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Publication numberUS3589422 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 29, 1971
Filing dateMar 17, 1969
Priority dateMar 17, 1969
Also published asCA925392A, CA925392A1, DE2004745A1
Publication numberUS 3589422 A, US 3589422A, US-A-3589422, US3589422 A, US3589422A
InventorsDavid Bellamy Jr, Philip Gregory Ralston
Original AssigneeBaxter Laboratories Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Sealed bag for liquids
US 3589422 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [45] Patented 3,356,244 12/1967 Witchell [72] Inventors David Bellamy, Jr.

Kenllwonh: Philip Gregory Ralston, Villa Park, both of III [21] Appl. No. 807,759

[22] Filed Mar. 17, 1969 June 29, 1971 Baxter Laboratories, Inc.

[73] Assignee Morton Grove, Ill.

I 54 SEALED 1m; FOR LIQUIDS Primary Examiner-Donald F. Norton Atlorneys-Walter C, Kehm and W. Garrettson Ellis ABSTRACT: A sealed bag for containing liquids. Typically made by a blow-molding process from a tube of molten thermoplastic resin. The bag comprises a tubular body of flexible plastic, sealed at one end, and narrowing to an integral tubular neck portion at the other end. A head portion, integral with the neck portion, seals the bag. A tubular recess is formed, typically in the head portion of the bag, for receiving a needle or the like for puncturing the bag to obtain the liquid contents. Generally, the cross section of the bag is oval, and a hanger at one end of the bag is attached thereto at a single station to facilitate collapse of the bag as liquid is withdrawn.

PATENTH] JUN29I9Y1 3,589,422

Philip Gregory Rolston ByW SEALED BAG FOR LIQUIDS BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION Sealed, plastic containers for liquids can be fabricated, filled, and heat sealed to enclose the liquid contents in an integrally sealed bottle or bag so that the bag can'be opened only by rupturing the plastic wall of the container. The container is typically made by extruding a molten tube or parison of thermoplastic resin into a mold, and inflating the parison with air to form a container sealed by action of the mold at one end. While maintaining the container in inflated condition, a precisely metered quantity of the liquid contents are placed in the container, causing those portions thereof in contact with the liquid to solidify. An open, unsealed end of the container above the liquid level remains in the molten condition after insertion of the liquid. A second mold is then closed about the open, unsealed end to form a sealed neck and head portion of the container which is integral with the main tubular body thereof. The finished product is thus a liquid-containing plastic bag or bottle which encloses its liquid contents in sealed plastic.

It is desirable to use such plastic containers for the storage and distribution of parenteral solutions, blood and other sterile products which are typically administered in measured amounts, particularly since sterility of the liquid contents can be assured until the plastic is ruptured, and also because the plastic container is inexpensive and can be thrown away after use.

It is further desirable to enclose liquids such as parenteral solutions, blood plasma, or blood in a collapsible plastic container so that, as the liquid is removed from the container, the container collapses. A higher degree of sterility of the liquid can be maintained in this manner, since air, which usually carries contaminants, does not have to be vented into the container to facilitate removal of the liquid.

A problem, however, exists in the design of the means for gaining access to the plastic container to remove the liquid. To do this, the plastic wall of the container must be ruptured in a controlled manner while assuring continued sterility. The invention of this application provides a convenient means of access to sealed plastic bags, by which sterility can be maintained while withdrawing the liquid contents. Furthermore, the plastic bag of this invention exhibits improved collapsibility, permitting the liquid contents to be readily removed from the bag without the need for venting.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The invention of this application relates to a collapsible bag containing a liquid and having a tubular body of flexible plastic. The tubular body is closed and sealed at one end, and narrows to an integral tubular neck portion at the other end. A head portion made of the same plastic is integral with the neck portion and seals the bag. Additionally, the bag has at least one tubular recess located at one end thereof, and typically located in the head portion, for receiving a puncturing needle or the like for puncturing the bag to obtain the liquid contents. The recess is defined by a tubular sidewall and a bottom wall, the bottom wall serving as a puncturable membrane through which the needle penetrates to gain access to the liquid contents. Generally, the recess contains a plastic sleeve which serves as a guide for the needle.

Additionally, the tubular body of the bag of thisinvention has sufficiently thin walls so that the tubular body lies in a generally flat, limp condition when it is not supported by the liquid which it contains. To facilitate collapse of the tubular body as liquid is withdrawn, the bag is generally constructed to have oval cross section when held in expanded position by its liquid contents. Additionally, a hanger means is attached to one end of the body at a single station or point of attachment by means of a narrow connecting neck.

DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a plan view, partly in section, of a typical plastic bag of this invention, shown to be filled with a liquid parenteral solution or the like.

FIG. 2 is a sectional view of the bag of FIG. 1, taken along line 2-2.

FIG. 3 is a sectional view of part of the bag of FIG. 1, taken along line 33.

FIG. 4 is a fragmentary view of the bag of FIG. 1 in which the bag has been rotated about its longitudinal axis, showing a typical integral hanger means used herein.

DESCRIPTION OF SPECIFIC EMBODIMENT Referring to the drawings, a sealed, collapsible, liquid-containing bag is generally designated at 10. The bag comprises tubular body 12, made of flexible plastic, and sealed at end 14. At the same end, hanger 16 is formed integral with body 12, being connected thereto by narrow connecting neck 18, which is of substantially less width than hanger 16, as shown in FIG. 4. Hanger 16 is attached to body 12 at a single station or point of attachment. The advantage of this is that while bag 10 is suspended from hanger l6 and liquid is withdrawn from the bag, the collapse of the bag is facilitated, since the portion of the bag adjacent end 14 can collapse into a generally conical configuration with a single apex located at junction 20 of neck 18 and end 14. Thus the walls of tubular body 12 are brought closer together as liquid is removed from the bag than in the situation where a hanging means is connected to a bag at two stations, as in the case of a U-shaped hanging means.

At its other end, tubular body 12 narrows to an integral tubular neck 22, which, in turn, is integral with head portion 24. Head portion 24 is closed to seal bag 10. Thus the liquid contents 26 of the bag are completely sealed by an integral wall of plastic.

FIG. 2 shows how the bag of this invention is constructed to maintain an oval cross section while filled with liquid contents. However, the bag is not self-supporting, and collapses into a limp, generally flat configuration when not positively held in its expanded, oval configuration by the liquid contents. This oval configuration facilitates the collapse of the bag to a generally flat configuration, and permits more of the liquid contents thereof to flow by gravity out of the bag without mechanical assistance.

FIG. 3 shows tubular recesses 26 which are formed in head portion 24; and which are of sufficient length and width to receive and hold a needle or the like for puncturing the bag to obtain the liquid contents. Each recess 26 can be of any crosssectional shape desired, although the particular recesses shown are circular in cross section. Recesses 26 are formed having bottom wall 28, which is punctured by the needle as it passes into the container. Preferably, a beveled needle having an off center point is used. The needle is inserted into recess 26 breaking through bottom wall 28 at periphery 29 with ease, peeling bottom wall 28 away about periphery 29 as the needle advances.

Each recess 26 may contain a tubular sleeve 30 which serves as a guide for the needle for rupturing bottom wall 28 and obtaining the liquid contents of bag 10. The sleeve can be inserted into recess 26 and glued into place after bag 10 has been filled and sealed. The bore of sleeve 30 is preferably proportioned so that the needle used to obtain the liquid contents fits in tight sliding relation thereto, to prevent leakage of the liquid contents when bag 10 is inverted for removing liquid.

When recesses 26 and sleeves 30 are to be maintained in sterile condition, a conventional seal such as a rubber cap (not shown) can be placed over each sleeve 30. Typically, two sleeves 30 and recesses 26 are present to provide one means of access into the bag for removing the liquid contents thereof and another means of access into the bag to add medicaments as needed to the liquid contents thereof, or to connect several bags in series so that a larger amount of liquid can be provided in one administration to the patient.

It can be seen that the means of access of the bag of this invention simply requires passing a needle through the bore ofa sleeve 30 until bottom wall 28 is ruptured. Prior to that, the interior of bag remains sterile, since it is completely sealed from the exterior. After entry of a sterile needle which fits tightly within sleeve 30, the bag is still essentially sealed so that contaminants are unlikely to enter therein.

The tubular recesses described herein can also be used on plastic bags of circular and other nonoval cross sections, as well as with other means for hanging the bags.

As shown in FIG. 1, the portion of bag 10 near head portion 24 has a generally conical configuration created by a gradual reduction of the transverse dimensions of the bag in the direction of head portion 24. This prevents the lower portion of the filled and inverted bag from bulging excessively outward by stretching due to the weight of the liquid contents. Such stretching can result in the formation of undesirable shoulder pockets in the wall about neck 18, containing trapped liquid contents.

The wall of bag 10 is not necessarily of uniform thickness. For example, when bag 10 of oval cross section is formed from a parison of uniform wall thickness, the portions of the wall near the ends of the oval may be thinner than the portions of the wall near the sides of the oval.

What we claim is:

1. A sealed, collapsible bag containing a liquid, which bag comprises: a tubular body of flexible plastic, said tubular body being sealed at one end and narrowing at the other end to a head portion integral with said tubular body for sealing said bag, and a tubular recess at one end of said collapsible bag, said tubular recess being defined by a tubular sidewall of essentially uniform transverse dimension and a bottom wall, said walls being integral with the remaining material of said bag, said recess containing a tubular sleeve for receiving and holding means for puncturing the bag to obtain said liquid.

2. The collapsible bag of claim 1 in which said recess is located in said head portion.

3. The collapsible bag of claim 2 in which said tubular body is oval in cross section, said bag having integral hanger means at the end of said body opposite said head, said hanger means being attached to the body at a single station by a connecting neck which is of less width than the hanger means, to facilitate collapse of the bag while hanging by said means as liquid is withdrawn from the bag.

4. The collapsible bag of claim 2 in which a plurality of tubular recesses are defined in said head portion, each recess containing a tubular sleeve.

5. The collapsible bag of claim 4, in which the transverse dimension of said bag is progressively reduced in the direction of said head portion to define a generally conical configuratron.

6. In a sealed, collapsible bag containing a liquid, a tubular recess, said tubular recess being defined by a tubular sidewall of essentially uniform transverse dimension and a bottom wall, said walls being integral with the remaining material of said bag, said recess containing a tubular sleeve for receiving and holding means for puncturing the bag to obtain said liquid.

Patent Citations
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US2328569 *Feb 8, 1940Sep 7, 1943American Hospital Supply CorpContainer for and method of dispensing parenteral solutions
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3805986 *Feb 17, 1971Apr 23, 1974LabazContainers
US4049033 *Oct 9, 1975Sep 20, 1977Baxter Travenol Laboratories, Inc.Molded collapsible solution container
US4244409 *Oct 9, 1979Jan 13, 1981Abbott LaboratoriesCollapsible solution container
US4611350 *Oct 17, 1984Sep 9, 1986Mobil Oil CorporationBag having a band of reduced diameter
US5520677 *Feb 22, 1995May 28, 1996Hansen; BerndInfusion container with two connections
US6053888 *Aug 5, 1998Apr 25, 2000Kong; Carl Cheung TungVariable volume bottle and related medical fluid infusion system
US6652942Jan 8, 2001Nov 25, 2003Baxter International Inc.Assembly for a flowable material container
US6869653Jan 8, 2001Mar 22, 2005Baxter International Inc.Port tube closure assembly
US7329445Oct 17, 2003Feb 12, 2008Baxter International Inc.Assembly for a flowable material container
US7550185Jan 24, 2005Jun 23, 2009Baxter International Inc.Port tube and closure composition, structure and assembly for a flowable material container
US20040086675 *Oct 17, 2003May 6, 2004Ling Michael T.K.Assembly for a flowable material container
US20050158499 *Mar 14, 2005Jul 21, 2005Ling Michael T.Port tube and closure composition, structure and assembly for a flowale material container
USRE32065 *Sep 18, 1979Jan 14, 1986Baxter Travenol Laboratories, Inc.Molded collapsible solution container
EP0069246A2 *Jun 14, 1982Jan 12, 1983Gambro Lundia ABA container for delivery and/or collection of a liquid
Classifications
U.S. Classification383/9, 604/408, 383/24, 128/DIG.240
International ClassificationA61J1/00, A61J1/05
Cooperative ClassificationA61J1/05, Y10S128/24
European ClassificationA61J1/05