each and adapted for perfect bindings.

It will be readily appreciated, of course, that in the event a single transverse fold is utilized, the application of the lines 27 of adhesive will be omitted.

FIG. 7 shows a perfect binding primary magazine with a magazine insert of the type described and claimed herein secured therewithin. The primary magazine is indicated by the numeral 40. As best shown in FIG. 8, the magazine insert is comprised of four pages and is identified generally by the numeral 41. It will be noted that only two pages such as indicated by the numeral 42 of the primary magazine are shown above the insert, and similarly, two pages indicated by the numeral 43 are indicated below the magazine insert. The perfect binding is indicated by the numeral 44 which, as is well known in the art, is formed by burring the edges of the individual pages to facilitate the absorption of glue thereby and then applying glue to such edges. It will be noted that the edges of the folded ribbon have been trimmed in the conventional manner and the perforations or 26, as the case may be, are aligned, Likewise, the lines of adhesive 28 are vertically aligned and each page is secured thereby to its adjacent page. Thus, when the reader desires to remove the magazine insert, he can readily do so by pulling upon the outer edge portions thereof causing the desired portion to tear free along the perforated lines 25 leaving a bound article in the hands of the reader and secured together by the lines of adhesive 28 shown at the right in FIG. 8. The lines of adhesive 28 shown at the left in FIG. 8 facilitate the tearing operation by holding the four sheets in fixed relative position immediately adjacent the perforation 25, thereby creating less strain upon the perfect binding 44.

FIG. 9 illustrates a magazine insert formed from a ribbon such as shown in FIG. 6 which has been longitudinally folded along the line 39. It will be appreciated that the insert shown in FIG. 8 is one-half of such a ribbon after the ribbon has been cut along the line 39. In FIG. 9, however, it is desired to utilize the magazine insert in a saddle-stitched primary magazine which has been indicated by the numeral 45. One of the saddle-stitchings has been indicated by the numeral 46, and it will be seen that it extends through the outer pages of the primary magazine 45 as well as through the folds of the insert along the line 39. For the sake of convenience and illustration, only two pages 47 have been shown above the magazine insert and only two pages 48 of the primary magazine have been shown below the magazine insert. It will be noted that the perforations 25 and 26 are aligned and the lines of adhesive 27 and 28 are superimposed relative to each other. It will be readily seen that when the reader desires to remove a magazine insert from the primary magazine, all that is required is that he grasp the outer portions thereof and tear the same loose from the saddlestitched binding along the perforations 25 and 26, and the portion of the insert remaining in the readers hand will be a completely acceptable bound article for use by the reader and the saddle-stitching of the primary magazine will not be im paired or destroyed. It will be noted that the lines of adhesive to the left of the perforations in FIG. 9 serve to hold the individual pages of the magazine insert at that point tightly together and thereby prevent damage to the binding of the primary magazine.

FIGS. 10 and 11 show another form of the invention which may be utilized, but does not provide all of the advantages hereinbefore described. The preferred form of the invention has been described with respect to the production of the insert as illustrated in FIGS. 2 and 3 and described with respect thereto. However, if desired two lines of adhesive such as shown in FIG. 10 and identified by the numerals 50 and 51 may be applied at opposite sides ofa single line of perforations indicated by the numeral 52 and along one edge of the ribbon indicated by the numeral 53. When a single fold is provided to the ribbon 53 along the transverse line 54 and towards the lines 50 and 51, a single magazine insert comprised of two pages will be provided upon trimming. FIG. 11 shows such an insert when viewed from the lower end indicated by the numeral 55 of the insert and ribbon. It will be noted that the same advantages insofar as producing a readily acceptable and removable bound article are obtained. If the glue is applied to opposite sides of the ribbon 53 in the same manner as shown in FIGS. l3, but, of course with only two lines of adhesive instead of four, and if two transverse folds are performed, then a four-page magazine insert will be produced. The binding edge 56 is well adapted for inclusion in a perfectly bound magazine. Such a magazine insert, however, is not designed or adapted for inclusion in a saddle-stitched magazine and therefore does not have all of the advantages although insofar as the perfectly bound magazine is concerned, its advantages are readily apparent in that it does produce a readily removable bound article which can be readily separated from the primary magazine without damage to the same and which will nevertheless remain in bound form after being removed.

FIGS. I2 and I3 illustrate another form of the invention wherein the ribbon identified by the numeral 60 has a pair of relatively widely spaced lines of adhesive 61 and 62 applied to the central portions thereof and extending longitudinally thereof, A pair of spaced and parallel lines of perforation 63 and 64 are disposed between the two lines of adhesive 61 and 62. If desired, the adhesive may be applied to a single side of the ribbon, and in that a single fold along the line 65 will be made and the ribbon will be out along the line 66, the fold being made toward the lines of adhesive 61 and 62. Thereafter the ribbon is cut longitudinally between the perforated lines 63 and 64 and the magazine insert will be comprised of two sheets suchas shown in FIG. 13. The binding edge 67 which is formed by cutting along a line midway between the lines 63 and 64 is suitable and well adapted for perfect binding and the adhesive such as indicated by the numeral 62 will hold the portion of the insert torn free at the latter perforation 64 as a highly suitable bound article. Note,'however, that in this form of the invention there is no adhesive between the binding edge 67 and the line of perforation 64.

In the event it is desired to have a four-page magazine insert prepared by utilizing the method shown in FIG. I2, then the adhesive will be applied to opposite sides of the ribbon 60 along lines 61 and 62 throughout the full length of the ribbon as shown and on the opposite side it will be applied at least one-quarter, but preferably one-half of its length along juxtaposed and opposite the arranged lines. Then the initial fold will be made at line 66 toward the lines of adhesive 61 and 62, and thereafter the second fold will be made along lines 65 toward the lines of adhesive on the side of the ribbon not shown in FIG. 12. Thereafter cutting along a line parallel to and midway between the lines of perforation 63 and 64 will produce a magazine insert such as shown in FIG. 13 except, of course, that it will have four pages instead of two. It will likewise be devoid of adhesive between the perforations and the binding edge 67 which is formed by the longitudinal cutting between the lines 63 and 64.

From the above it will be readily seen that we have provided a novel and improved magazine insert which can be manufactured through the use of conventional printing press machinery and will provide a bound article which can be torn from the primary magazine without damage to the binding thereof or to the magazine insert and will be in a bound form acceptable to the trade after having been torn from the primary magazine. It will be appreciated that at the same time we have eliminated at least one additional step heretofore required to provide such an article and that our new magazine insert is much less expensive in that the production operations can be effected in 3-inch lifts (including 50-150 booklets at a time) in contrast to the individual operations heretofore required by known methods which involved insert-by-insert operation. As a consequence, we have found that we effect a very substantial saving in the manufacture of magazine inserts and at the same time produce an insert which will be more readily accepted by the trade.

lt will, of course, be understood that various changes may be made in the form, details, arrangement and proportions of the parts without departing from the scope of our invention which consists of the matter shown and described herein and set forth in the appended claims.

We claim:

1. A method of forming a magazine insert consisting in:

a. applying adhesive to one side of a sheet along two or more pairs of spaced substantially parallel lines so that the adhesive extends along at least substantially half the length thereof and terminates adjacent one of its ends;

b. folding said sheet upon itself transversely of said lines of adhesive at least once approximately midway between its ends with the side of said sheet bearing the adhesive to the inside and thereby causing the portions of said sheet at one side of said fold to be secured throughout substantially its entire length to the portions at the other side of said fold so as to form a signature; and

weakening the material of said signature throughout along a pair of lines one each of which extends generally parallel to and between different pairs of said lines of adhesive.

2. The method defined in claim 1, and

d. folding said signature along a line extending parallel to said lines of adhesive and between said pairs oflines.

3. The method defined in claim 1, and after being so folded,

d. cutting said signature along a line extending parallel to said lines of adhesive and between said pairs oflines.

4. The method defined in claim 1 wherein the outermore line of each pair of lines of adhesive is applied substantially equidistantly from the side of said signature adjacent thereto.

5. The method defined in claim 1 wherein each line of each of said pairs of adhesive lines is spaced equidistantly from its associated line.

6. The method defined in claim 1, and

d. applying adhesive to the opposite side of said signature along two or more pairs of spaced substantially parallel lines extending along at least substantially one-fourth the length thereof at locations aligned with said first-mentioned lines of adhesive and terminating adjacent one of its ends; and

e. again folding said signature transversely of said lines of adhesive at points disposed approximately midway between the ends of the folded signature with the adhesive bearing portions of the said opposite side to the in side thereby causing the portions of said signature at one side of said second fold to be secured to the portions at the other side of said second fold.

7. The method -defined in claim 6 wherein the outermore lines of each pair of said lines of adhesive are applied substantially equidistantly from the side of said signature adjacent thereto.

8. The method defined in-claim 6 wherein said lines of adhesive are arranged in superimposed relation upon the completion of said folding steps.

9. The method defined in claim 6, and after said transverse foldings, then folding said signature along a line extending parallel to said lines of adhesive and between said pairs of lines.

10. The method defined in claim 6, and after said transverse foldings, cutting said signature along a line extending parallel to said lines of adhesive and between said pairs of lines.

11. The method defined in claim 1 and including the following steps prior to the weakening of said material, but subsequent to applying adhesive to the first side:

e. applying adhesive to the opposite side of said signature along two or more pairs of spaced substantially parallel lines extending along at least one-quarter of the length thereof and terminating adjacent one of its ends; and

. again folding said signature transversely of said lines of adhesive at points disposed approximately midway between the ends of the folded signature with the adhesive bearing portions of the said opposite side to the inside, thereby causing the portions of said signature at one side of said second fold to be secured to the portions at the other side of said second fold.

12. The method-defined in claim 11, wherein the adhesive applied to the opposite side of said signature extends along no more than half the length thereof.

13. A method of forming a magazine insert consisting in:

a. applying adhesive to one side of a sheet along a pair of spaced substantially parallel lines along at least substantially half the length thereof and commencing adjacent one ofits ends;

b. folding said sheet toward said lines of adhesive and transversely thereof so as to form a signature; and

c. weakening the material of said signature throughout its length along at least one line extending generally parallel to and between said lines of adhesive.

14. The method defined in claim 13 wherein the material of said signature is weakened along two spaced lines extending generally parallel to and between said lines of adhesive.

15. A method offorming a magazine insert consisting in:

a. applying adhesive to one side of a sheet along a pair of spaced substantially parallel lines along at least substantially half the length thereof and commencing adjacent one of its ends;

b. applying adhesive to the opposite side of said sheet along a pair of spaced substantially parallel lines along at least substantially one-quarter of the length thereof and commencing adjacent one ofits ends, the lines of said secondmentioned pair being aligned with said first-mentioned pair at opposite sides of said signature;

0. folding said sheet toward said first-mentioned lines of adhesive and transversely thereof approximately midway between its ends so as to form a signature;

(1. folding said signature transversely again and toward said second-mentioned lines of adhesive at points disposed approximately midway between the ends of the folded signature; and

f. weakening the material of said signature throughout its length along a line extending generally parallel to and between said lines of adhesive.

16. A method of forming a magazine insert consisting in:

a. applying adhesive to one side of a sheet in two or more pairs of spaced parallel lines each of which extends along at least substantially half the length thereof and terminates adjacent one of its ends with the outermore line of each pair disposed substantially equidistantly from the edge of said signature adjacent thereto;

b. folding said sheet transversely of said lines of adhesive at least once approximately midway between its ends with the side of said sheet bearing the adhesive to the inside so as to form a signature;

c. applying adhesive to the opposite side of said signature in two or more pairs of spaced parallel lines along at least substantially one-fourth the length thereof and commencing adjacent one of its ends and at locations aligned with and opposite said first-mentioned lines of adhesive;

d. weakening the material of said signature throughout along a pair of lines one each of which extends generally parallel to and between one of the pairs of said lines of adhesive; and

e. folding said signature along a line parallel to said lines of adhesive and disposed between said two pairs of lines of adhesive.

17. A method of forming a magazine insert consisting in:

a. applying adhesive to one side of a sheet throughout substantially its entire length along four equally spaced parallel lines commencing adjacent one of its ends and the outermore two thereof being disposed substantially equidistantly from the adjacent sides of said signature;

. applying adhesive to the opposite side of said sheet in four spaced parallel lines along substantially half the length thereof and commencing adjacent one of its ends and being disposed at locations directly opposite said first-mentioned lines of adhesive;

. folding said sheet transversely of said lines of adhesive approximately midway between its ends so as to form a signature;

d. folding said signature transversely of said lines of adhesive approximately midway between its ends while in its folded form;

. folding said signature along a line parallel to said lines of adhesive and disposed between the two inner of said lines; and weakening the material of said signature throughout along a pair of lines each of which extends generally parallel to and is disposed between one of different pairs of said lines of adhesive.

18. A method of forming a magazine insert consisting in:

a. applying adhesive to one side of a sheet in at least two pairs of spaced substantially parallel lines along at least substantially half the length thereof and commencing adjacent one of its ends, said pairs of lines being disposed substantially equidistantly from their adjacent sides of said sheet;

b. applying adhesive to the opposite side of said sheet in two or more pairs of spaced substantially parallel lines along at least substantially one-quarter of the length thereof and commencing adjacent one of its ends, said second-mentioned lines of adhesive being aligned with said first-mentioned lines of adhesive;

. folding said sheet toward said first-mentioned lines of adhesive and transversely thereof approximately midway between its ends so as to form a signature;

d. folding said signature toward said second-mentioned lines of adhesive and transversely thereof at points disposed approximately midway between the ends of the folded signature; and

e. weakening the material of said signature throughout along a pair of lines one each of which extends generally parallel to and between the lines of one of the pairs of said lines of adhesive.

19. The method defined in claim 18, and

f. folding the folded signature along a line extending parallel to said lines of adhesive through points located between said pairs oflines of adhesive.

20, The method defined in claim 18, and

g. cutting the folded signature along a line extending parallel to said lines of adhesive through points located between said pairs of lines of adhesive.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3815895 *Dec 7, 1970Jun 11, 1974Harris Intertype CorpJam detector system
US3917251 *Jan 25, 1974Nov 4, 1975S & F Delise Realty CorpMethod for the high speed folding of sheet paper
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Classifications
U.S. Classification270/37, 270/52.19, 281/21.1, 270/52.18, 283/56, 281/3.1, 281/16
International ClassificationB65H45/12, B65H45/30, B42C19/00, B42C19/06
Cooperative ClassificationB65H45/30, B42C19/06
European ClassificationB42C19/06, B65H45/30