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Publication numberUS3589522 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 29, 1971
Filing dateJun 26, 1969
Priority dateJun 26, 1969
Publication numberUS 3589522 A, US 3589522A, US-A-3589522, US3589522 A, US3589522A
InventorsChiodo Thelma
Original AssigneeChiodo Thelma
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Boot rack
US 3589522 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [72] Inventor Thelma Chiodo 13 East Bell Street, Des Moines,1owa 50315 [21] Appl. No. 836,767 [22] Filed June 26, 1969 [45] Patented June 29, 1971 [54] BOOT RACK 3 Claims, 3 Drawing Figs.

[52] U.S. C1 211/34 [51] int. Cl A47f 7/08 [50] FieldoiSearch 21 1/34,35, 36, 37, 38

[5 6] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 426,111 4/1890 Cotfin 211/37X 446,312 2/1891 Wikle 12/123 Lambert.... Mansfie1d.....

Rocheleau.... Grace Carson Auer Bernier Primary ExaminerNile C. Byers, Jr. Attorney-Henderson & Strorn 2ll/37X 2l1/37X 211/34X 211/0 211/34 thereof.

BOOT RACK This invention relates generally to footwear racks or clothing racks.

It is generally well known to every mother and teacher of small children that in wintertime and in other seasons of adverse weather, there is considerable trouble with wet, muddy and sloppy boots. If these are put into a box, the bottom boots get wet and stay wet inside the boot.

If they are placed in a normally upright position,.the snow within the boots drips downwardly into the toe area because all children seem to be able to get snow into their boots. When again placing the boots upon the shoes, such water-laden boots will drain all over a floor or rug and make walking in and out of a door difficult. This is of course objectionable and in want of improvement.

Accordingly, it is the principle object of the present invention to provide a boot rack upon which boots may be dried in such a position that any snow caught within the boot will drain outwardly. therefrom and not into the toe thereof.

.Another object of the present invention is to provide a boot rack which includes a plurality of upwardly extending posts upon which at least several sets of boots may be dried at the same time, thus accommodating at least several children.

Yet another object of the present invention is to provide a boot rack which includes a tray into which draining water from the boots may drip, thus preventing the same from flowing upon a carpet or floor.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a boot rack which can accommodate various sizes of boots and which is accordingly adaptable also for adults as well, and wherein the boot rack may conveniently fit into a closet or corner, and if placed side by side, could be lined up along a wall or corridor.

Yet a further object of the present invention is to provide a boot rack which is readily adaptable for also drying out mittens or gloves in a likewise position whereby water will not drain into the fingertip portions of the gloves or mittens but will drain outwardly from the opposite end thereof.

Other objects of the present invention are to provide a boot rack which is simple in design, inexpensive to manufacture, rugged in construction, easy to use and efficient in operation.

These and other objects will become readily evident upon a study of the following specification and the accompanying drawing wherein:

FIG. 1 is a top plan view of the present invention,

FIG. 2 is a side elevation view thereof shown partly in cross section and,

FIG. 3 is an enlarged fragmentary side cross sectional view thereof shown in operative use for drying a boot and a mitten.

Referring now to the drawing in detail, the reference numeral 10 represents a boot rack according to the present invention wherein there is a base tray 11 provided with a flat central area 12 formed by a flat bottom wall 13 which is provided at its periphery by upwardly extending opposite sidewalls l4 and opposite end walls 15. Thus a means is provided for capturing dripping water within the tray.

Within the tray central area 12, there are provided a plurality of upwardly extending stubs 16 which are integrally formed with the tray. The tray accordingly could preferrably be made of material and the stubs 16 are thus made when the tray is moulded. The upper end of the stubs are each provided with integrally formed upwardly extending pins 17 upon which are placed upwardly extending posts 18 which can be mounted. Each post 18 has at its lower end upwardly extending openings 19 into which the pins 17 are receivable.

The upper end of each post is provided with a plastic cap 20 of relatively enlarged size that may be snapped over the upper end of the post, the cap providing a rounded upper end so as not to deform the shape of a boot or glove 2] and 22 respectively, positioned.

The posts 18 may be made of any material, wood or the like.

In operative use, it will now be evident that boots or mittens may be dried upon the rack in a proper manner so that water may drip outwardly instead of dripping into the end thereof.

What I now claim is:

1. In a boot rack, the combination of a tray, and a plurality of posts upon said tray, said tray comprising means for supporting a plurality of boots or mittens, wherein said tray is comprised of a generally flat bottom wall, said flat bottom wall having a generally flat upper side upon which water may be collected, the peripheral edges of said bottom wall being adjacent upwardly extending opposite side edges and opposite end edges comprising walls for retaining said water within said tray.

2. The combination as set forth in claim 1, wherein said tray is integrally formed having a plurality of upwardly extending stubs upon the central upper area of said bottom wall, said stubs each having self-contained means for supporting thereupon a vertically upwardly extending post for supporting said boot or mitten.

3. The combination as set forth in claim 2, wherein the upper end of each said' stub is provided with a centrally positioned, upwardly extending pin, and each said post mounted upon said stub comprises a longitudinally extending member having an opening within a lower end thereof into which said pin is receivable, and the upper end of each said post is provided with a plastic cap upon which said boot or mitten may be draped.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US426111 *Sep 6, 1889Apr 22, 1890 Device for drying boots
US446312 *Nov 20, 1890Feb 10, 1891 Johan jakob wikle
US567903 *Mar 10, 1896Sep 15, 1896 Boot-rack
US686314 *May 18, 1901Nov 12, 1901Henry Clay MansfieldBoot-drier.
US739620 *Oct 23, 1902Sep 22, 1903Melina Flora RocheleauSleeve-form.
US1280445 *May 16, 1918Oct 1, 1918William Preston GraceDevice for drying gum boots.
US2512574 *Nov 13, 1945Jun 20, 1950Selby Shoe CompanyShoe conveyer
US2989188 *Jul 23, 1957Jun 20, 1961Edwin AuerCarriage-like rack for use in the manufacture of shoes
US3079002 *Nov 1, 1960Feb 26, 1963Wright & Co Inc E TShoe rack
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3762573 *Jun 10, 1971Oct 2, 1973Collins JBoot rack
US3802572 *Jun 27, 1972Apr 9, 1974Shackel JApparatus for hanging boots
US5377849 *Apr 14, 1993Jan 3, 1995Martin; Harold G.Sports equipment rack
US5918357 *May 2, 1997Jul 6, 1999Pennell; William RayShoe rack facilitating removal of spikes and method
US5981908 *Feb 24, 1998Nov 9, 1999Kathleen Ruth McGuireHeating apparatus for vertically stacked hair rollers
US6012592 *Aug 10, 1998Jan 11, 2000Ferguson; Kenneth RossBoot rack assembly
US7178680 *Mar 17, 2004Feb 20, 2007Karen Lynn BotnerRack and tray assembly for foot apparel
US7484631Nov 16, 2004Feb 3, 2009Nenger CorporationModular storage system for logistical management of operational units
US7716849 *Jul 12, 2007May 18, 2010Neil HicksGlove dryer
DE202013009055U1Oct 12, 2013Dec 6, 2013Karl KemnaStiefelkarre
Classifications
U.S. Classification211/34, 219/523, 219/521
International ClassificationA47L23/00, A47L23/20, A47F7/08
Cooperative ClassificationA47L23/20, A47F7/08
European ClassificationA47F7/08, A47L23/20