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Publication numberUS3589624 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 29, 1971
Filing dateOct 24, 1968
Priority dateOct 24, 1968
Publication numberUS 3589624 A, US 3589624A, US-A-3589624, US3589624 A, US3589624A
InventorsSmith Thomas R
Original AssigneeMaytag Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Waste disposer with liner
US 3589624 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Inventor Appl. No.

Filed Patented Assignee tent Thomas R. Smith Newton, Iowa 770,291

Oct. 24, 1968 June 29, 1971 The Maytag Company Newton, Iowa WASTE DISPOSER WITH LINER 10 Claims, 3 Drawing Figs.

U.S.Cl 241/46.08, 241/285 Int. Cl ..B02c 13/16, B02c 13/282,802c 18/42 Field of Search 24l/l00.5,

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS Jordan Brucken Hedlund 1.

Moore .1

Ross

Primary Examiner-Donald G. Kelly AttorneyWilliarn G. Landwier 241/100.5 241/100.5 X 241/285 X 241/259 241/257 X ABSTRACT: The waste disposer apparatus disclosed includes a resilient housing for resiliently supporting the disposer in a sink and for defining a comminution chamber and further includes a stainless steel liner for the comminution chamber. The resilient housing in combination with the substantially nonresilient, noncorrosive, and wear-resistant stainless steel liner provides a quiet, long life, waste disposer apparatus.

WASTE DISPOSER WITH LINER BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION 1. Field of the Invention This invention relates to a wall construction for a comminution chamber in a waste disposer apparatus and more particularly to a liner in the comminution chamber.

2. Description of the Prior Art Prior art has shown waste disposers having metallic housings rigidly supported by a sink and defining a comminution chamber. Other disposers have included a resilient housing for resilient support to the sink and for defining a comminution chamber. Still other disposers have used a metallic housing with a resilient liner within the comminution chamber.

These prior art constructions, however, have included limitations as a result of compromises relating to at least one of the important operating characteristics of the waste disposer. For example, disposers having a metallic housing rigidly supported to the sink are more subject to transmission of vibration and noise. Disposers having a resilient housing or a resilient lining are more subject to certain material failures resulting from the abrasion or cutting by objects present in the comminution chamber.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION It is an object of the instant invention to provide an improved waste disposer apparatus having decreased vibration and noise and increased life of the comminution chamber wall.

It is a further object to provide a waste disposer comminution chamber wall construction comprising substantially rigid inner liner and outer shell members and a resilient core member.

It is a further object of the instant invention to provide a waste disposer apparatus having a liner for the comminution chamber that is substantially noncorrosive, nonresilient, and extremely wear resistant.

It is a further'object of the instant invention to provide a waste disposer apparatus having a resilient member for providing a resilient mounting of the waste disposer and defining generally a comminution chamber in which is positioned a substantially nonresilient, noncorrosive, wear-resistant liner.

These objects are achieved in a waste disposer apparatus having a resilient housing supportable from a sink-mounting structure and generally defining a waste disposer comminution chamber. Positioned within the resilient housing is a liner having noncorrosive and long wearing characteristics to achieve, in cooperation with the resilient housing, reduced noise transmission and improved long life characteristics.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a fragmentary view of a waste disposer apparatus having portions shown in section to expose the components relating to the subject matter of the instant invention;

FIG. 2 is an enlarged sectional view of a fragmentary portion of the waste disposer apparatus shown in FIG. I; and

FIG. 3 is a sectional view taken along the broken sectional line 3-3 as shown in FIG. 1.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT Referring to FIG. 1, there is shown a waste disposer I having an upper housing I1 defining generally a comminution chamber 13 for accommodating waste material to be comminuted. The disposer includes an inlet 14 at its upper end for receiving the waste material and flushing liquid. The inlet 14 is formed at least in part by a flanged inlet sleeve member 15 supportable in a drain opening of a sink 16 or the like.

The inlet sleeve member 15 is connected to the flanged inlet end 17 of the upper housing 11 through a supporting arrangement including a resilient sink gasket 19; an upper mounting plate 20, an annular ring (not shown) supported by the inlet sleeve 15, a lower mounting plate 21 having an inner flange 23 supported on the annular ring, a flange clamping plate 24, and a plurality of mounting studs 25. The assembly and operation of this supporting arrangement is more fully described in US. Pat. No. 3,409,234 issued Nov. 5, 1968 Thomas R. Smith and assigned to the assignee of the instant application.

The upper housing 11 may be molded of a polyurethane or other elastomeric material that provides a strong, tough, resilient wall particularly well suited to use in the environment of a waste disposer apparatus. Support of the disposer 10 through the resilient upper housing 11 achieves reduced transmission of noise and vibration.

A lower housing 29 defines a discharge chamber 30 communicating with a fluid outlet 31. In casing member 32 includes an outer shell portion 33 and a rigid housing clamp 38 encompassing the lower portion of the upper housing 11 and having a flange 34 mating with a flange 35 on the lower housing 29. A plurality of bolts 36 join the mating flanges 34, 35. The amount of the upward extension of the outer shell portion 33, as shown in FIG. 1, can be modified and somewhat reduced, if desired.

A substantially cylindrical annular shredder ring 37 is maintained in a relatively stationary position by the clamping action of the housing clamp 38 and the lower housing 29. The shredder ring 37 includes a plurality of inwardly extending shredding elements 39 disposed around the inner periphery thereof. Positioned between adjacent pairs of the inwardly extending elements 39 are longitudinally extending channels 40 for accommodating flow of fluid and comminuted waste material from the comminution chamber 13 toward the discharge chamber 30 and the outlet 31. The shredder ring 37 engages and compresses a sealing flange 41 at the lower end of the upper housing 11 and a sealing gasket 43 recessed in the upper flange 35 of the lower housing 29 to seal the comminution chamber 13 and discharge chamber 30 from leakage through the connection at the mating flanges 34, 35 of the housing clamp 38 and the lower housing 29.

A rotary impeller assembly includes a rotor 45 attached to the motor shaft (not shown) for rotation therewith. The rotor 45 supports a pair of substantially identical impellers 46 that are cooperable with the inwardly extending elements 39 of the shredder ring 37 for effecting comminution of the waste material upon rotation of the rotor 45 Attached to the lower portion of the lower housing 29 is a motor 47 for rotating the rotary impeller assembly in a clockwise direction in FIG. 3 to effect comminution of waste material between the impellers 46 and the shredder ring 37. Control means (not shown) provide for selective energization of the motor 47.

The disclike rotor 45 has an upper face substantially forming a bottom for the comminution chamber and a lower face substantially forming the upper side of the discharge chamber whereby the rotor 45 effectively serves as a divider between the comminution chamber 13 and the discharge chamber 30. The rotor 45 includes a depending central mounting hub 49 attached to the motor shaft, as by a threaded engagement, for effecting rotation of the rotor 45 by the motor 47. The outer diameter of the rotor 45 is established so that the periphery is closely spaced from the inner surface of the inwardly extending elements 39. The rotor 45 also includes a plurality of holes 50 for accommodating flow of fluid from the comminuting chamber into the discharge chamber.

The pair of impellers 46 are pivotally supported, as best shown in FIG. 3, at substantially diametrically opposed positions on the rotor 45 and, since the impellers 46 are substantially identical, a description of one impeller 46 and its mounting applies to each of the pair. Pivotal mounting of the impeller 46 provides for effective comminution while reducing the incidence of jamming. The impeller 46 is located near the outer portion of the rotor 45 and pivotally supported thereon by a pivot pin 51 supported in turn by a hub 53 on the rotor The impeller 46 is freely pivotable between its retracted or inoperative position as shown by the broken lines 54 in FIG. 3 and its extended or operative position as shown by full lines in FIG. 3. The impeller 46 is movable from its retracted position to its operative position responsive to centrifugal force acting upon the impeller 46 upon rotation of the rotor 45 by the motor 47. The impeller 46 includes a first portion 55 having a relatively large mass responsive to centrifugal force for effect ing movement of the impeller 46 in a clockwise direction about the pivot pin 51 upon rotation of the rotor 45. The impeller 46 further includes a comminuting portion 56 cooperable with the inwardly extending elements for effecting comminution of the waste materials therebetween. The impeller 46 still further includes a tapered rear portion 57 engageable with the resilient stop means 59 upon the movement of the impeller 46 to the operative position.

The stop means in the form of resilient dampening means is provided as the centrally located resilient cushion member 59 having portions engageable by the pivotally operable impeller 46 wherein a first face or portion 60 is engageable by the rear portion of the impeller in the operative position while a separate face or portion 61 is engageable by the outer portion 55 of the impeller 46 while in the retracted position. The resilient cushion member 59 may be formed ofa polyurethane material or other suitable elastomeric material possessing resistance to the moisture and abrasion present in the environment of the food waste disposer.

The rotary assembly further includes a first upwardly extending projection in the form ofa kicker 63 and a second upwardly extending member 64 serving as a guard for the cushion member 59 as it moves into the waste material. The resilient cushion 59 in the present waste disposer is operable for absorbing the impact and preventing transmission of objectionable vibration and noise resulting from the operation of the pivotal impellers 46 into either the operative or the retracted position. Thus the repeated kicking in and out of the impeller 46 due to the presence of materials tending to cause jamming may occur without creating a vibration and noise problem.

A liner 67 is positioned within the comminution chamber 13 and conforms substantially to the contour of inner wall of the resilient housing 11. As best shown in FIGS. 1 and 2, the liner 67 includes a lower flange portion 68 that becomes clamped between the lower flange 41 of the resilient housing 11 and the upper surface of the shredding ring 37. The orientation of the parts shown in FIG. 2 is that resulting from the initial assembly and positioning of the specific parts shown. As the bolts 36 are tightened, however, the mating flanges 34, 35 move together and lower flange 41 of the resilient housing 11 is compressed to effect a seal between the housing l1 and the housing clamp 38. Referring to FIG. 2, the clamping action also compresses the resilient housing 11 around the flanges 68 ofthe liner 67 to effect a seal. Referring to FIG. 1, this clamping action further effects compression of the liner 67 against the resilient housing 11 along its upper bell-shape portion to effecta sealing relationship between the liner 67 and the resilient housing 11.

The combination of the inner liner 67, the outer shell portion 33, and the resilient housing 11 forms a wall construction in which the resilient housing 11 substantially fills the space between the liner 67 and shell portion 33 and thus provides a sound and vibration dampening core.

The clamping action of the housing clamp member 38 to the lower housing 29 effects a self-sealing of the liner 67 to the flexible housing 11; however, an optional embodiment would include the provision of a bead of material adjacent the edge of the liner 67 to achieve the sealing or would alternately include the use of a sealant between the liner and the resilient housing wall to prevent the entrance of fluid and comminuted waste particles between the liner and the housing wall.

In this preferred embodiment, the liner 67 is fabricated from a relatively thin stainless steel material having substantially nonresilient and noncorrosive characteristics. The stainless steel possesses wear-resistant characteristics giving the comminution chamber 13 substantially unlimited life against material failure resulting from abrasion of the materials. This liner 67 protects the resilient housing 11 against damage from sharp bones or other material which may be normally inserted into a disposer l0 or which may fall into it inadvertently. Without a liner, the resilient housing 11 is subject to penetration of sharp orjagged bones or other materials. The presence of the relatively thin stainless steel liner 67 prevents such damage and the backing up of the liner with the sound dampening core aids in preventing transmission of vibration and noise.

The combination of the stainless steel liner 67 and the resilient housing 11 is effective for preventing damage to the housing from materials within the comminuting chamber while retaining the effective vibration isolation and noiseor sound-absorbing characteristics of the resilient housing. The combination of the stainless steel liner 67 and the outer shell portion 33 with the resilient housing or core 11 achieves still further improved operating characteristics over previously known waste disposers.

In the drawings and specifications, there has been set forth a preferred embodiment of the invention and although specific terms are employed these are used in a generic and descriptive sense only and not for purposes of limitation. Changes in form and the proportion of parts as well as the substitution of equivalents are contemplated as circumstances may suggested or render expedient without departing from the spirit or scope of this invention as further defined in the following claims.

Iclaim:

1. In a waste disposer apparatus having a shredder ring, means for defining a comminution chamber wall above said shredder ring comprising an inner relatively rigid liner, an outer relatively rigid shell spaced from said inner liner, and a core means comprising relatively resilient material generally filling the space between said inner liner and said outer shell.

2. In a waste disposer apparatus as defined in claim 1 wherein said core means includes means for resiliently supporting said waste disposer apparatus.

3. In a waste disposer apparatus including resilient housing means defining a comminution chamber, sleeve means defining an inlet into said comminution chamber, means for supporting said waste disposer apparatus, comminution means including a shredder ring in a lower portion of said comminution chamber, lower housing means connected to said resilient housing means and defining a discharge path from said comminution chamber, and drive means for operating said comminution means, wherein the improvement comprises a substantially rigid liner within a portion of said comminution chamber above said shredder ring and conformably positioned adjacent said resilient housing means.

4. In a waste disposer apparatus as defined in claim 3 wherein said liner is a substantially noncorrosive, wear-resistant, metallic member.

5. In a waste disposer apparatus as defined in claim 3 wherein said liner is formed for sealing engagement with said resilient housing means to prevent fluid from entering therebetween.

6. In a waste disposer apparatus as defined in claim 3 wherein said resilient housing means includes an upper portion supportable on said sleeve means for resiliently supporting said waste disposer apparatus.

7. A food waste disposer comprising: means defining a comminution chamber including a substantially rigid inner liner, a substantially rigid outer shell spaced from said inner liner, and a resilient core means substantially filling the space between said inner liner and said outer shell; means for supporting said waste disposer apparatus; comminution means including a shredder ring in a lower portion of said comminution chamber, said liner having a lower edge portion adjacent the upper portion of said shredder ring; lower housing means defining a discharge path from said comminution chamber; and drive means for operating said comminution means.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2785864 *Aug 9, 1954Mar 19, 1957Given Machinery CompanyRemovable splash guard and mounting therefor in waste grinding structures
US2978190 *Aug 30, 1956Apr 4, 1961Gen Motors CorpGarbage grinder
US3144213 *Jul 17, 1961Aug 11, 1964W T Hedlund CompanyWaste disposer mount and housing
US3342427 *Jan 31, 1964Sep 19, 1967Beloit CorpVertical refiner
US3430871 *Dec 27, 1966Mar 4, 1969Maytag CoControl for waste disposer apparatus
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3643880 *Aug 12, 1970Feb 22, 1972Cumberland Eng CoMaterial cutting machine and sound-absorbing hood therefor
US6439487Mar 14, 2000Aug 27, 2002Emerson Electric Co.Grinding mechanism for a food waste disposer and method of making the grinding mechanism
US6481652Feb 5, 2001Nov 19, 2002Emerson Electric Co.Food waste disposer having variable speed motor and methods of operating same
US6648252Feb 5, 2001Nov 18, 2003Emerson Electric Co.Switched reluctance machine and food waste disposer employing switched reluctance machine
US6854673Oct 2, 2002Feb 15, 2005Emerson Electric Co.Food waste disposer having a variable speed motor
US7048213Jan 11, 2002May 23, 2006Emerson Electric Co.Methods of operating a food waste disposer having a variable speed motor
US7500628Mar 16, 2007Mar 10, 2009Emerson Electric Co.Food waste reduction mechanism for disposer
US7607599Jun 3, 2004Oct 27, 2009Emerson Electric Co.Food waste reduction mechanism for disposer
US7866583Sep 16, 2009Jan 11, 2011Emerson Electric Co.Food waste reduction mechanism for disposer
US8087600Apr 30, 2008Jan 3, 2012Johnson Electric S.A.Food waste disposal unit
WO2001068261A1 *Mar 14, 2001Sep 20, 2001Emerson Electric CoGrinding mechanism for a food waste disposer
Classifications
U.S. Classification241/46.8, 241/285.1
International ClassificationE03C1/266, E03C1/26
Cooperative ClassificationE03C1/2665
European ClassificationE03C1/266B