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Publication numberUS3590863 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 6, 1971
Filing dateApr 28, 1969
Priority dateApr 28, 1969
Publication numberUS 3590863 A, US 3590863A, US-A-3590863, US3590863 A, US3590863A
InventorsFrancis S Faust, Ernest R Edmunds
Original AssigneeSybron Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Washer for hospital and laboratory glassware and the like
US 3590863 A
Abstract  available in
Images(8)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 1 1 3,590,863

[72] Inventors Francis S. Faust {50] Field of Search 134/63, Buffalo; 82-83, 144, 145,148,152,165,167,170,l76, Ernest R. Edmunds, Tonawanda, both 01, 179, 200; 239/251, 261, 264, 265 NY. 121 Appl. N0. 820,708 1 1 R ferences Cited [22] Fiied Apr. 28, 1969 UNITED STATES PATENTS 145 Patented July 6,1971 1,249,514 12 1917 SChalel 134/200 ux 173! g f s N 3,009,470 11 1961 Zurek 134 176 3,017,892 1/1962 Mixon 134/165 x 3 'l 3,064,665 1 1/1962 Martiniak..... 134/176 3,o70,104 12/1962 Faust et a1. 134/165 x 1967; 3,253,784 5/1966 Long et al 239/264 x abandoned which 15 a continuation of FOREIGN PATENTS application Ser. No. 423,962, Jan. 7, 1965, now abandoned. 453,013 11/1927 Germany 134/82 313,164 8/1930 Great Britain 134/83 OTHER REFERENCES TURBOMATIC, Better Built Machinery Co.," 8/62, p. 3 (copy in group 367). 134/145 [54] WASHER FOR HOSPITAL AND LABORATORY Primary Exammer-R0bert Bleutge 13 Claims, Drawing Figs. [52] U.S.Cl 134/144, ABSTRACT: A washing machine for laboratory-type glass- 134/148, 134/152, 134/165, 134/176, 239/251, ware having an improved coupler FlGS. 10-44) includ- 239/265 ing an interchangeable rotary head 300 and having rails 111 [51] Int. Cl B08b 3/02, adapted to receive a rollable dolly 135 supporting a variety of B67c 1/00 holders including a spindle rack and pipette holder 219.

DlSTILLED WATER 757 COLD WATER HOT WATER PATENIEU JUL 6|97| 3.590.863

:jj SORTING/ l TABLES SHEET 1 UF 8 '9 1 r NONSTERILE STORAGE AND SORTING AREA E r za y" T l iii: 40 J L .1 7%/1/Q'1 J RACK STORAGE r I'] 4 T FILLED RACKS a CONTAINERS Z T] CENTRAL SUPPLY WASHER UNIVERSAL WASHER -j i l 45 DECONTAfiNATION J l ii-w T 29%;? 4- L 1 AREA 4 U 50 mTll/[l 1 if I j 1 rrr EMPTY RACKS a CONTAINERS INVENTORS Froncls S. Faust Ernest R. Edmunds mmdlm ATTORNEYS 1 --PAT-ENTE[IJUL 6l97| 3,590,863

SHEET 3 BF 8 INVENTORS Francis 8; Faust Ernest' R. Edmunds ATTORNEYS PATENTED JUL 6l97| 3.590.863

SHEET 5 [1F 8 INVENTORS Froncls S.- Faus* Ernest R. Edmunds ATTORNEYS PATENTEUJUL BIB?! 3,590,863

sum 7 BF 8 INVENTORS 90 1 z 144' 276 Francis 8. Faust 11 2Q 1 Ernest R. Edmunds ATTO'R NEYS WASHER FOR HOSPITAL AND LABORATORY GLASSWARE AND THE LIKE This application is a continuation of application Ser. No. 723,332, filed Apr. 22, I968, which in turn is a continuation of application Ser. No. 608,702, filed Jan. I I, 1967, which in turn is a continuation of application Ser. No. 423,962, filed Jan. 7, I965, all ofwhich are now abandoned.

This invention relates to a washing machine and more particularly to a washer for laboratory type glassware as used in hospitals and research organizations, although features of the invention are adapted to washers used for any kind of articles.

An object of the invention is to provide such a washer which functions to isolate the soiled article decontamination area of an institution from the washed article nonsterile storage and sorting area thereof, this being achieved by providing a barrier wall between these two areas and mounting the washer made in accordance with the present invention so as to be a part of this barrier wall, the soiled glassware or other soiled articles being fed into the inlet end of the washer from the soiled article decontamination area, and the washed articles being removed from the washer in the nonsterile storage and sorting area thereof.

Another object is to provide such a pass-through washer in which the loading and unloading is extremely simple, is being merely necessary to load a dolly on the inlet side with a rack or holder loaded with soiled articles and push the dolly into the washer, and thereafter to pull the dolly out from the exit side of the washer and remove the rack or holder loaded with cleaned articles.

Another aim is to provide such a pass-through washer which is closed during the washing, rinsing or other treating period and in which the closure members are utilized to facilitate both the loading and unloading operations.

Another object is to provide such a washer which includes a variety of interchangeable holders for the glassware, which holders are severally adapted for the efficient water pressure washing and rinsing of different varieties of laboratory glassware.

Another object of the invention is to provide, for certain of said holders, a water supply coupling adapted to couple with a pressurized water distribution conduit in the holder and which is moved into an out of operative position automatically, such movement being effected in response to starting and stopping the supply of rinse or wash water.

Another object of the invention is to provide a simple and effective rotary spray tree which can be substituted for the coupler described in the preceding paragraph and which rotary spray tree effectively washes the under sides of articles contained in other varieties of holders.

Another object is to provide a dolly useable in conjunction with a variety of holders in which each holder can be quickly and easily mounted on the dolly and latched thereto.

Other objects and advantages of the invention will be apparent from the following description and drawings in which:

FIG. 1 is a floor plan of a portion of the hospital showing the location of the washer embodying the present invention as a pass-through washer between a decontamination area and a nonsterile storage and sorting area.

FIG. 2 is an enlarged transverse vertical section taken generally on line 2-2, FIG. 1, parts being shown in elevation and the washer cabinet being shown as containing a dolly carrying a spindle rack.

FIG. 3 is a vertical section taken generally on line 3-3, FIG. 2 and illustrating one door in an open position and supporting certain components capable of being moved into the washing compartment.

FIG. 4 is a horizontal section taken generally on line 4-4, FIG. 3.

FIG. 5 is an enlarged fragmentary vertical section taken generally on line 5-5, FIG. 4.

FIG. 6 is a fragmentary horizontal section taken generally on line 6-6, FIG. 5.

FIG. 7 is a perspective view of one of the doors arranged in a generally horizontal position.

FIG. 8 is a perspective view of a dolly-forming part of the washer and shown as carrying the spindle rack of FIGS. 2-4.

FIG. 9 is a fragmentary enlarged vertical section taken generally on line 9-9, FIG. 8 and particularly illustrating the attachment of the spindle rack to the dolly.

FIG. 10 is a fragmentary enlarged vertical section taken generally on lines 10-10, FIGS. 3 and 8 and illustrating portions of the dolly, its track, the spindle rack and a hydraulic coupler through which water for washing and rinsing are supplied to the spindle rack.

FIGS. 11-14 are fragmentary horizontal sections taken on the correspondingly numbered lines, FIG. 10.

FIG. 15 is a fragmentary top plan view of the dolly shown in the preceding figures but showing the same carrying a tank type of holder instead of thespindle rack illustrated in FIGS. 2-10.

FIG. 16 is a fragmentary vertical section taken generally on line 16-16, FIG. 15 and showing the tank containing a removable holder for washing large or open mouth pipettes.

FIG. 17 is a view similar to FIG. 16 showing the tank converted into a pressure tank and containing a removable holder for washing small mouth pipettes.

FIG. 18 is a view similar to FIG. 15 showing the dolly carrying a holder and a surgical instrument basket instead of the spindle rack illustrated in FIGS. 2-10.

FIG. 19 is a fragmentary vertical section taken line 19-19, FIG. 18.

FIG. 20 is a fragmentary vertical section taken generally on line 20-20, FIG. 18.

FIG. 21 is a vertical section through the water supply nozzle shown in the preceding figures but showing the same rotatably supporting a rotary spray tree for rotation about the vertical axis of the nozzle.

FIG. 22 is a top plane view of the hub of the rotary spray tree illustrated in FIG. 21, with parts broken away.

FIG. 23 is a fragmentary vertical section similar to FIG. 2 showing the dolly of the preceding figures carrying a rack for petri dishes.

FIG. 24 is a view similar to FIGS. 2 and 23 and showing the dolly of the preceding figures carrying a rack for large mouth beakcrs.

FIG. 25 is a view similar to FIGS. 2, 23 and 24 and showing the dolly of the preceding figures carrying a rack for test tubes.

generally on LOCATION OF WASHING MACHINE While features of the invention can be adapted to washers for any kind of articles, the invention is especially illustrated in conjunction with washing the many varieties of laboratorytype glassware and instruments used in hospitals or other research organizations, and in FIG. 1 is illustrated the floor plan of a part of such a hospital or research organization in which the soiled laboratory-type glassware and instruments are brought to a soiled laboratory-type glassware and instruments are brought to a soiled entry area 30 where the various types of glassware or surgical instruments can be placed in the various racks or holders hereinafter described. These filled racks or holders are then taken to a decontamination or washing area 31 having a wall 32 separating it from the nonsterile storage and sorting area 33.

A pass-through washer 35 embodying the present invention is fitted in an opening 36 in this wall 32 and one or more additional pass-through washers 37, of larger or smaller size and adapted for washing other articles, can also be fitted in another opening 38 in this wall. The wall 32 and washers 35, 37 therefore effectively isolate the areas 33 and 45 from the area 31.

The various racks, holders and baskets hereinafter described, containing the different varieties of washed laboratory glassware or instruments are removed from the passthrough washer 35 embodying the present invention on carts which are assembled in rows in the nonsterile storage and sorting area 33 opposite sorting tables 40 where the glassware and instruments are sorted and placed in suitable containers (not shown) upon an endless belt 41 which delivers the same through an opening 42 in a wall 44 to a presterile area 45 from which the glassware and instruments are placed in a sterilizer (not shown). The different varieties of racks or holders, hereinafter described, are brought back through a door 46 to the soiled area entry 30 for refilling with the different varieties of laboratory glassware or instruments as previously described.

THE CABINET AND WASH WATER STORAGE TANK The cabinet 50 of the pass-through washing machine 35 comprises an outer sheet metal shell 51 having front and rear walls 52 and 53 connected by sidewalls 54 and 55 and a top wall 56, the bottom being open and strengthened by internal angle irons 58 around its bottom. At the four corners of the bottom frame formed by these angle irons 58, vertically adjustable feet 59 of any suitable form are provided to support and permit ofleveling the cabinet.

The front and rear walls 52 and 53 are provided in their upper parts with rectangular front and rear door openings 60 and 60a. The horizontal tops of these openings are defined by inwardly projecting horizontal flanges 61 and 61a, respectively, and the sides of these openings are defined by inwardly projecting vertical side flanges 62 and 62a. The horizontal bottom edges 63 and 63a of these openings are unflanged. To the edge portion of each horizontal upper flange 61 and 61a is suitably secured an edge of a sheet metal strip 64 and 64a which is of Z-shaped form in cross section, the offset portions of these strips forming channels 65 and 65a which open toward the outside of the cabinet. To the edge portion of each vertical side flange 62 and 62a is suitably secured an edge of a sheet metal strip 66 and 66a which is of Z-shaped form in cross section, the offset portions of these strips forming channels 68 and 68a which open toward the outside of the cabinet.

The cabinet 50 also comprises an inner shell 70 which forms a washing compartment 71 and a wash water storage tank compartment 72, the space between the inner and outer shells 50 and 70 forming a motor, pump and piping compartment.

The inner shell 70 comprises front and rear walls 75 and 75a which are suitably secured to the outer shell front and rear walls 52 and 53 in face-to-face relation therewith. Each of these front and rear inner shell walls 75 and 75a is provided with a door opening 76 and 76a conforming respectively to the door openings 60 and 60a of the outer shell 50. The horizontal top edge of each inner shell door opening 76 and 76a is in the form ofa horizontal flange 78 and 78a seated on the corresponding flange 61 and 61a of the outer shell 50.

The horizontal bottom edge of each inner shell door open ing 76 and 76a is in the form of anoffset 79 and 79a forming an upwardly opening trough protruding outwardly through the corresponding opening 60, 60a of the outer shell 50, the ends of these troughs being closed by small vertical end heads 80 and 80a.

The inner shell front and rear walls 75 and 75a are not so wide as the outer shell front and rear walls 52 and 53 and also are not so wide in their areas forming the wash water storage tank compartment 72 as their areas forming the washing compartment 71 as best shown in FIG. 2. The bottom edges of the inner shell front and rear walls are connected by the bottom wall 81 of the wash water storage tank compartment 72. The top edges of the inner shell front and rear walls 75 and 75a are connected by an inner shell top wall 82 from which a vent pipe 83 extends upwardly through the outer shell top wall 56. Between the washing compartment 71 and the wash water storage tank compartment 72 the inner shell front and rear walls are connected by a horizontal trough-shaped bottom wall 85 which is shaped to drain toward the center into a central tail pipe 86 discharging downwardly into the wash water storage tank compartment 72. One inner shell sidewall 88 is connected at its edges to the meeting edges of the inner shell top wall 80, front and rear walls 75 and 75a and the bottom wall 81 of the wash water storage tank compartment 72. The opposite other inner shell sidewall is in the form of an upper sheet metal rectangular section 89 and a lower sheet metal rectangular section 90. The upper rectangular section 89 is connected to the upper parts of the vertical side edges of the inner shell front and rear walls 75 and 75a and to the horizontal edges of the inner shell top wall 82 and bottom wall of the washing compartment 71. The lower rectangular section 90 is connected to the lower parts of the vertical side edges of the inner shell front and rear walls 75 and 75a and to the horizontal edge of the bottom 81 of the wash water storage tank compartment 72. The top edge of the lower inner shell sidewall section 90 abuts and is preferably connected to the bottom of the bottom wall 85 of the washing compartment 71.

WASH WATER DIVERTER A rectangular waste water tank or trough 95, open at its top, is mounted on this inner shell sidewall section 90 and is provided with a drain outlet 98 extending through this inner shell sidewall section 90 which drain outlet connects with a main drain line 100 extending through the outer shell sidewall 54 of the cabinet. A deflector plate 101 is mounted upon a horizontal rock shaft 102 below the tail pipe 86 the ends of which rock shaft are journaled in bearings 103 carried by the inner shell front and rear walls 75 and 75a. A rock lever 104 is fast to one end of this rock shaft 102 and a mechanism 105 is provided for swinging this rock lever and deflector plate from a position in which it diverts the wash water from the tail pipe 86 into the waste water tank or trough 95 or into the body 106 of wash water contained within the wash water storage tank compartment 72 for which body the waste water tank 95 forms an overflow.

DOORS AND TRACK FOR DOLLY As best shown in FIG. 2, 3 and 4, L-shaped brackets 110 are secured to the inner faces of the inner shell sidewalls 88 and 89 at the four corners of the cabinet to project horizontally inwardly therefrom in the same horizontal plane which is preferably slightly above the troughs 79 forming the lower margins of the door openings. The pair of brackets 110 at each side of the washer support a horizontal rail 111 which is C- shaped in cross section, the channels of which rails open in opposition to each other.-

Front and rear doors 115 and 115a close the front and rear door openings 60 and 60a so as to define the front and rear ends of the pass-through washing compartment 71, these doors also carrying rails 118, 1180 which mate with and form continuations of the rails 111 when the doors are opened. Since these doors and their mountings, and their tracks, are identical in construction, a description of one (the front door) will be deemed to apply to both, the corresponding parts of the rear door 115a being distinguished by the suffix a.

Each door 115 comprises a sheet metal panel 119 with its top edge formed to provide a lateral flange 120 adapted to enter the channel 65 formed by the top Z-shaped strip 64 and with each of its vertical side edges formed to provide a lateral flange 121 adapted to enter the channel 68 formed by the corresponding Z-shaped side strip 66 of the cabinet. The lower end of each of these vertical side flanges 121, as best shown in H6. 6 and 7, is provided with a hole 122 aligning with a bearing bushing 123 welded or otherwise secured to the inside of the flange 121. The bearing bushings 123 for each door are in horizontal alignment with each other and are supported by pivot pins 124 extending through openings 125 in the outer shell vertical flanges 62 at the door openings and welded to the inner shell sidewall panels 88 and 89. The lower edge of each door 115 is provided with an inwardly offset angular drip flange 128 and the axis of the pivot pins 124 for each door is placed so that each door can be swung from the vertical full line closed position to the broken line horizontal open position illustrated in FIG 5. in this last position the edges of the side flanges 121 engage the undersides of stop blocks 129 suitably secured to the inner shell sidewall panels 88 and 89 as best shown in FIGS. 4 and 5.

Each door carries the pair of parallel rails 118 which are shown as being h-shaped in cross section, these rails aligning horizontally with the C-shaped rails 11] of the cabinet when the doors are open. Each door can also be strengthened by cross ribs in the form of suitably secured channels 130 having their ends abutting the sides of the rails 118.

The outer shell of the cabinet is provided above each door opening 60, 60a with a suitable catch 131, 131a to be engaged by a manually releasably latch 132, 132a mounted on the exterior and outboard end of the corresponding door 115, a.

THE DOLLY The dolly, indicated generally at 135, is designed to roll from the tracks 118 on the open horizontal front door 115 onto the rails 111 in the washing compartment 71 and thence onto the rails 118a of the open horizontal rear door 115a, these doors being closed during the washing operation.

As best shown in FIGS. 8 and 9, the dolly comprises a rectangular frame of marginal front, rear and side channel bars 138, 139 and 140 joined together at their ends with their channels opening downwardly. Each of these channel bars is also provided with horizontal flanges projecting inwardly from its lower edge to provide a supporting shelf. These flanges 141 for the side channel bars 140 extend the full length of these bars but these flanges 142 for the front and rear channel bars 138 and 139 terminate short of their center to leave gaps 144. The front and rear ends of each side channel bar 140 is supported by rollers 146, these riding on the h-shaped rails 118 and 1180 of the front and rear doors 115 and 1150 and also on the C-shaped rails 111 in the washing compartment 71. The dolly is also provided with front and rear handles 148.

To support the different varieties of holders hereinafter described, the inside wall of the rear crossbar 139 is provided with a central circular opening 150 in its inner upright wall and this wall is also provided with a pair of circular openings 151 flanking the central opening 150.

THE WASH AND RINSE WATER SUPPLY The wash and rinse water supply includes a recirculation pump 155 having an inlet 156 withdrawing wash water from the wash water storage tank compartment 72. Distilled water, cold water and hot water can also be supplied from supply lines 157, 157' and 157" to the discharge line 158 of this pump, the pump being rendered inoperative by control means (not shown) when this is done. The outlet line 158 connects with an overhead stationary spray tree 159 in the top of the washing compartment 71 and which sprays the wash water, distilled water, cold water or hot water supplied to it downwardly upon the articles to be washed contained within the washing compartment 71.

A particular feature of the invention resides in the supply of this water via a branch line 160 to the bottom of the washing compartment 71. This branch line 160 extends through a screen 161 removably supported on angle irons 162 on the opposite sidewalls 88 and 89 of the washing compartment 71. The discharge end of this branch 160 includes an upright floor flange coupling 163 into which is screwed the lower threaded end of an upstanding nozzle indicated generally at 165. The upper part of this nozzle has a sidewall 166 provided with a concentric smooth cylindrical surface 168 and also has an end head 169 enclosing its upper end. The nozzle 165 has a plurality of relatively large openings 170 through its cylindrical sidewall 166, and the nozzle 165 also has an annular row of relatively small orifices 171 extending vertically through its end head 169 close to the margin thereof and concentric with a small orifice 172 through the center of the end head. On the cylindrical surface 168 of the nozzle 165 is slidably mounted a vertically slidable cylindrical coupler indicated generally at 175. This vertically slidable cylindrical coupler comprises a cylindrical metal sleeve 176 the inside diameter of which is substantially larger than the cylindrical external surface 168 of the nozzle so as to provide an annular chamber 178 between these two parts. In the bottom of this sleeve 176 is pinned, or otherwise secured, a slide bearing bushing 179 which slidingly engages the external cylindrical surface 168 of the nozzle 165. In the upper end of the sleeve 176 is fixedly mounted a ringshaped end head composed of four parts, namely, a bottom washerlike end head 180 soldered or otherwise secured as indicated at 181 within the bore of the sleeve near its upper end, an outer sleeve 182 press fitted in the upper end of the sleeve 176 against the upper face of the outer part of the washerlike end head 180, a resilient valve collar 183 of soft resilient plastic material, such as synthetic rubber, fitted with its outer periphery in the bore of the outer sleeve 182 and protruding a substantial distance upwardly above the upper coplanar faces of the sleeve 182 and an inner tubular sleeve 184 fitting the bore of the synthetic rubber valve collar 183 and the lower end of which is attached to the washerlike end head 180 around a central opening 185 therein of which the bore of the inner sleeve 184 forms a continuation. Rods 186 can join and space the washerlike end head 180 and slide bearing bushing 179 and a thrust or step-bearing ring 188 is preferably provided at the bottom of the cylindrical surface 168 of the nozzle for a purpose which will presently appear.

An important feature of the of the invention resides in the relation between the washerlike end head 180 and the annular row of orifices 171 in the end head 169 of the nozzle 165. Thus in the fully lowered position of the vertically slidable cylindrical coupler 185 the washerlike end head 180 seats on the top face of the end head 169 in position to close the entire annular row of orifices 171 through this last end head. When the water pressure in the nozzle 165 is relieved, any water trapped in the vertically slidable cylindrical coupler escapes through its central orifice 172 and this vertically slidable cylindrical coupler 175 slides down by gravity with its bearing bushing 179 forming the sliding surface on the cylindrical surface 166 of the nozzle 165, until the washerlike end head engages and seats upon the upper end head 169 of the nozzle 165 to close the annular row of orifices 171 therethrough. When wash water, distilled water, cold water or hot water is introduced via the branch line 160 into the nozzle 165, the pressure of this water in the annular row of orifices 171 is exerted upwardly against the underside of the washerlike end head thereby to lift the sliding vertically slidable cylindrical coupler 175. The water can then escape in volume from the annular chamber 178, under the washerlike end head 180 and upwardly through its central opening and the bore of the metal sleeve 184 and synthetic rubber collar 183 to discharge upwardly into one of several mating devices as hereinafter described. lt will be noted that the vertically slidable cylindrical coupler 175 can be easily manually lifted from the nozzle 165 for servicing or for replacement with the rotary spray tree illustrated in FIGS. 21-25.

SPlNDLE RACK ATTACHMENT, FIGS. 214

One of a number of attachments used in conjunction with the washer is a spindle rack 190 illustrated in conjunction with the form of the invention shown in FIGS. 2-14. This spindle rack is particularly designed for the thorough internal cleansing of very long or narrow necked vessels of glassware indicated at A, FIGS. 2-4, these pieces of glassware being fitted over or suspended on the upwardly projecting spindles 191 of the spindle rack 190 the upper ends of which spindles are open so as to discharge water directly against the inverted bottom of the vessels A to flow downwardly along the sides thereof and out through their mouths.

To this end the spindle rack 190 comprises a central horizontal body tube 192 which is preferably square in cross section and the ends of which are closed by end heads 193 and 194 which, as best shown in FIG. 9, are arranged in closely spaced relation to the front and rear inverted C-shaped crossbars 138, 140 of the dolly 135. The end head 193 of this body tube of the spindle rack 190 has a pin 195 which is fitted in the central hole 150 of the crossbar 139 and its opposite end is provided with a longitudinally projecting tongue 196 having a keyhole slot 198 which is adapted to be fitted over and latched to a headed pin 199 projecting upwardly from the center of the crossbar 138 of the dolly.

The central body tube 192 of the spindle rack is provided with a plurality of branch pipes 200 projecting laterally therefrom in a horizontal plane and having their outboard ends supported by the flanges 141 of the inverted Cshaped side bars 139 of the dolly 135. As best shown in FIG. 10 each of these branch tubes 200 extends through and is suitably secured in opposite side openings 201 in the central body tube 192 to project from opposite sides of this central body tube. Water from the central body tube 192 is supplied to each of these branch tubes 200 via an opening 202 in the latter contained within the central body tube 192 as best shown in FIG. 10. The outboard end of each of these branch tubes is preferably closed by a removable nylon end head 204, the same being shown as comprising a plug having a head 205 and stem 206, the latter being inserted into the outboard end of the corresponding branch pipe 200 and being held in sealed engagement therewith by an O-ring 208.

The spindle rack 190 includes a plurality of upstanding tubular spindles 191 the upper ends of which are open and the lower ends of which are screwed in a fitting 209, these fittings 209 extending through the tops of the branch pipes 200 at suitably spaced intervals and being soldered thereto, the water from these branch pipes 200 being conducted through these fittings 209 to the several spindles 191 to be discharged upwardly therefrom against the inside of the glassware vessels A placed thereon.

An important feature of the spindle rack 190 resides in the provision of means for coupling the horizontal center body tube 192 with the vertically slidable cylindrical coupler 175 each time the water in the nozzle 165 is pressurized. For this purpose the central body tube 192 is provided at its center with an opening 210 through its bottom, this opening being surrounded by horizontal washerlike disc 21] having a central opening 212 therethrough. When the dolly 135 containing a spindle rack 190 is centered on the tracks 111 in the washing compartment 71 the opening 210 of the bottom washerlike disc 21] of the spindle rack 190 is arranged coaxially of the synthetic rubber collar 183 of the tubular coupler 175. Accordingly when distilled water, cold water, hot water or rinse water is introduced under pressure via the branch line 160 into the nozzle 165, the pressure of this water in the annular row of orifices 171 will raise the vertically slidable cylindrical coupler 175 and cause its synthetic rubber collar 183 to engage and seal against the under side of the washerlike disc 211 of the spindle rack 190. The sealed relation is maintained by the pressure of the water against the full under surface of the washerlike end head 180 after it leaves contact with the spindle end head 169 so that the water supplied under pressure from the nozzle 165 is introduced in volume into the central tube, branch pipes and spindles 192, 200 and 191 of the spindle rack thereby to wash the interiors of the glassware vessels A placed on these spindles.

PlPETTE WASHING ATTACHMENTS, FIGS. -17

In FIGS. 1517'are illustrated attachments for washing both so-called easy and so-called hard pipettes, the easy wash pipettes B having large openings at their opposite ends and the hard wash pipettes C each having one end constricted to have a very small orifice.

The common attachment for both types of pipettes comprises a holder 219 including a sheet metal channel-shaped body 220 having longitudinal vertically extending side flanges 221 to which are secured, as by welding, a pair of pins 222 which project outwardly from one end of the channel-shaped body and are positioned to be inserted in the pair of holes 151 in the C-shaped cross bar 139 of the dolly 135. The opposite end of the channel-shaped body 220 is provided with a vertically extending flange 223 to which a tongue 224 is secured, this tongue protruding longitudinally from the center of the channel-shaped body and being provided with a keyhole slot 225 adapted to fit over and be removably attached to the headed pin 199 projecting upwardly from the C-shaped crossbar 138 of the dolly.

At its center an upstanding tubular tank 228 is secured to the channel-shaped body 220 the lower open end of this tubular tank being flanged, as indicated at 229, and this flange secured to the top face of the channel-shaped body 220 and the upper end of this tank preferably being strengthened by a bead 230.

The channel-shaped body 220 is provided with four large holes 231 extending vertically therethrough in centered relation with a central hole 232 also extending vertically therethrough. The tank is also provided with a pair of swing latches 233 at its opposite sides which are adapted to hold a cover 234 in sealing relation with the open upper end of the tank. This cover comprises a sheet metal cap having a depending rim 235 having a liner 236 of soft resilient plastic material, such as synthetic rubber, and which liner for the rim 235 snugly fits the bead 230 at the upper end of the tank 228.

The cover is provided at opposite sides with catches 238 in the form of ears having upwardly projecting detent portions 239 spaced from the body of the tank 228. The swing latches 233 are pivoted on opposite sides of the tank 228 so that their upper ends swing out and up to engage with these cars. Each swing latch is provided at its opposite end with a spring finger 240 which is shaped to spring over and releasably clasp the upwardly projecting detent portion 239 of a corresponding ear 238.

This cover is not used when washing the easy to wash or large mouth pipettes B, and when washing these, a washerlike pad or disc 241 of soft resilient plastic material such as rubber is first placed in the tank on its bottom, this pad being shaped so as to close the four large holes 231 in the bottom of the tank and to leave the central hole 232 open. On top of this pad is then placed a basket or holder 242 for the large mouth pipettes B. This basket comprises a bottom outer cylinder 243; inner cylindrical ring 244; a circular piece of wire mesh 245 having its circular margin interposed between this bottom cylinder and bottom ring; a U-shaped handle 246 having the bottom of its vertical legs secured to the inside of the bottom cylinder 243; and a plurality of sleeves 248 spaced upwardly from the bottom cylinder 243 and from each other and secured to the sides of the handle 246 so as to form the upper part of a tubular basket. With the large mouth pipettes B placed in this basket and the filled basket loaded in the tank 228 with the grip portion of the handle 246 uppermost, when the nozzle is pressurized with distilled, cold, hot or washed water the pressure thereof in the annular series of orifices 171, against the washerlike end head 180, FIG. 10, raises the cylindrical coupling along the exterior cylindrical face 168 of this nozzle 166 and forces its rubber collar 183 into engagement with the bottom of the channel-shaped holder 220. With the dolly 135 containing this channel-shaped holder properly centered in the washing compartment 71, the bore of this resilient valve collar 183 is in register with the hole 232 of the channel-shaped holder 220. Accordingly the water from the vertically slidable cylindrical coupler 175, escaping from the annular chamber 178, flows upwardly through the opening 232 into the bottom of the tank 228 from which it is distributed in the space under the screen 245 to the various large mouth pipettes B to flow upwardly therethrough as well as around the outside of these pipettes. This water overflows the beaded upper rim 230 of the tank. On removing the basket of cleaned pipettes B the water drains back through the screened bottom 245.

When washing the small mouth pipettes C which are difficult to clean, different parts are used. Thus, the use of the rubber disc 241 is eliminated, and the holder 250 used for the small mouth pipettes C comprises a large diameter central tube 251 having an annular ring-shaped base 252 secured to its bottomv This ring-shaped base is provided with an annular peripheral groove into which is set the inner part of a circular screen 253 the outer part of which is arranged close to the inside of the cylindrical tank 228.

To the periphery of this central tube 251 are suitably secured discs 255, 256, 258 and 259 having openings 260 which are in axial alignment with one another and through which the small mouth pipettes C are adapted to be individually inserted. However, the lower pair 255 and 256 of these discs are spaced closely together and are arranged near the bottom of the central tube 251 and sandwiched between them in a circular body 261 of soft, resilient plastic material the perimeter of which projects outwardly from these discs 255 and 256 so as to frictionally engage and seal against the inside of the tank 228. This sealing body is provided with through holes 262 which align with the holes 260 but are of smaller size so as to frictionally engage and seal against the sides of the pipettes C and also so as to be of reduced size when pipettes are not present therein. The central tube 251 is provided with a series of openings 263 through its sidewalls leading to the space above the sealing body 261 and the top of this central tube can be provided with a plug 264 to which a handle 265 of any suitably form can be secured.

In washing small mouth pipettes C they are threaded through the openings 260 of the discs 259, 258, 256 and 255, small mouth end first, down from the top of the holder until their small mouth ends pass through and are sealed in the openings 262 of the sealing body 261 at the bottom of the holder. The rubber disc 241 used with the large mouth pipettes are in FIGS. and 16 is not employed and instead the holder 250 containing the small mouth pipettes C is inserted, screen 253 first, down into the tank 228. The cover 234 is then placed and the swinging latches 233 swung upwardly to engage and bear down upon the detent projections 239 of the cover.

Upon now admitting the required water under pressure into the nozzle 165, this pressure in the annular series of orifices 171 raises the vertically slidable cylindrical coupling 175 so as to bring its resilient valve collar 183 into engagement with the ring-shaped base 252 of the holder 250. Accordingly the water from the nozzle 165 and coupler 175 now passes, as indicated by the arrows in FIG, 17, up through the central tube 251 of the holder 250, and escapes through the openings 263 as indicated by the arrows in this figure. Upon filling the tank space around the upper part ofthe pipettes C this water has no place to escape except flowing downwardly through the center of the pipettes C, the cover 234 preventing the water from overflowing the tank and the seal body 261 preventing the water from flowing directly out through the bottom of the tank. Accordingly the small mouth pipettes are washed, rinsed, sanitized or otherwise treated internally and externally, the water flowing down through these pipettes and escaping through the holes 231 in the bottom of the tank.

SURGICAL INSTRUMENT ATTACHMENT FIGS. 18-20 In FIGS. 18-20 is illustrated an attachment 270 for washing surgical instruments D this attachment also being secured to the dolly 135 to be in centered relation therewith. This attachment comprises a holder indicated generally at 271 and a basket 272 removably placed within this holder and supporting the surgical instruments D. The holder 271 comprises a generally rectangular bottom 273 having sidewalls 274 rising therefrom and having front and rear end walls 275 rising from its front and rear edges. To the underside of the bottom wall 273 is secured the upwardly projecting flanges of a channelshaped conduit 278 which extends the full length ofthe holder and is closed at its opposite ends. This channel-shaped conduit is provided with a central opening 279 which, with the holder 271 on a dolly centrally positioned in the washing compartment 71 aligns with the rubber valve collar 183 of the cylindrical coupler 175.

The bottom 273 is provided with a central series of through openings 280 leading to the interior of the channel-shaped conduit 278 and at each end the holder is provided with a header 281 extending the full width of the holder and having a top wall 283 secured at its edge to the corresponding end wall 275 of the holder, a vertical wall 284 spaced inwardly from each end wall 275 of the container to form a chamber 285, and a bottom flange 286 projects horizontally from the bottom edge of the vertical wall 284 and away from the end wall 275 of the container, this flange preferably being spaced above the bottom wall 273 as best shown in FIGS. 19 and 20. Each end compartment 285 is provided with a large opening 288 leading to the channel-shaped conduit 278 and through which water is introduced into and removed from the end chambers 285 this water passing through holes 289 in the vertical wall 284. The holder 271 is provided with a pair of pins 290 projecting from one end thereof to enter the pair of openings 191 in the dolly 135, these pins being welded to blocks 291 and secured to the underside of the holder at one end thereof. The opposite end is provided with a central tongue 292 protruding horizontally therefrom and having a keyhole slot 293 adapted to fit over and be latched to the headed pin 15] of the dolly 135.

The basket 272 can be of any suitable form, being shown as having a rectangular wire frame 295 formed to provide handles 296 and to mount a tray-shaped wire cloth 298 in which the surgical instruments D are placed. With the basket 272 of instruments D placed in the holder 271 and this holder latched to the dolly 135 and the dolly centered in the washing compartment 71, when liquid under pressure is admitted to the nozzle 165, this pressure in the annular row of orifices 171 lifts the coupling sleeve 175 and brings the rubber valve collar 183 into engagement with the center of the channel-shaped conduit 278 surrounding its central opening 279. This water escapes upwardly through the openings 280 in the central part of the holder bottom 273 to impinge against the undersides of the instruments D laying on the bottom of the wire basket 272. This water also passes through the large end openings 288 into the end chambers 285 and escapes through the holes 289 in the inner wall 284 of this end chamber so as to impinge against the ends of the wire basket 272. This water overflows the holder 271, and when the basket 272 is removed the water drains from the instruments D. Similarly when the holder 271 is removed the water drains through the holes 280, 288, 289 and 279 so that no water is trapped in the compartments 285 or channel-shaped conduit 278.

ROTARY SPRAY TREE The forms of the invention illustrated in FIGS. 21-25 are particularly characterized by the employment of a rotary spray tree 300 mounted on the cylindrical periphery 168 of the nozzle 165. As best shown in FIGS. 21 through 23 this rotary spray tree comprises a metal sleeve 301 having an internal diameter substantially larger than the cylindrical periphery 168 of the nozzle which it surrounds so as to form an annular chamber 302 therebetween. Fixed within the lower end of the sleeve 301 is a rotary bearing bushing 303 which fits the cylindrical external surface 168 of the nozzle 165 and which also rides on the step bearing or thrust ring 188. Fixed within the upper end of the cylindrical sleeve 301 is a second bearing bushing 304 fitting the upper end of the cylindrical surface 168 of the nozzle 165. This last bearing bushing has a pair of diametrically oppositely located vertical openings 305 therethrough and the chamber 302 between the bearing bushings 303 and 304 is in communication with the side openings 170 ofthe nozzle 135.

Tubular arms 308 are fixed to and project diametrically oppositely from the sleeve 301 the open inner ends of these tubular arms being in communication with the annular chamber 302. The outer ends of these arms can be closed by removable plugs 309 of any suitable form and each of these arms is provided with a series of openings 310 in its top extending the full length of the arm and adapted to direct streams of water upwardly. To secure rotation of the arms 308 about the axis of the nozzle 165, each is provided at its outer end with a side orifice 311, these orifices being directed in a clockwise direction ifthe tree is to rotate counterclockwise and vice versa.

. With such a rotary spray tree 300 as illustrated in FIGS. 21-23 mounted on the nozzle, when the water from the nozzle 165, in addition to discharging upwardly through its top orifices 171 and 172 also passes through its side openings 170 into the arms 308. On emerging through the sidewall holes 311 at the ends of these arms, these streams create a force rotating the arms 308 and their sleeve 301 about the axis of the nozzle 165, the bearing bushings 303 and 304 of this sleeve riding on the periphery of the nozzle 165 and being supported by the step bearing 188. Accordingly the streams of water escaping upwardly from the holes 310 in these arms as well as from the pair of holes 305 in the upper bearing sleeve 304 are rotated so as to travel around the bottom of the wash ing compartment 71 and to impinge any glassware in holders supported thereabove.

Such glassware can be Petri dishes E supported in a rack 315. This basket can be fomied of wires suitably secured together to form a rectangular frame 316 with bottom and sidewalls fitting in the dolly 135 to rest upon the flanges 141 and 142. This basket can also have internal cross wires 318 forming slots or nests adapted to receive the lower parts of the Petri dishes E in the parallel angular position illustrated in FIG. 23.

For washing large mouth beakers F, a rack 320 as illustrated in FIG. 24 can be employed, this rack comprising a rectangular frame 321 of wires adapted to fit within the dolly 135 and rest upon its flanges 141 and 142. This frame can have handles 322 and is composed of horizontal cross wires which can support groups of upwardly projecting spring wires 323 over which groups of the large mouth beakers F can be individually placed so as to obtain the desired spacing thereof.

For test tubes G, the holder comprises a rectangular bottom plate 325 having its rim shaped to fit within the dolly 135 and be supported on its flanges 141, 142 this bottom plate also having an upwardly projecting marginal rim 326. This bottom plate can be provided with a plurality of rectangular openings 328 over which rectangular wire cloth baskets 329 can be placed. In each of these baskets test tubes G are placed in groups with their open ends down. Short test tubes G can be placed in one basket, the next size in another basket and larger test tubes in another basket. In order to prevent the upward force of the streams of water issuing upwardly from the rotary spray tree 300 from driving any of these test tubes upwardly, a wire cloth cover 330, preferably having a wire rim 331, can be placed over the group of test tubes in each basket and either weighted to hold the test tubes down or provided with suitable fastening pins 332 adapted to be inserted in openings 333 in strips 334 forming part ofthe end walls of these baskets.

OPERATION The various forms of glassware and instruments, holders and baskets shown, after being emptied at the sorting tables 40, FIG. 1, in the nonsterile storage and sorting area 33, are brought through the door 46 into the soiled entry area 30 where they are refilled with soiled glassware or instruments. Confining attention first to the form of spindle rack 190 shown in FIGS. 214, they are refilled with the laboratory glassware A which this particular type of spindle rack is designed to wash. Such beakers A are inverted and placed individually upside down over a corresponding spindle 191, the beakers A being supported in an elevated position by the upper ends of the spindles.

After a spindle rack 190 has been so loaded with beakers A, it is brought into a decontamination area 31 and brought up to the washer 35 embodying the present invention. The front or inlet door of this pass through washer 35 is then opened by releasing its latch 132 from the catch 131 and lowering the door to the horizontal position shown in FIGS. 3 and 4. The door swings about its pivot pins 124 to this position in which it is held by the stop block 129, FIG. 5.

From the preceding washer a dolly 135 has been emptied and returned to the washing compartment 71 of the washer, being supported by its rollers 146 on the rails 111 therein. This empty dolly is then drawn forwardly by its handle 148 onto the rails 118 on the front or entry door 115, these latter rails aligning with the rails 111 in the washing compartment 71 so that the dolly can be easily rolled from one pair of rails to the other.

The filled spindle rack 190 is then mounted in this empty dolly 135 on the front or entry door 115. This is done by passing the pin 195 at one end of the central body tube 192 of this spindle rack in the central opening 150 of the rear crossbar 139 of the dolly and lowering the spindle rack until the end blocks 204 of its branch pipes 200 are supported on the flanges 141 of the side bars 140 of the dolly. In doing so the keyhole slot 198 of the tongue 196 is brought down over the headed pin 199 on the front crossbar 138 of the dolly and the spindle rack is then shifted rearwardly so that the headed pin 199 is lodged in the small part of the keyhole slot 198 to retain the spindle rack 190 against upward displacement.

The dolly 135 so loaded with the spindle rack 190 is then pushed into the washing compartment 71, its rollers 146 riding from the rails 118 on the horizontal front or entry door 115 onto the rails 111 in the washing compartment 71. The attendant in the decontamination area 31 then closes the front or entry door 115 by lifting its outboard end and latches the same in a closed upright position, this serving to enclose the washing compartment 71.

The operator, or suitable automatic control mechanism (not shown) can then start any required sequence of rinsing and washing the glassware A by introducing cold water, hot water or distilled water from the supply lines 157, 157' and 157" into the line 158, FIG. 2, or by energizing the pump to withdraw wash water from the body 106 contained within the wash water storage tank compartment 72 and supplying this wash water under pressure to the pipe 158. During this operation the diverter plate 101, FIGS. 2 and 3 can be tilted to divert the used water emerging from the tail pipe 86 of the washing compartment 71 either into the waste water trough 95, as shown by full lines in FIG. 2 or to the body 106 of wash water in the wash water storage tank compartment 72. The water when diverted to the waste water trough 95 flows out through the drain 98, 100 and the water so diverted into the body 106 is recirculated by the pump 155.

In every such sequence of washing or rinsing, water under pressure is supplied to the pipe 158 FIGS. 2 and 3, thereby to produce downward sprays from the overhead spray tree 159 and to wash the exterior of the inverted beakers A on the spindles 191 within the washing compartment 71. In addition, however, the water in the branch line 160 is pressurized, thereby to pressurize the liquid within the upstanding cylindrical nozzle illustrated in detail in FIG. 10. The pressure within this nozzle 165, pressurizes the liquid in the annular row of orifices 171. This pressure is exerted upwardly against the washerlike end head of the vertically slidable cylindrical coupler 175, now in its fully depressed position, and pressure against this end head forces this vertically slidable cylindrical body 175 upwardly, this body being guided in this movement by its sliding bearing bushing 179.

The important result of this upward movement of the vertically slidable cylindrical coupler 175 is that its resilient valve sleeve 183 is moved upwardly into sealing contact with the washerlike plate horizontal disc 211 fast to the under side of the spindle rack at its center. This seal is maintained essentially by an increase in the effective area of the washerlike end head 180 of the vertically slidable cylindrical coupler 175, the full area of this end head being now subject to water pressure. Thus, as soon as the washerlike end head 180 of the vertically slidable cylindrical coupler 175 leaves contact with the end head 169 of the nozzle 165, liquid immediately starts to flow from the annular chamber 178 over the top of the nozzle end head 169 to exert its upwardly effective force against the full underside of the washerlike end head 180 of the vertically slidable cylindrical coupler 175 to urge the vertically slidable cylindrical coupler 175 upwardly and to maintain a seal between the upper end of the resilient valve sleeve 183 and the washerlike disc 211 fixed to the underside of the spindle rack 190.

This into passes through the resilient valve sleeve 183 and opening 212 of this washerlike disc 211 into the central tube 192 of the spindle rack 190. From there this water is distributed through the ports 202 into the various branch tubes 200 and from these branch tubes 200 the water passes upwardly through the fittings 209 into the upright spindles 191 the upper ends of which are open so that the water is forced against the inside of the bottoms of the various beakers A carried by the spindles to flow downwardly along the sidewalls and emerge from the mouths thereof, this water, together with the water from the overhead spray tree 159, being collected on the bottom wall 85 of the washing compartment 71 to drain into the tail pipe 86 and to be diverted by the deflector plate 101 either into the waste water trough 95 or to the body 106 of wash water in the wash water storage compartment 72, as previously described.

After the sequence of washing and rinsing operations has been completed, an operator in the nonsterile storage and sorting area 33 opens the rear or exit door 115a by releasing the latch 132a from the catch 131a and lowering the door about its pivot pins 1240 until it is held in a horizontal position by the stop blocks 129a. In this position its pair of rails 118a are in alignment with the pair of rails 111 in the bottom of the washing compartment 71. The operator then by means of a handle 148 pulls the dolly 135 out on to the rear or exit door 115a, the rollers 146 supporting the dolly riding from one pair of rails to the other. The operator then removes the loaded spindle rack 190 from the dolly 135, pushes the dolly 135 back into the washing compartment 71 and closes and latches the rear or exit door 1150. The spindle rack 1 90 loaded with the washed beakers A is then moved to the sorting tables 40. After the beakers A have been removed from the spindle rack 190 onto the sorting tables 40, the racks are brought back through the door 46 into the soiled entry area 30 for refilling as previously described. v

As large mouth pipettes B accumulate in the soiled entry area 30 they are inserted into the baskets 242, FIG. 16, in a vertical position on the bottom screen 245 of each basket, the open mouth pipettes being held upright by the side rings 243 and 248 thereof. When a basket 242 has been filled, a disc 241 of rubber is placed in the bottom of the tank 228 of a holder 219 and this holder is taken to the washer 35 in the decontamination area 31 and the front or inlet door 115 of the washer is opened and its dolly 135 is rolled out from its washing compartment 71 onto the rails 118 of this door. The holder 219 is then secured to this dolly 135, the end pins 222 of this holder being inserted in the pair of side holes 151 in the rear crossbar 139 of the dolly 135 and the headed pin 199 of the dolly being brought up through the keyhole slot 225 of its tongue 224 and the holder shoved rearwardly so as to latch the keyhole slotted tongue under this headed pin.

The operator then shoves the loaded dolly from the rails 118 on the front or inlet door 115 of the washer onto the rails 111 within the washing compartment 71 and closes and latches the front or entry door; The required sequence of rinsing and washing the pipettes in the basket B is then applied in the same manner as previously described and supplying water under pressure, FIG. 10, to the nozzle 165 applies pressure through the orifices 171 to raise the vertically slidable cylindrical coupler 175 and to cause its resilient valve collar 183 to seal against the underside of the channel-shaped body 220 of the holder 219, but with the holder 219 this seal is made directly with the underside of its channel-shaped body 220 as shown in FIG. 16 to discharge the water through the port 232 upwardly into the space below the screen bottom 245. This water passes upwardly through the open mouth pipettes B to overflow the tank 228. This water also passes, of course, around the exterior of these pipettes.

After the washing and rinsing operation has been completed the rear or exit door 115a is opened, the loaded dolly 135 rolled out, and the holder 219 removed to the sorting tables 40, following which the empty containers are brought back to the soiled entry area 30 through the door 46.

As small mouth pipettes C accumulate in the soiled entry area 30 they are inserted in the holder 250, FIG. 17, being inserted downwardly through the holes 260 in the discs 255, 256, 258 and 259 carried by the central tube 251 of this holder and the lower ends of these pipettes C being forced through the rubber seal 261 sandwiched between the lower pair of discs 255, 256. The rubber disc 241, FIGS. 15 and 16, if present, is then removed from the bottom of the tank 228 of the holder 219 and the loaded holder 250 is inserted into the tank 228 of this holder 219. In inserting the holder 250 the periphery of the soft sealing disc 261 is brought into pressure contact with the bore of the tank 228. The operator then closes and latches the cover 234, opens the front or entry door 115 of the washer 35, rolls out the empty dolly 135 from its washing compartment 71, and loads the holder 219 on this dolly in the same manner as described in connection with washing the open mouth pipettes B. He then rolls the loaded dolly 135 into the washing compartment 71 and closes and latches the front or entry door 115.

The rinse or wzush water is then supplied in the same manner as previously described, the pressure of this water, through the orifices 171, FIG. 10, of the nozzle 165, causing the vertically slidable cylindrical coupler 175 to rise, but in washing the small mouth pipettes C, FIG. 17, the resilient valve sleeve 183 of this vertically slidable cylindrical coupler 175 is brought into sealing contact with bottom of the channel-shaped body 220 of the holder 219 around its port 232. With each wash or rinse sequence, the pressurized water flows past the base ring 252 up the central tube 251 and out through its side openings 263 to wash the exterior of the small mouth pipettes C. This water also enters the top of these pipettes and flows under pressure downwardly therethrough to emerge from their lower ends against the bottom screen 253 through which the water drains through the openings 231 to flow down to the bottom of the washing compartment 71 and its tail pipe 85 and from there to be diverted by the deflector plate 101 either in the drain trough or in the body 106 of the wash water.

The rubber sealing disc 261 has an effective seal at its periphery against the bore of the cylinder 228 and if any hole 262 therein is left unfilled with a pipette C, it is of reduced diameter, as illustrated in FIG. 17 so as to provide increased impedance to bypassing of the water through this soft rubber sealing disc 261 without passing through the interiors of the pipettes Cr As surgical instruments D accumulate in the soiled entry area 30 they are placed in the baskets 272 and the filled baskets 272 are placed in the holders 271 and these holders 271 mounted in the empty dolly 135 withdrawn onto the rails 118 of the open door of the washer 35. This mounting of the holders 271 is done by inserting the pair of pins 290 through the pair of holes 151 in the rear crossbar 139 of the dolly and catching the headed pin 199 in the keyhole slot 293 of the tongue 292 of this basket.

The loaded dolly is then rolled into the washing compartment 71 along the rails 118 and 111 and the front or entry door 115 latched and the washing and rinsing sequence started as previously described. Supplying rinse or wash water under pressure raises the vertically slidable cylindrical coupler 175, FIG. 10, and its resilient valve collar 183, but with the form of the invention shown in FIGS. l820 this resilient valve collar 183 contacts the underside of the channel-shaped conduit 278 around its central opening 279 to supply the water to the interior of this conduit. This water flows upwardly through the holes 280 in the bottom plate 273 of the holder 271 and thence upwardly through the screen basket 272 to flow past and wash the instruments D, overflowing the holder 27]. Water also enters the end compartments 285 and flows out horizontally through the holes 289 in the inner walls 284 of these chambers to impinge against the ends of the screen basket 272 and wash the instruments D from a horizontal direction.

The operation of the rotary spray tree illustrated in FIGS. 21-25 is as follows, this rotary spray tree 300 being substituted for the vertically slidable cylindrical coupler 175 on the nozzle 165.

When the dolly 135 is used with the basket 315 for the Petri dishes E; or with the wire holder 320 for the large mouth beakers F; or with the holder 325 and wire mesh baskets 329 for the test tubes G, the rotary spray tree 300 is substituted for the vertically slidable cylindrical coupler 175 employed in the forms of the invention illustrated in FIGS. 220. When water is supplied under pressure for rinsing or washing the glassware in said holder, this pressure in the nozzle 165 produces up wardly directed jets from the orifices 171 and 172 in the end head 169 of this nozzle 165, and these jets impinge against the glassware in the center of such baskets or containers in the washing compartment 71. In addition the pressurized water from the nozzle 16S passes through its side ports 170 into the annular chamber 302 between the bearing bushings 303 and 304 for the rotary cylinder supporting the laterally projeeting tubular arms 308. A part of this water passes upwardly through the orifices 305 in the top bearing bushing 304 to jet upwardly against the underside of the glassware, this bearing bushing preferably being fixed to the cylinder 301 so as to rotate therewith and thereby swing the jets of water issuing from these orificesin a circle under the glassware. The water under pressure in the tubular arms 308 also escapes through the orifices 311 provided in the sides of these tubular arms at the outer ends thereof. These orifices are arranged to jointly rotate the tree 300 in either a clockwise or counterclockwise direction whereby the tubular arms 308 sweep under the full undersides of the glassware contained in the baskets or holders on the dolly thereabove. The water from these arms also escapes through the series of top holes 310 in these tubular arms 308 so as to impinge against the undersides of the glassware as the arms rotate. Desirably, of course, the top of this glassware can be washed by the overhead spray tree 159 which can be made to be stationary or to rotate as may be desired. It will be noted that the holders or baskets shown in FIGS. 23-25 support the glassware in an inverted or partly inverted position so that draining of the water between wash and rinse cycles, and at the end ofthe sequence, is rapid.

From the foregoing it will be seen that the present invention provides a washer which is highly effective in washing large quantities of many different types of articles, particularly the many different shapes of laboratory glassware used in hospitals and research facilities, having for this purpose a variety of attachments not only in the holders or baskets for the glassware but also in the means whereby the water is effciently distributed to the glassware contained in the holders or baskets. The water distributing means includes either a coupler on the water supply moved in response to water pressure to seal against a seat on the glassware basket or holder around an inlet opening to a water distributing means in the holder, or a rotary spray tree which can be substituted for the coupler.

By power-actuated means, as used in the claims, for moving the coupler 175 into engagement with the water inlet 211 of the dolly 135 is meant means including any source of stored power including, in addition to the water pressure used, electricity, compressed air or other fluid under pressure.

What we claim is:

1. An improvement in a washing machine having a washing compartment, a holder for supporting articles to be washed and having an inlet member, means movably supporting said holder in a predetermined position in said washing compartment, said improvement comprising, an outlet member in said compartment, a water coupler movably mounted to said outlet member, means adapted for alternatively supplying water to both said coupler and to a rotary spray head also adapted to be mounted to said outlet member, said last mentioned means comprising at least one opening in the sidewall of said outlet member adapted to communicate with said rotary spray head, said coupler being movable into operative engagement with said inlet member responsive to water pressure from said outlet when said holder is in said predetermined position.

2. An improvement in accordance with claim 1 including at least one opening in an upper head of said outlet member.

3. An improvement in accordance with claim 1 in which said coupler is slidably mounted to said outlet member.

4. An improvement in accordance with claim 1 in which said rotary spray head rotatably surrounds said outlet member.

5. A washing machine, comprising a cabinet forming a washing compartment, horizontal rails mounted in the said washing compartment, a dolly including a frame and rollers adapted to rollably support the dolly on said rails, a holder for supporting articles to be washed, said holder being removably supported on said dolly, water distribution passage means in said holder having an inlet opening receiving water and having outlet openings on said holder arranged to discharge against said articles carried on said holder, water supply means in said cabinet and releasable coupling means adapted to connect said inlet opening with said water supply means, said holder comprises a central horizontal tube having said inlet opening in its bottom, a plurality of branch tubes supplied with water and projecting from said central horizontal tube in a common plane and supported at their ends on said dolly, and open top spindles supplied with water and projecting upwardly from said branch tubes adapted to individually support said articles to be washed.

6. A washing machine having a washing compartment, a pressurized water supply tubular nozzle projecting upwardly into the bottom of said washing compartment and having a closed upper end head and a port through its sidewall and also having an annular series of upwardly directed orifices in the marginal part of said upper end head, a movable holder for supporting and distributing water to the articles to be washed and including means having a water inlet opening surrounded by a downwardly facing valve seat, means movably supporting said holder in a predetermined position in said washing compartment, a tubular water coupler sleeve, a sliding bearing bushing fastened in the lower end of said sleeve and slidingly mounted for vertical movement on the sidewall of said nozzle and forming a chamber in said tubular sleeve communicating with said port, said tubular sleeve having an upper end head positioned to seat on said end head of said nozzle to cover said annular series of orifices and having a central discharge opening, and a resilient valve collar mounted on said end head of said sleeve to surround its discharge opening and engageable with said downwardly facing valve seat, the water pressure in said annular series of orifices initiating upward movement of said valve sleeve and resilient valve collar toward said downwardly facing valveseat thereby to permit water flow from said nozzle through its port into said chamber and from said chamber between said end heads into said resilient valve collar and out through said inlet opening of said holder.

7. A washing machine having a washing compartment, a pressurized water supply tubular nozzle in the bottom portion of said washing compartment and having an end head and at least one side port, a movable holder for supporting and distributing water to the articles to be washed and including means having a water inlet opening surrounded by an outwardly facing valve seat, means movably supporting said holder in a predetermined position in said washing compartment, a coupler sleeve mounted for longitudinal sliding movement lengthwise of said nozzle and having an internal chamber communicating with said port, said sleeve having a valve seat engageable with said first mentioned valve seat to engage and disengage in response to sliding movement of said sleeve relative to said nozzle, and means responsive to the pressure of the water in said supply means affecting the movement of said sleeve to engage said first mentioned valve seat comprising a water outlet opening in an end head of said sleeve surrounded by its valve seat, and an orifice in said end head of said nozzle arranged to be closed by said end head on said sleeve.

8. A washing machine. comprising a cabinet forming a washing compartment, horizontal rails mounted in the lower part of said washing compartment, said cabinet being provided in its front wall with an inlet opening the lower part of which aligns with said rails, horizontal rails aligning at said inlet opening with said rails in said compartment, a dolly including a frame and rollers adapted to rollably support the dolly on said rails, pressurized water supply means carried by said cabinet, a holder for said articles adapted to be removably placed on said dolly comprising a bottom plate through which an inlet opening extends upwardly, an upstanding tank fixed to and rising from said bottom plate in line with said inlet opening of said bottom plate, the bottom of said tank being provided with a drain opening, and a removable basket adapted to support tubular open-ended articles to be washed in a vertical position in said tank and comprising a vertical tube communicating at its lower end with said inlet opening through said bottom plate and having an opening in its upper end, a horizontal diaphragm fixed to the lower end of said vertical tube spaced from its lower extremity and adapted to have pressure contact with the inside face of the tank sidewall and provided with a plurality of openings extending vertically therethrough and through which openings said tubular articles are inserted, and a cover for said tank, whereby water from said inlet opening of said bottom plate is conducted by said vertical tube into the upper part of said tank to descend through the interiors of said tubular open-ended articles and escape through said drain opening, and releasable coupling means adapted to connect said bottom plate inlet opening with said pressurized water supply means,

9. A washing machine comprising a cabinet forming a washing compartment, horizontal laterally spaced rails mounted adjacent the lower part of said washing compartment, said cabinet being provided with a sidewall opening the lower part of which aligns with said rails, a pressurized water supply leading to and having an upright cylindrical outlet member arranged in the bottom of said washing compartment, a dolly movably supported on said rails for movement through said sidewall opening into and out of a position in the bottom of said washing compartment and composed of spaced longitudinal and cross members providing a low, flat horizontal frame operatively arranged in its entirety in the bottom of said washing compartment and the greater part of the horizontal area of which frame is open to permit water to be projected upwardly through said dolly into said washing chamber, a plurality of holders for the articles to be washed, means snuggly fitting each holder on top of said dolly in predetermined relation thereto, a generally coaxial sleeve supported by said upright cylindrical outlet member, bearing means interposed between said sleeve and the said upright cylindrical outlet member and permitting both rotary and axial movement of said sleeve relative to said upright cylindrical outlet member, and means associated with said sleeve for distributing water from said upright cylindrical outlet member upwardly through said dolly and against the articles on said holder carried by the dolly, said upright cylindrical outlet member having at least one side port, and said sleeve surrounding said upright cylindrical outlet member with said bearing means interposed between said sleeve and the periphery of said upright cylindrical outlet member.

l0. A washing machine as set forth in claim 9 wherein said last means comprises a series of tubular arms projecting horizontally from said sleeve and supplied with water from said side port, said arms having discharge 0 enin s some arranged to discharge upwardly through sai doly into said washing compartment and others arranged to discharge horizontally to rotate said arms and sleeve around said upright cylindrical outlet member.

11. A washing machine as set forth in claim 10 additionally including hold-down means to prevent said dolly from being lifted free from said rails.

12. A washing machine as set forth in claim 9 wherein said last means comprises an upwardly facing first valve seat on said tubular sleeve, a restricted opening through the upper part of said sleeve and surrounded by said valve seat, means providing a chamber between the bore of said sleeve and the periphery of said upright cylindrical outlet member whereby the pressurized water from said side port raises said sleeve axially, and said holder for the articles to be washed having a downwardly facing second valve seat positioned to mate with said first valve seat and also having means arranged to distribute the water from said restricted opening to the articles on said holder.

13. A washing machine as set forth in claim 12 additionally including means for latching said holder against being lifted free from said dolly.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification134/144, 134/148, 239/265, 134/152, 239/251, 134/176, 134/165
International ClassificationB01L99/00, B08B11/02
Cooperative ClassificationB01L99/00, B08B11/02
European ClassificationB01L9/52, B08B11/02
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Feb 27, 1989ASAssignment
Owner name: MDT CORPORATION, A DE CORP.
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:CASTLE COMPANY;REEL/FRAME:005036/0117
Effective date: 19890221
Owner name: SANTA BARBARA RESEARCH CENTER, GOLETA, CA., A CA C
Aug 7, 1987ASAssignment
Owner name: CASTLE COMPANY
Free format text: CHANGE OF NAME;ASSIGNOR:SC ACQUISITION CORP. NO. 1;REEL/FRAME:004741/0707
Effective date: 19860725
Sep 15, 1986ASAssignment
Owner name: SC ACQUISITION CORP., NO. 1, A NEVADA CORP.
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:SYBRON CORPORATION;REEL/FRAME:004607/0079
Effective date: 19860711
Owner name: SC ACQUISITION CORP., NO. 1, A NEVADA CORP., STATE
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:SYBRON CORPORATION;REEL/FRAME:004607/0079