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Publication numberUS3589772 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 29, 1971
Filing dateJan 23, 1969
Priority dateJan 23, 1969
Publication numberUS 3589772 A, US 3589772A, US-A-3589772, US3589772 A, US3589772A
InventorsLeaver Gardner
Original AssigneeSteelcase Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Chair
US 3589772 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 72] Inventor Gardner Leaver New York. N.Y. [21] Appl. No. 793,373 [22) Filed Jan. 23, 1969 [45] Patented June 29, 1971 [73] Assignee Steelcase, Inc.

Grand Rapids, Mich.

[541 CHAIR 7 Claims, 10 Drawing Figs.

[52] 0.8. CI 297/445, 297/290, 297/457 [51] Int. Cl. A47c 7/00, A470 7/14 [501 Field of Search 2971445 -450, 454, 282, 418; 248/187, 188.7

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,649,147 8/1953 Sanford 297/447 X Page 56, Oct. 1965 issue of INDUSTRIAL DESIGN MAGZ.

Primary Examiner-Casmir A. Nunberg Atlorney- Price, I-Ieneveld, Huizenga & Co'oper ABSTRACT: A chair having a frame with a right arm, left arm, seat cross support member, and a back cross support member, said frame being mounted on a U-shaped support member having two legs extending upwardly, each of the legs being connected to one of the arms of the frame; and a seat assembly having seat and back portions mounted on said frame,

the seat portion being connected to the seat cross support member and the back being connected to the back cross sup port member.

PATENTEU JUN29 I97! SHEET 1 OF 3 CHAIR BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION In the furniture industry, there has been and is a constant need for highly styled chairs which are unique, attractive, comfortable and yet of a construction which can be manufactured at a practical cost so as to be sold at a marketable price.

Many attempts have been made to accomplish this need but very few have been successful. Either such chairs are not suffrciently unique, attractive, or comfortable or the cost of the manufacturing the same is prohibitive. In many such unsuccessful instances the chairs are constructed of so many parts the simplicity is lost and the cost of manufacturing the parts and assembling them makes the cost impractical.

SUMMARY The present invention is a chair which satisfies the need referred to above. The components are very few in number including a base, support means extending upwardlyfrom that base, a frame means, and a seat assembly supported on the frame. The construction is unique in the shape and arrangement of these components which not only creates a unique and pleasing design but produces a sturdy and rigid chair which is relatively economical to manufacture and therefore can be sold at a market price comparable to highly styled chairs of this unique type.

Therefore, the object of my invention is to provide a highly styled chair of unique construction which can be manufactured at a practical cost.

Further, an object of this invention is to provide a highly styled chair of a small number of components which are easily assembled and produce a sturdy and rugged chair. The frame means is operably connected to and supported by said support means. A seat assembly including a seat and a backis operably connected and supported by the frame means. Such a construction is unique, economical and therefore advantageous and offers all' of the advantages discussed above.

The objects and advantages of this invention can be seen by reference to the enclosed drawings wherein:

FIG. 1 is a slightly elevated perspective view of the chair;

FIG. 2 is a front perspective view of the chair;

FIG. 3 is a side view of the chair;

FIG. 4 is a rear view of the chair;

FIG. 5 is a slightly lowered perspective view of the chair;

FIG. 6 is a side view of the support means and frame means of the chair;

FIG. 7 is a front view of the support means and frame means of the chair;

FIG. 8 is a cross section of the bottom portion of the support means taken along line VIII-VIII of FIG. 7;

FIG. 9 is a cross section of the seat assembly taken along line lX-IX of FIG. 2; and

FIG. 10 is a side view of the base of the chair.

The basic elements of this chair can best be seen by reference to FIG. 3 wherein there is shown a base 10, a support means 20, a frame means 30, and a seat assembly 40. The overall combination of these elements can further be understood by referring to FIG. I, 2, 4 and 5.

Referring to FIG. 10, it can be seen that the base 10 is a spindle-type base and includes a ring stand 11, cantilever supports 12a and 12b, spindle-tube mounting I4, and a spindle tube 13. The ring stand 11 is simply a circular ring (see FIG. 1). Extending upwardly from that ring and on opposite sides thereof are cantilever supports 12a and 12b. These are welded to the ring stand 11 prior to the chrome plating of the base.

then welded. to the spindle-tube mounting 14. As can be discerned from the dashed'lines, the spindle tube 13 is hollow with a hole extending all the way through it and through the spindle mounting 14.

The support means'20 is shown in more detail in FIGS. 6, 7

and 8. It consists of a U-shaped support member 22 having a right leg 22 and a left leg 22b which act to define a generally U-shaped configuration. This member is welded to a bell housing 24 and a spindle 23. A hole 25 is punched in this U-shaped piece of steel 22 at the base of the U. This is shown in cross section in FIG. 8. The top of the spindle 23 then extends a short distance into this hole 25 and is welded in place. The darkened area 26 represents a weld which has been ground flush. The spindle 23 is of a slightly narrower diameter than the inside diameter of the spindle tube 13. On the other hand, the bell housing 24 has a larger inside diameter than the outside diameter of the spindle tube 13. Thus, the spindle 23 slides down through'the spindle tube 13 while the bell housing 24 fits over the spindle tube 13. The spindle is locked in place by some sort of lockwasher or locking cap 27 which keys into the groove at the base of the spindle 23. (See FIGS. 5 and 6) The frame means 30 is detailed in FIGS. 6 and 7. It has a right arm 31, a left arm 32, a seat cross support means 33, a back cross supportmeans 34, and screw holes 36. The right and left arms 31 and 32 have identical shapes and dimensions and as can be seen from FIG. 1, they start at a point behind the seat assembly 40 and curve down and around to a point beneath the seat assembly 40. They are joined together at their ends by the seat cross support member 33 and by the back cross support member 34. These four members are welded together. In each of the seat cross support member 33 and the back cross support member 34, there are three screw holes 36 through which the seat assembly 40 can be connected to'the frame 30.

The seat assembly 40 is detailed in FIG. 9. 41 is the seat portion of the seat assembly 40 and 42 is the back portion. The cushion frame 43 is a solid piece of plywood which has been formed into the particular configuration shown. In addition, strips 46 have been tacked onto the seat edge and the back edge of the seat assembly 40 in order to give the ultimate seat assembly 40 a slight curl at these points. A cushion material 44 such as foam rubber or polyfoam is placed on the cushion frame 43 and is covered with a cover material 45. Note that the cushion frame 43 is equipped with screw eyes 47 whose locations correspond to the location of the screw holes 36 in the frame 30.

These four main elements are combined in the following fashion. The top of the right leg 22a is welded to the right arm 31 of the frame 30. The position of this connection is roughly in the middle of the right arm 31. In a similar fashiomthe left leg 22b of the support means 20 is welded to the left arm 32 of the frame 30. The frame 30 and the support means 20 can now be chromed as a unit. The seat assembly 40 is placed on the frame 30 with the back 42 resting against the back cross support member 34 and the seat 41 resting on the seat cross support member 33. As shown in FIGS. 4 and 5, screws 35 are screwed through the screw holes 36 in the cross support members 33 and 34, through the cover material 45, through the cushion material 44, and into the screw eyes 47 which are secured to the cushion frame 43. The spindle 23 is greased and slipped into the spindle tube 13. The bell housing 24 conceals the spindle tube 13 and is preferably sufficiently large that it does not rub against the spindle tube 13. The spindle 23 extends through the spindle tube 13 and is locked in place by some sort of lockwasher or locking cap 27 which keys into the groove at the base of the spindle 23.

The result is obviously a most unique and attractive chair. The frame 30 which supports the seat assembly 40 doubles as a frame and as attractive armrests. The support means 20 extend upwardly from the base 10 of the chair in a most attractive U-shape and support the chair at the arms 31 and 32 of the frame 30. Thus in a sense, the support means 20 doubles as an arm support and as a support for the chair generally. The entire chair then rotates about a most attractive cantilevered spindle-type base.

It is understood that the above is merely a preferred embodiment of this invention and that changes and alterations can be made without departing from the broad spirit and broader aspects thereof.

The embodiments of the invention in which an exclusive property or privilege I claim are defined as follows. 7

1. A chair comprising: a base; support means extending upwardly from said base and being generally of a U-shaped configuration; a frame means including a left arm member and a right arm member connected at their ends by cross supports; said frame means being operably connected to and supported by said support means at said arm members between said cross supports; a seat assembly including a seat and a back, said seat assembly being operably connected to and supported by said frame means, such that said arm members are generally above said seat member.

2. The chair of claim 1 wherein said support means includes a left leg and a right leg extending upwardly from said base, said legs defining a generally U-shaped configuration.

3. A chair comprising: a base; support means extending up wardly from said base and being of a generally U-shaped configuration; a frame means including a left arm member, a right arm member and cross support means being operably connected to said arm members; a seat assembly including a seat and a back being operably connected to and supported by said cross support means; each of said arm members comprising a load-bearing structural member extending downwardly from said back to said seat; said support means extending above said seat of said seat assembly and being operably connected to said arm members.

4. The chair of claim 3 wherein said support means includes a left leg and a right leg extending upwardly from said base,

said legs defining a generally U-shaped configuration; said left leg being operably connected to said left arm member and said right leg being operably connected to said right arm member.

5. The chair of claim 4 wherein said cross support means constitutes seat cross support means and back cross support means; said seat being operably connected to and supported by said seat support means and said back being operably connected to and supported by said back support means.

6. A chair comprising a base; a generally U-shaped support means having a left leg and a right leg extending upwardly from said base; a frame means including a left arm member, a right arm member, each of said arm members having two ends, and two cross support members; said crossmember-s joining said left arm member to said right arm member near said ends thereof, said crossmembers being generally parallel to each other; said frame means being supported by said generally U-shaped support member, said left leg of said support member being operably connected to said left arm member intermediate its ends and said right leg of said support member being operably connected to said right arm member intermediate its ends; a seat assembly including a seat and a back, said seat assembly being supported by said crossmembers, said seat being operably connected to one of said crossmembers and said back being operably connected to the other of said crossmembers.

7. The chair of claim 6 in which each of said arm members extends from said crossmember supporting said back and curves downwardly to said crossmember supporting said seat; each of said left and right legs of said support means being connected to said left and right arms respectively, at a point above the plane of said seat.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2000624 *Oct 25, 1932May 7, 1935Traver Harry GChair
US2649147 *Nov 28, 1947Aug 18, 1953Sanford Products IncMetal chair
US3041109 *Sep 29, 1958Jun 26, 1962Miller Herman IncWeb and spreader furniture construction
US3142514 *Mar 5, 1962Jul 28, 1964Ginat Jonathan JChair
US3152836 *Feb 5, 1963Oct 13, 1964Robert A SwanChair construction
US3309136 *Dec 27, 1965Mar 14, 1967Kehoe Frank EChair
Non-Patent Citations
Reference
1 *Page 56, Oct. 1965 issue of INDUSTRIAL DESIGN MAGZ.
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3874727 *Mar 13, 1973Apr 1, 1975Rudolph Baresel BofingerChair
US5308142 *Jan 23, 1992May 3, 1994Steelcase, Inc.Chair with arm mounted motion control
US5320410 *Jan 14, 1992Jun 14, 1994Steelcase Inc.Chair control
US5516196 *Feb 14, 1994May 14, 1996Steelcase, Inc.Chair with arm mounted motion control
US5630643 *Jun 1, 1993May 20, 1997Steelcase IncUpholstered chair with two-piece shell
US7905549Nov 19, 2007Mar 15, 2011Ilinko Ltd.Highchair
EP0310544A1 *Jul 25, 1988Apr 5, 1989Equus Marketing AgOffice chair
EP0471654A1 *Jul 30, 1991Feb 19, 1992Claes RönblomA device which is intended to be fitted to an armchair or like article
EP0913110A2 *Sep 30, 1998May 6, 1999Eisen- Und Drahtwerk Erlau AktiengesellschaftSitting furniture
EP1922956A2Nov 16, 2007May 21, 2008ILinko LtdChild's high chair
Classifications
U.S. Classification297/451.3, 297/452.57, 297/290, 297/452.17
International ClassificationA47C7/00, A47C7/18
Cooperative ClassificationA47C7/004, A47C7/18
European ClassificationA47C7/00B2, A47C7/18