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Publication numberUS3588123 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 28, 1971
Filing dateSep 22, 1969
Priority dateSep 22, 1969
Publication numberUS 3588123 A, US 3588123A, US-A-3588123, US3588123 A, US3588123A
InventorsCandella Vick C
Original AssigneeCandella Vick C
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Record-cleaning device
US 3588123 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [72] Inventor Vick C. Candella 6509 Pilgrim St., Metalrie, La. 70003 [2l] Appl. No. 859,918 [22] Filed Sept. 22, 1969 [45] Patented June 28, 1971 [54] RECORD-CLEANING DEVICE 5 Claims, 10 Drawing Figs.

[52] US. Cl. 274/47 [Sl] Int. Cl Gllb3/58 [50] Field of Search 274/39, 47;

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,938,732 5/1960 Mautell,.lr. 274/47 3,005,223 10/1961 Tayloretal 3,401,708 9/1968 Henes Primary Examiner-Leonard Forrnan Assistant Examiner-Charles E. Phillips Attorney-Calvin J. Laiche PATENTHIJUN28I9?! 35,88,123

SHEET 1 OF 2 INVENTOR. V/CK C CA/VflE/JA PATENTEDJuuaa an INVENTOR. V/CK C CA/VflELL/l BY Odom M RECORD-CLEANING DEVICE BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION The instant invention pertains to that field of the art concerned with devices or apparatuses for cleaning conventional phonograph records. 7

As is well known, conventional phonograph records will inevitably pick up dust and dirt whereby the sound emanating from the record during its subsequent playing is distorted. It is also possible that a dirty record will in turn result in damage to both the needle and the record due to the dirt building up in the groove which causes the needle to wear and/or jump the groove. By way of the present device, a phonograph record can be readily cleaned which in turn extends the useful life of the phonograph needle, retards advance of distortion caused by natural needle damage to the record groove, reduces needle friction and all other sources of friction at the point of contact between the needle and the record groove while concomitantly, the cleaning liquid acts as a coolant and lubricant. Thus, the wiping and brushing of records is dispensed with, as well as brushing of the needle.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The present invention basically comprises a circular concave-shaped member having a circumferential raised portion whereby liquid can be retained within the member. The member is further defined by being provided with an extended portion positioned on its opposite side at the center thereof. Such portion is adapted to fit within the spindle socket of a conventional record turntable having a removable spindle. A preferred embodiment includes a weighted member having extended portions on both of its sides. The inner surface of the circular concave-shaped member, in turn, is provided with a hole adapted to receive the extended portion on the bottom of the weighted member. For conventional 45 r.p.m. records, the weighted member is provided with another extended portion on its bottom which is adapted to fit within the enlarged spindle hole of a conventional 45 r.p.m. record. The interior bottom portion of the circular concave-shaped member is also preferably provided with a raised portion located at essentially the center thereof. The raised portion is of maximum thickness in the middle, usually over that area defined by the nongrooved inner portion of a record, and tapers downwards out towards the circumferential raised portion. This feature not only protects the bottom groove, but additionally facilitates removal of the record since the operator can tilt the record by depressing one edge andreadily grabbing hold of it. If the bottom of the concave-shaped member was flat, then a suction force would be created between the record and the member which would in turn hamper removal of the record.

Another preferred embodiment includes record-lifting means comprising a base portion having an extended upright portion to pass through the spindle hole of a musical record, together with a weighted member provided with a hole therein adapted to receive the extended upright portion of the recordlifting means. The bottom interior portion of the concaveshaped member is also provided with a recessed portion located essentially on its center line and which is adapted to receive the record-lifting means whereby the record positioned between the weighted member and the record-lifting means is laterally and vertically restrained. The thickness of the base portion of the record-lifting means exceeds the depth of the recessed portion in the circular concave-shaped member whereby the record is suspended above the interior bottom of the latter. In this manner, liquid is allowed to reside between the phonograph record and the bottom interior portion of the concave-shaped member so as to achieve the results discussed supra.

DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING FIG. I in the drawing depicts a plan view of the present record-cleaning device shown in position on top of a phonograph turntable relative to the phonograph record arm.

FIG. 2 in the drawing represents a sectional view taken along the line 2-2 of FIG. 1 showing a preferred embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 3 represents a side elevation view of the record-locating and -retaining means depicted in FIG. 2.

FIG. 4 in the drawing represents a sectional view taken along the line 2-2 of FIG. 1 showing the adaptation of the preferred embodiment of the present invention for the cleaning of 45 r.p.m. records.

FIG. 5 in the drawing represents a sectional view taken along the line 2-2 of FIG. 1 showing yet another embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 6 in the drawing represents a sectional view taken along the line 2-2 of FIG. I showing the embodiment of FIG. 5 utilized in the cleaning ofa 45 r.p.m. phonograph record.

FIG. 7 is a plan view of the record-lifting means shown in FIGS. 5 and 6.

FIG. 8 is a side elevation view of the record-lifting means shown in FIG. 7.

FIG. 9 is a plan view of the weighted member shown in section in the embodiment of FIGS. 5 and 6.

FIG. I0 is a side elevation view of the weighted member of FIG. 9.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT The present record-cleaning device 10 comprises the circular concave-shaped member 11 which in turn is provided with the circumferential raised portion 12. The inner diameter of the circumferential raised portion 12 is sufficient to accommodate the largest diameter musical record disc for which the present device would be designed for as desired.

The circular concave-shaped member II is provided with the extended portion 13 positioned on its bottom side and located at essentially the center or longitudinal axis thereof. The extension 13 is adapted to fit within the spindle hole of a conventional phonograph turntable having a removable spindle. In operation, the spindle (not shown) is removed from the turntable 14 upon which the present cleaning device 10 is then placed. The extended portion or spindle extension 13 is designed to fit snugly within the spindle hole 15 so as to prevent its lateral movement during the rotation of the turntable 14.

The inner or interior surface of the pan-shaped member 11 is preferably provided with the raised or enlarged portion 16 which is located at essentially the center of the circular member 11. As shown in FIG. 2, the enlarged portion 16 tapers downward toward the outer circumferential raised portion 12. In this manner, the liquid 19 contained within the member 11 is allowed to flow underneath the record 17 positioned within the pan member 11. The diameter of the enlarged portion 16 is preferably equivalent to about that of the inner nongrooved area of a record. This feature not only avoids contact with the bottom groove, but more important, facilitates the easy removal of a record. This is accomplished by the operator depressing one edge of the record 17, thus tilting it for easy gripping.

As a preferred embodiment, the present recordcleaning device also includes the weighted member 20. As shown in greater detail in FIG. 3, the member 20 comprises the base portion 21 which is connected to the extended upright portion 22 located on top thereof. The portion 22 in essence constitutes a handle whereby the member 20 can be readily placed in the position as shown in FIG. 2. The extended p0:- tion 23 is provided on the bottom of the base portion 21 for positioning the member 20 relative to the circular member I] which in turn is provided with the hole I8 located on the inner surface thereof. The diameter of the extended portion 23 is slightly smaller than that of the spindle hole diameter of a conventional phonograph musical record, e.g. usually around one-fourth inch. In operation, the record 17 is placed within the pan, lining up the spindle hole within the record with that of the hole 18, and thereafter inserting the extended portion 23 through the record into the hole 18. The extended portion 23 is adapted to fit snugly within the hole 18 so as to prevent undue lateral displacement or movement of the record 17 during its rotation and cleaning by way of the present device.

As a variation of the preferred embodiment of the present invention, specifically for the cleaning of 45 r.p.m. records, the weighted member 20 is provided with the additional extended portion 24 also located on the bottom thereof. The diameter of the extended portion 24 is slightly smaller than that of the spindle hole diameter of a conventional 45 r.p.m. musical record. Referring to FIG. 4, the 45 r.p.m. record 25 is first placed within the pan member 11. Thereafter, the extended or raised portion 24 of the member 20 is positioned within the enlarged spindle hole of the 45 r.p.m. record simultaneously while inserting the extended portion 23 within the hole 18 located in the bottom of the member 11. Thus, the specific arrangement of the weighted member 20 functions similarly with either conventional A-inch spindle hole records or conventional 45 r.p.m. records.

Another preferred embodiment of the present record-cleaning device is that as depicted in FIG. 5. In FIG. the panshaped member 30 is provided with the recessed portion 3I located on the inside at essentially the center thereof. The record-lifting means 32 is adapted to fit within the recessed portion or section 31. Referring to FIGS. 7 and 8, the recordlifting means 32 comprises the base portion 33 which is of a thickness somewhat greater than the depth of the recessed portion 31 whereby the record 17 is prevented from resting on the bottom of the pan-shaped member 30 for the reasons advanced above. The member 32 further comprises the upright extended portion 34 which is adapted to fit within the spindle hole of a conventional phonograph musical record disc. In such manner, the record can be readily placed within or removed from the pan-shaped member 30.

The latter preferred embodiment also preferably comprises the weighted member 35 which is provided with the hole 36 adapted to receive the extended portion 34 of the member 32. In such manner, the member 35 upon being placed over the extended portion 34 after the record 17 has been inserted in place, serves to weight down and prevent any vertical movement of the record 17 during its rotation.

As in the embodiment of FIG. 4, the embodiment of FIG. 5 is adapted to accommodate 45 r.p.m. records in the manner shown in FIG. 6. Specifically, the member 35 is provided with the extended portion 37 which is of a diameter somewhat smaller than that of the spindle hole diameter of the 45 r.p.m. record 25 whereby the operating relationship shown in FIG. 6 is realized. Thus, as in the preferred embodiment depicted in FIGS. 2 and 4 above, the weighted member 35 serves a similar dual purpose. For ease of manufacture as well as for other reasons which will become apparent as the discussion proceeds, the base portion 33 of the member 32 is preferably circular and made integral with the extended portion 34.

In operation, referring to the preferred embodiment of FIG. 2, the record-cleaning device is placed upon the turntable 14, the spindle of which is first removed. The record 17 is then placed within the pan-shaped member 11 and pressed down into position. The concave-shaped or pan-shaped member 11 is then filled with a suitable record-cleaning material, for example, water, alcohol, or the like, however, water being preferred for economic reasons. Of course, this procedure can be reversed. Thereafter, the weighted member is placed in position by inserting the extended portion 23 through the spindle hole of the record 17 and into the hole 18 positioned in the bottom of the enlarged portion 16 of the pan member 11.

The member 20 thus serves to weight down the record 17 and hold it in position against any vertical or lateral movement. Moreover, the member 20 serves to prevent the record 17 from slipping during rotation due to the drag of the needle 40 positioned on the bottom front of the phonograph record arm 41.

The turntable is then allowed to rotate whereupon the needle 40 dislodges any dirt and dust positioned within the groove of the record 17. The dislodged material floats to the top or surface of the liquid located within the pan 11. In this manner, the record 17 is cleaned while it is being played with the net result that the useful life of the needle is extended due to removal of dirt within the groove. Conversely, the life of the record is extended due to less abrasion of the groove thus extending the true fidelity of the record. This eliminates washing, wiping, or brushing the records, aswell as brushing of the needle after playing the record whereby the fidelity of the record is maintained in an undistorted condition over an extended length of time. The liquid further acts as a coolant and lubricant between the needle and the record. As an ancillary feature, the pan member 11 when filled with a liquid can be employed to level a turntable.

It can be appreciated by one skilled in the art that various types of materials can be employed in the manufacture of the present record cleaning device. However, for ease of manufacture and serviceability, the pan member 11 is preferably fabricated from a plastic material, e.g. polystyrene, polyvinyl chloride, or the like. The same materials would also preferably be employed in the manufacture of the record lifting means 32. The weighted members 20 or 35 are preferably plastic coated lead or other similar heavy metal.

It can also be appreciated that various modifications and changes can be made in the design of the present member without departing from the true scope and spirit of the present invention. For example, the shape of the enlarged portion 16 of the embodiment of FIG. 2 can be varied. Moreover, a separate member or element could be substituted for the enlarged portion 16 while achieving the same results. The particular design or configuration of the weighted members 20 and 35 can vary, as well as the record lifting means 32. In the embodiment of FIGS. 5 and 6, the record-lifting means 32 could actually be square or some other shape. Moreover, various of the components could be made in a number of separate units, however, the integral structure shown in the drawings as described above is preferred from an overall viewpoint of cost and functionality.

lclaim:

l. A musical record-cleaning device comprising an essentially circular concave-shaped member having a circumferential raised portion whereby a liquid can be retained within said member, the inner diameter of the raised portion being greater than that of a record to be placed and cleaned therein, said member being further defined by being provided with an extended portion positioned on its opposite side at essentially the center of said member and which is adapted to fit within the spindle socket of a conventional record turntable, said device further including a weighted member comprising a base portion having an extended portion on its bottom side adapted to pass through the spindle hole of the musical record, said weighted member further comprising an extended upright portion positioned on the top of its base portion whereby said weighted member can be readily gripped and removed; and said circular concave-shaped member is provided with a hole located on its inside surface and which is of a diameter and depth sufficient to receive the extended portion positioned on the bottom of the base portion of said weighted member whereby the musical record positioned between said circular concave shaped member and said weighted member is laterally and vertically restrained from movement.

2. The record-cleaning device of claim 1 further characterized in that said circular concave-shaped member is provided with a raised portion on its inside surface at the center thereof whereby the peripheral edge of the record placed therein is positioned above the outer circumferential bottom of said concave shaped member such that an operator can tilt the record for easy removal upon depressing an edge thereof.

3. The record cleaning device of claim 1 further characterized in that said weighted member is also provided with a circumferential raised portion along the peripheral bottom of its base portion, the raised portion being adapted to fit within the spindle hole of a conventional 45 r.p.m. musical record whereby the record is positioned essentially concentric within said circular concave-shaped member.

4. A musical record-cleaning device comprising an essentially circular concave-shaped member having a circumferential raised portion whereby a liquid can be retained within said member, the inner diameter of the raised portion being greater than that of a record to be placed and cleaned therein, said member being further defined by being provided with an extended portion positioned on its opposite side at essentially the center of said member and which is adapted to fit within the spindle socket of a conventional record turntable, said device further including record-lifting means comprising a base portion having an extended upright portion adapted to pass through the spindle hole of the musical record; said record-cleaning device further including a weighted member provided with a hole therein adapted to receive the extended upright portion of said record-lifting means whereby the record when positioned between said members is restrained from lateral and vertical movement; and said circular concave-shaped member is further defined in that its inside surface is provided with a recessed portion positioned at essentially the center thereof and which is adapted to receive said record lifting means to thereby prevent its lateral movement.

5. The record cleaning device of claim 4 further characterized in that said weighted member is further defined in that its bottom portion is provided with a circumferential raised portion along its bottom periphery adapted to fit within the spindle hole of a conventional 45 rpm musical record whereby the record is positioned essentially concentric within said circular concave shaped member.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3747942 *Jan 7, 1972Jul 24, 1973Hammond CCleaning phonograph records
US4868373 *Feb 27, 1986Sep 19, 1989U.S. Philips CorporationMemory card comprising an optical memory disc and microelectronic memory component, and apparatus for transferring information to and from such card
Classifications
U.S. Classification369/72, G9B/3.87
International ClassificationG11B3/58, G11B3/00
Cooperative ClassificationG11B3/5827
European ClassificationG11B3/58A1A